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Some reading for the “anti-warmalists” and “climate-change deniers”


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Author Topic: Some reading for the “anti-warmalists” and “climate-change deniers”  (Read 11338 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #900 on: September 20, 2017, 04:15:24 pm »

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« Reply #901 on: September 20, 2017, 04:16:57 pm »

For them it's a side issue which they most likely don't give a shit about. In public the will just say whatever the govt says is the official line.

The loony left will of course scour the earth for this or that military individual who will say what the left wants to hear.


Okay, so we can take it from that piece of wisdom that the US military are full-of-shit because the generals don't have a mind of their own.

Thank you for clarifying that the US military, as I have always suspected, is full-of-shit.
 
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #902 on: September 20, 2017, 10:08:25 pm »

I'd highly recommend logic 101. It's a valuable paper 😁
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« Reply #903 on: September 20, 2017, 10:14:52 pm »

Why do you keep posting the same shit?🤔
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« Reply #904 on: October 03, 2017, 08:26:47 pm »

Why do you keep posting the same shit?🤔


Well, I keep posting that brilliant chart at the top of every fresh page on this thread so you flat-earthers/anti-warmalists/climate-change-deniers keep getting reminded of how you are idiots with your heads buried deep in the sand as you desperately look for “fake science” in a vain attempt to debunk what conventional science is telling humans about the way they have been trashing their planet.
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« Reply #905 on: October 03, 2017, 08:29:20 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Death of gas and diesel begins as GM announces
plans for ‘all-electric future’


The announcement comes on the heels of the Chevy Bolt's success.

By PETER HOLLEY | 2:53PM EDT - Monday, October 02, 2017

A Chevrolet Bolt is ringed by electric and fuel cell vehicles covered by tarps. On October 2nd, General Motors announced that it will produce two new electric models on the Bolt underpinnings in the next 18 months and 20 electric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles by 2023. — Photograph: General Motors/Associated Press.
A Chevrolet Bolt is ringed by electric and fuel cell vehicles covered by tarps. On October 2nd, General Motors announced that it will produce
two new electric models on the Bolt underpinnings in the next 18 months and 20 electric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles by 2023.
 — Photograph: General Motors/Associated Press.


AFTER nearly a century of building vehicles powered by fossil fuels, General Motors — one of the world's largest automakers — announced on Monday that the end of GM producing internal combustion engines is fast approaching.

The acceleration to an all-electric future will begin almost immediately, with GM releasing two new electric models next year and an additional 18 by 2023.

At a media event at GM's technical campus in Warren, Michigan, on Monday, Mark Reuss, the company's chief of global product development, said the transition will take time, but the course has been set.

“General Motors believes in an all-electric future,” Reuss said. “Although that future won't happen overnight, GM is committed to driving increased usage and acceptance of electric vehicles.”

Reuss avoided naming the year when the auto giant will cease producing gas and diesel vehicles, noting that the company is too large to make such an estimate, according to USA Today.

GM finished 2016 as the world's third-largest auto-seller, breaking previous company records with 10 million vehicles sold, the company said in a news release.

The automaker said that arriving at a “zero emissions future” will require a two-pronged approach: battery electric and hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles.

At Monday's event, Fast Company reported, officials unveiled three concepts for reporters: “a sporty crossover, a larger wagon or SUV and a tall, boxy pod car that looked like a people-mover for cities”.

GM also introduced a fuel-cell-powered heavy-duty truck with two electric motors known as Surus, or “silent utility rover universal superstructure”.

GM's foray into the electric marketplace has already resulted in resounding success, with the Chevrolet Bolt being named Motor Trend's 2017 Car of the Year and the 2017 North American Car of the Year. The Bolt boasts a 240-mile battery range on a single charge and costs $37,500 before tax incentives. That range places the vehicle well above the Nissan Leaf (up to 107 miles on a single charge) and slightly above Tesla's Model 3 (up to 220 miles on a single charge for a standard battery).

