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Some reading for the “anti-warmalists” and “climate-change deniers”


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Author Topic: Some reading for the “anti-warmalists” and “climate-change deniers”  (Read 11380 times)
Donald
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« Reply #650 on: August 11, 2017, 12:04:29 am »

....and that's the great thing about democracy...we get what the majority of us deserve😉

...I wouldn't want it any other way...although I do feel for the minorities...but I manage not to lose any sleep over it😉
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Donald
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« Reply #651 on: August 12, 2017, 11:24:37 am »

....looks like I will have to put off planting the mango trees...
....bloody global cooling😳

Global Warming delivers coldest NZ winter in eight years


It may have been warm overnight this week, but New Zealand is currently experiencing its coldest winter since 2009.

MetService meteorologist Georgina Griffiths said not only has it been cold, the main centres have also experienced more rain than last year, with Christchurch sitting at 134 per cent of its usual rainfall at 551mm compared with 411mm.

However, just to confuse people even more – especially in eastern parts of the country – temperatures are expected to hit 18 degrees, even 20 degrees in Napier, this weekend.

“It has been enormously wet and cold, it’s been a crappy year, basically. It’s an unusual and extremely volatile year.”


A volatile year.  Damn Global Warming.  I knew it was responsible for something.  Cold.  Wet.  And now?  Warm!

Can you believe it? 

She said most towns were “running quite cool bar this recent four or five day warm blip”.

“The temperatures for the first 60 per cent of the year, 220 days, Christchurch is running a full degree and a half cooler than this time last year. That might not sound much but actually when you get a year when it’s 1 degree above the long term average you’re almost into record territory.”

Wellington and Auckland were each running 1 degree colder than last year.

“It may not sound like much, but it’s very significant difference over a seven-month time period.”

OMG!

Surely this indicates the cusp of a mini Ice Age?  You know, like we had during the ’60s?

Or?

Or, the amount of sun spot activity is dropping as per normal solar seasonal variations, and all this is just another normal day in long term climate change.

But fear not Global Warming people.  In the face of the coldest winter in eight years, the scientists have found new hope:

“This is the coldest winter we have had in a long while – since 2009 for many regions. The difference in temperatures between last winter, which was incredibly warm, and this winter, has been absolutely noticeable on the wardrobe, and the power bill.”

MetService duty meteorologist April Clark told the Herald earlier today most of the country was enjoying temperatures on average up to 4C warmer than usual for this time of year.

“It has been, on average, warmer, especially than what we have been having. The last couple weeks of July, pretty much almost every main centre was colder than average. So maybe that’s why it’s feeling so warm.”

Maybe.

Thank goodness we don’t have to rely on uncorrupted science.  We can just go “meh, it feels warm, so… you know, maybe.”

 Nz herald
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #652 on: August 12, 2017, 11:46:49 am »

The normal trend for the last 11000 or so years is gradual warming (with some spikes and troughs) and gradual sea level rise. If this continues it won't be a surprise. If the sun "goes quiet" for a significant period it also won't be a surprise if we get a significant period of no warming, or even bad cold. Don't throw away your long johns.
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #653 on: August 12, 2017, 12:49:33 pm »

I guess all the government funded climate bodies will have to "homogenize" all that evil unpleasant unwarm temp data, again 😁
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #654 on: August 12, 2017, 05:14:42 pm »


from The Washington Post....

EDITORIAL: This is how bad things could get
if Trump denies the reality of climate change


Recent studies provide a glimpse at the dangerous future ahead.

By EDITORIAL BOARD | 7:45PM EDT - Tuesday, August 08, 2017

Parched ground at the Guadalteba reservoir during a strong drought in Ardales, Spain. — Photograph: Jon Nazca/Reuters.
Parched ground at the Guadalteba reservoir during a strong drought in Ardales, Spain. — Photograph: Jon Nazca/Reuters.

OVER THE NEXT WEEK OR SO, the Trump administration must decide whether to approve or suppress a major federal climate change report. Though scientists have signed off on its findings, including that the average U.S. temperature has spiked in the past several decades and that humans have almost certainly played a predominant role, President Trump and Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt have indicated they simply do not believe the experts.

Even as the federal climate assessment has been under review, the warnings have grown starker.

A paper published last week in Nature Climate Change offered a harrowing view. International negotiators committed in Paris to keeping global temperature rise below 2 degrees Celsius, the point past which experts warn warming could be very dangerous. Analysts from the University of Washington and the University of California at Santa Barbara found that there is only a 5 percent chance the world will achieve that goal.

Instead of predicting how technology or policy might change, the researchers looked at how nations have done until now and inferred from those trends what will happen in the future. As economies expand, they emit more planet-warming carbon dioxide into the air. Fortunately, over time economies also produce more efficiently, using less fuel and therefore emitting less carbon dioxide for every widget assembled or mile driven. By projecting population growth, economic expansion and carbon efficiency into the future, the analysts came up with a rough guide to where the global temperature will be at the end of the century.

