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Obituaries


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akadaka
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« Reply #250 on: November 25, 2012, 03:03:45 pm »

Puerto Rican boxing great Hector Camacho dies

http://nz.sports.yahoo.com/news/article/-/15441376/puerto-rican-boxing-great-hector-camacho-dies-doctor/
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« Reply #251 on: December 06, 2012, 07:56:30 am »

http://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainment/music/8042964/Jazz-legend-Dave-Brubeck-dies



Jazz composer and pianist Dave Brubeck, whose pioneering style in pieces such as "Take Five" caught listeners' ears with exotic, challenging rhythms, has died.

He was 91.

Brubeck died on Wednesday morning (local time) of heart failure after being stricken while on his way to a cardiology appointment with his son Darius, said his manager Russell Gloyd.

Brubeck would have turned 92 on Thursday.

Brubeck had a career that spanned almost all American jazz since World War II. He formed The Dave Brubeck Quartet in 1951 and was the first modern jazz musician to be pictured on the cover of Time magazine - on November 8, 1954 - and he helped define the swinging, smoky rhythms of 1950s and '60s club jazz.

The seminal album "Time Out," released by the quartet in 1959, was the first ever million-selling jazz LP, and is still among the best-selling jazz albums of all time.

It opens with "Blue Rondo a la Turk" in 9/8 time - nine beats to the measure instead of the customary two, three or four beats.

A piano-and-saxophone whirlwind based loosely on a Mozart piece, "Blue Rondo" eventually intercuts between Brubeck's piano and a more traditional 4/4 jazz rhythm.

The album also features "Take Five" - in 5/4 time - which became the Quartet's signature theme and even made the Billboard singles chart in 1961. It was composed by Brubeck's longtime saxophonist, Paul Desmond.

"When you start out with goals - mine were to play polytonally and polyrhythmically - you never exhaust that," Brubeck told The Associated Press in 1995. "I started doing that in the 1940s. It's still a challenge to discover what can be done with just those two elements."

After service in World War II and study at Mills College in Oakland, Calif., Brubeck formed an octet including Desmond on alto sax and Dave van Kreidt on tenor, Cal Tjader on drums and Bill Smith on clarinet. The group played Brubeck originals and standards by other composers, including some early experimentation in unusual time signatures. Their groundbreaking album "Dave Brubeck Octet" was recorded in 1946.

The group evolved into the Quartet, which played colleges and universities. The Quartet's first album, "Jazz at Oberlin," was recorded live at Oberlin College in Ohio in 1953.

Ten years later, Joe Morello on drums and Eugene Wright on bass joined with Brubeck and Desmond to produce "Time Out."

In later years Brubeck composed music for operas, ballet, even a contemporary Mass.

In 1988, he played for Mikhail Gorbachev, at a dinner in Moscow that then-President Ronald Reagan hosted for the Soviet leader.

"I can't understand Russian, but I can understand body language," said Brubeck, after seeing the general secretary tapping his foot.

In the late 1980s, Brubeck contributed music for one episode of an eight-part series of television specials, "This Is America, Charlie Brown."

His music was for an episode involving NASA and the space station. He worked with three of his sons - Chris on bass trombone and electric bass, Dan on drums and Matthew on cello - and included excerpts from his Mass "To Hope! A Celebration," his oratorio "A Light in the Wilderness," and a piece he had composed but never recorded, "Quiet As the Moon."

"That's the beauty of music," he told the AP in 1992. "You can take a theme from a Bach sacred chorale and improvise. It doesn't make any difference where the theme comes from; the treatment of it can be jazz."

In 2006, the University of Notre Dame gave Brubeck its Laetare Medal, awarded each year to a Roman Catholic "whose genius has ennobled the arts and sciences, illustrated the ideals of the church and enriched the heritage of humanity."

At the age of 88, in 2009, Brubeck was still touring, in spite of a viral infection that threatened his heart and made him miss an April show at his alma mater, the University of the Pacific.

By June, though, he was playing in Chicago, where the Tribune critic wrote that "Brubeck was coaxing from the piano a high lyricism more typically encountered in the music of Chopin."

More acclaim came his way when it was announced that he would be a recipient of the Kennedy Center Honors at a ceremony in late 2009.

