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Signs of Spring


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nitpicker1
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« on: June 22, 2010, 08:42:23 pm »


For the gardeners amongst us:  Looking for signs of Spring? Down this way the appearance of chickweed and regrowth of chives tells us it's time for seed sowing, that's when Spring really starts, usually early August, not September, down here. Chickweed has started, sumpin's funny somewhere.

Time to plant garlic.   


my weather station says we are going to have 2 extra seconds of day tomorrow  Grin
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« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2010, 02:55:46 pm »

Garlic planted.

Shallots planted.

Strawberries planted.

First Paperwhites in flower - 4 weeks after my Mother's first one I might add.

The ground is starting to get muddy after last summer's drought so I have just done a bit of quick digging. Once the clay soil round here gets muddy it does more harm than good to dig.
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« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2010, 08:19:07 pm »



Garlic, yep - the 4 selfsown peas are trying to climb   and we have 3 minutes more daylight since 22nd June. I will ignore the fact that we have had three days in a row of max. 7.8c and very few glimpses of sun.


There is one flower opened on the selfsown seedling tomato I brought in to the office window before the frosts started. That will be interesting 'cos the plant could have been infertile.

The plant is skinny and weak so I don't think it will do very well, and as the open flower is on it's own in the bract there wont be a pollen transfer. 

nemmind, it's having fun trying
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« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2011, 02:45:10 pm »


For the gardeners amongst us:  Looking for signs of Spring? Down this way the appearance of chickweed and regrowth of chives tells us it's time for seed sowing, that's when Spring really starts, usually early August, not September, down here. Chickweed has started, sumpin's funny somewhere.

Time to plant garlic.   


my weather station says we are going to have 2 extra seconds of day tomorrow  Grin


That was last year. The seasons don't know where they are down here.

We have had three distinct springs this year, three distinct new growths on the native trees, three crops of field mushrooms and my barrel gardens have felt them all.

I have had 3 harvested crops from each barrel after a winter return hiccup in  Spring and another in early summer
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

After the third (February) Spring when these pix were taken -16th of May, there was a massive surge of new growth. I got a few of the second crop of tomatoes before I went on holiday, they're kaput now we've had a frost at last.




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This season's crop from this barrel were the selfsown peas that poked up before the winter, carrots and lettuce -  the Cos that I hated and returned the unused portion of the seeds to Webbs as being wrongly labelled and the poor wee overwintered Sweet 100s tomato. Gave away the Cos that grew, some people like them.  Roll Eyes




The NZ Spinach is the best producer and I have had umpteen meals from it since it reappeared from last year's selfsown seeds just after christmas. It was handy then because I had just removed my spent early Sugarsnaps from that barrel and didn't have to replant it.

I didn't renew the potting mix, gave the the barrels an early dose of slow release general fert then a generous cover of crushed dag manure and a sprinkle of lime. Stunk a bit for a while and Peppi tried to roll in it, GGGGRRRRR, but the wool on top of the soil makes a great mulch and I can pull it back to plant a seeding.



My third season of container gardening, I think I'm getting the hang of it.



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« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2011, 07:19:17 pm »

From my point of view gadening is the most beautiful thing we do, it helps in removing all the frustration, tension which occur in our daily life.
I have my small garden in my house, there are some plants of Red Rose, Jasmine, but I love money plant because it increases money(just kidding) all of them are my favorites.
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« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2011, 09:35:24 pm »

Hi HeatherHope, nice to meet another gardening enthusiast.
What else do you have at your place?
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« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2011, 09:09:47 am »

Signs of Spring?

The leaves on the poplars have only just changed colour and are dropping round here!
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« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2011, 10:09:08 am »

Signs of Spring?

The leaves on the poplars have only just changed colour and are dropping round here!

So is that later than or just as usual for your area?


Had an extensive trip round Otago/Southland late last month, pockets of riverside willows look stupid there, with their bare branches having a topknot of new green growth.