They found that there is a 90 percent chance the world will warm between 2 degrees and 4.9 degrees Celsius, with a median of 3.2 degrees. Though this avoids the most alarming scenarios scientists have previously considered, it also excludes the least concerning, finding virtually no chance the Earth will keep warming below the desirable level of 1.5 degrees Celsius.

How does this translate into the real world? Some other new research provides answers. Experts at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles found that at 4.5 degrees of temperature rise by 2100, highly populated and impoverished swaths of South Asia would experience heat waves so extreme that human beings would not be able to survive without protection. At 2.25 degrees of warming, heat-wave temperatures in the region would be dangerous but not as deadly. Another new analysis from European Union researchers warned that deaths due to extreme weather across Europe could increase from about 3,000 per year to 152,000 annually if the Earth warmed 3 degrees by century’s end.

Each of these studies comes with caveats. For example, much of the risk would be averted with a strong global commitment to cutting carbon dioxide emissions, particularly if green technology became significantly cheaper, making it easier to decarbonize than in the past. Yet even if the breakthroughs do not come, or do not come fast enough, the latest research suggests it is neither unrealistic nor pointless to aim for the low end of the range of possible climate outcomes, even over 2 degrees, to at least limit the damage to the planet’s habitability. That path, however, requires leaders to admit there is a problem.


__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • The Washington Post's View: California's cap-and-trade program could offer other states guidance

 • Joel Clement: I'm a scientist. I'm blowing the whistle on the Trump administration.

 • The Washington Post's View: The dream of ‘clean coal’ is burning up

 • Robert J. Samuelson: Trump ignores the messy reality of global warming — and makes it all about him


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/this-is-how-bad-things-could-get-if-trump-denies-the-reality-of-climate-change/2017/08/08/087b8bb0-7bae-11e7-9d08-b79f191668ed_story.html
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #655 on: August 12, 2017, 05:15:42 pm »

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Donald
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« Reply #656 on: August 12, 2017, 09:43:58 pm »

Ain't got time to look at cartoons about fantasy, gut it's great to be back home in ....THE SUBTROPICAL NORTH😜
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #657 on: August 12, 2017, 10:48:58 pm »

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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #658 on: August 13, 2017, 01:34:01 am »

Looks like a misrepresentation. Take a look at Vostok and Greenland ice core related graphs.

Also the last twenty years of Satellite data show flat to negligible warming as Co2 reaches new records. Warmunists have made dozens of wild theories of why this is so (this is after they tried to deny this warming pause existed). Again, they make little sense.
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #659 on: August 13, 2017, 02:56:14 am »

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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #660 on: August 13, 2017, 03:28:12 am »

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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #661 on: August 13, 2017, 03:32:14 am »

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« Reply #662 on: August 13, 2017, 03:40:06 am »

Listen to some talks on YouTube by Richard Lindzen, Judith Curry and John Christie. They are accomplished and highly published (yes peer reviewed) sceptics who know what they are talking about. Stefan Molyneux has also put together quite a good explanation of the "97% consensus" scam (he's not a scientist as far as I'm aware but he has assembled the facts in an easy to understand way, for those who bother to question the eco cult of Co2 doom).
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #663 on: August 13, 2017, 03:48:58 am »

Look at the credentials of the scientists I mentioned. There are sites like desmog blog and source watch that try to smear such scientists by weak association with fossil fuel money (they gave a talk at a foundation that received money from big oil etc etc). Desperate propaganda from a failing end of the world cult.
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #664 on: August 13, 2017, 04:06:21 am »

 







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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #665 on: August 13, 2017, 06:42:25 pm »

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Donald
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« Reply #666 on: August 13, 2017, 06:57:40 pm »

Oh jeeezzz....watch out he's going into one of his "cut and paste the same post ad infinitum" fetish attacks🙄
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #667 on: August 13, 2017, 07:41:52 pm »

The spam attacks that wrecked xnc2? I'm sure there's a therapy for that 😁
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Donald
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« Reply #668 on: August 13, 2017, 08:06:59 pm »

Adj......"I'm sure there's a therapy for that 😁"

....yes... there is....but not sure if it's legal😉
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #669 on: August 13, 2017, 10:20:57 pm »

Warmunism is a religion. It's very much like a medieval or stone age religion. Dissidents must be silenced and damaged.
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #670 on: August 19, 2017, 08:25:36 pm »

And what about Arctic sea ice hysteria?



Oh dear, another massive nail in the alarmism coffin.  😀
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #671 on: August 28, 2017, 03:07:05 pm »


from The Washington Post....