As GM commits to electric innovation, the company will compete in an increasingly crowded marketplace. In recent months, Tesla unveiled the company's first mass market electric vehicle, joining companies such as Ford, Volvo, Nissan, Aston Martin and Jaguar Land Rover, all of whom are vying for market space.

On Monday, Ford announced plans to create a group known as “Team Edison” that is to be tasked with developing fully electric cars. Sherif Marakby, Ford's head of electrification and autonomous vehicles, told Automotive News that the company is on pace to produce 13 electrified vehicles over the next five years.

“We see an inflection point in the major markets toward battery electric vehicles,” Marakby said. “We feel it's important to have a cross-functional team all the way from defining the strategy plans and implementation to advanced marketing.”


• Peter Holley is a technology reporter at The Washington Post.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Take a ride in Chevy's Bolt EV, the car that wants to take down Tesla

 • VIDEO: How to Adult: How to buy a car

 • ‘We understand what needs to be fixed’, Tesla says after missing Model 3 production goals

 • Tesla's Model 3 has ‘mass appeal’. That doesn't mean you can afford it.

 • Volvo says it will abandon traditional engines by 2019


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/innovations/wp/2017/10/02/death-of-diesel-begins-as-gm-announces-plans-for-all-electric-future
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #906 on: October 03, 2017, 09:50:48 pm »

$60000+ for an electric Mr Bean cart?😁
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #907 on: October 03, 2017, 09:52:52 pm »

Um, I didn't notice any signs of the death of fossil fuel cars on the freeway this evening.😀
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« Reply #908 on: October 04, 2017, 05:18:34 am »

how will they produce the electricity to power these milk cartons on wheels?
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« Reply #909 on: October 04, 2017, 10:16:58 am »

BURN MORE COAL?😜
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« Reply #910 on: October 04, 2017, 10:18:59 am »

KTJs dream car...



😁
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« Reply #911 on: October 04, 2017, 10:31:08 am »


...wonder what safety rating t big would have...looks suicidal😳

Haha....can't wait to him on the road in my 5 litre V8😜

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« Reply #912 on: October 04, 2017, 10:35:51 am »

The end goal of lefty watermelons is to piss off motorists. They are driven by internal knee-jerk hatred rather than rational analysis.
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« Reply #913 on: October 04, 2017, 10:39:21 am »

Ditto almost any issue they are involved in. Rational analysis enrages them. That's because of their unresolved mental issues to do with the inability to deal with the world as it really is (basically not growing up) , without going off on childish knee-jerk abuse and anger.
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #914 on: October 04, 2017, 12:37:54 pm »

how will they produce the electricity to power these milk cartons on wheels?


Put solar panels on your roof.

No more paying money to greedy oil companies.
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« Reply #915 on: October 04, 2017, 12:39:49 pm »

KTJs dream car...


Well, actually, no.

If I purchased an EV, it would most likely be a Renault ZOE.

I'd go for the Signature Nav version....400km range between charges.


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« Reply #916 on: October 04, 2017, 12:42:30 pm »

Haha....can't wait to him on the road in my 5 litre V8


Even a Nissan Leaf would leave your 5-litre V8 choking in the dust at the traffic lights.

Don't you know that electric motors develop maximum torque and horsepower right from the time they start rotating?

Why do you think diesel-electric locomotives can walk away with a train weighing thousands of tonnes coupled onto the rear drawgear?

It's those electric traction motors.

Fuck, you're thick & stupid....DUMBARSE!!
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« Reply #917 on: October 04, 2017, 01:06:08 pm »

..haha...I was talking about in opposite directions😜
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« Reply #918 on: October 10, 2017, 02:19:07 pm »


from The Washington Post....

There's enough wind energy over the oceans to power
human civilization, scientists say


Wind energy over the open oceans could provide tremendous amounts of power,
if we find a way to capture it.


By CHRIS MOONEY | 3:12PM EDT - Monday, October 09, 2017

An offshore wind farm stands in the water near the Danish island of Samso, May 19th, 2008. — Photograph: Bob Strong/Reuters.
An offshore wind farm stands in the water near the Danish island of Samso, May 19th, 2008. — Photograph: Bob Strong/Reuters.