Brubeck told the AP the announcement would have delighted his late mother, Elizabeth Ivey Brubeck, a classical pianist who was initially disappointed by her youngest son's interest in jazz. (He added that she had lived long enough to come to appreciate his music.)

Born in Concord, California, on December 6, 1920, Brubeck actually had planned to become a rancher like his father. He attended the College of the Pacific (now the University of the Pacific) in 1938, intending to major in veterinary medicine and return to the family's 45,000-acre spread.

But within a year Brubeck was drawn to music. He graduated in 1942 and was drafted by the army, where he served - mostly as a musician - under General George S. Patton in Europe. At the time, his Wolfpack Band was the only racially integrated unit in the military.

In an interview for Ken Burns' PBS miniseries "Jazz," Brubeck talked about playing for troops with his integrated band, only to return to the US to see his black bandmates refused service in a restaurant in Texas.

Brubeck and his wife, Iola, had five sons and a daughter. Four of his sons - Chris on trombone and electric bass, Dan on drums, Darius on keyboards and Matthew on cello - played with the London Symphony Orchestra in a birthday tribute to Brubeck in December 2000.

"We never had a rift," Chris Brubeck once said of living and playing with his father. "I think music has always been a good communication tool, so we didn't have a rift. We've always had music in common."
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« Reply #252 on: December 06, 2012, 12:09:31 pm »

Take 5 Dave.
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #253 on: December 12, 2012, 06:03:31 pm »


From the Los Angeles Times....

Famed sitarist Ravi Shankar dies at 92

The Indian musician hobnobbed with The Beatles and pioneered
the benefit concert with the Concert for Bangladesh in 1971.


Associated Press | 8:49PM - Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Beatle George Harrison, left, with Ravi Shankar in 1967.
Beatle George Harrison, left, with Ravi Shankar in 1967.

RAVI SHANKAR, the revered master of the sitar who introduced Indian music to much of the Western world, died Tuesday in San Diego County. He was 92.

Shankar was a hippie musical icon of the 1960s, playing at Woodstock and hobnobbing with The Beatles.

In 1966 the Indian musician met Beatle George Harrison, who became his most famous disciple and gave the musician-composer unexpected pop-culture cachet. Harrison labeled Shankar "the godfather of world music."

Shankar continued to give virtuoso performances into his 90s, including one in 2011 at Walt Disney Concert Hall.

In New Delhi, the Inidan prime minister's office confirmed Shankar's death and called him a “national treasure.”

The sitarist also pioneered the concept of the rock benefit with the 1971 Concert For Bangladesh. To later generations, he was known as the estranged father of popular American singer Norah Jones.

Shankar collaborated with Harrison, violinist Yehudi Menuhin and jazz saxophonist John Coltrane as he worked to bridge the musical gap between the West and East.


Photograph gallery: Ravi Shankar

Describing an early Shankar tour in 1957, Time magazine said “U.S. audiences were receptive but occasionally puzzled.”

His close relationship with Harrison, the Beatles lead guitarist, shot Shankar to global stardom in the 1960s.

Harrison had grown fascinated with the sitar, a long necked, string instrument that uses a bulbous gourd for its resonating chamber and resembles a giant lute. He played the instrument, with a Western tuning, on the song “Norwegian Wood”, but soon sought out Shankar, already a musical icon in India, to teach him to play it properly.

The pair spent weeks together, starting the lessons at Harrison's house in England and then moving to a houseboat in Kashmir and later to California.

Gaining confidence with the complex instrument, Harrison recorded the Indian-inspired song “Within You Without You” on the Beatles' “Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band”, helping spark the raga-rock phase of '60s music and drawing increasing attention to Shankar and his work.

Shankar's popularity exploded, and he soon found himself playing on bills with some of the top rock musicians of the era. He played a four-hour set at the Monterey Pop Festival and the opening day of Woodstock.

Though the audience for his music had hugely expanded, Shankar, a serious, disciplined traditionalist who had played Carnegie Hall, chafed against the drug use and rebelliousness of the hippie culture.

“I was shocked to see people dressing so flamboyantly. They were all stoned. To me, it was a new world,” Shankar told Rolling Stone of the Monterey festival.

While he enjoyed Otis Redding and the Mamas and the Papas at the festival, he was horrified when Jimi Hendrix lit his guitar on fire.

“That was too much for me. In our culture, we have such respect for musical instruments, they are like part of God,” he said.