How Harvey went from a little-noticed storm to a behemoth

More than 9 trillion gallons of water have fallen over eastern Texas as worst-case scenarios unfold.

By SANDHYA SOMASHEKHAR | 6:06PM EDT - Sunday, August 27, 2017

This photo made available by NASA shows Hurricane Harvey over Texas on Saturday, as seen from the International Space Station. — Photograph: Jack Fischer/Associated Press.
This photo made available by NASA shows Hurricane Harvey over Texas on Saturday, as seen from the International Space Station.
 — Photograph: Jack Fischer/Associated Press.


EVEN IF Hurricane Harvey had been a milder storm, spinning lazily across the Gulf of Mexico, there would have been reasons for alarm early last week.

For starters, the jet stream — the air current that meanders across the continent, pushing storms along a familiar path — flowed far north of Texas, and thus when Harvey crashed into the state there was nothing in the atmosphere to shove it somewhere else. Harvey stalled.

After making landfall, the storm took a path that positioned it almost perfectly to drag huge bands of rain out of the Gulf and onto the metropolis of Houston, which is interlaced with rivers and bayous and paved over with impervious urban surfaces. Essentially parked near the coastal town of Victoria, Harvey has dumped trillions of gallons of water across Southeast Texas.

Harvey also proved that the Gulf of Mexico — in late August, in a warming climate — can prove explosive for the development of what is generically called a tropical cyclone. In barely more than a day the storm went from a disorganized tropical depression to a significant hurricane and then all the way up to Category 4 — the second-highest rating on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane intensity scale, which is based on wind speed.

The result: a record-setting storm that within 24 hours plunged much of the nation's fourth-largest city and its surroundings under feet of choppy brown water. It threatens to submerge even more of the region during the next few days.

“There are a lot of worst-case-scenario stars that aligned,” said Marshall Shepherd, a professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Georgia and a past president of the American Meteorological Society. “As bad as it is now, we still have days of this to go.”

The National Weather Service downgraded Harvey to a Category 1 hurricane on Saturday and then to the status of a tropical storm. The rating change might have given people a false sense of security that the worst of the storm was over.

On social media and elsewhere, weather officials and meteorologists emphasized that the danger had not passed and was actually just beginning.

“More people die of inland flooding than any other hurricane threat,” the National Weather Service tweeted multiple times.

“Houston, let me be blunt,” Travis Herzog, a meteorologist for the ABC affiliate in Houston said on Twitter early on Saturday. “Prepare for a flood today. Prepare for multiple tornadoes. Do not underestimate #Harvey. Respect the water.”

A stunning amount of rain has fallen over Texas so far, and it is expected to continue for several more days as the storm creeps along, weakening slightly. In general, things will probably get worse before they get better; some areas might see as many as 50 inches of rainfall when all is said and done, wreaking damage that experts predict could lead to years of recovery across the region.


Hurricane Harvey approaches the Texas Gulf Coast in this GOES East satellite image by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on August 25th. — Picture: NOAA/Reuters.
Hurricane Harvey approaches the Texas Gulf Coast in this GOES East satellite image by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
on August 25th. — Picture: NOAA/Reuters.


As of Sunday afternoon, the storm had deposited 9 trillion gallons over Southeast Texas, as bands of rain picked up moisture from the Gulf. That's enough water to fill up the Great Salt Lake twice over, meteorology student Matthew Cappucci wrote for The Washington Post.

“Just how unprecedented is this?” Cappucci wrote. “Well, remember the flooding that New Orleans experienced with Hurricane Katrina? Most places saw about 10 to 20 feet of water thanks to levee failure, inundating about 80 percent of the city. Now, if we took the amount of rainfall that Texas has seen and spread it over the city limits of New Orleans, it would tower to 128 feet in height — roughly reaching as high as a 12-story office building.”

Experts say the lack of “steering currents” to move the storm along is unusual and probably responsible for the scale of the flooding. As of Sunday evening, the center of the storm was virtually parked at a spot about 25 miles northwest of the coastal town of Victoria — crawling southeast at 2 miles per hour toward the Gulf.

With a more common tropical storm, the damage in any one place would be mitigated by the fact that the storms move quickly, spreading the rain over a larger area.

Perhaps making things worse is something called the “brown ocean effect,” which hypothesizes that storms, which typically get their energy over the ocean or another large body of water, can absorb that energy and moisture from rain-soaked land. “The land, in effect, mimics the energy supply of the ocean,” University of Maryland Baltimore County professor Jeff Halverson wrote for the Capital Weather Gang.


Joel Achenbach and Jason Samenow contributed to this report.

• Sandhya Somashekhar is the social change reporter for The Washington Post.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • NOTE: Because of Hurricane Harvey, The Washington Post is temporarily removing the limit on the number of articles that can be read without a subscription.