NEW RESEARCH published on Monday finds there is so much wind energy potential over oceans that it could theoretically be used to generate “civilization scale power” — assuming, that is, that we are willing to cover enormous stretches of the sea with turbines, and can come up with ways to install and maintain them in often extreme ocean environments.

It's very unlikely that we would ever build out open ocean turbines on anything like that scale — indeed, doing so could even alter the planet's climate, the research finds. But the more modest message is that wind energy over the open oceans has large potential — reinforcing the idea that floating wind farms, over very deep waters, could be the next major step for wind energy technology.

“I would look at this as kind of a greenlight for that industry from a geophysical point of view,” said Ken Caldeira of the Carnegie Institution for Science in Stanford, California. The study, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was led by Carnegie researcher Anna Possner, who worked in collaboration with Caldeira.

The study takes, as its outset, prior research that has found that there's probably an upper limit to the amount of energy that can be generated by a wind farm that's located on land. The limit arises both because natural and human structures on land create friction that slows down the wind speed, but also because each individual wind turbine extracts some of the energy of the wind and transforms it into power that we can use — leaving less wind energy for other turbines to collect.

“If each turbine removes something like half the energy flowing through it, by the time you get to the second row, you've only got a quarter of the energy, and so on,” explained Caldeira.

The ocean is different. First, wind speeds can be as much as 70 percent higher than on land. But a bigger deal is what you might call wind replenishment. The new research found that over the mid-latitude oceans, storms regularly transfer powerful wind energy down to the surface from higher altitudes, meaning that the upper limit here for how much energy you can capture with turbines is considerably higher.

“Over land, the turbines are just sort of scraping the kinetic energy out of the lowest part of the atmosphere, whereas over the ocean, it's depleting the kinetic energy out of most of the troposphere, or the lower part of the atmosphere,” said Caldeira.

The study compares a theoretical wind farm of nearly 2 million square kilometers located either over the U.S. (centered on Kansas) or in the open Atlantic. And it finds that covering much of the central U.S. with wind farms would still be insufficient to power the U.S. and China, which would require a generating capacity of some 7 terawatts annually (a terawatt is equivalent to a trillion watts).

But the North Atlantic could theoretically power those two countries and then some. The potential energy that can be extracted over the ocean, given the same area, is “at least three times as high.”

It would take an even larger, 3 million square kilometer wind installation over the ocean to provide humanity's current power needs, or 18 terawatts, the study found. That's an area even larger than Greenland.

Hence, the study concludes that “on an annual mean basis, the wind power available in the North Atlantic could be sufficient to power the world.”

But it's critical to emphasize that these are purely theoretical calculations. They are thwarted by many practical factors, including the fact that the winds aren't equally strong in all seasons, and that the technologies to capture their energy at such a scale, much less transfer it to shore, do not currently exist.

Oh, and then there's another large problem: Modeling simulations performed in the study suggest that extracting this much wind energy from nature would have planetary-scale effects, including cooling down parts of the Arctic by as much as 13 degrees Celsius.

“Trying to get civilization scale power out of wind is a bit asking for trouble,” Caldeira said. But he said the climate effect would be smaller if the amount of energy being tapped was reduced down from these extremely high numbers, and if the wind farms were more spaced out across the globe.

“I think it lends itself to the idea that we're going to want to use a portfolio of technologies, and not rely on this only,” said Caldeira.

Energy gurus have long said that among renewable sources, solar energy has the greatest potential to scale up and generate terawatt-scale power, enough to satisfy large parts of human energy demand. Caldeira doesn't dispute that. But his study suggests that at least if open ocean wind becomes accessible someday, it may have considerable potential too.

Alexander Slocum, an MIT mechanical engineering professor who has focused on offshore wind and its potential, and who was not involved in the research, said he considered the paper a “very good study” and that it didn't seem biased.