In 1971, moved by the plight of millions of refugees fleeing into India to escape the war in Bangladesh, Shankar reached out to Harrison to see what they could do to help.

In what Shankar later described as “one of the most moving and intense musical experiences of the century,” the pair organized two benefit concerts at Madison Square Garden that included Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan and Ringo Starr.

The concert, which spawned an album and a film, raised millions of dollars for UNICEF and inspired other rock benefits, including the 1985 Live Aid concert to raise funds for famine relief in Ethiopia and the 2010 Hope For Haiti Now telethon.

Ravindra Shankar Chowdhury was born April 7th, 1920, in the Indian city of Varanasi.

At the age of 10, he moved to Paris to join the world famous dance troupe of his brother Uday. Over the next eight years, Shankar traveled with the troupe across Europe, America and Asia, and later credited his early immersion in foreign cultures with making him such an effective ambassador for Indian music.

During one tour, renowned musician Baba Allaudin Khan joined the troupe, took Shankar under his wing and eventually became his teacher through 7 1/2 years of isolated, rigorous study of the sitar.

“Khan told me you have to leave everything else and do one thing properly,” Shankar told The Associated Press.

In the 1950s, Shankar began gaining fame throughout India. He held the influential position of music director for All India Radio in New Delhi and wrote the scores for several popular films. He began writing compositions for orchestras, blending clarinets and other foreign instruments into traditional Indian music.

And he became a de facto tutor for Westerners fascinated by India's musical traditions.

He gave lessons to Coltrane, who named his son Ravi in Shankar's honor, and became close friends with Menuhin, recording the acclaimed “West Meets East” album with him. He also collaborated with flutist Jean Pierre Rampal, composer Philip Glass and conductors Andre Previn and Zubin Mehta.

“Any player on any instrument with any ears would be deeply moved by Ravi Shankar. If you love music, it would be impossible not to be,” singer David Crosby, whose band The Byrds was inspired by Shankar's music, said in the book “The Dawn of Indian Music in the West: Bhairavi”.

Shankar's personal life, however, was more complex.

His 1941 marriage to Baba Allaudin Khan's daughter, Annapurna Devi, ended in divorce. Though he had a decades-long relationship with dancer Kamala Shastri that ended in 1981, he had relationships with several other women in the 1970s.

In 1979, he fathered Norah Jones with New York concert promoter Sue Jones, and in 1981, Sukanya Rajan, who played the tanpura at his concerts, gave birth to his daughter Anoushka.

He grew estranged from Sue Jones in the 80s and didn't see Norah for a decade, though they later re-established contact.

He married Rajan in 1989 and trained young Anoushka as his heir on the sitar. In recent years, father and daughter toured the world together.

When Jones shot to stardom and won five Grammy awards in 2003, Anoushka Shankar was nominated for a Grammy of her own.

Shankar, himself, has won three Grammy awards and was nominated for an Oscar for his musical score for the movie “Gandhi”.

Despite his fame, numerous albums and decades of world tours, Shankar's music remained a riddle to many Western ears.

Shankar was amused after he and colleague Ustad Ali Akbar Khan were greeted with admiring applause when they opened the Concert for Bangladesh by twanging their sitar and sarod for a minute and a half.

“If you like our tuning so much, I hope you will enjoy the playing more,” he told the confused crowd, and then launched into his set.


http://www.latimes.com/news/la-famed-sitarist-ravi-shankar-dies-at-92-20121211,0,3239939,full.story
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« Reply #254 on: December 12, 2012, 06:07:32 pm »

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Magoo
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« Reply #255 on: December 12, 2012, 06:27:26 pm »

I remember his rise to fame in the 60's.   Two talented daughters.
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« Reply #256 on: December 17, 2012, 05:06:27 pm »

Long-serving priest dies at 100


Marist priest George "Chalky" Duggan died in Upper Hutt recently, aged 100.

 Long-serving Marist priest George "Chalky" Duggan, once described as "chief among the divine publicists" by a Wellington journalist, has died in Upper Hutt, aged 100.

He died at St Joseph's Home of Compassion yesterday, where an official blessing from Pope Benedict had been conferred upon him on his 100th birthday earlier this year.

Duggan was a lecturer based on the hill overlooking the Mission Vineyard for many years at Mount St Mary's, Greenmeadows, in Hawke's Bay.

