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Weight Watchers sucks up to McCrap


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Author Topic: Weight Watchers sucks up to McCrap  (Read 597 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« on: March 04, 2010, 10:12:48 pm »


Weight Watchers does deal with McDonald's

Weight Watchers has given the thumbs up to 3 meals on the McDonald's menu for those on their diet program.

NZPA | 10:04AM - Wednesday, 03 March 2010

MEAL DEAL: Weight Watchers has done a deal with McDonald's to promote some of its meals. — Photo: Fairfax Media.
MEAL DEAL: Weight Watchers has done a deal
with McDonald's to promote some of its meals.
 — Photo: Fairfax Media.


Slimming company Weight Watchers has done a deal with the fast food chain McDonald's to endorse some items on its menu.

McDonald's branches were now offering three meals that each added up to 6.5 Weight Watchers' points.

The system allowed people on the Weight Watchers' programme between 18 and 40 points each day, which they must stay within to obtain and retain their goal weight.

Salads and water or diet soft drinks were served with the meals.

A Filet-O-Fish, Chicken McNuggets and a Sweet Chilli Seared Chicken Wrap, were the same meals McDonald's customers are used to but staff in 150 restaurants around the country had been trained to make the meals more consistently, with the same amount of sauce each time, so they fell within the points system.

Weight Watchers said the deal followed similar arrangements with restaurant chains in Britain and America.

People had a greater chance of losing weight and keeping it off when they did not deprive themselves of every indulgence, said spokesman Chris Stirk.

"This is a noble cause," the chief executive of McDonald's New Zealand, Mark Hawthorne, said yesterday.

"We serve 1.5 million meals a week in New Zealand to 4 million people and we're making every best effort to generate a change in behaviour, to create an awareness in consumers about making healthy choices."

Mr Hawthorne said the Weight Watchers menu items would be extended.

He said the points for each meal had been calculated based on the maximum amount of sauce that could be shot out from the company's ‘sauce guns’.


Weight Watchers Deal With McDonalds

But nutritionists and obesity experts say the partnership is a marketing ploy to lure people into McDonald's where they will buy more fat-laden foods.

"Make no mistake, this is about selling more burgers and fries," Boyd Swinburn, from the Australian Society for the Study of Obesity at Deakin University, said.

"Mum can go in and feel good about her Weight Watchers meal while she buys the kids burgers. Anyone who thinks otherwise is naive."

The nutritionist Rosemary Stanton agreed, saying sales of burgers and chips soared when McDonald's ushered in its Deli Choices rolls in 2004.

"It got new people through the doors, but once they were in they bought the burgers."

In 2006, McDonald's switched to a canola-sunflower blend with about 12 per cent saturated fat. It also reduced the sugar in its buns by about 40 per cent.

"We would never have partnered with them if they had not gone on a significant journey of change," the director of business for Weight Watchers Australasia, Chris Stirk, said.

The three meals include nuggets (1560 kilojoules), a Filet-O-Fish (1390kJ) and a sweet chilli seared chicken wrap (1640kJ), all served with salad.


with The Sydney Morning Herald.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/3397683/Weight-Watchers-does-deal-with-McDonalds
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Magoo
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« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2010, 08:09:35 pm »

Who wants to diet on fast food?
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2011, 03:41:22 pm »


McDonald's looks at diet Big Mac in health push



By MIRIAM STEFFENS - The Sydney Morning Herald | 5:00AM - Sunday, 06 March 2011

SUPER-SLIM SIZED? McDonald's is considering a slimmed-down version of its classic Big Mac burger to woo increasingly health-conscious diners.
SUPER-SLIM SIZED? McDonald's is considering a slimmed-down version
of its classic Big Mac burger to woo increasingly health-conscious diners.


THE HEAD of McDonald's Australia, Catriona Noble, admitted the fast food chain had not done enough to address nutrition concerns over its menu and is considering items such as a Big Mac Light to win over health-conscious families.

"When you look at our core menu, the things that people love about McDonald's, I still think that we need to find ways to evolve our core menu where you don't have to sacrifice taste for health," Ms Noble said.

"What if we had a version of the Big Mac that is, say, a Big Mac Light? It might have a low-fat sauce on it, it might have a wholemeal bun."

While it would not taste exactly the same, it could be offered as a healthier alternative to the original burger.

"There's nothing wrong with a Big Mac, it's great quality food, it's 100 per cent beef, but it's probably not something you want to eat every day."

To counter a backlash in the nation's obesity crisis, McDonald's has added healthier choices such as salads and wraps and taken steps such as reducing sugar and salt in its buns, changing its cooking oil and disclosing nutritional information.

The changes earned it the Heart Foundation tick on some meals but critics argued they mostly delivered more customers, helping the chain push up sales of its traditional fare.

Sales growth at McDonald's has slowed amid weaker retail spending.

The nutritionist Rosemary Stanton said McDonald's would have to increase the salad and reduce the size of the meat and cheese in the burger, change the sauce and replace the bun with a crustier one, meaning the burger would take longer to eat and consumers would feel sated without having to buy more, "which won't appeal to them [McDonald's]."

Ms Noble said the introduction of a Big Mac Light was probably two to three years off, "because to make those kinds of changes with the scale of our business is massive". The development of the company's Angus beef burgers took three years from first concept to sale.

A Big Mac has 493 calories and 26.9 grams of fat, almost a quarter of the average daily adult energy intake and almost half the saturated fat intake.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/4736502/McDonalds-looks-at-diet-Big-Mac-in-health-push
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ssweetpea
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« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2011, 02:06:00 pm »

Change that 100% beef patty for 100% lean beef patty put the special sauce on a diet than add vegetables.

A wholemeal bun would make it more filling and improve both the taste and texture as well.

How about a side order of steamed or dry roasted mixture of vegetables instead of fries big on fat and low on potato?

Can you imaging a one of those little bags fries come in filled with lightly roasted carrot, kumara, potato, parsnip and pumpkin sticks instead? or a little bag of steamed broccoli or cabbage? Long green beans with a dipping sauce perhaps?

I know that when I am after a quick meal on a cold evening or day I don't want an F***ing cold salad big on iceberg lettuce where the only flavour comes from a oil laiden dressing with almost as many kilojoules as a Big Mac. Angry
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