“The conclusion implied by the paper that open ocean wind energy farms can provide most of our energy needs is also supported history: as a technology gets becomes constrained (e.g., horse drawn carriages) or monopolized (OPEC), a motivation arises to look around for alternatives,” Slocum continued by email. “The automobile did it to horses, the U.S. did it to OPEC with fracking, and now renewables are doing it to the hydrocarbon industry.”

“The authors do acknowledge that considerable technical challenges come into play in actually harvesting energy from these far off-shore sites, but I appreciate their focus on the magnitude of the resource,” added Julie Lundquist, a wind energy researcher at the University of Colorado, Boulder. “I hope this work will stimulate further interest in deep water wind energy.”

Underscoring the theoretical nature of the calculations, Lundquist added by email that “current and foreseeable wind turbine deployments both on- and off-shore are much smaller than would be required to reach the atmospheric energy limitations that this work and others are concerned with.”

The research points to a kind of third act for wind energy. On land, turbines are very well established and more are being installed every year. Offshore, meanwhile, coastal areas are now also seeing more and more turbine installations, but still in relatively shallow waters.

But to get out over the open ocean, where the sea is often well over a mile deep, is expected to require yet another technology — likely a floating turbine that extends above the water and sits atop some kind of very large submerged floating structure, accompanied by cables that anchor the entire turbine to the seafloor.

Experimentation with the technology is already happening: Statoil is moving to build a large floating wind farm off the coast of Scotland, which will be located in waters around 100 meters deep and have 15 megawatts (million watts) of electricity generating capacity. The turbines are 253 meters tall, but 78 meters of that length refers to the floating part below the sea surface.

“The things that we're describing are likely not going to be economic today, but once you have an industry that's starting in that direction, should provide incentive for that industry to develop,” said Caldeira.


• Chris Mooney reports on science and the environment for The Washington Post.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • EPA chief Scott Pruitt tells coal miners he will repeal power-plan rule on Tuesday: ‘The war against coal is over’

 • One of the oldest climate change experiments has led to a troubling conclusion

 • Scientists mapping Greenland have produced some surprising — and worrying — results


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/10/09/theres-enough-wind-energy-over-the-oceans-to-power-human-civilization-scientists-say
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« Reply #919 on: October 10, 2017, 07:46:51 pm »


from The Washington Post....

At least 10 dead, tens of thousands evacuated as wildfires
ravage Northern California's wine country


Tens of thousands of acres are burning in Napa and Sonoma,
where homes — and some wineries — have been destroyed.


By BREENA KERR, ALISSA GREENBERG, CARA STRICKLAND, SCOTT WILSON and HERMAN WONG | 9:57PM EDT - Monday, October 09, 2017



SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA — Fires pushed by warm winds and fueled by dry ground swept through California wine country on Monday, killing at least 10 people, injuring numerous others, and torching more than 2,000 homes and businesses.

State fire officials warned that the conditions, particularly winds that at times exceeded 50 miles per hour, would probably exacerbate the fires in the days ahead. At least 14 separate blazes burned in eight Northern California counties, prompting evacuations of more than 20,000 frightened residents, including patients in threatened hospitals.

“This is really serious; it's moving fast,” Governor Jerry Brown (Democrat) said during a news conference in which he declared an emergency in seven counties. “The heat, the lack of humidity and the winds are all driving a very dangerous situation and making it worse. It's not under control by any means. But we're on it in the best way we know how.”

Later in the day, Brown wrote a five-page letter to President Trump seeking federal emergency aid. A vocal critic of Trump's politics, Brown wrote that he has “determined that this incident is of such severity and magnitude that an effective response is beyond the capabilities of the State and affected local governments and supplemental federal assistance is necessary.”

The fires, which whipped up overnight on Sunday, added to what has already been a severe fire season in the West. More than 8 million acres have burned in at least four states, raising questions from across the political spectrum about the connection to climate change and forest management practices.

The current wildfires had burned more than 70,000 acres in Northern California by late Monday afternoon, nearly all of those in Sonoma and Napa counties, the heartland of the state's renowned wine industry. A smaller but fast-moving fire in Mendocino County to the north killed one person, according to Jonathan Cox, a battalion chief and spokesman for Cal Fire. The sheriff of Sonoma County confirmed seven additional deaths there, and Cal Fire confirmed two deaths in the Atlas Fire in Napa County.


