Xtra News Community 2
November 13, 2019, 06:58:54 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Welcome to Xtra News Community 2 — please also join our XNC2-BACKUP-GROUP.
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links BITEBACK! XNC2-BACKUP-GROUP Staff List Login Register  

Some reading for the “anti-warmalists” and “climate-change deniers”


Pages: 1 ... 46 47 48 49 50 [51] 52 53   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Some reading for the “anti-warmalists” and “climate-change deniers”  (Read 14707 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1250 on: May 05, 2019, 05:32:14 pm »



Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1251 on: May 05, 2019, 05:32:31 pm »


from The Seattle Times…

Climate denier Trump can't handle the truth
about why Central Americans flock to U.S.


By WILL BUNCH | 3:30AM PDT — Friday, May 03, 2019

President Donald J. Trump walks on the South Lawn while departing the White House on April 26.
President Donald J. Trump walks on the South Lawn while departing the White House on April 26.

LET'S STIPULATE RIGHT HERE that President Donald Trump doesn't understand a lot of things, even as he enters his 28th month in charge of the massive bureaucratic battleship that is the U.S. government. But no issue has flummoxed our rage-prone 45th president more than the rise in unauthorized crossings at the U.S.-Mexico border — even after promising his xenophobic base that his harsh immigration crackdown would make America great again.

When numbers came into the White House showing this decade's biggest surge in refugees at the border — with Border Patrol agents detaining as many as 4,000 migrants, many of them women and children, in a single day — Trump reportedly went ballistic.

The commander-in-chief sought even harsher family separation policies, even after the first wave of ripping toddlers and even infants from their mommies and daddies, in 2018, had shocked consciences around the globe. He threatened to completely shut down the border with Mexico, which would have crippled commerce and maybe triggered a recession. A senior aide told CNN's Jake Tapper that the president was “increasingly unhinged” about border crossings, even as he furiously tweeted out more fear.

To Trump, immigrants are cheaters, frauds or out-and-out criminals, trying to take advantage of us.

But Donald Trump can't handle the truth.

Because to do that, the Trump administration would have to do something alien to every xenophobic bone in its body: embrace science. The president would have to start accepting that climate change is real, that it's occurring right now, and that responses like mass migration are an unavoidably human reaction to drought, floods and misery.

Experts (admittedly, non-persons in Trumpland) believe that a sizable portion of the recent steep increase in migrants from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are doing so because record drought in the region — the result of a warming planet — has destroyed crops and left destitute farmers desperate to save their families. Simply put, images of armed U.S. officers seizing kids at the border still won't deter parents who see the only alternative as famine and crushing poverty.

“People have been displaced by climate for millennia, but we are now at a particular historical moment, facing a new type of environmentally driven migration that will be more fast and furious,” Maria Cristina Garcia, a Cornell University professor publishing a book on climate-driven migration, said recently.




Conor Walsh, who works for Catholic Family Services in Honduras, wrote recently in the Arizona Daily Star that severe drought in neighboring Guatemala in 2018 resulted in significant crop loss for as many as 300,000 subsistence farmers there. Indeed, the cycle of arid days without rain and severe floods has become so pronounced in the key growing regions of Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras during the 2010s that the area is now called “the dry corridor.”

Experts note that the last big drought in 2014 matched up with the last big surge in U.S. border crossings. And the World Bank says climate change may cause as many as 1.4 million people to leave Central America and Mexico over the next 30 years.

Imagine a world where, instead of yelling at Cabinet members to lock up more kids in cages, the president sat at the Resolute Desk and listened to the story of Fredi Onan Vicen Pena, a 41-year-old Honduran coffee farmer who told The New York Times he has seen a drought-fueled disease called coffee rust destroy 70 percent of his crop, while most of his family members have already left for the U.S. or elsewhere.

That world, sadly, does not exist.

Can the United States do anything to help the struggling farmers of Honduras and Guatemala? The answer is “yes.” Sebastian Charchalac, a Guatemalan agronomist who was running a program with about $200,000 in U.S. aid, told the New Yorker he was seeing real success in helping farmers diversify crops, conserve water and, as a result, save their land. Then in 2017 the Trump administration killed the program.

Indeed, one element of Trump's rage-frenzied rampage over border crossings has been an announcement that the U.S. will end all foreign aid to the three key Central American nations — about $350 million to $400 million a year as a spiteful punishment for the supposed failure to curb migration. That money goes not just for farm aid but also for programs that attack problems like urban gang violence — i.e., all of the horrible things that would cause people to abandon their native countries, undertake an arduous and dangerous long journey, and seek freedom in the United States.

Meanwhile, climate-change-driven migration — and the famines, wars and other crises created by this — are only going to get worse. In January, the Pentagon warned yet again that climate change is a major national security issue for this country. But Trump, who won the presidency insisting he knows more than the generals, didn't listen.

He definitely won't listen to the scientists, either. The president only listens to the narcissistic rantings of his damaged psyche — and that is creating a human-rights crisis on this continent.


__________________________________________________________________________

Story updated at 3:37PM PDT — Friday, May 03, 2019.

