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Some reading for the “anti-warmalists” and “climate-change deniers”


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Author Topic: Some reading for the “anti-warmalists” and “climate-change deniers”  (Read 18025 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #1325 on: December 17, 2019, 11:28:23 am »


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« Reply #1326 on: December 17, 2019, 11:28:42 am »


A stupid moron reacts to SCIENTIFIC FACTS about the reality of global warming & climate change…





…he's probably the village idiot from Woodville, eh?
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Im2Sexy4MyPants
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« Reply #1327 on: December 17, 2019, 11:39:43 am »

but not caused by humans silly
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« Reply #1328 on: December 17, 2019, 04:39:49 pm »


About 100 times as many scientists say humans are contributing towards global warming as scientists who say they aren't.

And most of the scientists who say humans aren't contributing towards global warming haven't had their stuff peer-reviewed.

Which tends to tell us that those denialist scientists are “fake scientists” just like Donald J. Trump is America's “fake president”.

The world is full of stupid, gullible people who swallow everything spouted by “fake scientists” and America's “fake president”.
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« Reply #1329 on: December 18, 2019, 12:44:35 pm »



Peer Reviewed Studies and/or Major Scientific Journal Articles Disputing Man-made Causes for Global Warming
Links Below


We don't dispute that there may have been some global warming since the turn of the century. Even though it is quite likely some of the measurements were distorted and there is still some dispute over whether we've really warmed at all (see ”If The Globe Is Warming Why Are The Oceans Not?” and ”The Earth may have actually COOLED in the past 60 years!”. But we'll assume for a minute that the earth really has warmed 0.7°C in the past 100 years. That is certainly within the realm of natural variability. Below are links to peer reviewed and/or major scientific journal articles backing the case for a natural cause for global warming. Man has always blamed other men (and women) for bad weather. Medieval peasants burned people at the stake believing that they were witches causing the bad weather. Lets not be so ignorant this time around. The earth goes through warming and cooling cycles, this is just one of them (one of the milder one's I might add).

So why haven't you heard of these studies? Perhaps the following could answer that question:
“I would like to say we're at a point where global warming is impossible to deny. Let's just say that global warming deniers are now on a par with Holocaust deniers.” - Ellen Goodman, national syndicated columnist
“David Suzuki has called for political leaders to be thrown in jail for ignoring the science behind climate change. At a Montreal conference last Thursday, the prominent scientist, broadcaster and Order of Canada recipient exhorted a packed house of 600 to hold politicians legally accountable for what he called an intergenerational crime.” - Jail politicians who ignore climate science: Suzuki
The IPCC's chairman, Dr. Rajendra Pachauri, recently compared eco-skeptic Bjorn Lomborg to Hitler. "What is the difference between Lomborg's view of humanity and Hitler's?" Pachauri told a Danish newspaper. "If you were to accept Lomborg's way of thinking, then maybe what Hitler did was the right thing. - National Review
Solar Cycles causing global warming:

A 150,000-year climatic record from Antarctic ice
Abstract: “During much of the Quaternary, the Earth's climate has undergone drastic changes most notably successive glacial and interglacial episodes. The past 150 kyr includes such a climatic cycle: the last interglacial, the last glacial and the present holocene interglacial. A new climatic-time series for this period has been obtained using delta18 O data from an Antarctic ice core.”

A Variable Sun Paces Millennial Climate
Abstract: “Paleoceanographers report that the climate of the northern North Atlantic has warmed and cooled nine times in the past 12,000 years in step with the waxing and waning of the sun. Some researchers say the data make solar variability the leading hypothesis to explain the roughly 1500-year oscillation of climate seen since the last ice age, and that the sun could also add to the greenhouse warming of the next few centuries”

Possible solar origin of the 1,470-year glacial climate cycle demonstrated in a coupled model
Abstract: “We conclude that the glacial 1,470-year climate cycles could have been triggered by solar forcing despite the absence of a 1,470-year solar cycle.”

Widespread evidence of 1500 yr climate variability in North America during the past 14 000 yr
Abstract: “Times of major transitions identified in pollen records occurred at 600, 1650, 2850, 4030, 6700, 8100, 10 190, 12 900, and 13 800 cal yr B.P., consistent with ice and marine records. We suggest that North Atlantic millennial-scale climate variability is associated with rearrangements of the atmospheric circulation with far-reaching influences on the climate.”

Influence of Solar Activity on State of Wheat Market in Medieval England
Abstract: “The database of Prof. Rogers (1887), which includes wheat prices in England in the Middle Ages, was used to search for a possible influence of solar activity on the wheat market. We present a conceptual model of possible modes for sensitivity of wheat prices to weather conditions, caused by solar cycle variations, and compare expected price fluctuations with price variations recorded in medieval England.

We compared statistical properties of the intervals between wheat price bursts during years 1249-1703 with statistical properties of the intervals between minimums of solar cycles during years 1700-2000. We show that statistical properties of these two samples are similar, both for characteristics of the distributions and for histograms of the distributions. We analyze a direct link between wheat prices and solar activity in the 17th Century, for which wheat prices and solar activity data (derived from 10Be isotope) are available. We show that for all 10 time moments of the solar activity minimums the observed prices were higher than prices for the correspondent time moments of maximal solar activity (100% sign correlation, on a significance level < 0.2%). We consider these results as a direct evidence of the causal connection between wheat prices bursts and solar activity.”


Climate Models

Progress in Physical Geography 27,3 (2003) pp. 448–455
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
Abstract: Climate models are now being used extensively to diagnose the causative, especially anthropogenic, factors of observed climatic changes of the past few decades (Palmer, 2001; Stott ., 2001; Thorne ., 2002). These models are also used to make long-term climate projections and climate risk assessments based on future anthropogenic forcing scenarios (Saunders, 1999; Palmer, 2001; Houghton ., 2001; Pittock, 2002; Schneider, et al S.H., 2002). Many such exercises help to shape public policy recommendations concerning future energy use and various ‘climate protection’ measures in order to prevent ‘dangerous climate impacts’ (e.g., Schneider, S.H., 2002; O’Neill and Oppenheimer, 2002). But meaningful and credible scientific confidence, resting either on the traditional deterministic method of quantification or the probabilistic mode of measuring change (as favoured by, for example, Washington, 2000; Räisänen and Palmer, 2001; Schneider, S.H., 2002) cannot yet be made to such computer experiments because climate models do not yield sufficiently reliable, quantitative results in reproducing well-documented climatic changes around the world. (This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research grant AF 49620-02-1-0194 and by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration grant NAG5-7635.)

Effects of bias in solar radiative transfer codes on global climate model simulations
Albert Arking - Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Abstract: Codes commonly used in climate and weather prediction models for calculating the transfer of solar radiation in the atmosphere show systematic differences amongst each other, and even the best of codes show systematic differences with respect to observations. A 1-dimensional radiative-convective equilibrium model is used to show the effects of such bias on the global energy balance and on the global response to a doubling of CO2. We find the main impact is in the energy exchange terms between the surface and atmosphere and in the convective transport in the lower troposphere, where it exceeds 10 W m-2. The impact on model response to doubling of CO2, on the other hand, is quite small and in most cases negligible.

Anthropogenic:

Implications of the Secondary Role of Carbon Dioxide and Methane Forcing in Climate Change: Past, Present, and Future
Abstract: “A review of the recent refereed literature fails to confirm quantitatively that carbon dioxide (CO2) radiative forcing was the prime mover in the changes in temperature, ice-sheet volume, and related climatic variables in the glacial and interglacial episodes of the past 650,000 years, even under the “fast-response” framework where the convenient if artificial distinction between forcing and feedback is assumed. Atmospheric CO2 variations generally follow changes in temperature and other climatic variables rather than preceding them.”

On global forces of nature driving the Earth’s climate. Are humans involved?
Abstract: “The authors identify and describe the following global forces of nature driving the Earth’s climate: (1) solar radiation as a dominant external energy supplier to the Earth, (2) outgassing as a major supplier of gases to the World Ocean and the atmosphere, and, possibly, (3) microbial activities generating and consuming atmospheric gases at the interface of lithosphere and atmosphere. The writers provide quantitative estimates of the scope and extent of their corresponding effects on the Earth’s climate. Quantitative comparison of the scope and extent of the forces of nature and anthropogenic influences on the Earth’s climate is especially important at the time of broad-scale public debates on current global warming. The writers show that the human-induced climatic changes are negligible.”

The Continuing Search for an Anthropogenic Climate Change Signal: Limitations of Correlation-Based Approaches
Abstract: “Several recent studies claim to have found evidence of large-scale climate changes that were attributed to human influences. These assertions are based on increases in correlation over time between general circulation model prognostications and observations as derived from a centred pattern correlation statistic. We argue that the results of such studies are inappropriate because of limitations and biases in these statistics which leads us to conclude that the results of many studies employing these statistics may be erroneous and, in fact, show little evidence of a human fingerprint in the observed records.”

Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects Within The Frame Of Physics
Abstract: The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that authors trace back to the traditional works of Fourier 1824, Tyndall 1861, and Arrhenius 1896, and which is still supported in global climatology, essentially describes a fictitious mechanism, in which a planetary atmosphere acts as a heat pump driven by an environment that is radiatively interacting with but radiatively equilibrated to the atmospheric system. According to the second law of thermodynamics such a planetary machine can never exist. Nevertheless, in almost all texts of global climatology and in a widespread secondary literature it is taken for granted that such mechanism is real and stands on a firm scientific foundation. In this paper the popular conjecture is analyzed and the underlying physical principles are clarified. By showing that (a) there are no common physical laws between the warming phenomenon in glass houses and the fictitious atmospheric greenhouse effects, (b) there are no calculations to determine an average surface temperature of a planet, (c) the frequently mentioned difference of 33 degrees Celsius is a meaningless number calculated wrongly, (d) the formulas of cavity radiation are used inappropriately, (e) the assumption of a radiative balance is unphysical, (f) thermal conductivity and friction must not be set to zero, the atmospheric greenhouse conjecture is falsified.
Quote:
Global climatologists claim that the Earth's natural greenhouse effect keeps the Earth 33C warmer than it would be without the trace gases in the atmosphere. 80 percent of this warming is attributed to water vapor and 20 percent to the 0.03 volume percent CO2. If such an extreme effect existed, it would show up even in a laboratory experiment involving concentrated CO2 as a thermal conductivity anomaly. It would be manifest itself as a new kind of `superinsulation' violating the conventional heat conduction equation. However, for CO2 such anomalous heat transport properties never have been observed.

http://www.globalwarminghoax.com/page.php?8

« Last Edit: December 18, 2019, 01:06:46 pm by Im2Sexy4MyPants » Report Spam   Logged

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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #1330 on: December 28, 2019, 02:36:13 pm »


from The Washington Post…

2°C: Beyond the limit

On land, Australia's rising heat is ‘apocalyptic’. In the ocean, it's worse. Tasmanian Aboriginals
faced genocide, and now extreme climate change is threatening what's left of their culture.


By DARRYL FEARS | Friday, December 27, 2019

Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.
Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.

BRUNY ISLAND, TASMANIA — Even before the ocean caught fever and reached temperatures no one had ever seen, Australia's ancient giant kelp was cooked.

Rodney Dillon noticed the day he squeezed into a wet suit several years ago and dove into Trumpeter Bay to catch his favorite food, a big sea snail called abalone. As he swam amid the towering kelp forest, he saw that “it had gone slimy.” He scrambled out of the water and called a scientist at the University of Tasmania in nearby Hobart. “I said, ‘Mate, all our kelp's dying, and you need to come down here and have a look’.”

“But no one could do anything about it.”

Climate change had arrived at this island near the bottom of the world, and the giant kelp that flourished in its cold waters was among the first things to go.

Over recent decades, the rate of ocean warming off Tasmania, Australia's southern-most state and a gateway to the South Pole, has climbed to nearly four times the global average, oceanographers say.

More than 95 percent of the giant kelp — a living high-rise of 30-foot stalks that served as a habitat for some of the rarest marine creatures in the world — died.


Strands of bull kelp at Shelly Point in Tasmania. The Tasman Sea is warming, and once plentiful giant kelp forests have rapidly declined. Indigenous artists rely on a kelp habitat for traditional jewelry and basket making. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.
Strands of bull kelp at Shelly Point in Tasmania. The Tasman Sea is warming, and once plentiful giant kelp forests have rapidly declined.
Indigenous artists rely on a kelp habitat for traditional jewelry and basket making. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.


Giant kelp had stretched the length of Tasmania's rocky east coast throughout recorded history. Now it clings to a tiny patch near Southport, the island's southern tip, where the water is colder.

“This is a hot spot,” said Neil Holbrook, a professor who researches ocean warming at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania. “And it's one of the big ones.”

Climate scientists say it's essential to hold global temperatures to 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial times to avoid irreversible damage from warming.

The Tasman Sea is already well above that threshold.

The Washington Post's examination of accelerated warming in the waters off Tasmania marks this year's final installment of its global series “2C: Beyond the Limit”, which identified hot spots around the world. The investigation has shown that disastrous impacts from climate change aren't a problem lurking in the distant future: They are here now.

Nearly a tenth of the planet has already warmed 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) since the late 19th century, and the abrupt rise in temperature related to human activity has transformed parts of the Earth in radical ways.

In the United States, New Jersey is among the fastest-warming states, and its average winter has grown so warm that lakes no longer freeze as they once did. Canadian islands are crumbling into the sea because a blanket of sea ice no longer protects them from crashing waves. Fisheries from Japan to Angola to Uruguay are collapsing as their waters warm. Arctic tundra is melting away in Siberia and Alaska, exposing the remains of woolly mammoths buried for thousands of years and flooding the gravesites of indigenous people who have lived in an icy world for centuries.

Australia is a poster child for climate change. Wildfires are currently raging on the outskirts of its most iconic city and drought is choking a significant portion of the country.

Nearly 100 fires are burning in New South Wales, nearly half of them out of control. Residents of the state, where Sydney sits, wear breathing masks to tolerate the heavy smoke, which has drifted more than 500 miles south to the outskirts of Melbourne.

This is happening even though average atmospheric temperatures in Australia have yet to increase by 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit).

The ocean is another story.

A stretch of the Tasman Sea right along Tasmania's eastern coast has already warmed by just a fraction below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), according to ocean temperature data from the Hadley Center, the U.K. government research agency on climate change.

As the marine heat rises and the kelp simmers into goo, Dillon and other descendants of Tasmania's first people are losing a connection to the ocean that has defined their culture for millennia.

Aboriginals walked to present-day Tasmania 40,000 years ago during the Stone Age, long before rising sea levels turned the former peninsula into an island.

Cut off from Aboriginals on the mainland, about a dozen nomadic tribes were the first humans to live so close to the end of the Earth, fishing amid the giant kelp for abalone, hunting kangaroo and mutton birds, turning bull kelp into tools, and fashioning pearlescent snail shells into jewelry for hundreds of generations.

But that was before British colonizers took their land and deployed an apartheid-like system to wipe them out.

Now, as descendants try to finally get full recognition as the first people and original owners of Tasmania, climate change is threatening to remove the marine life that makes so much of their culture special.

Two of the most severe marine heat waves ever recorded struck back to back in recent years.

In the first, starting in 2015, ocean temperatures peaked at nearly 3 degrees Celsius (5.4 degrees Fahrenheit) above normal in the waters between Tasmania and New Zealand. A blob of heat that reached 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) was more than seven times the size of Tasmania, an island the size of Ireland.

The region's past heat waves normally lasted as long as two months. The 2015-2016 heat wave persisted for eight months. Alistair Hobday, who studied the event, compared it to the deadly 2003 European heat wave that led to the deaths of thousands of people.

“Except in this case, it's the animals that are suffering,” said Hobday, a senior research scientist at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, a government agency.

South of the equator, Australia's summer stretches from December to February — and soaring temperatures turned the mainland deadly this year. An estimated 23,000 giant fruit bats — about a third of that species's population in Australia — dropped dead from heat stress in Queensland and New South Wales in April.

The bats, called flying foxes, cannot survive temperatures above 42 degrees Celsius (107.6 degrees Fahrenheit). Another 10,000 black flying foxes, a different species, also died. Bodies plopped into meadows, backyard gardens and swimming pools.

A month later, more than 100 ringtail possums fell dead in Victoria when temperatures topped 35 degrees Celsius (95 degrees Fahrenheit) for four consecutive days.

The warming waters off Tasmania are not just killing the giant kelp, but transforming life for marine animals.

Warm-water species are swimming south to places where they could not have survived a few years ago. Kingfish, sea urchins, zooplankton and even microbes from the warmer north near the mainland now occupy waters closer to the South Pole.

“There's about 60 or 70 species of fish that now have established populations in Tasmania that used not to be here,” said Craig Johnson, who leads the ecology and biodiversity center at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania. “You might see them occasionally as sort of vagrants, but they certainly did not have established populations.”

But the region's indigenous cold-water species have no place to go. Animals such as the prehistoric-looking red handfish are accustomed to the frigid water closer to the shore. They cannot live in the deep-water abyss between the bottom tip of Tasmania and Antarctica.

“It's a geographic climate trap,” Johnson said. Marine animals unique to Australia — the wallabies and koalas of the deep — could easily vanish. “So there's going to be a whole bunch of species here that we expect will just go extinct.

“You know, it's not a happy story.”


Genocide

Every time he dives for abalone, Rodney Dillon plays his part in what is arguably Tasmania's saddest story of all.

At 63, he's getting too old for the occasional plunge. Before a dive on a windy day in September, two people had to wrestle his wet suit over a thick athlete's body softened by time.

Dillon persists because diving puts a favorite food on the family table, and, more important, it carries on a dying Aboriginal custom nearly ended by the British crown and the Australian governors it appointed.


Rodney Dillon, 63, on indigenous land on Bruny Island. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.
Rodney Dillon, 63, on indigenous land on Bruny Island. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.

Dillon sheds his wet suit after hunting for abalone. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.
Dillon sheds his wet suit after hunting for abalone. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.

Dillon dives for abalone off Bruny Island. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.
Dillon dives for abalone off Bruny Island. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.

Under the water, amid swaying emerald stalks of kelp, Dillon thought that he glimpsed the world his ancestors saw.