A firefighter covers his eyes as he walks past a burning hillside in Santa Rosa on Monday. — Photograph: Jeff Chiu/Associated Press.
A firefighter covers his eyes as he walks past a burning hillside in Santa Rosa on Monday. — Photograph: Jeff Chiu/Associated Press.

The pace of the burn took firefighters by surprise: The fires charred 20,000 acres in about 12 hours, which Cox called “a phenomenal rate of growth.” He said firefighters had “zero percent” containment and warned that, while winds had weakened slightly over the course of the day, “because of heat and low humidity, fire growth is still likely.”

The situation in Santa Rosa, the largest city in Sonoma County, appeared dire. The Tubbs Fire, as the blaze in Sonoma is known, sped southwest from Calistoga in Napa Valley, jumped Highway 101 and entered Santa Rosa. Cal Fire officials said the cause is under investigation.

A resident, Ron Dodds, told TV station KTVU that “people are running red lights, there is chaos ensuing.”

“It's a scary time,” Dodds said. “It looks like Armageddon.”

The city imposed a curfew Monday, running from 6:45 p.m. until sunrise on Tuesday, to prevent looting in the evacuation zone, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Kaiser Permanente evacuated about 130 patients from the Santa Rosa Medical Center by ambulance and private bus early on Monday morning, according to Jenny Mack, the health system’s public relations director for Northern California. The patients were taken to Kaiser Permanente in San Rafael, in Marin County, and to other hospitals and evacuation sites.


Fire glows on a hillside in Napa. — Photograph: Josh Edelson/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Fire glows on a hillside in Napa. — Photograph: Josh Edelson/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.

Sutter Santa Rosa Regional Hospital also evacuated all of its patients. By Monday afternoon, the hospital was inaccessible because of road closures.

Will Powers, a Cal Fire representative, said the California Highway Patrol was evacuating some people by helicopter in rural areas of Sonoma, Napa and Lake counties.

The vineyards of Napa and Sonoma counties are the source of some of the country's best wines, and the scores of tasting rooms are among the state's most popular tourism destinations. Witness accounts on Monday suggested that damage to the industry could be significant, especially if the fires continue to burn in the days ahead.

“It looks like a bombing run,” Joe Nielsen, the winemaker at Donelan Family Wines in Sonoma County, said in an interview with the San Francisco Chronicle. “Just chimneys and burned-out cars and cooked trees.”

Evacuations began at about 11 p.m. on Sunday evening and continued through Monday. Some people left burning homes for evacuation centers, only to find those centers threatened by fire a few hours later.


A firefighter walks near a pool as a neighboring home burns in the Napa wine region in California on Monday, as multiple wind-driven fires continue to whip through the region. — Photograph: Josh Edelson/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
A firefighter walks near a pool as a neighboring home burns in the Napa wine region in California on Monday, as multiple wind-driven fires
continue to whip through the region. — Photograph: Josh Edelson/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


In Rincon Valley, on the northeast outskirts of Santa Rosa, pastor Andy VomSteeg opened his New Vintage Church to those fleeing the fire. By Monday afternoon, more than 400 people, many of them elderly, had taken refuge inside.

“I left without my clothes,” said Nell Magnuson, a resident of the luxury retirement home Villa Capri. She wore only a maroon robe.

“We had to get out in a hurry,” she said. “When we left, the flames were in the second floor.”

Magnuson, who was worried about where she would sleep Monday night, said that “our whole lives have turned upside down. We don't have a clue what’s going to happen. It's just losing everything. All the pictures, my whole life.”

But before her concerns could be addressed, the fire began to threaten the church.

“You caught us just in time,” Magnuson said as she headed for the exit. “We're being evacuated again.”

Thick smoke hung over Sonoma County, and ash rained down in some towns. People wore masks on the streets, and businesses shut down.


