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Obituaries


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Magoo
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« Reply #125 on: January 04, 2011, 08:12:24 pm »

I think I have seen that one Ali... will look it out again.   
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akadaka
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« Reply #126 on: January 17, 2011, 05:49:49 pm »

http://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainment/music/4549307/Cold-Chisels-drummer-dies


Cold Chisel drummer Steve Prestwich has died at the age of 56, less than two weeks after being diagnosed with a brain tumour.

 shit less than 2 weeks....must have been a rabid tumour Undecided
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« Reply #127 on: January 17, 2011, 06:07:52 pm »

.. he might have helped himself  Grin
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« Reply #128 on: February 13, 2011, 09:03:04 pm »

http://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainment/tv/4651960/Outrageous-Fortune-actor-Frank-Whitten-dead

so long frank...will miss the random friday nights coffee and chats at the Borders book shop in Queen st     Sad




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVbOVX_gCMc&feature=player_embedded
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Magoo
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« Reply #129 on: February 14, 2011, 05:43:38 am »

Gone to soon.
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« Reply #130 on: February 14, 2011, 07:44:43 am »

Aww Aka .. u knew him .. he was sooo young!!

My favourite Granpa!!
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« Reply #131 on: March 14, 2011, 11:32:49 am »

Joe Morello, jazz drummer for Dave Brubeck Quartet, dies at age 82 -

nytimes


 http://nyti.ms/hxKoOn
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Magoo
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« Reply #132 on: March 14, 2011, 11:38:37 am »

Take 5 Joe.
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #133 on: March 19, 2011, 10:35:59 pm »


From the Los Angeles Times....

Owsley Stanley dies at 76
— ‘Acid King’ of the '60s psychedelic era

He reputedly made more than a million doses of LSD,
much of which fueled Ken Kesey's notorious Acid
Tests — rollicking parties featuring all manner of
psychedelic substances, strobe lights and music.


By ELAINE WOO - Los Angeles Times | Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Owsley “Bear” Stanley, left, and the Grateful Dead's Jerry Garcia in 1969. Stanley, a 1960s counterculture legend who flooded the flower power scene with LSD and was an early benefactor of the Dead, died in a car crash in his adopted country of Australia. He was 76. — Photo: Reuters.
Owsley “Bear” Stanley, left, and the Grateful Dead's Jerry Garcia in 1969.
Stanley, a 1960s counterculture legend who flooded the flower power scene
with LSD and was an early benefactor of the Dead, died in a car crash in his
adopted country of Australia. He was 76. — Photo: Reuters.


NEARLY EVERYONE familiar with the history of the 1960s has heard of Timothy Leary and Ken Kesey, the pranksters who spread the gospel of psychedelics to the countercultural generation. But far fewer remember Owsley Stanley.

Stanley, who died Saturday at age 76, was arguably as pivotal as Leary and Kesey for altering minds in the turbulent '60s. Among a legion of youthful seekers, his name was synonymous with the ultimate high as a copious producer of what Rolling Stone once called "the best LSD in the world … the genuine Owsley." He reputedly made more than a million doses of the drug, much of which fueled Kesey's notorious Acid Tests — rollicking parties featuring all manner of psychedelic substances, strobe lights and music. Tom Wolfe immortalized Stanley as the "Acid King" in the counterculture classic "The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test" (1968).

The music that rocked Kesey's events was made by the Grateful Dead, the iconic rock band of the era that also bears Stanley's imprint. His chief effect on the band stemmed not merely from supplying its musicians with top-grade LSD but from his technical genius: As the Dead's early sound engineer, Stanley, nicknamed "Bear," developed a radical system he called the "wall of sound," essentially a massive public address system that reduced distortion and enabled the musicians to mix from the stage and monitor their playing.