My NI kowhai is close to budburst, chickweed is still growing and the silver beet sown after the longest day and supposed to stand through winter is starting to bolt.  We had three crops of field mushrooms for the year, spring bulbs were flowering at Queenstown late May. My Totara tree has had three distinct cycles of bright new growth, and did the same last year.

This stupid seasonal repetition has been happening for the last two or three years. 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Seasonal Weather Outlook - issued 10 June 2010
Regime Change During May the Tasman Sea and New Zealand area went from a regime that favoured lingering anticyclones to one that favoured the developing of low pressure centres. In the last week of May a large, multi-centred low deepened in the Tasman Sea and then slowly crossed the South Island and lingered near Chathams. This brought extreme amounts of rain to the southeast of the South Island. It delivered 191 mm of rain to Oamaru airport and 280 mm to Oamaru city in six days. That's about equal to the amount of rain recorded in these sites in the eight months from 20 September 2009 to 20 May 2010.


Sea Surface Temperature Pattern.
Seasonal forecasting is all about watching trends that change slowly from one month to the next; trends that are related to how the planet is handling its heat budget. For us, the main item of interest is how heat is transferred from the Pacific Ocean into the atmosphere to make weather. For this, the eastern equatorial part of the Pacific is the target area to watch. After being warmer than normal since last June, the sea in this area has now reverted to near normal temperatures. So the recent El Nino has faded and we are now having neither El Nino nor La Nina conditions, and this is described as "neutral territory". Since March there has been a period of upwelling along the equatorial Pacific, causing sub surface temperatures to cool below normal, and this cooling phase is now nearing the surface, so that conditions are becoming favourable for a transition towards La Nina over the next few months. Trade winds have recently been stronger than normal near and west of the dateline, and convection has been stronger than normal over Indonesia and northwest Australia-these are factors that are consistent with La Nina conditions. However trade winds have also been weaker than normal about the Galapagos, so it looks as though the current phase of neutral conditions should continue for a few months. Recently the seas around New Zealand and in the Tasman Sea have been slightly warmer than normal in places. This may continue to act as a source for extra evaporation and cloudiness over the next few months.


The Southern Oscillation Index (SOI).
The impact of La Nina or El Nino on our daily weather maps can be computed by a parameter called the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI). The SOI is compiled from the weather maps, and counts the difference in the isobars between Tahiti and Darwin. In April it dived sharply into positive La Nina territory. This was a temporary blip related to some low pressure systems that lingered near Darwin, and recently its value has relaxed but is still positive. A year in the recent past that behaved similarly is 2003, and that year stayed in neutral territory during winter. Anyone with local weather recordings from 2003 may be able to use them as a possible indicator of the impact of weather this year.


Likely weather patterns as we slip into winter.
We are neither having an El Nino pattern, nor a La Nina pattern. The pattern is in-between or in 'neutral territory'. This increases the amount of variability and the possible extremes for our weather pattern. Sea surface temperatures around New Zealand may revert to near average during the next few months, and air temperature are expected to be generally milder than normal. This does not rule out a few short-term cold snaps and frosty periods that are typical of winter. Some decent snowfalls are likely for the ski fields. The main pattern this winter is expected to consist of broad troughs of low pressure moving across New Zealand. Some may be followed by periods of cold west to southwest winds with mountain snow. A few passing fronts may be followed by a period of enhanced southerly winds with hail or snow showers for eastern hills. As in May, a few low pressure systems may form in the mid Tasman Sea and move onto New Zealand,bringing periods of wind and rain. This pattern is often preceded by a burst of enhanced northwest or northerly winds bringing mild conditions. By July these lows are more likely to be more in the south, rather than the mid,Tasman Sea. Acting as a variation between the troughs, there are likely to also be some anticyclones. These have been weak in the New Zealand region lately and are expected to occasionally track across the northern Tasman Sea, bringing fogs and frost. Some of these may linger in the area east of Chatham Islands,or to north of New Zealand, and thus enhance the westerly flow onto the South Island.