Will Bunch is an opinion columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer and a syndicated columnist for many newspapers including The Seattle Times.

https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/climate-denier-trump-cant-handle-the-truth-about-why-central-americans-flock-to-u-s/
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7978



WWW
« Reply #1252 on: May 06, 2019, 08:14:36 am »

funnest fake news ever

« Last Edit: May 06, 2019, 09:00:13 am by Im2Sexy4MyPants » Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1253 on: May 07, 2019, 10:47:02 pm »


from The New York Times…

Humans Are Speeding Extinction and Altering
the Natural World at an ‘Unprecedented’ Pace


A dire United Nations report, based on thousands of scientific studies, paints an urgent picture
of biodiversity loss and finds that climate change is amplifying the danger to humanity.


By BRAD PLUMER | Monday, May 06, 2019

Fishing nets and ropes are a frequent hazard for olive ridley sea turtles, seen on a beach in India's Kerala state in January. A new 1,500-page report by the United Nations is the most exhaustive look yet at the decline in biodiversity across the globe. — Photograph: Soren Andersson/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Fishing nets and ropes are a frequent hazard for olive ridley sea turtles, seen on a beach in India's Kerala state in January. A new 1,500-page
report by the United Nations is the most exhaustive look yet at the decline in biodiversity across the globe.
 — Photograph: Soren Andersson/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


WASHINGTON D.C. — Humans are transforming Earth's natural landscapes so dramatically that as many as one million plant and animal species are now at risk of extinction, posing a dire threat to ecosystems that people all over the world depend on for their survival, a sweeping new United Nations assessment has concluded.

The 1,500-page report, compiled by hundreds of international experts and based on thousands of scientific studies, is the most exhaustive look yet at the decline in biodiversity across the globe and the dangers that creates for human civilization. A summary of its findings, which was approved by representatives from the United States and 131 other countries, was released on Monday in Paris. The full report is set to be published this year.

Its conclusions are stark. In most major land habitats, from the savannas of Africa to the rain forests of South America, the average abundance of native plant and animal life has fallen by 20 percent or more, mainly over the past century. With the human population passing 7 billion, activities like farming, logging, poaching, fishing and mining are altering the natural world at a rate “unprecedented in human history.”

At the same time, a new threat has emerged: Global warming has become a major driver of wildlife decline, the assessment found, by shifting or shrinking the local climates that many mammals, birds, insects, fish and plants evolved to survive in. When combined with the other ways humans are damaging the environment, climate change is now pushing a growing number of species, such as the Bengal tiger, closer to extinction.

As a result, biodiversity loss is projected to accelerate through 2050, particularly in the tropics, unless countries drastically step up their conservation efforts.

The report is not the first to paint a grim portrait of Earth's ecosystems. But it goes further by detailing how closely human well-being is intertwined with the fate of other species.

“For a long time, people just thought of biodiversity as saving nature for its own sake,” said Robert Watson, chair of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, which conducted the assessment at the request of national governments. “But this report makes clear the links between biodiversity and nature and things like food security and clean water in both rich and poor countries.”

A previous report by the group had estimated that, in the Americas, nature provides some $24 trillion of non-monetized benefits to humans each year. The Amazon rain forest absorbs immense quantities of carbon dioxide and helps slow the pace of global warming. Wetlands purify drinking water. Coral reefs sustain tourism and fisheries in the Caribbean. Exotic tropical plants form the basis of a variety of medicines.

But as these natural landscapes wither and become less biologically rich, the services they can provide to humans have been dwindling.


Cattle grazing on a tract of illegally cleared Amazon forest in Pará State, Brazil. In most major land habitats, the average abundance of native plant and animal life has fallen by 20 percent or more, mainly over the past century. — Photograph: Lalo de Almeida/for The New York Times.
Cattle grazing on a tract of illegally cleared Amazon forest in Pará State, Brazil. In most major land habitats, the average abundance of native plant
and animal life has fallen by 20 percent or more, mainly over the past century. — Photograph: Lalo de Almeida/for The New York Times.


Humans are producing more food than ever, but land degradation is already harming agricultural productivity on 23 percent of the planet's land area, the new report said. The decline of wild bees and other insects that help pollinate fruits and vegetables is putting up to $577 billion in annual crop production at risk. The loss of mangrove forests and coral reefs along coasts could expose up to 300 million people to increased risk of flooding.

The authors note that the devastation of nature has become so severe that piecemeal efforts to protect individual species or to set up wildlife refuges will no longer be sufficient. Instead, they call for “transformative changes” that include curbing wasteful consumption, slimming down agriculture's environmental footprint and cracking down on illegal logging and fishing.

“It's no longer enough to focus just on environmental policy,” said Sandra M. Díaz, a lead author of the study and an ecologist at the National University of Córdoba in Argentina. “We need to build biodiversity considerations into trade and infrastructure decisions, the way that health or human rights are built into every aspect of social and economic decision-making.”

Scientists have cataloged only a fraction of living creatures, some 1.3 million; the report estimates there may be as many as 8 million plant and animal species on the planet, most of them insects. Since 1500, at least 680 species have blinked out of existence, including the Pinta giant tortoise of the Galápagos Islands and the Guam flying fox.

Though outside experts cautioned it could be difficult to make precise forecasts, the report warns of a looming extinction crisis, with extinction rates currently tens to hundreds of times higher than they have been in the past 10 million years.

“Human actions threaten more species with global extinction now than ever before,” the report concludes, estimating that “around 1 million species already face extinction, many within decades, unless action is taken.”