"Owsley was truly important in setting the example of someone who would go to almost any length, beyond what anyone would think reasonable, to pursue the goal of perfection … sonic perfection, the finest planet Earth ever saw," Grateful Dead publicist Dennis McNally said Monday. "They never would have done that without Bear. Furthermore, the greater San Francisco scene never would have been what it was without the opportunity for thousands of people to experience psychedelics, which would not have happened without Bear."

Stanley, who moved to Australia more than 30 years ago, was driving his car in a storm near the town of Mareeba in Queensland when he lost control and crashed, said Sam Cutler, a longtime friend and former Grateful Dead tour manager. He died at the scene. His wife, Sheilah, sustained minor injuries.

Described by Cutler as a man who held "very firm beliefs about potential disasters," Stanley relocated to Australia because he believed it was the safest place to avoid a new ice age. He was a fanatical carnivore who once said that eating broccoli may have contributed to a heart attack several years ago. In his later years he was mainly a sculptor and jeweler, and his works were sought by many in the music industry, including the Rolling Stones' Keith Richards, Cutler said.

"He was a very sophisticated man," Cutler said, "an amalgam of scientist and engineer, chemist and artist."

With artist Bob Thomas, Stanley designed the Dead's distinctive logo: a skull emblazoned with a lightning bolt. He also recorded about 100 of the band's performances, many of which later were released as albums. He once said that he considered preserving the live concerts one of his most important accomplishments.

Born Augustus Owsley Stanley III in Kentucky on January 19, 1935, he was the grandson of a Kentucky governor and son of a naval commander. His nickname, Bear, reputedly was inspired by the profuse chest hair he sprouted in adolescence.

He studied engineering briefly at the University of Virginia before dropping out and joining the Air Force, where he trained as a radio operator. After completing his military service in 1958, he moved to California and worked at a variety of jobs, including a stint at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge. He also studied ballet, Russian and French.

He enrolled at UC Berkeley in 1963 as the Free Speech Movement was erupting and drugs such as LSD began flowing. He got his first taste of LSD in April 1964. "I remember the first time I took acid and walked outside," he told Rolling Stone in 2007, "and the cars were kissing the parking meters."

That experience convinced him that he needed a steady and trustworthy supply. He found a recipe at the campus library. Then, with a chemistry major named Melissa Cargill, he started a lab and began manufacturing a very pure form of the drug.

His lab was raided twice; Stanley spent two years in prison. According to "A Long Strange Trip", McNally's history of the Grateful Dead, Stanley estimated that he had produced enough LSD to provide about 1.25 million doses between 1965 and 1967.

After his release from prison in 1972, he returned to the Dead and began working on a new sound system, a monolithic collection of speakers and microphones that channeled the music through a single cluster of equipment. The band introduced it in 1974 at San Francisco's Cow Palace, but it was too expensive to sustain and Stanley later gave most of it away. But his ideas were later adopted by concert equipment makers.

Not everyone was a fan of the system. "It was always malfunctioning," Country Joe McDonald, of the '60s psychedelic band Country Joe & the Fish, said in an interview Monday. "The Grateful Dead and their extended family were like a unit, a nine-headed hydra. They did things their own way. People loved it. It was part of their mystique." Stanley, whom McDonald knew slightly and remembered as "kind of an obnoxious" person, "fit in really well."

For a brief time Stanley was the Grateful Dead's main financial backer and put them up in a pink stucco house in Watts, where he had moved his LSD lab. A 1966 Los Angeles Times profile described Stanley roaring up to a Sunset Boulevard bank on a motorcycle with wads of money crammed in his helmet, pockets and boots. The Times' and other accounts described him as an LSD millionaire, a status Stanley denied. But it inspired a Dead song, "Alice D. Millionaire". He also was immortalized in a Steely Dan composition, "Kid Charlemagne", and in a Jimi Hendrix recording of the Beatles' "Day Tripper", in which Hendrix can be heard calling out "Owsley, can you hear me now?"

Stanley downplayed his influence on the psychedelic explosion, explaining that he began producing LSD only to ensure the quality of what he ingested.