He was also a regular contributor to letters to the editor pages of numerous publications throughout New Zealand and abroad.

A West Coaster, Fr Duggan, SM, was ordained in 1936 in Rome on the feast of St Thomas Aquinas, whose work he studied.

His nickname "Chalky" originated from a boxer named Chalky Duggan.

Duggan was born in Runanga near Greymouth and was educated by the Mercy Sisters and Marist Brothers in Greymouth and Reefton.

His secondary education was at St Bede's College, Christchurch, where he was dux in both 1927 and 1928.

He won a University National Scholarship in 1928 - the first St Bede's student to do so.

A spokeswoman for the Catholic Church said his colourful and non-compromising denunciation of what he considered to be aberrant or erroneous theology and doctrine meant that he was often engaged in feisty exchanges of view in letters to the editor columns of numerous publications.

Those who knew him personally however knew a very different man from his public persona. 

He was a keen sportsman, a counsellor and a man skilled in the domestic arts of cooking and preserving, the church spokeswoman said.

In recent years, he became increasingly frail, and lived in the care of the Silverstream Home of Compassion, supported by his Marist confreres at the neighbouring Marian Court.

Despite impaired hearing, he enjoyed visitors and conversation and happily recounted stories of his many and wide experiences.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/8089905/Long-serving-priest-dies-at-100
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« Reply #257 on: December 28, 2012, 03:09:40 pm »

Stormin' Norman
DEAD AT 78


General H. Norman Schwarzkopf -- the commander of U.S. forces during the first Iraq conflict -- has died in Tampa, Florida.

Schwarzkopf became popularly known as "Stormin' Norman" during 1991 Gulf War that booted Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein's forces out of neighboring Kuwait.

Operation Desert Storm lasted just over a month as Schwarzkopf's international coalition made quick work of the Iraqi troops.

Schwarzkopf had retired in Tampa where he held his last assignment as commander-in-chief of U.S. Central Command.

Schwarzkopf was 78 years old. Cause of death is unclear, at this point.

Side note about "Stormin' Norman" -- aside from his military success he was also largely responsible for Katie Couric's rise to fame.

Read more: http://www.tmz.com/2012/12/27/general-h-norman-schwarzkopf-dead-dies-gulf-war-iraqi-kuwait-stormin-norman/#ixzz2GJQktiV1
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akadaka
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« Reply #258 on: January 04, 2013, 02:56:51 pm »

Patti Page  Angry


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« Reply #259 on: January 04, 2013, 06:24:25 pm »

Yeh and How much is that Doggie in the Window  Cry
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« Reply #260 on: January 04, 2013, 06:35:54 pm »

She had a lovely voice.
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« Reply #261 on: February 01, 2013, 08:59:45 am »


Broadcaster Sir Paul Holmes dies

Home News National

Fri, 1 Feb 2013
 
http://www.odt.co.nz/news/national/244360/broadcaster-sir-paul-holmes-dies


for the record see
http://xtranewscommunity2.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,12642.0.html
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« Reply #262 on: February 01, 2013, 09:04:05 am »


 you will be remembered.
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Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body.

But rather, to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming...

WOW, What a Ride!"

Please note: IMHO and e&oe apply to all my posts.
Magoo
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« Reply #263 on: February 01, 2013, 09:18:27 am »

The unbeatable battle.   
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« Reply #264 on: February 08, 2013, 09:15:16 am »

Pioneer of pirate radio passes away

Ross Goodwin .. a great boss and sadly taken to young!

IMO THE VOICE
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« Reply #265 on: February 19, 2013, 06:11:32 am »


18 February 2013 Last updated at 15:07 GMT

Richard Briers, The Good Life star, dies aged 79

Comments (401)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-21498077
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Magoo
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« Reply #266 on: February 19, 2013, 06:48:55 am »

We always enjoyed any show Richard Briers was in.   Played a good part in Monarch of the Glen and especially as Tom.    Exit stage left Richard.
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« Reply #267 on: February 19, 2013, 07:00:13 am »

We always enjoyed any show Richard Briers was in.   Played a good part in Monarch of the Glen and especially as Tom.    Exit stage left Richard.