Unless nations step up their efforts to protect what natural habitats are left, they could witness the disappearance of 40 percent of amphibian species, one-third of marine mammals and one-third of reef-forming corals. More than 500,000 land species, the report said, do not have enough natural habitat left to ensure their long-term survival.

Over the past 50 years, global biodiversity loss has primarily been driven by activities like the clearing of forests for farmland, the expansion of roads and cities, logging, hunting, overfishing, water pollution and the transport of invasive species around the globe.

In Indonesia, the replacement of rain forest with palm oil plantations has ravaged the habitat of critically endangered orangutans and Sumatran tigers. In Mozambique, ivory poachers helped kill off nearly 7,000 elephants between 2009 and 2011 alone. In Argentina and Chile, the introduction of the North American beaver in the 1940s has devastated native trees (though it has also helped other species thrive, including the Magellanic woodpecker).


Volunteers collected trash in March in a mangrove forest in Brazil. The loss of mangrove forests and coral reefs along coasts could expose up to 300 million people to increased risk of flooding. — Photograph: Amanda Perobelli/Reuters.
Volunteers collected trash in March in a mangrove forest in Brazil. The loss of mangrove forests and coral reefs along coasts could expose up to
300 million people to increased risk of flooding. — Photograph: Amanda Perobelli/Reuters.


All told, three-quarters of the world's land area has been significantly altered by people, the report found, and 85 percent of the world's wetlands have vanished since the 18th century.

And with humans continuing to burn fossil fuels for energy, global warming is expected to compound the damage. Roughly 5 percent of species worldwide are threatened with climate-related extinction if global average temperatures rise 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, the report concluded. (The world has already warmed 1 degree.)

“If climate change were the only problem we were facing, a lot of species could probably move and adapt,” Richard Pearson, an ecologist at the University College of London, said. “But when populations are already small and losing genetic diversity, when natural landscapes are already fragmented, when plants and animals can't move to find newly suitable habitats, then we have a real threat on our hands.”

The dwindling number of species will not just make the world a less colorful or wondrous place, the report noted. It also poses risks to people.

Today, humans are relying on significantly fewer varieties of plants and animals to produce food. Of the 6,190 domesticated mammal breeds used in agriculture, more than 559 have gone extinct and 1,000 more are threatened. That means the food system is becoming less resilient against pests and diseases. And it could become harder in the future to breed new, hardier crops and livestock to cope with the extreme heat and drought that climate change will bring.

“Most of nature's contributions are not fully replaceable,” the report said. Biodiversity loss “can permanently reduce future options, such as wild species that might be domesticated as new crops and be used for genetic improvement.”

The report does contain glimmers of hope. When governments have acted forcefully to protect threatened species, such as the Arabian oryx or the Seychelles magpie robin, they have managed to fend off extinction in many cases. And nations have protected more than 15 percent of the world's land and 7 percent of its oceans by setting up nature reserves and wilderness areas.

Still, only a fraction of the most important areas for biodiversity have been protected, and many nature reserves poorly enforce prohibitions against poaching, logging or illegal fishing. Climate change could also undermine existing wildlife refuges by shifting the geographic ranges of species that currently live within them.


An elephant in the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy at the foot of Mount Kenya, outside Nairobi. More than 500,000 land species do not have enough natural habitat left to ensure their long-term survival. — Photograph: Tony Karumba/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
An elephant in the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy at the foot of Mount Kenya, outside Nairobi. More than 500,000 land species do not have enough
natural habitat left to ensure their long-term survival. — Photograph: Tony Karumba/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


So, in addition to advocating the expansion of protected areas, the authors outline a vast array of changes aimed at limiting the drivers of biodiversity loss.

Farmers and ranchers would have to adopt new techniques to grow more food on less land. Consumers in wealthy countries would have to waste less food and become more efficient in their use of natural resources. Governments around the world would have to strengthen and enforce environmental laws, cracking down on illegal logging and fishing and reducing the flow of heavy metals and untreated wastewater into the environment.

The authors also note that efforts to limit global warming will be critical, although they caution that the development of biofuels to reduce emissions could end up harming biodiversity by further destroying forests.

None of this will be easy, especially since many developing countries face pressure to exploit their natural resources as they try to lift themselves out of poverty.

But, by detailing the benefits that nature can provide to people, and by trying to quantify what is lost when biodiversity plummets, the scientists behind the assessment are hoping to help governments strike a more careful balance between economic development and conservation.

“You can't just tell leaders in Africa that there can't be any development and that we should turn the whole continent into a national park,” said Emma Archer, who led the group's earlier assessment of biodiversity in Africa. “But we can show that there are trade-offs, that if you don't take into account the value that nature provides, then ultimately human well-being will be compromised.”

In the next two years, diplomats from around the world will gather for several meetings under the Convention on Biological Diversity, a global treaty, to discuss how they can step up their efforts at conservation. Yet even in the new report's most optimistic scenario, through 2050 the world’s nations would only slow the decline of biodiversity — not stop it.

“At this point,” said Jake Rice, a fisheries scientist who led an earlier report on biodiversity in the Americas, “our options are all about damage control.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Brad Plumer is a reporter covering climate change, energy policy and other environmental issues for The New York Times's climate team.