“I sometimes got lost in the kelp. I would lose concentration from catching food and go to look, sort of sky-gaze, at the beauty of the light coming through,” he said.

The light dimmed for the natives known as the Palawa in the late 1700s, when the British established a penal colony for convicted outcasts at Sydney harbor and looked south for more land to conquer.

Between 4,000 and 7,000 Aboriginals were spread out over Tasmania, then known as Van Diemen's Land, when the British military arrived with a group of convicts in 1803. Within 50 years, all but 200 of the Aboriginals were dead.

In a history that isn't widely known in Australia, let alone the wider world, Aboriginal land was seized without a treaty, said Lyndall Ryan, author of The Aboriginal Tasmanians, a history of how the native people met their demise.

When the natives tried to defend the kangaroo hunting and abalone fishing grounds that sustained them, they were routed.

“Genocide was government policy for more than 200 years,” Ryan wrote in an email to The Washington Post.

At the time, British archaeologists adhered to junk science that said Aboriginals were the last link between humans and apes.


William Lanne, the last full-blooded Tasmanian Aboriginal man, died in 1869. — Photograph: Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group/Getty Images.
William Lanne, the last full-blooded Tasmanian Aboriginal man, died in 1869.
 — Photograph: Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group/Getty Images.


When William Lanne, the last full-blooded Tasmanian Aboriginal man, died in 1869, a researcher cut off his head, stole it to England for study, then displayed it in a museum. After Truganini, the last full-blooded woman, died seven years later, her skeleton was placed on display at a museum in Tasmania against her wishes. “Don't let them cut me,” she said on her deathbed.

With their deaths, Tasmania declared that Aboriginal Tasmanians were extinct.

Around 1910, after Australia became a nation under the British, officials launched a program that removed mixed-race Aboriginal children from their mothers.

In his book, Australia's Coloured Minority: Its Place in the Community, author A.O. Neville partly explained the young country's motive. Assimilation of black Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people could be assured only by “breeding out the colour” of their skin.

As a “protector of Aborigines” in Western Australia for 21 years ending in 1936, Neville had a guiding influence on the child removal program.

Over six decades, welfare workers across Australia took children, some of them at birth, from any parent the state deemed unfit, up to an estimated 50,000. Brown children were placed in white institutions, church social programs and homes to promote inter-mixing.

“Generally by the fifth and invariably by the sixth generation, all native characteristics of the Australian Aborigine are eradicated,” Cecil Evelyn Cook, the “chief protector of Aborigines” in North Australia, said in 1933. “The problem of our half-castes will be quickly eliminated by the complete disappearance of the black race, and the swift submergence of their progeny in the white.”

Ancient Aboriginals likely would not recognize the 20,000 or so Tasmanians who currently identify as their descendants. The large majority are white.

Dillon said dark-complexioned Aboriginals on the mainland doubt his heritage because of his appearance.

Like most Aboriginals in Tasmania, his skin is pale. His eyes are blue-green, the color of the sea. White locks atop his head swirl like ice cream.

“People make nasty comments all the time,” he said.

Dillon's great-great-grandmother, Fanny Cochrane Smith, is known as the last speaker of the indigenous Aboriginal language. He is considered an elder among his people in Tasmania, and he is leading them in speaking out against discrimination.

The Tasmanian Aboriginal Center, formed in the 1970s, is demanding full recognition by the government. Nearly 200 years after the British arrived, Tasmania became the first Australian state to apologize for engaging in child removal and has also given back a small portion of land.


An exhibit of indigenous shell necklaces at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery in Hobart. The practice of stringing shells is an important part of Aboriginal women's culture in Tasmania. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.
An exhibit of indigenous shell necklaces at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery in Hobart. The practice of stringing shells is an important
part of Aboriginal women's culture in Tasmania. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.


In 2008, then-prime minister Kevin Rudd apologized to the “Stolen Generations”. That year, the state of Tasmania agreed to dole out 5 million Australian dollars to victims and their kin.

At her house in Launceston, Nanette Shaw, a descendant, clings to the traditions of her forebears by fashioning bull kelp into baskets.

Shaw, 66, said she turned to basketmaking to ease the trauma she experienced while growing up as an Aboriginal.

“It centers me,” Shaw said. She suffers from depression and alcoholism, and the craft is her distraction. “I have not been drinking for nearly 10 years. Sometimes the depression takes over, and rather than walk down and get a bottle, I'll do this.”

But if impacts from climate change worsen, the traits can't be handed down to children, she said.

The shells are disappearing amid a mix of warming water and pollution. As recently as two decades ago, it was hard to walk on the beach without stepping on them, she said. “Now you're walking on pure sand,” Shaw said.


Patsy Cameron, 72, collects bull kelp at Shelly Point. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.
Patsy Cameron, 72, collects bull kelp at Shelly Point. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.

Nanette Shaw, an Aboriginal elder, oils a kelp basket she created using traditional techniques at her home. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.
Nanette Shaw, an Aboriginal elder, oils a kelp basket she created using traditional techniques at her home.
 — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.


Marina shell necklaces made by Patsy Cameron, 72, collected in a traditional kelp basket. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.
Marina shell necklaces made by Patsy Cameron, 72, collected in a traditional kelp basket. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.

Ninety miles away on Scamander Beach, her friend Patsy Cameron found bull kelp to gift to Shaw and several handfuls of jewelry-quality shells.

But it now takes nearly a day to collect them, as opposed to two hours years ago.

“If climate change destroys the seaweed, our shell supply will disappear along with the kelp forest,” said Cameron, 72.

“It's getting hotter and that heat, it's affecting not only the giant kelp, but the color of the abalone is changing,” Dillon said.

“We just take too much out of the Earth and we don't put it back,” Dillon said. “Australia is one of the worst if you know about coal. How much coal do we need to dig up? And we're too stupid to see what this is causing … because we make money out of it.”

And now, Australia is caught in a record-breaking heat wave.


The apocalypse

The heartbreaking video went viral late in November: A koala bear slowly walked through wildfire.

The marsupial, euthanized days later because its burns didn't heal, was just one victim of the many wildfires that started burning in the Australian spring and are still going at the start of summer.

At least nine people have died and 700 homes have been destroyed. One woman in New South Wales took a few of her house's charred remains to Australia's Parliament in early December with a message for Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

“Morrison, your climate crisis destroyed my home,” Melinda Plesman wrote in bold red letters.

Morrison is an ardent supporter of coal excavation in a country that produced 44 million tons in 2017. Australia is the world's leading exporter of coal, mostly to Asia, and the fourth-largest producer.

A few weeks before the koala — nicknamed Lewis — was euthanized, the newly re-elected prime minister took his advocacy for coal to a new level. He pledged to outlaw environmental demonstrations, calling the protests a “new breed of radical activism” that is “apocalyptic in tone.”

One month later, a Sydney Morning Herald headline described conditions in Australia's most iconic city as “apocalyptic,” as residents choked in a smoky haze from bush fires. A coalition of doctors and climate researchers declared it a public health emergency.

The bush fires have arrived amid record heat and particularly dry conditions that experts say are being made more common thanks to climate change.

The country experienced a five-day heat wave in the state of Victoria that shattered records. The Friday before Christmas was the hottest December day on record, measuring 47.9 degrees Celsius (118.2 degrees Fahrenheit) at the Horsham weather station.

Rescuers searching for human survivors in the scorched remains of forests have discovered koalas, a creature found only in Australia, burned to death in eucalyptus trees where they sought shelter. At the Port Macquarie Koala Hospital, where Lewis was put down, it was called “a national tragedy.”


Two bush fires approach a house on the outskirts of Bargo, southwest of Sydney, on December 21. A “catastrophic” fire danger warning was issued for the greater Sydney region. — Photograph: David Gray/Getty Images.
Two bush fires approach a house on the outskirts of Bargo, southwest of Sydney, on December 21. A “catastrophic” fire danger warning
was issued for the greater Sydney region. — Photograph: David Gray/Getty Images.


The tragedy playing out underwater is much worse, but invisible to most.

In 1950, giant kelp stretched over 9 million square meters in a thick band along Tasmania's coast, said Cayne Layton, a research fellow at the marine and antarctic institute. Today, it covers fewer than 500,000 meters in little spots on the coastline.

Giant kelp is lovely but fragile. It needs cool, clean, nutrient-rich water to survive, and it's losing all three.

It is a serious loss. Divers coveted swimming amid plants that grew like the mythical beanstalk to glimpse some of the world's rarest creatures. Squid fed there, red handfish hid there, spiny pipehorse lounged about, and rock lobster were abundant.

The most recent study — nearly 10 years old — estimated that 95 percent of giant kelp had been lost to warming and pollution, Layton said, and is probably much worse now.

The less spectacular common kelp, which grows on the coastal slope leading to deep water, is overtaking the spaces where giant kelp grew, Layton said. Along with long, straplike bull kelp that clings to giant rocks near the shore, common kelp appears to be more tolerant to warming temperatures.

But even these species aren't safe. The warming water has introduced a new plague: long-spine sea urchins, an animal that greedily devours kelp.

A single urchin was found in the cold waters off Tasmania by divers conducting a survey in 1978. Now, there are more than 18 million, according to the most recent survey by the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies.

Sea urchins prefer warm water. They swarm rocky reefs where kelp grows, leaving oceans barren and devoid of life.