I loved The Good Life - he worked so well with Felicity Kendall and he was also great in Ever Decreasing Circles with Penelope Wilton (and the very wickedly sexy Peter Egan).
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« Reply #268 on: February 26, 2013, 06:25:03 am »


Broadcaster Phillip Leishman dies
NZ Newswire
February 26, 2013, 6:32 am
Veteran television presenter Phillip Leishman has died, after a battle with cancer. ...

http://nz.news.yahoo.com/a/-/top-stories/16240889/broadcaster-phillip-leishman-dies/

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« Reply #269 on: February 26, 2013, 07:59:56 am »

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« Reply #270 on: March 06, 2013, 10:23:01 am »


Hugo Chavez dies after cancer battle

Associated Press | 11:08AM - Wednesday, 06 March 2013

HUGO CHAVEZ: The 58-year-old has ruled Venezuela for 14 years.
HUGO CHAVEZ: The 58-year-old has ruled Venezuela for 14 years.

VENEZUELAN PRESIDENT HUGO CHAVEZ has died after a two-year battle with cancer, ending the socialist leader's 14-year rule of the South American country.

The death was announced by Vice President Nicolas Maduro said in a televised speech.

The flamboyant 58-year-old leader had undergone four operations in Cuba for a cancer that was first detected in his pelvic region in mid-2011. His last surgery was on December 11 and he had not been seen in public since.

"It's a moment of deep pain," Maduro, accompanied by senior ministers, said, his voice choking.

Chavez easily won a new 6-year term at an election in October and his death will devastate millions of supporters who adored his charismatic style, anti-US rhetoric and oil-financed policies that brought subsidised food and free health clinics to long-neglected slums.

Detractors, however, saw his one-man style, gleeful nationalizations and often harsh treatment of opponents as evidence of an egotistical dictator whose misplaced statist economics wasted a historic bonanza of oil revenues.

Chavez's death paves the way for a new election that will test whether his socialist "revolution" can live on without his dominant personality at the helm.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/americas/8388566/Hugo-Chavez-dies-after-cancer-battle
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« Reply #271 on: March 22, 2013, 11:52:29 am »


Obituary: GEORGE LOWE

George Lowe, born January 15th 1924, died March 20th 2013.

The Telegraph | 8:38PM GMT - Thursday, 21 March 2013

GEORGE LOWE loading film into his camera. — Photo: GEORGE LOWE Collection/Polar World.
GEORGE LOWE loading film into his camera. — Photo: GEORGE LOWE Collection/Polar World.

GEORGE LOWE, the mountaineer, who has died aged 89, was both a key member and the last survivor of the 1953 British expedition that conquered Everest.

Lowe played a crucial part in the party’s success, displaying phenomenal strength and stamina to ferry kit up to the South Col, just shy of the peak, from where his fellow New Zealander and friend Edmund Hillary, with Sherpa Tenzing Norgay, pushed on to the summit itself. Spending day after day at altitudes of more than 23,000ft, Lowe often had to wade through waist-high snow to ensure everything was where it needed to be.

According to John Hunt, the expedition’s leader, Lowe “put up a performance which will go down in the annals of mountaineering as an epic achievement of tenacity and skill”. It was nothing less, Hunt added in his memoir The Ascent of Everest (1953), than an “astonishing feat of endurance”. Such was the effort that at one point Lowe himself felt “hollow and weak”.

When Hillary and Norgay were descending from the summit of Everest, it was Lowe, coming up from the South Col camp, who was the first to meet them. He handed Hillary a mug of warm lemonade and heard Hillary’s famous exclamation: “Well we knocked the bastard off!” Hillary also passed Lowe a fragment of marine limestone. Millions of years previously the rock had formed part of the sea-floor; by 1953, however, it was a souvenir from the highest point on the planet.

Lowe had displayed superb ice-craft over 10 days in spearheading a route up the Lhotse face, immediately below the South Col. But he was not just a climber. He also carried with him a Kodak Retina II, capturing many images that effectively made him deputy to the official expedition cameraman, Tom Stobart. And when the party reached altitudes that Stobart, weakened by a dose of pneumonia, was unable to endure, Lowe provided the photographic record.

The film of the triumph, The Conquest of Everest, was itself a great success, and nominated for an Oscar. With his reputation on ice and with film assured, Lowe was recruited as official photographer in the Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1957-58, which made the first successful overland crossing of Antarctica via the South Pole.