• A version of this article appears in The New York Times on Tuesday, May 7, 2019, on Page A1 of the New York print edition with the headline: “Wildlife Facing Extinction Risk All Over Globe”.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/06/climate/biodiversity-extinction-united-nations.html
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7978



WWW
« Reply #1254 on: May 09, 2019, 12:15:55 am »


we need wars to get rid of humans
Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1255 on: May 09, 2019, 02:52:36 pm »



Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1256 on: May 10, 2019, 03:16:57 pm »



Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1257 on: May 17, 2019, 07:12:33 pm »


from The Washington Post…

It was 84 degrees near the Arctic Ocean this weekend
as carbon dioxide hit its highest level in human history


The carbon dioxide milestone and unusual warmth in northwest
Russia blend into the portrait of human-induced climate change.


By JASON SAMENOW | 2:55PM EDT — Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Carbon dioxide levels from approximately 1750 to the present day. — Graph: Scripps Institute of Oceanography.
Carbon dioxide levels from approximately 1750 to the present day. — Graph: Scripps Institute of Oceanography.

OVER THE WEEKEND, the climate system sounded simultaneous alarms. Near the entrance to the Arctic Ocean in northwest Russia, the temperature surged to 84 degrees Fahrenheit (29 degrees Celsius). Meanwhile, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere eclipsed 415 parts per million for the first time in human history.

By themselves, these are just data points. But taken together with so many indicators of an altered atmosphere and rising temperatures, they blend into the unmistakable portrait of human-induced climate change.

Saturday's steamy 84-degree reading was posted in Arkhangelsk, Russia, where the average high temperature is around 54 this time of year. The city of 350,000 people sits next to the White Sea, which feeds into the Arctic Ocean's Barents Sea.




In Koynas, a rural area to the east of Arkhangelsk, it was even hotter on Sunday, soaring to 87 degrees (31 degrees Celsius). Many locations in Russia, from the Kazakhstan border to the White Sea, set record-high temperatures over the weekend, some 30 to 40 degrees (around 20 degrees Celsius) above average. The warmth also bled west into Finland, which hit 77 degrees (25 degrees Celsius) on Saturday, the country's warmest temperature of the season so far.

The abnormally warm conditions in this region stemmed from a bulging zone of high pressure centered over western Russia. This particular heat wave, while a manifestation of the arrangement of weather systems and fluctuations in the jet stream, fits into what has been an unusually warm year across the Arctic and most of the mid-latitudes.

In Greenland, for example, the ice sheet's melt season began about a month early. In Alaska, several rivers saw winter ice break up on their earliest dates on record.

Across the Arctic overall, the extent of sea ice has hovered near a record low for weeks.




Data from the Japan Meteorological Agency show April was the second warmest on record for the entire planet.

These changes all have occurred against the backdrop of unremitting increases in carbon dioxide, which has now crossed another symbolic threshold.

Saturday's carbon dioxide measurement of 415 parts per million at Hawaii's Mauna Loa Observatory is the highest in at least 800,000 years and probably over 3 million years. Carbon dioxide levels have risen by nearly 50 percent since the Industrial Revolution.

The clip at which carbon dioxide has built up in the atmosphere has risen in recent years. Ralph Keeling, director of the program that monitors the gas at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, tweeted that its accumulation in the last year is “on the high end”.

Carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas that, along with the rise of several other such heat-trapping gases, is the primary cause of climate warming in recent decades, scientists have concluded.

Eighteen of the 19 warmest years on record for the planet have occurred since 2000, and we keep observing these highly unusual and often record-breaking high temperatures.

They won't stop soon, but cuts to greenhouse emissions would eventually slow them down.


__________________________________________________________________________

Jason Samenow has loved weather since he was a boy. At the University of Virginia, he earned a degree in environmental science, focusing in atmospheric science. He went on to earn a master's degree in atmospheric science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2000. Samenow is The Washington Post's weather editor. From 2000 to September 2010, he worked as a climate change analyst for the federal government, monitoring, analyzing and communicating the science of climate change. He founded CapitalWeather.com in early 2004, the first professional weather blog on the Internet, which became part of The Washington Post in 2008. Samenow is a past chairman of the D.C. Chapter of the American Meteorological Society and a Weather and Society Integrated Studies Fellow. He earned the Digital Seal of Approval from the National Weather Association.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Vietnam just observed its highest temperature ever recorded: 110 degrees, in April

 • Red-hot planet: Last summer's punishing and historic heat in 7 maps and charts


https://www.washingtonpost.com/weather/2019/05/14/it-was-degrees-near-arctic-ocean-this-weekend-carbon-dioxide-hit-its-highest-level-human-history
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1258 on: May 17, 2019, 09:38:24 pm »


from The Seattle Times…

Leading the charge in climate battle

Washington state takes big steps toward curbing climate changing carbon.

By DAVID HORSEY | 9:17AM PDT — Tuesday, May 14, 2019



WITH A big push from Governor Jay Inslee and the votes of the Democrats who control both houses of the Legislature, new laws have been enacted to cut carbon emissions in Washington state. The most significant measure mandates that electrical utilities in the state must cease using coal by 2025 and natural gas by 2045.

While the national government has, for two years, been retreating from the fight against climate change, Washington and other key states — California, in particular — have kept the United States inching forward in the battle to mitigate the dire consequences of rising global temperatures.