"I just wanted to know the dose and purity of what I took into my own body. Almost before I realized what was happening, the whole affair had gotten completely out of hand. I was riding a magic stallion. A Pegasus," he told Rolling Stone. "I was not responsible for his wings, but they did carry me to all kinds of places."

In addition to his wife, he is survived by sons Pete and Starfinder; daughters Nina and Redbird; eight grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.


elaine.woo@latimes.com

http://www.latimes.com/news/obituaries/la-me-owsley-stanley-20110315,0,3733346.story
« Last Edit: March 19, 2011, 10:41:20 pm by Kiwithrottlejockey » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #134 on: March 24, 2011, 09:40:12 am »




Dame Elizabeth


We have just lost a Hollywood giant. More importantly we have lost an incredible human being," British singer Elton John said in a statement.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainment/celebrities/4803599/Elizabeth-Taylor-dies
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« Reply #135 on: April 19, 2011, 02:08:19 pm »

Michael Sarrazin, best known for starring opposite Jane Fonda in 1969's "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?," has died in Montreal after a brief battle with cancer. He was 70.

Sarrazin died Sunday surrounded by family.

In Sydney Pollack's Depression era-set "Horses," which was nominated for nine Oscars and won a single statuette for Gig Young's supporting role, Fonda played a suicidal woman who heads to Hollywood and meets up with Sarrazin's character, an aspiring director. The two enter a grueling dance marathon, during which she tries to convince him to shoot her and put her out of her misery.

Among Sarrazin's other memorable roles were Irvin Kershner's 1967 con-artist movie "The Flim-Flam Man," in which he played the reluctant apprentice to grifter George C. Scott, and the Paul Newman-directed 1970 film "Sometimes a Great Notion," playing Newman's misunderstood half-brother.

http://au.news.yahoo.com/a/-/entertainment/9225356/horses-star-michael-sarrazin-dies-at-70/
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Magoo
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« Reply #136 on: April 20, 2011, 08:34:45 pm »

http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/4911868/Broadcaster-Kerry-Smith-dies-after-cancer-battle


Gone too soon Kerry.
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« Reply #137 on: April 20, 2011, 10:02:06 pm »

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« Reply #138 on: April 21, 2011, 12:12:06 am »

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« Reply #139 on: June 04, 2011, 10:54:25 am »

. Assisted suicide advocate Dr. Jack Kevorkian passed away early Friday morning at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, north of Detroit.

Long-time associate and friend Jeffrey Fieger said Kevorkian died of a pulmonary embolism around 2:30 am. He was 83-years-old.

"Last night, I got a call about 10:30 from one of the doctors, telling me that he had taken a turn for the worse," Kevorkian's attorney Mayer Morganroth said, according to CBS station WWJ.

Kevorkian had been hospitalized for nearly two weeks with kidney and respiratory problems.

"He had a cancerous legion, but that they felt was operable. But everything seemed to be, shall we say solvable, except he got pulmonary thrombosis, a clot that came into the lungs, and that bottomed out very quickly," Morganroth said.

Kevorkian passed with his niece, Ava Janus, and Morganroth by his side.
Born in 1928, in the Detroit suburb of Pontiac, Kevorkian graduated from the University of Michigan's medical school in 1952 and became a pathologist.

Kevorkian said he first became interested in euthanasia during his internship year when he watched a middle-aged woman die of cancer. She was so emaciated, her sagging, discolored skin "covered her bones like a cheap, wrinkled frock," Kevorkian wrote.

After building a suicide device in 1989 from parts he found in flea markets, he sought his first assisted-suicide candidate by placing advertisements in local newspapers. Newspaper and TV interviews brought more attention.

On June 4, 1990, he drove his van to a secluded park north of Detroit. After Janet Adkins, 54, of Portland, Ore., met him there, he inserted a needle into her arm and, when she was ready, she flipped the switch that released a lethal flow of drugs.