Kelp forests' “importance is equal to forests on land,” said Layton, “so if you can imagine what the world would be like without trees, that's what a world without kelp forests would be like.”

Scientists say there is only one explanation for why sea urchins migrated so far from their warmer natural habitat near Sydney to the cold waters around Tasmania: the East Australian Current.

The current, made famous in the film “Finding Nemo”, is fed by a vast stream of tropical water that reaches Australia's coast after traveling all the way from South America. The water then flows south down the east coast of Australia and then swings back east just north of Sydney.

At that point, the warm-water current splits, with some water flowing southward toward the Tasman Sea in the form of swirls of tropical water called eddies — and this secondary branch has intensified.

This extension of the East Australian Current is spewing thousands of eddies deeper southward toward Tasmania, carrying the larvae of warm-water species to places they had never been.

According to research compiled by Professor Gretta Pecl at the University of Tasmania, toxic algae blooms lurk where giant kelp once flourished. Abalone have gone from healthy to “stressed.” The brightly colored Maori octopus is being replaced by the gloomy octopus, more common to the waters near Sydney. And a yellow-bellied sea snake has migrated to the habitat.

The warmer water disintegrated most of the giant kelp over two decades and contributed to the massive, record-breaking marine heat wave of 2015.

“You can't say that this event was due to climate change,” said Holbrook, the ocean scientist. “But what you can say is that the intensity was much more likely due to climate change.

“You liken it to smoking,” he said. “If you smoke cigarettes, you increase the likelihood of getting lung cancer.”


Saving the farms

The marine heat wave left something behind when it finally ended: disease.

A sickening smell at the shallow Pipe Clay Lagoon is how Pacific oyster mortality syndrome introduced itself to Steve Calvert.

The syndrome, known as POMS, turned his small oyster farm in the lagoon into a mass grave, and the smell of the dead stretched for miles. Calvert lost 75 percent of his oysters in 2016. Other farmers in the region's five major farming areas lost nearly 100 percent of their stock.

Oyster mortality disease had stricken France, China, the United States, New Zealand and even Sydney, but never pristine Tasmania.

“We've got a reputation in Tasmania of having pure water and some of the freshest air in the world,” said Calvert's son, Liam, a manager at the farm. “So that's part of why there's an attraction to the Tasmanian oyster, because people think pristine-forest freshness and all that kind of thing.”


Oystermen work in Clifton Beach, Tasmania. Scientists are working with oyster farmers to reduce the impact of disease linked to warming waters. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.
Oystermen work in Clifton Beach, Tasmania. Scientists are working with oyster farmers to reduce the impact of disease linked to warming waters.
 — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.


Simon Neil works an oyster bed at Clifton Pacific Oysters in Clifton Beach. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.
Simon Neil works an oyster bed at Clifton Pacific Oysters in Clifton Beach. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.

Oysters are sorted by size and quality at Clifton Pacific Oysters. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.
Oysters are sorted by size and quality at Clifton Pacific Oysters. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.

Climate change had raised the region's water temperatures to an ideal level for the contagion. POMS joined warm-water toxic algal blooms as a new threat to the region's aquaculture and fisheries.

In an encouraging sign that Tasmania's aquaculture can adapt, scientists had prepared the Calverts and other farmers for the possibility that POMS would strike.

“We've been working with industry for quite a long time, and we’ve always had the philosophy that scientists need to know how to farm and farmers need to know how to do science,” said Sarah Ugalde, a research fellow at the University of Tasmania.

Ugalde and her team persuaded the farmers to buy oysters from other areas that survived a disease outbreak. They used that stock to cultivate a disease-tolerant oyster. The Calverts lost about a million oysters but rebuilt the stock with spat — oyster babies — recommended by scientists.

Tasmania's $25-million-per-year oyster farming industry is thriving. The product price, driven up to $1 per oyster from demand during the disaster, stayed the same, helping the Calverts to increase revenue.

“It's good performance work, and there's a good return for the hard work,” Steve Calvert said. “We still love this ocean.”

It's a matter of adapting to a warming world.

“Generally, there's been a lot of work that’s gone into trying to estimate how fisheries production … will change with climate change,” Johnson, the marine institute researcher, said.

“For southeastern Tasmania, which accounts for most of Australia's fishery production, the projections are that the fishery production will decline,” Johnson said in his office by the water.

“Like I said, it's not a particularly happy story.”


Waves crash near the shore in Cloudy Bay near Bruny Island. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.
Waves crash near the shore in Cloudy Bay near Bruny Island. — Photograph: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post.

__________________________________________________________________________

Juliet Eilperin contributed to this story.

Darryl Fears joined The Washington Post as a general assignment reporter on the Metro staff in 1999. He went on the cover race, demographics and immigration on the national desk, and, for a brief time, urban affairs in the District of Columbia. Before joining The Washington Post, he was a staff writer for the Detroit Free Press, the Atlanta Journal and Constitution and the Los Angeles Times. Darryl has profesional affiliations with the National Association of Black Journalists and the Society of Environmental Journalists. He speaks conversational Spanish (fading for lack of practice).

Bonnie Jo Mount is a staff photojournalist for The Washington Post. She joined The Post as the Picture Editor in 2008. Bonnie Jo has lived in a variety of places, working as an editor, educator and photojournalist. Previous positions include: assistant professor at Hampton University (VA); deputy managing editor for visuals and interactive media at The News & Observer (North Carolina); director of photography at The Gazette (Colorado Springs, Cororado); photography editor at The Jackson Hole Guide (Wyoming); and photojournalist on the staffs of The Burlington Free Press (Vermont), The Knoxville News-Sentinel and The Tampa Tribune. Mount earned a B.A. in Fine Arts from the University of South Florida and studied in the MFA program at the Visual Studies Workshop. In 2002 she spent an academic year at Stanford University as a John S. Knight Fellow.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/world/climate-environment/climate-change-tasmania
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« Reply #1331 on: December 28, 2019, 02:37:37 pm »


Yep … global warming/climate change combined with Australian racism.

What a mix, eh?

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« Reply #1332 on: December 28, 2019, 06:27:15 pm »


from The Washington Post…

Australia braces for yet another ‘extreme’ heat wave
that will escalate bush fire risks


Australia is bracing for more bush fire risks as another “extreme” heat wave hits.

By ANDREW FREEDMAN | 1:28PM EST — Friday, December 27, 2019

Bush fires burn a property in Balmoral, southwest of Sydney, on December 19. — Photograph: Peter Parks/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Bush fires burn a property in Balmoral, southwest of Sydney, on December 19. — Photograph: Peter Parks/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.

JUST A WEEK after enduring one of its hottest December heat waves on record, much of Australia is bracing for another round of punishing, dry heat and bush fire dangers through the weekend and into next week.

The new heat wave is forecast to be “extreme,” the most severe designation on the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's forecast scale. Such heat waves pose a health “risk for anyone who does not take precautions to keep cool, even those who are healthy,” the BOM states on its website.

The hottest areas will be in inland South Australia on Friday and Saturday, while southeastern Australia, which has been severely affected by deadly bush fires that have burned an area nearly twice the size of Connecticut, is forecast to heat up by Sunday and into Monday.

In Sydney, the high temperature is forecast to be close to 95 degrees Fahrenheit (35 Celsius) on Sunday, although inland regions closer to the fire's front lines could soar into the 100s.

The Rural Fire Service in New South Wales is predicting “very high” fire danger over the weekend, with “deteriorating weather conditions” early next week as hot, dry weather takes hold.

“Extreme intensity” heat wave conditions are probable for northern parts of Western Australia, the southeast portion of New South Wales, and far eastern Victoria during the three-day period starting Saturday, the BOM forecasts. For example, Canberra, the nation's capital, is forecast to reach 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38 Celsius) over the weekend.

The typical high temperature in Canberra during the month of December is 81.5 degrees (27.5 Celsius).

The heat is predicted to extend into the first week of the new year, which begins what is typically the country's hottest month. However, it may be difficult for Australia to eclipse the records set in December, with numerous all-time heat records falling in individual locations, and the country setting records for its hottest day ever measured.

The country is in the grips of a serious drought, which is exacerbating the hot conditions as more of the sun's energy goes into heating the air rather than also evaporating water from vegetation. The extremely dry conditions have allowed tree types that typically do not burn to go up in flames as bush fires have raged for months along the eastern coast of Australia.

One fire, known as the Gospers Mountain blaze, measures more than 1 million acres in size. The result of several fires combined, it is referred to as a “mega fire” and has been burning on the outskirts of Sydney, sending a plume of hazardous smoke into the country’s most iconic city week after week.




The heat and fires have become a political flash point in Australia, where the Liberal-National coalition government of Scott Morrison has come under fire for its strident support of coal production and refusal to re-evaluate climate policies in the wake of the bush fires.

Australia is a leading coal exporter, and burning coal to generate electricity is a major source of greenhouse gases that cause global warming.


Telltale climate fingerprints

Human-caused global climate change is making heat waves such as this one more likely to occur, more severe and longer-lasting. This year, natural climate variability is combining with climate change to strongly favor dry and hot weather in Australia, particularly in southeastern regions.