 SEASONAL OUTLOOK FOR CENTRAL OTAGO

RAIN continuing about normal.
WIND westerlies and southwesterlies.
TEMPERATURE becoming above normal after a near normal May.
SUNSHINE returning to normal after a sunny May.
SPECIALS passing fronts.
CONFIDENCE low to moderate.
Troughs and fronts arriving from the Tasman Sea are expected to vary in intensity and duration but should bring normal amounts of rain and snowfall. Some of these fronts may be preceded by bouts of northwest or northerly wind, and some may be followed by southerly winds. There should also be the typical number of cold spells this winter, bringing the usual number of frosty mornings.

SEASONAL OUTLOOK FOR COASTAL OTAGO

RAIN returning to normal after an extremely wet May and start to June.
WIND westerly quarter.
TEMPERATURE becoming about to above normal after a near normal May.
SUNSHINE becoming above normal after a cloudy May.
SPECIALS erratic rainfall.
CONFIDENCE low to moderate.
Wet periods are expected from passing fronts, but the main rain is expected to with episodes of easterly wind associated with low-pressure systems crossing central parts of the country. There may also be a few cold snaps,typical of winter. These are usually heralded by a large anticyclone moving onto Tasmania, and followed by a few clear frosty nights.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


http://www.metservice.com/about/news
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« Reply #8 on: June 28, 2011, 07:30:16 pm »

Icy blasts, snow as winter takes hold
Last updated 10:13 28/06/2011

The warmer weather New Zealanders have so far been enjoying this winter will give way to an icy chill later today, forecasters say.

A wintry blast was finally pushing across New Zealand and would affect all of the country at some point, said WeatherWatch spokesman Philip Duncan.

Duncan said the top half of the North Island had yet to experience its first winter chill - but that would all change this afternoon.

Cold south easterly winds were expected to blast from Whanganui to Northland this afternoon and the region could expect lower temperatures, heavy showers and thunderstorms.

More than 1400 lightning strikes had already been recorded by WeatherWatch's lightning tracker. Most of the lightning had occurred off the Taranaki and Northland coasts.

While Auckland reached a maximum of 15 degrees celsius yesterday it dropped to an icy low of just five degrees in some areas overnight.

And the worst is yet to come, with MetService forecaster Derek Holland warning Aucklanders to prepare for cold days and even colder nights.

The cold air would also set in across the South Island today, with rain or showers developing in Canterbury this afternoon and snow gradually lowering to about 500 metres tonight.

The first major snow dump of the year in the South Island was likely to affect Porters, Lewis and Arthur's passes.

A "biting southerly" was due to hit Wellington today and would last until tomorrow, Duncan said.

Duncan said the wind chill temperature or "feels like" temperature would make it feel like it was a chilly 4C in the capital, but it would really be about 9C.

Temperatures would drop to single digits in most other parts of the lower North Island, including a high of 3C for Waiouru and 9C in Hawke's Bay.

Severe gales blowing across the Central Plateau could combine with snow to create blizzard-like conditions.

As well as on the Desert Road, heavy snow was likely to fall on the Tararua Range, Mt Taranaki, and the Gisborne and Hawke's Bay ranges.

The Coromandel could expect a high of 15C today but it would likely be around 12C tomorrow, Duncan said.

Gale-force southerlies could also create dangerous driving conditions in Kapiti, Horowhenua and Manawatu, especially for motorbikes and high-sided vehicles.

MetService said a trough of low pressure moving across the North Island could bring dangerous levels of rain to Gisborne and Hawke's Bay tomorrow.

However, the wintry conditions were likely to be short-lived, MetService said.

The weather should improve by Thursday, with a settled spell lasting until Saturday.