He later switched from his device to canisters of carbon monoxide, again insisting patients took the final step by removing a clamp that released the flow of deadly gas to the face mask.

Kevorkian earned the nickname "Doctor Death" in the 1990?s when he admittedly assisted in the suicides of more than 130 terminally ill patients. He told CBS News, he never regretted his actions.

In 1998 the Michigan legislature and then Governor John Engler passed a law banning assisted suicide in an effort to stop Kevorkian. In response, Kevorkian released his two page manifesto calling lawmakers unethical and corrupt.

"On this issue, they call it unethical to help end suffering and quickly, but it is ethical to let someone starve and thirst to death in a long period of time. Now that is a corruption of medical policy," Kevorkian said.

He was convicted in 1999 and spent more than eight years behind bars for the death of Lou Gehrig's disease patient Thomas Youk of Waterford, who said he wanted to die but lacked the ability to do it himself - a suicide that was seen around the world on "60 Minutes."

Kevorkian's life story became the subject of the 2010 HBO movie, "You Don't Know Jack," which earned actor Al Pacino Emmy and Golden Globe awards for his portrayal of Kevorkian.

Ruth Holmes knew Kevorkian for 16 years. She was his jury consultant and close friend. He also lived with her.

"This is a man who will go down as a great American hero. I think it's too close in time for what he actually stood for, but he was so much more than the man you saw on television. He had a just marvelous personality," Holmes said.
Holmes said she does not think Kevorkian was afraid of dying.

"I think he wanted everyone to be prepared for their own death. I don't believe that he was afraid of death, but I believe that he was a man who wanted everyone to have the knowledge of how to ease the transition from life to death at their call," Holmes said.

Morganroth and Kevorkian's niece are currently discussing funeral plans. They are thinking about a private burial and shielding the memorial away from the public.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504083_162-20068718-504083.html
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« Reply #140 on: June 04, 2011, 10:58:34 am »

He left it too long
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Magoo
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« Reply #141 on: June 04, 2011, 02:18:15 pm »

83 years too long.    Pity his father hadn't had a wank that day.  Roll Eyes
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« Reply #142 on: June 04, 2011, 03:11:23 pm »




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Cbx5eeX_fM&feature=player_embedded
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« Reply #143 on: June 07, 2011, 12:06:13 pm »




Shrek, the hermit sheep that became a jet-setting celebrity, died at his Bendigo home yesterday but his legacy will live on, says his owner.

"It's been a fantastic journey but he's left us with a legacy and it will continue," said John Perriam of Bendigo Station.

Aged 16, and said to be in pain through age-related illnesses, Shrek was put down yesterday morning, on the advice of a vet.

"His wellbeing was our number one priority. He's been under the care of a vet and we were told it was time to spare him any more pain. He was coming up 16 and that's an incredible age for a sheep. "

"It was a hard decision in some respects, but it's fitting his journey ended the way it did, so peacefully, " Mr Perriam said.

Shrek gained international fame in 2004. The story of how shepherd Ann Scanlan caught the sheep with the mammoth fleece that had avoided being shorn for six years captured international attention. Media from around the world reported on Shrek being shorn of his 22kg fleece.

He became the subject of three books and featured prominently in a fourth, raising funds for the Tarras School near Bendigo and the Cure Kids charity, lifting the profile of the wool industry and raising hundreds of thousands of dollars.

A marketing man once told Mr Perriam the worldwide exposure about Shrek contributed $100 million to the economy.

Josie Spillane of Cure Kids said Shrek had raised more than $150,000 for the charity, which funded medical research into life-threatening illnesses affecting children.

The royalties from Mr Perriam's books, Dust to Gold and Shrek - The Story of a Kiwi Icon, would continue to generate funds for the cause.

"Shrek has given Cure Kids a phenomenal fundraising opportunity and exposure and without the tenacity of the Perriams - John and Heather- this wouldn't have happened," Mrs Spillane said.