An early analysis of the previous December heat event shows that climate change may have made the Australian national heat record at least 20 percent more likely to occur now than in a climate that had not been influenced by human emissions of greenhouse gases. Ongoing research into the event may conclude that it could not have occurred without human-caused global warming, as previous analyses of other extreme heat events have found.

According to a new BOM report on the 2019 bush fires, spring brought the highest fire-weather danger on record in Australia, as measured by the Forest Fire Danger Index, with “record high values observed in areas of all States and Territories.”

Long-term climate trends in Australia show clear warming and an increase in extreme heat events. Last summer, for example, was the country's hottest on record, and the BOM found that climate change exacerbated extreme heat events as well as droughts during the year.

Australia has warmed by just over 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit (1 degree Celsius) since 1910, with most of the warming occurring since 1950. The BOM has found an uptick in the frequency of extreme heat events and severity of drought conditions during this period.

One of the most robust conclusions of climate science research is the link between general warming and increased occurrences and severity of extreme heat events.


__________________________________________________________________________

Andrew Freedman is an editor for the Capital Weather Gang at The Washington Post. He has long covered science research and policy, with a focus on climate change, extreme weather and the environment. He was among the first reporters to popularize the term “polar vortex” during the infamous East Coast winter of 2013 to 2014. He joined The Washington Post in 2019, having worked as an editor and reporter for Axios, Mashable, Climate Central and other publications. Andrew holds a BA in political science from Tufts University; a MA in climate and society from Columbia University; and a MA from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy.

__________________________________________________________________________

Stories related to this topic by Andrew Freedman:

 • Australia sizzles through record heat wave as Sydney faces ‘catastrophic’ fire danger (December 20, 2019).

 • Australia has its hottest day for a second straight day as areas face ‘catastrophic’ fire conditions (December 19, 2019).

 • Australia has its hottest day on record as Sydney residents brace for heat, fires and smoke (December 18, 2019).

 • Australia braces for highest temperatures in recorded history amid blistering heat wave (December 17, 2019).

 • Raging bush fires torch 5.3 million acres in New South Wales, Australia, turning beaches black with ash (December 10, 2019).


https://www.washingtonpost.com/weather/2019/12/27/australia-braces-yet-another-extreme-heat-wave-that-will-escalate-bush-fire-risks
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« Reply #1333 on: December 28, 2019, 07:22:59 pm »


Quote
An early analysis of the previous December heat event shows that climate change may have made the Australian national heat record at least 20 percent more likely to occur now than in a climate that had not been influenced by human emissions of greenhouse gases. Ongoing research into the event may conclude that it could not have occurred without human-caused global warming



The town of Cloncurry in northwest Queensland holds the record for the highest temperature in the shade recorded in Australia, at 53.1 °C (127.5 °F) on 16 January 1889.
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« Reply #1334 on: December 28, 2019, 07:37:35 pm »


The idiot from Woodville reacts to reality...





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« Reply #1335 on: December 30, 2019, 09:11:56 pm »



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« Reply #1336 on: January 03, 2020, 05:23:02 pm »


The “NEW NORMAL” is now here…



from The New York Times…

Apocalypse Becomes the New Normal

We're already in the early stages of climate crisis.

By PAUL KRUGMAN | 6:45PM EST — Thursday, January 02, 2020

Australia is experiencing a catastrophic fire season. — Photograph: Matthew Abbott/for The New York Times.
Australia is experiencing a catastrophic fire season. — Photograph: Matthew Abbott/for The New York Times.

THE past week's images from Australia have been nightmarish: walls of flame, blood-red skies, residents huddled on beaches as they try to escape the inferno. The bush fires have been so intense that they have generated “fire tornadoes” powerful enough to flip over heavy trucks.

The thing is, Australia's summer of fire is only the latest in a string of catastrophic weather events over the past year: unprecedented flooding in the Midwest, a heat wave in India that sent temperatures to 123 degrees Fahrenheit, another heat wave that brought unheard-of temperatures to much of Europe.

And all of these catastrophes were related to climate change.

Notice that I said “related to” rather than “caused by” climate change. This is a distinction that has flummoxed many people over the years. Any individual weather event has multiple causes, which was one reason news reports used to avoid mentioning the possible role of climate change in natural disasters.

In recent years, however, climate scientists have tried to cut through this confusion by engaging in “extreme event attribution”, which focuses on probabilities: You can't necessarily say that climate change caused a particular heat wave, but you can ask how much difference global warming made to the probability of that heat wave happening. And the answer, typically, is a lot: Climate change makes the kinds of extreme weather events we've been seeing much more likely.


Monitoring a fire on Thursday in East Gippsland, Victoria, where 17 people were missing. — Photograph: Darrian Traynor/Getty Images.
Monitoring a fire on Thursday in East Gippsland, Victoria, where 17 people were missing. — Photograph: Darrian Traynor/Getty Images.

Lake Conjola, in New South Wales. — Photograph: Robert Oerlemans/via Associated Press.
Lake Conjola, in New South Wales. — Photograph: Robert Oerlemans/via Associated Press.

And while there's a lot of randomness in weather outcomes, that randomness actually makes climate change much more damaging in its early stages than most people realize. On our current trajectory, Florida as a whole will eventually be swallowed by the sea, but long before that happens, rising sea levels will make catastrophic storm surges commonplace. Much of India will eventually become uninhabitable, but killing heat waves and droughts will take a deadly toll well before that point is reached.

Put it this way: While it will take generations for the full consequences of climate change to play out, there will be many localized, temporary disasters along the way. Apocalypse will become the new normal — and that's happening right in front of our eyes.

The big question is whether the proliferation of climate-related disasters will finally be enough to break though the opposition to action.

There are some hopeful signs. One is that the news media has become much more willing to talk about the role of climate change in weather events.

Not long ago it was all too common to read articles about heat waves, floods and droughts that seemed to go to great lengths to avoid mentioning climate change. My sense is that reporters and editors have finally gotten over that block.


The remains of a house outside Batemans Bay on Thursday. — Photograph: Peter Parks/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
The remains of a house outside Batemans Bay on Thursday. — Photograph: Peter Parks/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.

Cars leaving Batemans Bay in New South Wales on Thursday. — Photograph: Peter Parks/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Cars leaving Batemans Bay in New South Wales on Thursday. — Photograph: Peter Parks/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.

The public also seems to be paying attention, with concern about climate change growing substantially over the past few years.

The bad news is that growing climate awareness is mainly taking place among Democrats; the Republican base is largely unmoved.

And the anti-environmental extremism of conservative politicians has, if anything, become even more intense as their position has become intellectually untenable. The right used to pretend that there was a serious scientific dispute about the reality of global warming and its sources. Now Republicans, and the Trump administration in particular, have simply become hostile to science in general. Hey, aren't scientists effectively part of the deep state?

Furthermore, this isn't just a U.S. problem. Even as Australia burns, its current government is reaffirming its commitment to coal and threatening to make boycotts of environmentally destructive businesses a crime.

The sick irony of the current situation is that anti-environmentalism is getting more extreme precisely at the moment when the prospects for decisive action should be better than ever.


Dust and smoke from Australia’s bushfires are reaching New Zealand, with its effects visible in snow near Franz Josef Glacier. — Photograph: Photograph: STUFF NZ/Reuters.
Dust and smoke from Australia’s bushfires are reaching New Zealand, with its effects visible in snow near Franz Josef Glacier.
 — Photograph: STUFF NZ/Reuters.


On one side, the dangers of climate change are no longer predictions about the future: We can see the damage now, although it's only a small taste of the horrors that lie ahead.

On the other side, drastic reductions in greenhouse gas emissions now look remarkably easy to achieve, at least from an economic point of view. In particular, there has been so much technological progress in alternative energy that the Trump administration is trying desperately to prop up coal against competition from solar and wind.

So will environmental policy play a role in the 2020 campaign? Most Democrats seem disinclined to make it a major issue, and I understand why: Historically, the threat posed by right-wing environmental policy seemed abstract, distant and hard to run on compared with, say, Republican attempts to dismantle Obamacare.

But the wave of climate-related catastrophes may be changing the political calculus. I'm not a campaign expert, but it seems to me that campaigns might get some traction with ads showing recent fires and floods and pointing out that Donald Trump and his friends are doing everything they can to create more such disasters.

For the truth is that Trump's environmental policy is the worst thing he's doing to America and the world. And voters should know that.


__________________________________________________________________________

Paul Krugman joined The New York Times in 1999 as an Op-Ed columnist. He is distinguished professor in the Graduate Center Economics Ph.D. program and distinguished scholar at the Luxembourg Income Study Center at the City University of New York. In addition, he is professor emeritus of Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School. In 2008, Mr. Krugman was the sole recipient of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his work on international trade theory. Mr. Krugman received his B.A. from Yale University in 1974 and his Ph.D. from M.I.T. in 1977. He has taught at Yale, M.I.T. and Stanford. At M.I.T. he became the Ford International Professor of Economics. Mr. Krugman is the author or editor of 27 books and more than 200 papers in professional journals and edited volumes. His professional reputation rests largely on work in international trade and finance; he is one of the founders of the “new trade theory,” a major rethinking of the theory of international trade. In recognition of that work, in 1991 the American Economic Association awarded him its John Bates Clark medal. Mr. Krugman's current academic research is focused on economic and currency crises. At the same time, Mr. Krugman has written extensively for a broader public audience. Some of his articles on economic issues, originally published in Foreign Affairs, Harvard Business Review, Scientific American and other journals, are reprinted in Pop Internationalism and The Accidental Theorist. His column appears every Tuesday and Friday. Read his blog, The Conscience of a Liberal, and follow him on Twitter.