Lowe joined the 12-man party of the expedition leader, the British explorer Vivian Fuchs, which set out from Shackleton Base on one side of the continent, while Hillary led the support party from the Scott Base on the other side dropping supplies and establishing depots.

Fuchs relied on Lowe’s expertise to spot crevasses that were, Lowe later noted, “wider, deeper and harder to detect” than any he had previously encountered, and which posed a mortal threat to the tractors, dog-teams and snowmobiles they used to get around.

In the event Hillary reached the Pole first, on January 3rd 1958. The teams met when Fuchs arrived on January 19th, but while Hillary flew out, Fuchs continued on overland and arrived at Scott Base on March 2nd after a journey of 2,158 miles.

Wallace George Lowe was born in Hastings, on New Zealand’s North Island, on January 15th 1924, the seventh of eight children. His father was a fruit grower. Aged nine he shattered the bone in his left arm just above the elbow after falling off the steps of the veranda at home. The bone would not set correctly, and had to be re-broken seven times. His subsequent skill as an ice-climber was all the more remarkable as the accident left the limb almost entirely without strength.

He was educated in Hastings and soon developed an interest in photography, playing truant to hang around the studio of the aviator Piet van Asch, who was taking large landscape photographs from the air. Lowe even joined van Asch on several flights.

After qualifying as a schoolteacher, Lowe spent the immediate post-war years teaching at a primary school. In school holidays, however, he trained as a mountain guide, frequently teaming up with Hillary, five years his senior, in the Southern Alps, where they perfected their technique on such peaks as Mount Cook and Mount Tasman.

In 1951 the two men joined a four-man, four-month, New Zealand expedition to the Himalayas. The team had hoped, before setting off, to conquer one 20,000ft-plus summit; in the event they scaled six.

On the strength of this experience, he and Hillary were invited in 1952 to join Eric Shipton’s assault on Everest’s neighbour, Cho Oyu (26,850ft), a journey which would also involve exploring the Barun Valley in the same region. Their talents ensured that both secured their places on what was to prove the historic Everest expedition of the following year. However, planning in 1952 was not always up to the meticulous standards that Hunt would set. Running short of supplies on the return journey to the Indian border, Hillary was forced to bargain with locals for one abundant foodstuff: bananas. According to Lowe, an ensuing competition saw Lowe consume 120 in a single day. Hillary won their battle by eating 134.

After his return from the Antarctic in 1958, Lowe settled in England and joined the Department of Education and Science as an Inspector of Schools, which he remained until his retirement in 1984. In 1989 he helped found the Sir Edmund Hillary Himalayan Trust in Britain, established to improve conditions for Sherpas in the Himalayas; Lowe served as chairman until 2003.

With his ready wit, mobile face and gift for mimicry, George Lowe was an entertaining and amusing companion. Few of his companions will forget his imitation of Cheyne-Stokes breathing patterns, a condition suffered by some people at high altitude.

In his book Because It Is There (1962) Lowe recounted his experiences on his two major expeditions. He contrasted Hunt’s open style of leadership with that of Fuchs, who appeared to him to reach all decisions in camera. Lowe left no doubt as to which style he preferred. With other members of the Trans-Antarctic Expedition, Lowe received in 1958 the Polar Medal (with Antarctic clasp). He was also commemorated in Mount Lowe, a 3,000ft peak in the Shackleton Range.

He was appointed OBE for services to mountaineering and exploration.

He counted himself Edmund Hillary’s oldest friend. Before his own death, Hillary wrote the foreword to The Conquest of Everest: Original Photographs from the Legendary First Ascent, which Lowe compiled with Huw Lewis-Jones and which is to be published imminently. According to Hillary, Lowe “saved my life a few times over the years. Down in Antarctica, I remember when we were trying to get our ship, Theron, clear of the ice and I was standing with George on an ice-floe, cutting a channel. A steel cable fouled the propeller just as a rope-end flicked and locked around my ankle. Quickly, yet calmly, George managed to knock it free before it came tight. A moment later and I would have been sucked under...”

Lowe’s home in Derbyshire was filled with boxes of souvenirs from his climbing adventures — slides, press clippings and the like. But above all he treasured the fragment of rock from the summit that Hillary had given him, and which he kept on his desk. “It was always fairly simple,” he noted recently, “The mountains were a deep source of real happiness. They dispense a lion’s share of sorrow too, but it’s the joy that always wins out.”