__________________________________________________________________________

• See more of David Horsey's cartoons at The Seattle Times HERE.

https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/leading-the-charge-in-climate-battle
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1259 on: May 17, 2019, 10:51:31 pm »



Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7978



WWW
« Reply #1260 on: May 17, 2019, 11:53:23 pm »


climate climax fear porn fake news
a supernova destroys the whole universe

we all die

the end  Grin hahaha
Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1261 on: May 18, 2019, 12:02:35 am »



Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1262 on: May 30, 2019, 03:38:28 pm »



Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1263 on: May 30, 2019, 03:40:11 pm »


from The Seattle Times…

What orca extinction sounds like

The human clatter on the surface of the sea is a death knell for
the creatures below, particularly sound-sensitive killer whales.


By DAVID HORSEY | 2:45PM PDT — Wednesday, May 22, 2019



THERE ARE more than 300,000 ferry sailings in the Salish Sea in a single year. Washington waters also host 6,330 cargo, container and passenger vessels and 1,134 oil tankers and barge tows annually. Add to that a fleet of small, but noisy, pleasure craft zipping across the waves and it adds up to a cacophony of sound that is nothing like music to the sensitive hearing of the orcas.

The sleek killer whales that have been emblematic of the Northwest since before white settlers arrived are imperiled because of all the racket. Already stressed by pollution and the diminished salmon population on which they feed, the orcas are finding it increasingly difficult to locate the prey that remain because their highly sensitive sonic capability is being drowned out by all the sound of human machinery. The conveyors of commerce on the surface of the sea are clanging a death knell for the creatures below.


__________________________________________________________________________

• See more of David Horsey's cartoons at The Seattle Times HERE.

https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/what-orca-extinction-sounds-like
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1264 on: May 30, 2019, 03:44:40 pm »


from The Seattle Times…

Welcome to the Ever-brown State

Breathe in the fresh air while you still can, as droughts become the new normal for Washington.

By DAVID HORSEY | 12:42PM PDT — Thursday, May 23, 2019



WASHINGTON had a pretty good ski season with a nice, steady dump of snow, but that snowpack has disappeared rapidly in this spring's warmth. Water from melting snow will be in short supply this summer to power dams, help irrigate crops and keep streams and rivers at levels and temperatures that sustain fish runs. Governor Jay Inslee declared this week that nearly half of the state is heading into a serious drought.

The unusually dry summer could well bring even more wildfires than last year, which means more smoke fogging our sunny skies and choking sensitive lungs. It would be nice to think this year is an aberration, but the reality is that more frequent droughts will be a new normal for the Evergreen State as the effects of climate change become more pronounced. Breathe in the fresh air while you still can.


__________________________________________________________________________

• See more of David Horsey's cartoons at The Seattle Times HERE.

https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/welcome-to-the-ever-brown-state
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1265 on: June 01, 2019, 01:53:28 pm »


from The Seattle Times…

Trump lives in the great state of denial

Climate change is ravaging the country, but the president does not care.

By DAVID HORSEY | 8:26AM PDT — Friday, May 31, 2019



THE HARSH AND DEADLY EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE are becoming more pronounced, from the fast-melting snowpacks, shrinking glaciers and calamitous wildfires in our national parks, to the epic floods and more frequent tornadoes that are pummeling Midwest farm communities. It may be the biggest national-security challenge facing the nation.

Does the Trump administration care? Apparently, not at all. Not only do the president and his policymakers deny the reality of the global temperature rise driven by human-generated carbon emissions, they are actively undermining government scientists and researchers while loosening restrictions on polluting industries. Of all the outrages and assaults on the American people being perpetrated by President Donald Trump, his attack on climate science may be his most calamitous legacy to humanity.


__________________________________________________________________________

• See more of David Horsey's cartoons at The Seattle Times HERE.

https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/the-great-state-of-denial
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1266 on: August 04, 2019, 06:20:07 pm »


from The Washington Post…

Europe's flight-shame movement has travelers taking trains to save the planet

Young Europeans are digging out their parents' yellowing Europe-by-rail guidebooks.

By MICHAEL BIRNHAUM | 3:41PM EDT — Friday, August 02, 2019

Johan Hilm traveled from Stockholm to Austria in a 30-hour trip by train, bus and ferry. — Photograph: Darian Woehr/The Washington Post.
Johan Hilm traveled from Stockholm to Austria in a 30-hour trip by train, bus and ferry. — Photograph: Darian Woehr/The Washington Post.

STOCKHOLM — If he had hopped on a plane, Johan Hilm would have gotten from Sweden to Austria in two hours.

Instead, the lanky Swede made an epic overland journey by rail, bus and ferry that took more than 30 hours.

He joined a growing crowd of Europeans who are spurning air travel out of concern for the environment this summer.

Budget airlines such as Ireland's Ryanair and British easyJet revolutionized European travel two decades ago, when they first started offering to scoot people across the continent for as little as $20 a flight. That mode of travel, once celebrated as an opening of the world, is now being recognized for its contribution to global problems.

Tourists have been spooked by the realization that one passenger's share of the exhaust from a single flight can cancel out a year's worth of Earth-friendly efforts. And so they are digging out their parents' yellowing Europe-by-rail guidebooks and trading tips on the most convenient night train to Vienna.

Mark Smith, founder of Seat 61, a popular website dedicated to train-based travel around Europe and beyond, said he has noticed a change in the people coming to his site. When he set it up in 2001, users told him they loved trains, or were scared of flying, or couldn't fly.