 • VIDEO:  Texans battle against Harvey's destruction

 • Scope of Harvey's destruction starts to come into chilling focus

 • FEMA director: Recovery from Harvey will last ‘many years’

 • Catastrophic flooding ‘expected to worsen’ in Houston metro area

 • Should Houston have been evacuated?

 • Graphic: Tracking the severe flooding

 • Texans struggling against Harvey: ‘We've been through a lot of hurricanes, but we've never been stuck like this’

 • From little-noticed storm to behemoth: Gulf of Mexico in a warming climate can prove explosive

 • How Hurricane Harvey's wrath will impact prices at the gas pump

 • A photo of a dog carrying his food after Harvey hit Texas went viral. Here's his story.

 • What you can and can't say about climate change and Hurricane Harvey


https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/how-harvey-went-from-a-little-noticed-storm-to-a-behemoth/2017/08/27/2810c15a-8b5f-11e7-8df5-c2e5cf46c1e2_story.html
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #672 on: August 28, 2017, 03:08:26 pm »


It's good to see Mother Earth dishing out a bit of karma to the polluting USA and in particular, to the gun-toting, Trump-voting, bible-bashing wasteful wankers in Texas.

What goes around eventually tends to come back around again.
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Donald
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« Reply #673 on: August 28, 2017, 06:32:25 pm »

...yeah....nah....all a cunning plan by Mother Earth...well spotted....this is the guy who thinks people are mad to believe in god🙄
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Donald
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« Reply #674 on: August 28, 2017, 06:59:02 pm »


..hang on....so to cut our emissions in half and live in caves....we would save 0.08% of world emissions....so...basically..even if we did nothing...the result would be harder to measure than the margin of error....let's just be responsible but not stuff our economy pushing a mountain of shit uphill🙄... perhaps just being content playing the insignificant little country that we are...albeit with many inflated egos..would sf


This is a list of countries by total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in 2013. It is based on data for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, perfluorocarbon, hydrofluorocarbon, and sulfur hexafluoride emissions compiled by the World Resources Institute.[1] The emissions data shown below do not include land-use change and forestry.

List of countries by 2013 emissions   Edit

Country   GHG emissions
(MtCO2e)   Percentage of global total
(%)
World   45261.2517   100.00%
 China   11735.0071   25.93%
 United States   6279.8362   13.87%
 European Union (28)[2]   4224.5217   9.33%
 European Union (15)[3]   3374.0348   7.45%
 India   2909.0566   6.43%
 Russia   2199.1173   4.86%
 Japan   1353.3473   2.99%
 Brazil   1017.8745   2.25%
 Germany   894.0570   1.98%
 Indonesia   744.3403   1.64%
 Canada   738.3825   1.63%
 Mexico   733.0104   1.62%
 Iran   716.8149   1.58%
 South Korea   673.5412   1.49%
 Australia   580.0997   1.28%
 Saudi Arabia   546.8181   1.21%
 United Kingdom   546.2641   1.21%
 South Africa   510.2377   1.13%
 France   440.8485   0.97%
 Italy   420.8244   0.93%
 Turkey   408.4574   0.90%
 Ukraine   375.6670   0.83%
 Thailand   369.4310   0.82%
 Poland   361.1905   0.80%
 Argentina   334.2374   0.74%
 Pakistan   326.7740   0.72%
 Kazakhstan   313.7248   0.69%
 Spain   306.6117   0.68%
 Nigeria   304.0637   0.67%
 Malaysia   303.1518   0.67%
 Iraq   284.5679   0.63%
 Egypt   272.3785   0.60%
 Venezuela   268.4274   0.59%
 Vietnam   256.7606   0.57%
 Uzbekistan   225.7986   0.50%
 United Arab Emirates   221.4243   0.49%
 Kuwait   195.7803   0.43%
 Algeria   187.2679   0.41%
 Netherlands   186.7775   0.41%
 Philippines   171.6044   0.38%
 Bangladesh   163.6298   0.36%
 Colombia   159.5837   0.35%
 Angola   155.7220   0.34%
 Libya   133.0112   0.29%
 Ethiopia   123.3709   0.27%
 Czech Republic   120.9859   0.27%
 Belgium   113.4088   0.25%
 Turkmenistan   112.2850   0.25%
 Romania   109.4851   0.24%
 Chile   103.5626   0.23%
 Oman   101.7895   0.22%
 Myanmar   98.7527   0.22%
 Belarus   90.4979   0.20%
 Israel   89.5907   0.20%
 Greece   86.9692   0.19%
 Peru        86.2102   0.19%
 Cameroon   83.2755   0.18%
 Qatar   82.8463   0.18%
 Morocco   78.8839   0.17%
 Austria   78.4743   0.17%
 Tanzania   77.9457   0.17%
 New Zealand   75.0919   0.17%
 Azerbaijan   69.7221

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