• A version of this article appears in The New York Times on Friday, January 3, 2020, on Page A22 of the New York print edition with the headline: “Apocalypse Becomes the New Normal”.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Australia Fires Intensify: ‘It's Going to Be a Blast Furnace’ (January 2, 2020).

 • See Where Australia’s Deadly Wildfires Are Burning (January 2, 2020).

 • Why the Fires in Australia Are So Bad (January 1, 2020).

 • Apocalyptic Scenes in Australia as Fires Turn Skies Blood Red (December 31, 2019).

 • Australia's Volunteer Firefighters Find It Hard to Pause, Even for Christmas (December 24, 2019).

 • Australia Burns Again, and Now Its Biggest City Is Choking (December 6, 2019).


https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/02/opinion/climate-change-australia.html
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« Reply #1337 on: January 04, 2020, 02:39:04 pm »


from The New York Times…

Australia Is Committing Climate Suicide

As record fires rage, the country's leaders seem intent on sending it to its doom.

By RICHARD GLANAGAN | 8:25PM EST — Friday, January 03, 2019

An out-of-control fire in Hillville, in the Australian state of New South Wales, on November 12. — Photograph: Matthew Abbott/for The New York Times.
An out-of-control fire in Hillville, in the Australian state of New South Wales, on November 12. — Photograph: Matthew Abbott/for The New York Times.

BRUNY ISLAND, AUSTRALIA — Australia today is ground zero for the climate catastrophe. Its glorious Great Barrier Reef is dying, its world-heritage rain forests are burning, its giant kelp forests have largely vanished, numerous towns have run out of water or are about to, and now the vast continent is burning on a scale never before seen.

The images of the fires are a cross between “Mad Max” and “On the Beach”: thousands driven onto beaches in a dull orange haze, crowded tableaux of people and animals almost medieval in their strange muteness — half-Bruegel, half-Bosch, ringed by fire, survivors' faces hidden behind masks and swimming goggles. Day turns to night as smoke extinguishes all light in the horrifying minutes before the red glow announces the imminence of the inferno. Flames leaping 200 feet into the air. Fire tornadoes. Terrified children at the helm of dinghies, piloting away from the flames, refugees in their own country.

The fires have already burned about 14.5 million acres — an area almost as large as West Virginia, more than triple the area destroyed by the 2018 fires in California and six times the size of the 2019 fires in Amazonia. Canberra's air on New Yea'’s Day was the most polluted in the world partly because of a plume of fire smoke as wide as Europe.

Scientists estimate that close to half a billion native animals have been killed and fear that some species of animals and plants may have been wiped out completely. Surviving animals are abandoning their young in what is described as mass “starvation events”. At least 18 people are dead and grave fears are held about many more.

All this, and peak fire season is only just beginning.

As I write, a state of emergency has been declared in New South Wales and a state of disaster in Victoria, mass evacuations are taking place, a humanitarian catastrophe is feared, and towns up and down the east coast are surrounded by fires, all transport and most communication links cut, their fate unknown.

An email that the retired engineer Ian Mitchell sent to friends on New Year's Day from the small northern Victoria community of Gipsy Point speaks for countless Australians at this moment of catastrophe:

All

we and most of Gipsy Point houses still here as of now. We have 16 people in Gipsy pt.
No power, no phone no chance of anyone arriving for 4 days as all roads blocked.
Only satellite email is working We have 2 bigger boats and might be able to get supplies 'esp fuel at Coota.
We need more able people to defend the town as we are in for bad heat from Friday again.
Tucks area will be a problem from today, but trees down on all tracks, and no one to fight it.
We are tired, but ok.
But we are here in 2020!

Love
Us


The bookstore in the fire-ravaged village of Cobargo, New South Wales, has a new sign outside: “Post-Apocalyptic Fiction has been moved to Current Affairs”.

And yet, incredibly, the response of Australia's leaders to this unprecedented national crisis has been not to defend their country but to defend the coal industry, a big donor to both major parties — as if they were willing the country to its doom. While the fires were exploding in mid-December, the leader of the opposition Labor Party went on a tour of coal mining communities expressing his unequivocal support for coal exports. The prime minister, the conservative Scott Morrison, went on vacation to Hawaii.

Since 1996 successive conservative Australian governments have successfully fought to subvert international agreements on climate change in defense of the country's fossil fuel industries. Today, Australia is the world's largest exporter of both coal and gas. It recently was ranked 57th out of 57 countries on climate-change action.


Prime Minister Scott Morrison of Australia. — Photograph: Joel Carrett/European Pressphoto Agency/via Shutterstock.
Prime Minister Scott Morrison of Australia. — Photograph: Joel Carrett/European Pressphoto Agency/via Shutterstock.

In no small part Mr. Morrison owes his narrow election victory last year to the coal-mining oligarch Clive Palmer, who formed a puppet party to keep the Labor Party — which had been committed to limited but real climate-change action — out of government. Mr. Palmer's advertising budget for the campaign was more than double that of the two major parties combined. Mr. Palmer subsequently announced plans to build the biggest coal mine in Australia.

Since Mr. Morrison, an ex-marketing man, was forced to return from his vacation and publicly apologize, he has chosen to spend his time creating feel-good images of himself, posing with cricketers or his family. He is seen far less often at the fires' front lines, visiting ravaged communities or with survivors. Mr. Morrison has tried to present the fires as catastrophe-as-usual, nothing out of the ordinary.

This posture seems to be a chilling political calculation: With no effective opposition from a Labor Party reeling from its election loss and with media dominated by Rupert Murdoch — 58 percent of daily newspaper circulationfirmly behind his climate denialism, Mr. Morrison appears to hope that he will prevail as long as he doesn't acknowledge the magnitude of the disaster engulfing Australia.

Mr. Morrison made his name as immigration minister, perfecting the cruelty of a policy that interns refugees in hellish Pacific-island camps, and seems indifferent to human suffering. Now his government has taken a disturbing authoritarian turn, cracking down on unions, civic organizations and journalists. Under legislation pending in Tasmania, and expected to be copied across Australia, environmental protesters now face up to 21 years in jail for demonstrating.

“Australia is a burning nation led by cowards,” wrote the leading broadcaster Hugh Riminton, speaking for many. To which he might have added “idiots,” after Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack blamed the fires on exploding horse manure.

Such are those who would open the gates of hell and lead a nation to commit climate suicide.


A man drags away plastic garbage bins from a property engulfed in flames in Lake Conjola in New South Wales. — Photograph: Matthew Abbott/for The New York Times.
A man drags away plastic garbage bins from a property engulfed in flames in Lake Conjola in New South Wales.
 — Photograph: Matthew Abbott/for The New York Times.


More than one-third of Australians are estimated to be affected by the fires. By a significant and increasing majority, Australians want action on climate change, and they are now asking questions about the growing gap between the Morrison government's ideological fantasies and the reality of a dried-out, rapidly heating, burning Australia.

The situation is eerily reminiscent of the Soviet Union in the 1980s, when the ruling apparatchiks were all-powerful but losing the fundamental, moral legitimacy to govern. In Australia today, a political establishment, grown sclerotic and demented on its own fantasies, is facing a monstrous reality which it has neither the ability nor the will to confront.

Mr. Morrison may have a massive propaganda machine in the Murdoch press and no opposition, but his moral authority is bleeding away by the hour. On Thursday, after walking away from a pregnant woman asking for help, he was forced to flee the angry, heckling residents of a burned-out town. A local conservative politician described his own leader's humiliation as “the welcome he probably deserved”.

As Mikhail Gorbachev, the last Soviet leader, once observed, the collapse of the Soviet Union began with the nuclear disaster at Chernobyl in 1986. In the wake of that catastrophe, “the system as we knew it became untenable,” he wrote in 2006. Could it be that the immense, still-unfolding tragedy of the Australian fires may yet prove to be the  Chernobyl of climate crisis?


__________________________________________________________________________

• Richard Miller Flanagan (born 1961) is an Australian writer, “considered by many to be the finest Australian novelist of his generation,” according to The Economist. Each of his novels has attracted major praise and received numerous awards and honours. He also has written and directed feature films. He won the 2014 Man Booker Prize for “The Narrow Road to the Deep North”. The New York Review of Books described Flanagan as “among the most versatile writers in the English language. That he is also an environmental activist and the author of numerous influential works of nonfiction makes his achievement all the more remarkable.”

• A version of this article appears in The New York Times on Saturday, January 4, 2020, on page A23 of the New York print edition with the headline: “Australia Is Committing Climate Suicide”.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Nowhere Else to Go’: Some Defy Warnings to Flee Australian Fires (January 03, 2020).

 • PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY: The Australia Wildfires in Pictures (January 03, 2020).


https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/03/opinion/australia-fires-climate-change.html
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« Reply #1338 on: January 05, 2020, 08:15:43 am »



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« Reply #1339 on: January 06, 2020, 12:42:13 pm »


An excellent opinion piece appeared on The Washington Post early this morning, written by an Australian author and volunteer firefighter who lives in rural South Australia.