“Now, when people tell me why they are taking the train, they say two things in the same breath: They say they are fed up with the stress of flying, and they want to cut their carbon footprint,” Smith said.

So far, the biggest shift has been in green-conscious Sweden, where airline executives blame increased train travel — up one-third this summer compared with a year ago — for a drop in air passenger traffic.


In Sweden, flygskam, or “flight shame,” has encouraged some travelers to switch to trains. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.
In Sweden, flygskam, or “flight shame,” has encouraged some travelers to switch to trains. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.

Hilm reduced his carbon emissions by 80 percent by taking trains, a bus and a ferry instead of a plane. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.
Hilm reduced his carbon emissions by 80 percent by taking trains, a bus and a ferry instead of a plane. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.

Swedish leaders this month announced they would inject new cash into the national rail company. They plan to build up a new fleet of trains after years of cutbacks when cheap plane tickets were luring people into the skies.

The newly coined concept of flygskam, or “flight shame”, has turned some Swedes bashful about their globe-trotting. A guerrilla campaign used Instagram to tally the planet-busting travels of top Swedish celebrities. Next door in Norway, meanwhile, the prime minister felt the need to assure citizens that they need not apologize for flying to see family in the high north.

Hilm, 31, a health-care consultant who was on his way to hike across Austria for eight days, said he tried to live an environmentally responsible life. “I don't drive a car. I eat mostly vegetarian. I live in an apartment, not a big house.”

He was stunned when he assessed the impact of his flights. “I did one of those calculators you can do online,” he said, “and 80 percent of my emissions were from travel.”

“I don't want to say I'll never fly again, but I do want to be conscious about the decisions I make,” Hilm added over coffee in the Stockholm-to-Copenhagen train's bistro car. Little kids bounced on the squishy red banquette seats nearby. In the passenger compartments, some people dozed, others played card games. Out the window, cows looked up from their fields as the train hurtled through at 120 mph.

Environmentally friendly travel can require a time investment. To get to Austria, Hilm took a 5½-hour train trip to Copenhagen, a 1¾-hour bus to the Danish coast, a 45-minute ferry to Germany, a 90-minute train to Hamburg, an 11-hour night train to southern Germany and a final three-hour train.

He left his Stockholm apartment before 6 a.m. on a Wednesday. He arrived at his Alpine destination after noon the next day.

What was it worth? Measuring carbon dioxide emissions from travel can be an inexact science. One popular online calculator suggested that Hilm's trip would have led to about 577 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions if he had flown, compared with 118 pounds by rail, a savings of 80 percent.


The Stockholm-to-Copenhagen train speeds past fields and forests. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.
The Stockholm-to-Copenhagen train speeds past fields and forests. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.

Train attendant Iris Grundström tidies the bistro car of the Stockholm-to-Copenhagen train. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.
Train attendant Iris Grundström tidies the bistro car of the Stockholm-to-Copenhagen train. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.

In the first six months of 2019, air passenger traffic was down 3.8 percent in Sweden compared with the previous year. Climate concerns are among several reasons for the downturn, said Jean-Marie Skoglund, an aviation expert at the Swedish Transport Agency. He said a slowing economy, tax changes and an airline bankruptcy were other factors.

Across Europe, air travel still ticked up — by 4.4 percent — in the first quarter of 2019, according to figures from Airports Council International Europe, an industry group. But for young, green Europeans, saying no to flying is becoming a thing.

The shift has been inspired in part by Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old Swedish climate campaigner who sparked a worldwide school strike and has been crisscrossing Europe by train as she pressures politicians to do more about the environment. Thunberg has not been on a plane since 2015. This week, she said she would soon travel to the United States — by sailboat.

Record heat this summer and last has also focused attention on climate change and influenced travel plans. Hilm set out on his trip during a heat wave that brought all-time high temperatures to Paris, Britain, Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands.

“If you want to reduce your environmental impact, the best thing you can do is to stop flying,” said Susanna Elfors, founder of a Facebook group called Tagsemester, or Train Vacation, that has been credited with helping to spur train travel. Users exchange practical tips and cheer on each other's journeys. The Swedish-language group now has 99,000 members — which could mean that 1 percent of Sweden's 10 million people are using it.

The aviation sector generates about 2.5 percent of global carbon dioxide emissions — meaning it's only a small fraction of the problem. A European Union list released in April ranked Ryanair among Europe's top 10 carbon emitters, grouping the airline with companies that operate coal-fired power plants. “Passengers travelling on Ryanair have the lowest CO² emissions per kilometer traveled than any other airline,” the company responded in a statement.

European leaders are beginning to reconsider how much they should encourage plane travel. Jet fuel is currently untaxed in the E.U., unlike in the United States. France this month announced it would introduce an eco-tax on flights originating at French airports, with the money to be reinvested in rail networks and other environmentally friendly transport. Several other European countries have imposed or increased flight taxes. The Dutch government is lobbying for an E.U.-wide tax on aviation.

Even some airlines have gotten in on the “fly less” message.

“Think about flying responsibly,” Dutch airline KLM said in an advertisement unveiled this month. Unusually, it suggested considering a different form of transportation: “Could you take the train instead?”


The view from a train traveling between Malmö, Sweden, and Copenhagen. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.
The view from a train traveling between Malmö, Sweden, and Copenhagen. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.