His first marriage, to Susan, a daughter of Lord Hunt, was dissolved. He is survived by his second wife, Mary, and by three sons of his first marriage.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/9946849/George-Lowe.html



Kiwi mountaineer George Lowe dies age 89

The New Zealand Herald | 9:50AM - Friday, March 22, 2013

GEORGE LOWE has died at the age of 89. — Photo: The Telegraph.
GEORGE LOWE has died at the age of 89. — Photo: The Telegraph.

NEW ZEALANDER George Lowe, the last surviving climber from the team that made the first successful ascent of Mount Everest, has died. He was 89.

Lowe's widow, Mary, said he died on Wednesday at a nursing home in Ripley, central England, after an illness.

One of two New Zealanders on the 1953 British expedition, Lowe helped establish the final camp 1000 feet below the mountain's summit on May 28th, 1953.

The next day, Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay reached the peak.

As Sir Ed descended the next day, he told Lowe: "Well, George, we knocked the bastard off."

Lowe directed a film of the expedition, The Conquest of Everest, and also made The Crossing of Antarctica, a movie about a trans-Antarctic expedition later in the 1950s.

He is survived by Mary and three sons.

Born and raised in Hastings, Lowe spent most of his life abroad following the 1953 ascent. A school teacher before Everest, Lowe returned to education after the expedition, spending a decade at a school in Chile, the last eight years as rector.

Lowe met his wife later in England when both were "Her Majesty's [school] Inspectors", and married in 1980.

It was the second marriage for both, Lowe's first wife being Lord Hunt's daughter, Sue.

Lowe was a life-long friend of Sir Ed, and was the best man at his first wedding.

In 2008, Lowe told the Herald he was happy it was Sir Ed who stood on the summit first, and was enormously proud of the team effort that put his friend up there.

"In 1953, it was the team that climbed it. That was the thing. It's not like today where all the climbers have to go up to the top. The team had succeeded."

"[Today] it's an ego trip for the individual climber."

He was also pleased Sir Ed who got the attention following the ascent.

"I'm absolutely delighted I didn't have the life that Ed's had. Ed was the right one. I would have been a bugger. I wouldn't have had the diplomacy that Ed's had."

Double amputee and former mountaineer Mark Inglis said climbers of Lowe's era were "inspirational".

"They were just so tough. We used to learn from those who have gone before and the amazing thing that those guys did was they went to places that no other human being had ever been, which was amazing."

Lowe played a major role in motivating future generations to look to take up mountaineering, he said.

"New Zealand has just such a phenomenal record of inspirational mountaineers and most of the public never hear of them."

Many of them had lost their lives in the "dangerous sandpit that we play in," Mr Inglis said.


• Read Lowe's account of Hillary's successful Everest climb HERE.


Sir Edmund Hillary, accompanied by fellow New Zealand climber George Lowe, arrives in Auckland
and alights from a flying boat to a hero's welcome from a proud Kiwi public.


http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10872850
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Magoo
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« Reply #272 on: March 22, 2013, 12:45:07 pm »

I always thought it was a shame that only a couple of the people in the team became famous.  They couldn't have knocked the bugger off without support.
Well done Mr Lowe.
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« Reply #273 on: March 22, 2013, 12:59:03 pm »


When my Mum finished at teacher training college, she moved to Hastings and got a job teaching at the school where George Lowe was one of the teachers.

They used to appoint a mentor to look after the junior teachers just out of training college, and my Mum's mentor was George Lowe. They taught in adjacent classrooms.

My Mum told me that George was a real character and had lots of larger-than-life tales about his alpine adventures. When he was selected for the 1953 Everest expedition, he applied for unpaid leave from his teaching job, but the Hawke's Bay Education Board turned him down and insisted that he keep teaching. So George told them where to stick their job and buggered off anyway. After the successful expedition, George returned to Hastings with his mate Ed and headed for Parkvale School to catch up with his old workmates and pupils, bringing Ed along with him. Mum said that all the members of the Hawke's Bay Education Board turned up at the school and tried to put themselves in the limelight, but George told them to bugger off, that he was at the school to introduce Ed to the school staff and pupils, and not to pander to the tossers who tried to stop him from being part of the expedition.