Tom Toles' brilliant editorial cartoon published in the newspaper is also highly appropriate and “hits the nail right on the head”.



from The Washington Post…

In fire-ravaged Australia, climate denial goes up in smoke

By JENNIFER MILLS | 2:05PM EST — Sunday, January 05, 2020

Bushfires burn between the townships of Bemm River and Cann River in eastern Gippsland, Victoria, Australia. — Photograph: Darrian Traynor/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Bushfires burn between the townships of Bemm River and Cann River in eastern Gippsland, Victoria, Australia.
 — Photograph: Darrian Traynor/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


MUCH OF Australia's forested East Coast was already on fire by the time images emerged last month of Scott Morrison, our prime minister, holidaying in Hawaii. Sydney was blanketed in smoke. I'd been frantically updating emergency-services maps, checking on friends and relatives in four states, making sure my parents knew which kind of masks to get. I wondered whether Morrison realized he was on the verge of a Hurricane Katrina moment — whether he would rush back with a swift response, if only out of fear for his own political reputation.

“I don't hold a hose, mate,” he said on talk radio from Hawaii. “I don't sit in a control room.”

Like many volunteer firefighters, I am furious. Six months before the fires, and then again in September, Morrison declined to meet with a group of former fire chiefs who wanted to warn him that an emergency like this was on the horizon. Rural firefighting services in Australia are state-based and largely voluntary. They are often woefully underresourced, and some have been subject to recent budget cuts. Volunteer firefighters like me watched this season approach — the deadly combination of intense heat and Australia's worst drought in decades — with dread. Where were the extra resources we needed? And why was Australia still refusing to act on the climate emergency?

And so 2020 has begun with mass evacuations of towns in New South Wales and Victoria, as families flee in an unprecedented internal migration. On social media, Australians wish each other a safe new year as we scroll images of the sea blackened by soot, of families sheltering on red-lit beaches, of children rowing onto a lake in P2 face masks to escape the flames. Our holiday snaps are hashtagged #apocalypse. Since November, at least 23 people have died as a direct result of the fires, three of them volunteer firefighters. The severe health impacts from this smoke-filled summer will be harder to quantify.

Morrison did come home from Hawaii a little early, and he then wandered onto the fire ground in search of caring imagery. But out of the smoke has emerged a man of ashes. Video is making the rounds of this desperately awkward man getting a cold reception in the New South Wales town of Cobargo, where three people died and the main street burned to the ground last week. “I don't really want to shake your hand,” muttered an exhausted-looking firefighter. “Piss off,” residents called after Morrison as he fled his own media event.

Australians see ourselves as tough characters who take care of each other in a crisis. Country people don't express our feelings easily; we don't like to make a fuss. But in rural areas, volunteer firefighters give up days and nights to respond to incidents as they arise. We do this because someone has to. When we rise to challenges such as this one, we expect something similar from our leaders.




Firefighters are learning and adapting to changing conditions. After 173 people died in Victoria's Black Saturday fires in 2009, warning and evacuation systems were overhauled. Catastrophic fire danger warnings were introduced; trucks have been upgraded. All brigades are required to undertake annual burnover drills, which teach us how to avoid death inside our trucks in the event they are overtaken by fire. But these fires are occurring at an intensity, duration and scale we have not seen before. That fewer lives have been lost so far is a testament to these upgrades, to the dedication of firefighters and to public education about the risks.

Sadly, the fires are also an illustration of the principle that while a nation might share the same facts, its people can still refuse to share a reality. Morrison likes to note that Australia produces just 1.3 percent of the world's greenhouse-gas emissions. But Australia is also the world's biggest exporter of coal, and we have regularly sided with other big, fossil fuel-dependent nations to stymie global climate negotiations. At December's climate talks in Madrid, we came under fire for attempting to fiddle with the books to hide increased emissions. Australia is not just dragging its feet on climate change; it is actively making things worse. Internationally, there is a sense that we are getting what we deserve.

Months into the crisis, defense force reserves are finally being deployed to provide much-needed logistical support to firefighters. But Morrison still must answer for all the delays, for failing to communicate with rural fire services and for his government's continued advocacy of fossil fuels.

“This is not about any one individual,” Morrison said when asked about the public anger he is facing, and in a way he is right. Experts have been warning governments about the effects of warming for at least 30 years, and few in Canberra — or in Washington D.C., or in so many other centers of power around the world — have listened. But no longer can the climate emergency be posed as a problem of the future. We are moving beyond denial and into a hazy twilight of blame.


__________________________________________________________________________

Jennifer Mills is the author of the novel Dyschronia and a volunteer firefighter in rural South Australia.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Australia wildfires turn New Zealand's sky an apocalyptic orange

 • Australia's fires intensify as prime minister calls up army reservists to help contain the crisis

 • Richard Glover: Australia’s bush fires reveal how Scott Morrison has lost his way

 • Richard Glover: Australia's catastrophic bushfires should be an inflection point


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/global-opinions/in-fire-ravaged-australia-climate-denial-goes-up-in-smoke/2020/01/05/fcc90c0a-2e63-11ea-9b60-817cc18cf173_story.html
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« Reply #1340 on: January 07, 2020, 02:15:03 pm »



We don’t just have a bushfire crisis. We have an arson crisis, too
Arthur Chrenkoff




According to my calculations and estimates, the number of individuals around Australia whose arson has contributed to the current bushfire crisis has now passed 200.

This figure is not presented as a counter-argument to those who blame the fires on climate change. Most people (I hope) understand that trees tend not to spontaneously combust, no matter what the air temperature is; when we talk about bushfires starting naturally, we are talking about lightning strikes igniting tinder. The climate change argument posits that the more extreme weather conditions – higher temperatures, drought and so forth – make fires, however started, much more destructive and much more difficult to control and extinguish. These are debates to be had between climatologists, forestry experts and firefighters.

What is painfully clear, however, that Australia has a firebug crisis. It will no doubt be up to future royal commissions and inquiries to calculate exactly what proportion of the current loss and destruction can be attributed to human action, but I suspect it will be a significant one. Mankind may be causing climate change, but man is most definitely making fires start.

Where’s the proof, you ask? Below is a sample of news reports from around the country over recent months.

August 24:

Three teenage girls have been arrested for arson over 13 grassfires police allege were deliberately lit on the New South Wales mid-north coast. The girls, aged 12, 13 and 14, were arrested in South Kempsey on Wednesday by officers from Strike Force Tronto, which was set up to investigate the fires.No-one was hurt in the blazes, which damaged grassland before being controlled by rural firefighters. The teens will be dealt with under the Young Offenders Act.

September 10:

Police have located a 12-year-old boy in Queensland who allegedly lit a fire deliberately that destroyed bushland and part of a storage facility in Slacks Creek in Logan, about 5pm Monday. The boy was with a group of juveniles in bushland off Kingston Rd, behind Woodridge Skate Park, when he allegedly started the fire, which spread quickly to a nearby storage facility, destroying a fence, two shipping containers and their contents, and police say he will be dealt with under the provisions of the Youth Justice Act. Another two 14-year-old girls are also assisting police with their inquiries after allegedly deliberately lighting a fire in bushland in Ormeau on the Gold Coast this morning.

November 13:

NSW police believe 12 bushfires may have been deliberately lit by arsonists during Tuesday’s “catastrophic” fire conditions…A suspected arsonist was ­arrested after a chase through the Royal National Park, south of Sydney by an army Black Hawk helicopter. The crew of the 6th Aviation Regiment unit in the Black Hawk spotted a man “acting suspiciously” in the northern area of the park, The Daily Telegraph reported. A fire had begun nearby. After coordinating with police on the ground, the man was arrested late in the evening and was being questioned. A crime scene has been established near scorched bushland at South Turramurra where police are investigating the origins of the fire to try to confirm whether it was sparked by an arsonist…Authorities are also probing the circumstances around several suspicious fires at Katoomba in the Blue Mountains, at Berkeley near Wollongong, and at Moonbi near Tamworth.

November 14:

Police allege a teenager started a central Queensland bushfire that has destroyed 14 homes…Police say the 16-year-old boy has not been charged with arson, but will be dealt with under the state’s Youth Justice Act. The Cobraball fire, near Yeppoon, is still burning days after it destroyed homes, sheds and cars.

November 20:

Last week we learnt that the Binna Burra fire, which destroyed the historic Binna Burra Lodge in South East Queensland, was started by a carelessly discarded cigarette. And the Gold Coast hinterland bushfires the week before may have been started by army live-firing exercises at the Kokoda Barracks, a spokesperson for the Australian Defence Force has conceded.

November 20:

More than half of the 18 people who have been dealt with by police over recent Queensland bushfires are children, police have revealed. Since a state of emergency was declared in Queensland on November 9, police said they had taken action against 18 people for deliberately lighting fires. Of that, police said, 10 are juveniles who are being dealt with under the Youth Justice Act. In the two years to the end of 2018, 136 children were charged with endangering property in Queensland by lighting fires — just 18 were convicted. Several teens were charged over recent fires including a 16-year-old boy who allegedly started a fire west of Yeppoon that destroyed 30 structures and two other teens over a September blaze at Peregian on the Sunshine Coast.