Linnea Rothin, 23, and Marcus Nygren, 27, at Copenhagen Central Station. They have been traveling by train because of environmental concerns. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.
Linnea Rothin, 23, and Marcus Nygren, 27, at Copenhagen Central Station. They have been traveling by train because of environmental concerns.
 — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.


Airlines say they are taking steps to be greener. SAS, the largest airline in Scandinavia, is ending in-flight duty-free sales and asking passengers to pre-book meals so planes can be lighter and more fuel-efficient. Pilots have been urged to taxi on the ground with only one engine switched on.

Anxiety about climate change is “playing a part, for sure,” in Sweden's dropping air passenger traffic, said SAS chief executive Rickard Gustafson. He said the airline was pushing to expand its use of renewable fuels as quickly as possible.

He said, however, the world needs air travel.

“The society that we all enjoy, the wealth and the social security that we all have — without aviation, it would all collapse,” he said.

To be sure, there are limits to train travel. It can be time-consuming, and the transit is not always painless. Travelers on the Swedish Facebook group complain of trains without air conditioning that turn into saunas and delays that cause missed connections.

Marcus Nygren and Linnea Rothin, a Swedish couple who just returned from a three-week rail trip around central Europe, said on one stretch, they were crammed into a night train compartment with a woman who spoke neither the local language nor anything they could speak, and who was traveling with a vast assortment of baggage, including what appeared to be a sewing machine.

They also saw train travel as liberating.

“I've dreamed about going to an airport, looking at the board and saying, ‘Okay, I want to go there’. And that's pretty much what we've done,” only by rail, said Nygren, 27.

They bought Pan-European Inter-rail passes and set out with only a first destination in mind. Then they improvised their way from the Czech Republic to Hungary to Austria to Croatia to Slovenia to Germany. It was the first time either had traveled that way.

“Before, it would be, like, ‘Okay, I'm traveling to Italy’,” Rothin, 23, said. By rail and on the ground, she said, “you can kind of understand the way the countries influence each other,” as one culture shades into another.


Nygren and Rothin play the game “Hive” on their return train to Sweden. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.
Nygren and Rothin play the game “Hive” on their return train to Sweden. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.

The view from a Copenhagen-to-Stockholm train. Some travelers say taking trains has given them a new understanding of Europe. — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.
The view from a Copenhagen-to-Stockholm train. Some travelers say taking trains has given them a new understanding of Europe.
 — Photograph: Rebecka Uhlin/for The Washington Post.


Climate change experts caution that meaningful shifts will need to happen on a structural level that goes beyond any individual's private actions.

“In terms of personal climate activism broadly, whether you're talking about aviation, reducing the amount of meat you eat, consumption choices, the answer is always: It is important, but it is insufficient,” said Greg Carlock, a manager at the World Resources Institute, a Washington think tank.

Rail travelers say they simply want to lead climate-friendlier lives — and that they are delighted they already seem to have spurred a move to invest more in the Swedish rail system.

“You can do a lot of things on your own, but you also have to understand it's part of the ecosystem,” Rothin said.


__________________________________________________________________________

Karla Adam in London contributed to this report.

Michael Birnbaum is the Brussels bureau chief for The Washington Post. He previously served as the bureau chief in Moscow and in Berlin, and was an education reporter. He has covered the conflict in Ukraine, the Egyptian revolution, the fall of Libyan leader Moammar Gaddafi and the Arab Spring elsewhere in the Middle East. He has also worked at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Birnbaum has a degree in German history from Yale University. He grew up in Chicago.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO:‘Flight shame’: How avoiding planes might save the planet

 • Europe's ‘flight shame’ movement doesn’t stand a chance in the U.S.

 • Should short-haul flights be banned? Climate change is a major issue in elections in Europe and Australia.

 • France moves to combat climate change by making flights more expensive

 • An Airline That Doesn't Want You to Fly. That’s New

 • Listen on Post Reports: By The Way reporter Hannah Sampson on the airline asking its passengers not to fly

 • Teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg addressed French lawmakers. Right-wingers boycotted and mocked her.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/europes-flight-shame-movement-has-travelers-taking-trains-to-save-the-planet/2019/08/02/1bd38486-ac96-11e9-9411-a608f9d0c2d3_story.html
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1267 on: August 10, 2019, 10:18:10 pm »


from The Washington Post…

Climate change isn't an intangible future risk.
It's here now, and it's killing us.


Hundreds have died and thousands have been hospitalized since
the beginning of July as extreme heat waves smothered countries
around the world, a phenomenon scientists warn will intensify.


By KAYLA EPSTEIN | 5:58PM EDT — Friday, August 09, 2019



FOUR HUNDRED DEATHS in the Netherlands. More than 18,000 hospitalizations in Japan. An estimated 169 million people on alert in the United States.

This isn't the plot of a disaster movie. The numbers reflect the impact of extreme heat waves that smothered countries around the world in July and early August, a phenomenon that scientists warn will intensify as the Earth warms.

July was the hottest month on record, said Petteri Taalas, secretary general of the World Meteorological Organization, as he discussed the record. “This is not science fiction. It is the reality of climate change,” he said. “It is happening now, and it will worsen in the future without urgent climate action.”

In the Netherlands, 400 more people died in the next-to-last week of July than normally would have during a typical summer week, the country's statistics agency said on Friday. In the week that began on July 22, 2,964 people died, which is 15 percent more deaths than the country typically sees in a summer week. Scorching heat had toppled records across Europe in late July, and on July 25, Paris experienced its hottest day on record — a previously unthinkable 109 degrees.