When I was a kid, my Mum seemed to have an amazing knowledge of the 1953 Everest Expedition. When you are a kid, you never question your parents' knowedge, but as I got older I often wondered how come my Mum seemed to have so much intimate knowledge of the conquest of Everest. It was only many years later into adulthood that she told me about her association with George Lowe and how she had got all her information straight out of the horse's mouth from George Lowe and Ed Hillary.


As a matter of interest, the members of the expedition and in particular Ed Hillary, made no secret of the fact that the success of the expedition was largely due to George Lowe. George was regarded as the foremost ice climbing expert in the world in the early 1950s and that was the reason why he was on the expedition. When they got bogged down on the Lotse Face, it was George who literally dug them out of the hole and cut a route up the face over an epic period of about ten days of working hard at high altitude.

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« Reply #274 on: March 22, 2013, 11:13:10 pm »


Last climber from Hillary's Everest team dies

Associated Press | 8:01AM - Friday, 22 March 2013

GEORGE LOWE. — Photo: Hawke's Bay Today.
GEORGE LOWE. — Photo: Hawke's Bay Today.

NEW ZEALANDER George Lowe, the last surviving climber from the team that made the first successful ascent of Mount Everest, has died, his wife said Thursday. He was 89.

Mary Lowe said her husband died on Wednesday (Thursday NZT) at a nursing home in Ripley, central England, after an illness.

Lowe and his friend Sir Edmund Hillary were the only two New Zealanders on the 1953 British-led attempt to climb the world's highest peak.

Lowe was part of a small group that established the final camp 300 metres below the mountain's summit on May 28th, 1953. The next day, Hillary and Tenzing Norgay of Nepal reached the 29,035 foot (8,850 metre) peak.

As Hillary descended the next day, he greeted Lowe with: "Well, George, we knocked the bastard off."

"He and Hillary climbed together through life, really," said travel writer Jan Morris, who was part of the Everest expedition as a journalist for The Times newspaper.

"And when it came to the point near the summit, George had to play a subsidiary role. He climbed very high, he climbed to top camp and said goodbye to Hillary then helped him come down. He played a very important role."

Morris said she was now the expedition's only survivor.

She said Lowe was "a gentleman in the old sense — very kind, very forceful, thoughtful and also a true adventurer, an unusual combination."


VICTORIOUS: One of two New Zealanders on the 1953 British expedition, Lowe (right) helped establish the final camp 1000 feet below the mountain's summit on May 28th, 1953.
VICTORIOUS: One of two New Zealanders on the 1953 British expedition, Lowe (right) helped
establish the final camp 1000 feet below the mountain's summit on May 28th, 1953.


Hillary, who died in 2008, inevitably got much of the media attention — and a knighthood from Queen Elizabeth II. Mary Lowe said her husband "didn't mind a bit."

"He had a wonderful life," she said. "He did a lot of things, but he was a very modest man and he kept quiet about it."

"He never sought the limelight. Ed Hillary didn't seek the limelight either — but he had it thrust upon him."

Born in Hastings, New Zealand, in 1924, Lowe began climbing in the Southern Alps and met Hillary, another ambitious young climber with whom he forged a lifelong bond.

In 1951, he was part of a New Zealand expedition to the Himalayas, and in 1953 he and Hillary joined the British Everest expedition led by John Hunt.

Kari Herbert of Polarworld, which is due to publish Lowe's book "Letters From Everest" later this year, said Lowe's efforts had been crucial to the expedition's success.

"He was one of the lead climbers, forging the route up Everest's Lhotse Face without oxygen and later cutting steps for his partners up the summit ridge," she said.

Lowe directed a film of the expedition, "The Conquest of Everest". He also made "Antarctic Crossing" after participating in the 1955-58 Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition, the first successful overland crossing of the continent.

The film was nominated for an Academy Award in the documentary category.

Lowe later made expeditions to Greenland, Greece and Ethiopia, taught school in Britain and Chile, lectured on his expeditions and became Her Majesty's Inspector of Schools for England.

He was a founder of the Sir Edmund Hillary Himalayan Trust UK, a charity set up to support the mountain residents of Nepal.

Lowe is survived by Mary and by three sons from his first marriage to John Hunt's daughter Susan: Gavin, Bruce and Matthew.

Mary Lowe said a memorial service would be held next month.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/europe/8459131/Last-climber-from-Hillarys-Everest-team-dies
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