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Home made cleaning products


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Author Topic: Home made cleaning products  (Read 647 times)
ssweetpea
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« on: October 22, 2010, 09:02:19 am »

Ok, I just discovered I am out of laundry powder and the machine is full:-\

Fortunately I bought a jar of Borax recently and already had some washing soda so......

1 cup Borax
1 cup washing soda
2 cups grated soap (I used 2 bars of Knights Castile but a laundry soap like sunlight would probably be better)
a few drops of essential oil for a nice smell if liked

Mix together in a food processor and use 1-2 tablespoons per load of washing.


I haven't figured out the cost of this (the 1kg jar of Borax cost $10.45) but I am trying it out right now on a huge load.

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Magoo
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« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2010, 04:40:10 pm »

Let us know how well it worked.   It is a handy recipe to have.
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ssweetpea
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« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2010, 01:40:05 pm »

I used two tablespoons full in a warm wash as I have a big top loading machine. I also disolved it first as the soap in my mix was in bigger pieces than the rest of the mix.

It did work -my washing (sheets, towels, socks and t-shirts) was clean and smelled of roses. Grin

On the cost front however I doubt if it is much of a cost saver for a seasoned bargin hunter like me.

I can't to a full comparison as I can't recall what I paid for the Washing Soda, Woolworths has it at $4.08 per kg but I would have paid less.  I did use a $1 worth of soap and around $2.75 worth of Borax. Add that to the Washing Soda and the entire mixture (4 cups) weighed just over 700g. That is 66.6 tablespoons.


On Saturday I bought laundry powder at $3 for 2x500g boxes. One scoop of laundry powder = 4 tablespoons.

With that comparison the powder does come out cheaper even though you use twice as much.

However I seldom manage to get laundry powder that cheap.


One thing interesting to note was how the home made mix looked. Apart from the little lumps of white soap in mine (I should have used a finner grating disk:-\) it looks like normal laundry powder.


The Bin Inn has another recipe:

MAKE Laundry Powder

125g bar of Lemon Laundry Soap
1Kg Washing Soda
Powderise soap in food processor (chop up small with knife first). Add washing soda and mix together in food processor. Use only 15g per load (1 tablespoon). HINT - Do not buy expensive fabric softener. Add 1 tablespoon of baking soda to the final rinse to whiten, soften and deodorise.

http://www.bininn.co.nz/cleaningFrameset.htm

That looks much cheaper and sounds a lot like what housewives used during WWII when soap was rationed.
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« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2010, 01:47:27 pm »

I am going to try this on the soot stained bricks above my fireplace.


Washing away fireplace smoke and soot, or cleaning the smoke off the glass in wood stove doors, is easy and safe using washing soda (available in the laundry section of the supermarket).

Washing soda is one of the best heavy duty cleaners I know, and an excellent substitute for powerful solvents.

Washing soda can peel wax off floors, and it isnít recommended for aluminum, so only use on surfaces such as unpainted wood, glass or stone, that wonít be harmed.

INGREDIENTS
1 bucket warm water
1/2 cup washing soda

Wash surface, wearing gloves; then rinse.

For really tough jobs, make a thick washing soda paste by mixing it with water, and then spread the paste on the soot. Keep the paste damp by spraying every hour or so with a spray bottle. Leave the paste on overnight, and then rinse. Make certain to only use this formula on inert surfaces such as glass and stone, as this amount of washing soda can peel off paint, wax, etc.



Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/washing-soda-fireplace-soot-remover.html#ixzz13EjQIW3B
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dragontamer
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« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2010, 10:57:16 pm »

The most effective cleaner I've ever used on my log burner glass door is wet newspaper dipped in the (cool) ashes of the fire.

Scours the build up straight off with minimal elbow grease, and then just wipe it with first clean wet newspaper and then dry paper towels.  The whole lot can then be burnt.
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Magoo
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« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2010, 05:16:07 am »

The most effective cleaner I've ever used on my log burner glass door is wet newspaper dipped in the (cool) ashes of the fire.

Scours the build up straight off with minimal elbow grease, and then just wipe it with first clean wet newspaper and then dry paper towels.  The whole lot can then be burnt.
This really does work well.   Ashes ( including those from the ashtray) on a barely damp paper towel also remove the ring left by glasses on wood surfaces.            Not so effective on historic stains however.   This worked a treat on my walnut piano.
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Ares Abani
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« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2011, 01:35:48 am »

Good tips.
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dragontamer
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« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2011, 10:55:08 pm »

I am going to try this on the soot stained bricks above my fireplace.


Washing away fireplace smoke and soot, or cleaning the smoke off the glass in wood stove doors, is easy and safe using washing soda (available in the laundry section of the supermarket).

Washing soda is one of the best heavy duty cleaners I know, and an excellent substitute for powerful solvents.

Washing soda can peel wax off floors, and it isnít recommended for aluminum, so only use on surfaces such as unpainted wood, glass or stone, that wonít be harmed.

INGREDIENTS
1 bucket warm water
1/2 cup washing soda

Wash surface, wearing gloves; then rinse.

For really tough jobs, make a thick washing soda paste by mixing it with water, and then spread the paste on the soot. Keep the paste damp by spraying every hour or so with a spray bottle. Leave the paste on overnight, and then rinse. Make certain to only use this formula on inert surfaces such as glass and stone, as this amount of washing soda can peel off paint, wax, etc.



Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/washing-soda-fireplace-soot-remover.html#ixzz13EjQIW3B

I'm going to try this on my stupid varnished window sills.  I'm yet to find a paint remover that works as well as I want it to, and if this strips paint it will probably destroy varnish.   Grin  And if it doesn't, its a minimum of damage.
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« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2011, 10:09:12 am »

I came across a really easy way to clean burned pots the other day.

Sprinkle Baking Soda on the moist burnt area and heat.

I tried this on a pot I had burned milk in. There was a really thick hard layer on the bottom of the pot. Not the best pot for cooking semilina in obviously. Roll Eyes

I sprinkled on the baking soda - nothing happened - so I put the pot on the stove. The burned stuff just bubbled up under the frothing baking soda.

I had to do that 3 times washing  off the loose deposits with a brush each time but it was really easy - no elbow grease needed.
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Magoo
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« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2011, 04:41:17 pm »

That is a good tip.    I just bought a couple of new pots that do not have copper or heavy bottoms so things catch quite quickly if I take my eye off them.   Heating soapy water in them helps too.
Apparently if you rinse the pot out with cold water before you add the milk it will help prevent it from sticking.   You used to be able to buy a gadget to put in the bottom of the milk saucepan to stop it sticking too but darned if I can remember what they were.   Glass or metal  disks I think.
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dragontamer
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« Reply #10 on: October 02, 2011, 11:04:01 pm »

Marbles.

Just make sure you know where those puppies are at the end of the cooking time.   Undecided
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