Ms Scanlan said she initially thought Mr Perriam was "stark raving mad" for publicising the fact that a sheep had evaded shearing for so long. "You don't show people you've got woollies like that up in the hills."

Mr Perriam said mail arrived for Shrek at Bendigo Station almost every day and he had a huge fan base of people from all walks of life.

"We'll continue to tell people about Shrek and raise funds for the causes we've supported. His story isn't over."

Shrek will be cremated and his ashes scattered on Bendigo Station and on Aoraki Mt Cook "so he can watch over the South Island high country, the home of his ancestors".

A service will be held in his honour at the Church of the Good Shepherd at Tekapo and Mr Perriam said a bronze statue of the famous sheep would probably be placed in the village of Tarras.

Highlights in the life of a celebrity

* April 2004: Found by musterer Ann Scanlan on Bendigo Station

* April 28, 2004: Shorn live on national television in Cromwell with the removed fleece weighing 22kg.

* May 3, 2004: Met Prime Minister Helen Clark and Chilean president Ricardo Lagos at Parliament

* February 18, 2005: Flew to Auckland as guest of Pet Expo

* November 28, 2006: Shorn on iceberg 90km off Otago coast by Jim Barnett

* November 28, 2008: Retired, after being shorn at Auckland's Sky Tower observation deck (328m).

* May 2010: Brought out of retirement to visit Eden Park, Auckland, to promote book and to attend Cure Kid charity event in Queenstown.

* April, 2011: Meets Masterchef New Zealand chef Simon Gault and is filmed for a new television series featuring the celebrity chef.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10730636
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« Reply #144 on: June 21, 2011, 10:08:36 am »



'Jackass' star Ryan Dunn dies in fiery US crash
7:18 AM Tuesday Jun 21, 2011
 
Jackass star Ryan Dunn, who along with his castmates made Americans cringe and snicker through vulgar stunts in their multimillion-dollar TV and movie franchise, was killed early on Monday in a fiery car crash. He was 34.


http://www.nzherald.co.nz/entertainment/news/article.cfm?c_id=1501119&objectid=10733485
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« Reply #145 on: June 21, 2011, 10:18:05 am »

For those watchers of Jackass .. if you saw the one where one of the guys stuck a toy car up him bum and then went to a doc to have it xrayed .. Ryan was the support chap for him  Grin Grin

Bloody lunatics!  LOL
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Newtown-Fella
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« Reply #146 on: June 21, 2011, 12:20:02 pm »

he was once my neighbour .....

The dealing's done for Kenny the Busker

The Courtenay Place busker who had his amplifier confiscated in a long-running noise dispute with former mayor Mark Blumsky has died.

John Adams, 64, better known as Kenny the Busker, had a brain tumour and died at a home for the elderly in Churton Park on June 6.

The country music singer, known for wearing a cowboy hat and his heavy reliance on Kenny Rogers' song The Gambler, became embroiled in a mostly good-humoured battle with Mr Blumsky in the 1990s after the mayor sided with Courtenay Place apartment dwellers who were annoyed about the levels of night-time noise from Mr Adams' sound system.

When he lost that battle, Mr Adams diversified his entertainment routine to include a recitation of classic poems and prose.

Two of his friends approached The Dominion Post yesterday expressing concern about whether members of his family in the United States, believed to include a brother in Texas, were organising a funeral service for Mr Adams.

Robin Yee, of Newtown, said Mr Adams, who spent his final years living in a Dixon St flat, deserved a decent sendoff.

"He was not well off. When he had the amp, he made a dollar but he ran out of money when he could not sing. He was a person who wanted the best for people."

Stephen Cotterall said people who frequented Courtenay Place bars in the past 15 years would remember Mr Adams, who performed outside the old Shanghai Restaurant.

"He tried to entertain people as they walked around at night.