November 27:

A volunteer firefighter in Australia has been charged with deliberately lighting blazes during the nation’s bushfire crisis. Police arrested the man, 19, for seven counts of alleged arson in an area south of Sydney, New South Wales.

December 17:

NSW Rural Fire Service Inspector Ben Shepherd has revealed investigators are close to charging more than a dozen suspected arsonists believed to have deliberately lit bushfires as the state remains in the grip of an ongoing bushfire crisis. It comes amid revelations at least 56 people have already been charged or cautioned with 71 bushfire-related offences since August, with 16 ongoing investigations into suspicious fires, including a blaze that threatened the rim of suburban Sydney in South Turramurra, on Sydney’s Upper North Shore, on November 12.

So that’s up to 72 people in NSW.

December 20:

Almost 100 firebugs have deliberately started blazes across Queensland that have destroyed homes and consumed thousands of hectares of bushland.

Some 65 fires continue to burn across the state on Friday, jumping from 55 reported on Thursday, as the fire threat deepens heading into the weekend.

As firefighters remain on high alert, police revealed 103 of the destructive fires that have lashed Queensland since September were deliberately lit.

Figures obtained by AAP reveal 98 people – 31 adults and 67 juveniles – have been dealt with by Queensland police for deliberately setting fires.

And 98 in Queensland so far.

December 23:

Police in the central-western NSW town of Wellington have arrested an 11-year-old boy in relation to a fire along the Bell River. At 7 pm on Sunday emergency services responded to reports of a grass fire at a reserve at the western end of the town. A group of boys had allegedly been seen running from the area.

December 23:

As devastating bushfires ravage Australian communities, claiming lives and homes, firebugs have continued to ignite blazes across the weekend in WA. Firefighters were called to a “suspicious” blaze in the south-eastern suburb of Byford on Sunday afternoon, just hours after WA Police had made a public call-out for information about a bushfire that tore through Armadale on Saturday. The Department of Fire and Emergency Services (DFES) claimed the fire was deliberately lit just after 5 pm near Warrington Road… In Armadale, bushland was burnt and several roads were forced to close on Saturday afternoon due to a “suspicious” blaze that ignited about 11am near the Ranford and Armadale Road intersection. The incident prompted police to ask for public assistance to identify a man captured on CCTV who they want to question as part of their investigation.

December 29:

A series of suspicious grass fires across Victoria are under police investigation. A grass fire in Glenmore that broke out at 3.50 pm yesterday, burning about 10 hectares, was followed less than 30 minutes later by another suspicious grass fire in Bacchus Marsh. A third suspicious blaze then broke out in Parwan just five minutes later. It came after a suspicious grass fire threatened businesses and homes in the Bendigo suburb of White Hills about 3.30 pm yesterday. Meanwhile, police have charged a 71-year-old man for allegedly lighting a fire without a permit northwest of Moruya on the NSW south coast, causing a 40-hectare bushfire in the Wandera State Forest, and charged another man for allegedly lighting two bushfires near Cessnock in the Hunter.

December 31:

A bushfire that threatened lives and homes in suburban Melbourne is under investigation, amid suspicions it may have been deliberately lit… Another series of fires allegedly set in Melbourne’s eastern suburbs earlier in December have resulted in a man being charged with five criminal counts of arson. The 41-year-old was arrested on Monday after police executed warrants for fires in the Cranbourne and Dandenong areas lit on December 17 and December 28. The man faced court on Tuesday and was remanded in custody until his next appearance at Dandenong Magistrates Court on January 21.

December 31:

As South Australian firefighters continue to battle blazes that broke out during catastrophic conditions on Monday, a suspicious grassfire has come close to a popular camping area south of Adelaide. The fire, at Second Valley on the Fleurieu Peninsula south of Adelaide, was an unwelcome sight to campers as it burned in hills overlooking the Rapid Bay caravan park.

January 1:

A deliberately-lit bushfire in northeast Tasmania is sparking an emergency warning as winds increase.The blaze is part of a network of suspicious fires near Fingal which have burned across more than 6600 hectares.

January 2:

Police have arrested and charged a man following reports he allegedly started a fire in East Gippsland last night. The 36-year-old man, of no fixed address, is accused of starting a fire in Johnsonville, east of Bairnsdale.

January 3:

The Tasmania Fire Service said on Friday that uncontrolled fires in the state’s north-east had burnt down a house and destroyed a car at Tower Hill. Police believe the fire was started by arson on Monday.

There are no conspiracies here. Though arson has been tried and called for before as a tool of terror, the Australian fires seem to result from the actions of unconnected individuals who are either disturbed or reckless. This is nothing new; as ecological criminologist Paul Read wrote back in November:

A 2015 satellite analysis of 113,000 fires from 1997-2009 confirmed what we had known for some time – 40 per cent of fires are deliberately lit, another 47 per cent accidental. This generally matches previous data published a decade earlier that about half of all fires were suspected or deliberate arson, and 37 per cent accidental. Combined, they reach the same conclusion: 87 per cent are man-made…

If I had to guess, I’d say about 10,000 arsonists lurk from the top of Queensland to the southern-most tip of Victoria, but not all are active and some light fires during winter. The most dangerous light fires on the hottest days, generally closer to communities and during other blazes, suggesting more malicious motives. Only a tiny minority will gaze with wonder at the destruction they have wrought, deeply fascinated and empowered. Others get caught up with the excitement of chaos and behave like impulsive idiots.

As for children, they are not always malicious. Children and youths follow the age-crime curve where delinquency peaks in their late teens. Playing with fire is just one of many forms of misbehaviour. The great majority grow out of it. Four overlapping subgroups include accidental fire-play getting out of control; victims of child abuse – including sexual abuse – and neglect; children with autism and developmental disorders; and conduct disorder from a younger age, which can be genuinely dangerous.

The more fires, proportionally the more arsonists. And the recent mega-fires are really bringing out all the firebugs out of the woodwork (or into the woodwork to be more accurate). It is disturbing, but sadly not surprising or unexpected.

As some have suggested already, the current crisis, with its large sample of arsonists, provides a good opportunity for more research into the psychology, motivation and behaviour of fire-starters. This might help in the future, but clearly arsonists will always be with us.

The task is to make their work more difficult, for example through better management of our forests to make them less combustible. But as much as bushfires are an environmental and land management problem, as we search for solutions we can’t forget that they are also a criminal one.

https://www.spectator.com.au/2020/01/we-dont-just-have-a-bushfire-crisis-we-have-an-arson-crisis-too/

why is Australia so hot

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jan/15/whats-cranking-up-heat-south-eastern-australia

weather report

https://www.weather-forecast.com/maps/Australia

« Last Edit: January 07, 2020, 04:25:04 pm by Im2Sexy4MyPants » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #1341 on: January 07, 2020, 06:20:39 pm »


A stupid moron reacts to SCIENTIFIC FACTS about the reality of global warming & climate change…





…he's probably the village idiot from Woodville, eh?
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« Reply #1342 on: January 08, 2020, 09:55:41 am »



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« Reply #1343 on: January 08, 2020, 05:12:24 pm »

Australia has a long history of heatwaves and bush fires going back thousands of years which has nothing to do with global warming

1,371,000 square kilometres, or 18% of the Australian mainland. However, approximately 35% of the Australian continent receives so little rain it is effectively desert. The deserts in Australia are primarily distributed throughout the western plateau and interior lowlands of the country.

it's about the weather conditions, firebugs lightning strikes or powerlines coming down

all they need is fire breaks around built-up areas which the greens and the government are too stupid to make

I lived there for a few years it's hot
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« Reply #1344 on: January 08, 2020, 06:12:09 pm »


Yeah, you just keep on burying your head in the dirt and pretending that everything is all hunky dory.

'cause that's going to make it even funnier when global warming fucks up your grand-kids and great-grand-kids lives and snuffs them out.





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« Reply #1345 on: January 11, 2020, 03:28:55 am »

thing is by the time any bad shit happens you will be dead and finding out if you're a ghost
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« Reply #1346 on: January 11, 2020, 11:48:49 am »


Your grand-kids and great-grand-kids will be mouthing off about their selfish, fuck-you grandfather and great-grandfather as the planet wipes out the human race and adjusts to a new equilibrium which doesn't include the human beings who trashed their only lifeboat in the vastness of space. And all the other living things will die too, but they won't be the selfish twats who caused it, nor will they know it was selfish, ignorant twats like YOU.

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« Reply #1347 on: January 11, 2020, 06:40:09 pm »




(it's safely clickable too)
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« Reply #1348 on: January 11, 2020, 09:57:52 pm »

fake science a good scam
I think you go to China and India try to get get them to clean up their mess to save the planet
also, tell their people and all the people in the world a green carbon tax means their good life is over, shut down all their factories
and all their coal plants its time for everyone to go back to the stone age to save the planet

unless you got a better way to do it STFU
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« Reply #1349 on: January 12, 2020, 04:57:22 am »


Too right fake science is a scam.

Just look at all the global warming deniers who hide behind “fake science” while supporting America's stupid “fake president”.

It's amazing there are so many dumbfucks in the world.

Do people in Woodville point and laugh at you for being one of those?
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