- The Dominion Post, The Press, Stuff

http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/5199335/Icy-blasts-snow-as-winter-takes-hold


I don't think we hit 7c today    

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« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2011, 12:07:44 am »


It really is spring here now; the Pussy Willow is having kittens, I am using the chives, Cat has started bringing baby bunnies home to Dog again, pollen dust on the car, lawns need mowing and we've had no decent rain since the snow
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« Reply #10 on: September 08, 2011, 05:55:49 pm »

After being caught out by a cold snap every year I have finially learnt not to sew seed or plant when the weather first warms up in August.

Spring started arriving in Auckland before winter did, in other words we had a warm but very wet winter. My paperwhites started flowering in May and one of my old fashioned roses (Cornellia) never stopped flowering. It produced clusters one or two at a time all winter. If the themometor dropped below 10 it wasn't that noticable. I was suprised the fruit trees didn't start flowering. Just as well.

In early August things started warming up as per usual - and then we got that storm. The one that had a little slushy sleet falling on gobsmacked Aucklanders in the central city and children in Pukekohe, Bombay and Hunua trying to make snow balls.

It doesn't snow in Auckland - this was the first think that looked like snow rather than hail since 1974 when a tiny amount of sleet fell on the summit of Mt Eden.

Two frosts made it down the drive to ice up the windscreen of the van but not enough to freeze on our seltered lawn.

The weeds promptly started growing after the storm and a week later things are really gearing up and oh boy do I have some weeding and pruning to do.

With the weather being so wet and warm over winter the roses never really went dormant.
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« Reply #11 on: June 08, 2012, 12:16:40 pm »


My garlic is up. It wanted to be planted a month ago, it didn't wait for the first frost to wake it up.

Chickweed and chives, usually among the first signs of Spring - are in new growth

We seem to have had multiple winter-spring growth f'rinstance :

This year there were two separate flowerings of "my" cabbage trees,  and tall herbs such as Lovage and Fennel, and  Native Hebes, while my pet Totara has had 3 distinct new-growth appearances.  

I put this down to unseasonable cold snaps followed by return to "normal" during what is the growing season.

Over the last few (four) years we have had "good" summer weather while the more northern places seem to have had the rough stuff. We have had drought conditions both summer and winter.

This year we seem to have missed the worst of the equinoxial gales and hot Norwesters.. and we have had no icebergs floating past yet...
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« Reply #12 on: July 24, 2012, 12:01:04 pm »

Garlic is away and laughing, chives doing the same. Sugarsnap peas are showing their secondary leaves, most of the nicotinia has so far survived the winter and I have planted out the Christmas Lilies that had overwintered in dry peat crumbles. The waxeyes seem to have gone back to their hills since the snow retreated, guess they'll be back again: I see

Visit the MetService website:
http://www.metservice.com
{ROADSNOW Event 2012/1.105}
 
Issued by MetService at 9:10am Tuesday 24th July 2012
Valid until 9:00pm Tuesday 24th July

PORTERS PASS
Snow showers are expected to affect the road overnight tonight.  From late
Tuesday evening to Wednesday morning, expect 3 to 5cm of snow to accumulate
near
the summit.

ARTHURS PASS
Snow showers are expected to affect the road overnight tonight.  From late
Tuesday evening to Wednesday morning, expect 1cm or less of snow to accumulate
near the summit.

LEWIS PASS
Snow showers are expected to affect the road overnight tonight.  From late
Tuesday evening to Wednesday morning, expect 2 to 3cm of snow to accumulate
near
the summit.

yeahbut

I think we'll miss it, although we will probably get another bout of frosts  Roll Eyes

  
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« Reply #13 on: August 12, 2012, 11:04:34 pm »

Here in the north we have to beware of a false spring.

Often in August the weather warms up, the daffs (not the paperwhites, they flowered back in May and June) flower and the blossom appears on the early ripening plum trees then BAM we get another southerly blast with heavy rain.

Last year that was when we got snow in some parts and a little sleet in the Auckland CBD.

The result is that any newly planted seedlings get stunted or turn up their toes and rot as does any seed sown outdoors.
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