The entrance to the fire-ravaged Signorello Estate winery is seen on Monday in Napa. — Photograph: Marcio Jose Sanchez/Associated Press.
The entrance to the fire-ravaged Signorello Estate winery is seen on Monday in Napa. — Photograph: Marcio Jose Sanchez/Associated Press.

In Healdsburg, a town nearly circled by fire 16 miles north of Santa Rosa, exhausted evacuees bought supplies, fueled up and looked for a place to stay for the night.

Cindy Luzzi, who was visiting her son and his family in Santa Rosa, said her daughter-in-law got a call from a neighbor at about 2:30 a.m., telling them to evacuate.

“At first we didn't think it was anything to worry about. Then we went downstairs, opened our front door and looked towards the center of town,” Luzzi said. “It was just red, nothing but red.”

Luzzi and her daughter-in-law and two young grandchildren took refuge at the Francis Ford Coppola Winery in nearby Geyserville from 3 a.m. until 8 a.m., waiting for her son to join them. They were then able to book a room at the Best Western in town. But by 2 p.m., the hotel had filled up.

Shortages of rooms, bottled water and fuel were affecting surrounding towns as well.

“We're almost out of gas,” said Hardeep Gill, who owns a filling station in downtown Healdsburg, just off Highway 101.

Gill, who came into work because his employees couldn't get there, said he had lost a commercial building he owned worth about $9 million.

“I got a call around 3 a.m. because the fire sprinklers were going off,” he said. “That's when I knew it was a total loss.”


Alissa Greenberg reported from Berkeley, California, and Breena Kerr from Healdsburg. Scott Wilson and Herman Wong reported from Washington D.C. Mary Hui in Washington contributed to this report.

• Breena Kerr is a freelance journalist in the San Francisco Bay Area.

• Alissa Greenberg is a multimedia journalist whose features examine immigrant issues, international affairs, culture, travel, and community ties, with a generous dose of quirk.

• Cara Strickland is a freelance writer focusing on food and drink, singleness and faith.

• Scott Wilson is a senior national correspondent for The Washington Post, covering California and the west. He has previously served as The Post's national editor, chief White House correspondent, deputy Assistant Managing Editor/Foreign News and as a correspondent in Latin America and in the Middle East.

• Herman Wong is a deputy editor on the general assignment news desk for The Washington Post.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • These images show the devastation caused by California's deadly wine-country fires

 • PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY: The scene as wildfires devastate Northern California's wine region


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2017/10/09/fast-moving-wildfires-ravage-northern-californias-wine-country
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #920 on: October 10, 2017, 08:59:41 pm »

"There's enough wind energy over the oceans to power
human civilization, scientists say".

Yeah and if we harness all the snails in the world, put them on a giant treadmill chained together and replace them as they die off, there is unlimited energy there to power the world!! 😁

When you here these kinds of gormless eco-evangelist claims, remember to ask..
AT WHAT COST??? When you factor in storage and grid modification, not to mention enormous land use, these things are shit.
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« Reply #921 on: October 10, 2017, 09:31:41 pm »


Coal is energy from the sun turned into vegetation which has spent millions of years beneath the ground turning into coal.

Only a stupid moron would want to dig up coal when they can use the sun's rays directly to produce energy.

Also, only a stupid moron would block their mind to using FREE wind energy.

Idiots like that must still be living in the dark-ages, eh?
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« Reply #922 on: October 10, 2017, 10:57:59 pm »

Only an idiot refuses to look at all the facts. Converting to wind and solar is converting to piss-poor very expensive energy. That puts a huge cost on everything because our current civilisation runs on affordable energy. Wind and solar can not power cities. Wake the fuck up!
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« Reply #923 on: October 10, 2017, 11:16:54 pm »

Look up LCOE of different forms of energy. Don't be conned by figures on wind and solar. They are intermittent and require expensive backup and storage to supply baseload power (what cities and industry needs 24/7).
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« Reply #924 on: October 11, 2017, 03:03:06 am »

global warming is a conspiracy theory
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AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP

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