"He was a Christian and had a great deal of personal integrity."

Mr Adams' body is with the Wilson Funeral Home in Newtown. A spokesman said instructions had been received from the executor of his will in the US.

"We've been instructed Mr Adams will be cremated and there will be no funeral service."

Mr Yee said he was considering helping to organise an alternative, private service for his old mate.

Mr Blumsky, who is now New Zealand high commissioner in Niue, could not be contacted for comment last night.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/5168908/The-dealings-done-for-Kenny-the-Busker

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« Reply #147 on: June 21, 2011, 12:36:35 pm »

Girl who battled life of sickness dies

Aria MacDonald, the five-year-old girl who endured two liver, kidney, pancreas and small bowel transplants to fight a rare condition, has died in hospital.

Aria, from Auckland, received the transplants at Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha in February and May last year but was then diagnosed with post-transplant cancer. She suffered infection after infection as she tried to recover. 

Her mother, Anita MacDonald, announced the news on the family's blog. ''Her [Aria's] five years of life has been one of hardships, struggles, pain, suffering and sorrow; yet we know that she has gone to a place where she need not be bothered by these things any longer.''

She was born with a rare condition that stop her digesting food. Her cancer - a rare complication of organ transplants - was caused by the Epstein-Barr virus, which also causes glandular fever.

Aria turned five two weeks ago, and the family had hoped to take her to Disney World to celebrate, but Aria was too ill.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/5170655/Girl-who-battled-life-of-sickness-dies
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« Reply #148 on: June 23, 2011, 12:03:53 am »




A Brazilian woman listed by Guinness World Records as the world's oldest person has died, just weeks shy of her 115th birthday.

The title now reverts to a woman in the United States.

Maria Gomes Valentim died of multiple organ failure, said Helerson Lima, a spokesman for the nursing home where she lived. Valentim would have turned 115 on July 9.

Guinness said early today (NZ time) on its website that Valentim, "the first Brazilian super-centenarian to hold the title," died at the age of 114 years, 347 days.

On May 18, Guinness determined that Valentim was 48 days older than the person previously considered the world's oldest human, Besse Cooper from Monroe, Georgia.

"With Maria's passing, the title of Oldest Living Person reverts back to American Besse Cooper, age 114 years 299 days," Guinness said.

The Georgia woman's son, Sid Cooper, said today that his mother is doing well at her Monroe retirement community.

"She's gained some weight, she's eating real good," Sid Cooper said.

"Her memory is still really good," he added. "She remembers things from a long time ago and recognises people."

Guinness verified that Valentim was born on July 9, 1896, in the city of Carangola in the southeastern state of Minas Gerais. She lived there all her life.

Last month, Guinness said on its website that Valentim, who was known as "Grandma Quita," attributed her longevity to a healthy diet: eating a roll of bread every morning with coffee, fruit and the occasional milk with linseed.

Valentim's family told reporters that she had a stubborn streak and always made a habit of minding her own business. They also said that her father lived to be 100.

"She says she has lived long because she has always taken care of her own life - and not meddled in the lives of others," granddaughter Jane Ribeiro Moraes, 63, told a local newspaper in May.

Valentim married her husband, Joao, in 1913. He died in 1946.

Valentim is survived by four grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren and five great-great grandchildren. Her only son died at age 75 in the early 1990s.

Valentim was scheduled to be buried Tuesday afternoon at the Carangola cemetery.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/americas/5176957/The-worlds-oldest-person-dies-in-Brazil
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« Reply #149 on: June 25, 2011, 11:10:30 am »

Actor Peter Falk, who rose to fame on a rumpled raincoat and a shambling manner as the TV detective Lt. Columbo, has died at 83.


Falk died peacefully at his home in Beverly Hills, California, on Thursday evening, according to a statement released to CNN by a family friend. The cause of death was not released. In 2008, Falk's daughter said he was suffering from Alzheimer's disease.

CNN
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