On the other side of the planet, a heat wave in Japan stretched from July 29 to August 4 and killed at least 57 people, while more than 18,000 others were taken to hospitals, with 100 in serious condition, The Washington Post reported on Friday. A 50-year-old construction worker toiling on an Olympics project in Tokyo died of suspected heat stroke Thursday, when temperatures reached 95 degrees. Organizers of the Olympics told Reuters that the “precise cause of his death remains unknown,” but still, the city had numerous heat-related fatalities. On Friday, NHK reported that 45 people in Tokyo had died in a week because of the heat.

In the United States, most of the country endured a sweltering heat wave in July; several heat-related deaths were reported across the country. The month saw scorching and unusual temperatures across Alaska.

Heat waves are already deadly. A 2008 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that extreme heat events “are the most prominent cause of weather-related human mortality in the U.S., responsible for more deaths annually than hurricanes, lightning, tornadoes, floods, and earthquakes combined.”

And climate change will only make the situation worse.

Last year's National Climate Assessment, compiled by the Trump administration, warned that heat-related deaths would continue to increase. Climate change would cause illnesses such as asthma and hay fever to become more severe, while wildfires and pollution also posed a risk to respiratory health. Rising temperatures would alter the geographic distribution of disease-carrying insects and pests, endangering new populations.

“Climate change is a public health crisis,” Vijay Limaye told The Washington Post. “The science is really strong in telling us that with climate change accelerating, we expect heat waves to be more frequent, more intense and longer.”

Limaye is currently a fellow at the Natural Resources Defense Council, but used to study the impact of climate change at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. A 2018 study written by Limaye and his former colleagues found that climate change would lead to thousands more heat-related deaths in the eastern United States by the middle of the century. They said 11,562 additional annual deaths could occur among people 65 and older because of cardiovascular stress caused by heat, and increasingly high minimum temperatures would result in 8,767 additional fatalities.

“As a nation and as a globe, we are not prepared to confront an ever-mounting heat risk in terms of our health,” he said. For example, while air conditioning was known to save lives, Limaye warned that increased reliance on the technology could have a harmful long-term effect if the energy used for cooling continued to come from fossil fuels.

“We really need to focus on solutions that can stem the underlying climate problem,” Limaye said, “Or we're not going be able to adapt our way out of this.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Kayla Epstein is a multi-media journalist at The Washington Post who uses traditional reporting as well as social media and open journalism to tell stories and engage readers. She previously worked for The Guardian US, where she worked in support of the Pulitzer Prize-winning team that broke the National Security Agency stories and later spearheaded the audience efforts for the Counted project. Kayla joined The Post in 2016 as a social media editor embedded with the National desk. She covered the 2016 presidential election using social media and emerging platforms, and was a member of the team that won an Edward R. Murrow Award for Excellence in Social Media for its campaign coverage. She focuses on applying her digital journalism skills to an array of topics, including politics, national and breaking news, technology, and more.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: The natural world is under attack. Here's why David Attenborough is still hopeful.

 • Here's how the hottest month in recorded history unfolded around the world

 • Perspective: Europe's killer heat waves are a new norm. The death rates shouldn't be.

 • Heat wave smashes temperature records across Europe

 • Greenland wildfire part of unusual spike in Arctic blazes this summer

 • Europe never understood America's love of air conditioning — until now

 • Opinion: Your air conditioner is making the heat wave worse


https://www.washingtonpost.com/science/2019/08/09/climate-change-isnt-an-intangible-future-risk-its-here-now-its-killing-us
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7978



WWW
« Reply #1268 on: August 16, 2019, 03:25:51 pm »


Yes we have discovered weather
Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1269 on: August 17, 2019, 02:04:40 pm »


Meanwhile, on the island nation of Tuvalu, the southwest Pacific region's pariah island-continent nation is graphically displaying their true, “fuck you” bullying colours to the small nations of the region…





Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7978



WWW
« Reply #1270 on: August 17, 2019, 10:00:43 pm »

looks like you drew that picture
ill give it a 1 out of ten

why are those islands still not underwater yet wtf
Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1271 on: August 17, 2019, 10:09:23 pm »


The island nations of the South Pacific need to tell Australia to fuck-off from the Forum and boot them out.

Those island nations don't need Australia's aid.

They can quite easily get it from China in return for allowing China to establish military bases in their countries.

That'd really piss-off the Aussies and show them the island nations of the South Pacific aren't going to put up with Oz's “fuck-you” bullshit.
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7978



WWW
« Reply #1272 on: August 18, 2019, 01:52:37 pm »

yes why not let china fuck all those island people in the arse
Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1273 on: August 18, 2019, 03:02:28 pm »


As opposed to allowing Australia to fuck them in the arse?

Fuck, you're a stupid moron sometimes.

I'm going to laugh when global-warming induced climate change causes a huge flood through Woodville and wipes out your house.
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30333


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1274 on: August 18, 2019, 03:59:59 pm »


So … tell me … what does it feel like being Woodville's village idiot? 
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 

Pages: 1 ... 46 47 48 49 50 [51] 52 53   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Open XNC2 Smileys
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum


Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy
Page created in 0.125 seconds with 12 queries.