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Some reading for the “anti-warmalists” and “climate-change deniers”


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Author Topic: Some reading for the “anti-warmalists” and “climate-change deniers”  (Read 10544 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #625 on: July 04, 2017, 02:28:13 pm »



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« Reply #626 on: July 04, 2017, 02:41:35 pm »

Wish it would warm faster.....I'm freezing⛄️

...and I want to grow mango's up here in the sub tropics😜
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« Reply #627 on: July 07, 2017, 12:19:47 am »


from The Washington Post....

A trillion-ton iceberg the size of Delaware is about to break off Antarctica

Scientists say the iceberg will be among the largest ever seen.

By CHRIS MOONEY | 2:51PM EDT - Wednesday, July 05, 2017

An aerial view of the Larsen C ice rift. — Photograph: John Sonntag/NASA.
An aerial view of the Larsen C ice rift. — Photograph: John Sonntag/NASA.

AN ENORMOUS ICEBERG, more than 2,000 square miles in area — or nearly the size of Delaware — is poised to detach from one of the largest floating ice shelves in Antarctica and float off in the Weddell Sea, south of the tip of South America.

Scientists have been expecting the break from the Larsen C ice shelf, monitoring the progress of a crack that extended to over 100 miles long in recent months. The latest update from scientists with NASA and the University of California found that only three remaining miles of ice continue to connect the impending iceberg to the larger shelf.

Those parts of the iceberg that have already detached have begun to move rapidly seaward, widening the rift in recent days and leaving the remaining ice “strained near to breaking point,” according to Adrian Luckman, a scientist monitoring Larsen C at Swansea University in Wales.

The expected calving event  — on its own — will not affect global sea level, because the ice that has detached was already afloat in the ocean.  But some scientists fear that it could hasten the destabilization of the larger Larsen C ice shelf.

The iceberg itself will be enormous — one of the most massive ever seen from Antarctica. It will be over 600 feet thick and contain roughly 1 trillion tons of ice, according to an analysis by the European Space Agency and Noel Gourmelen, a scientist at the University of Edinburgh.




Scientists are divided about the impact of climate change on this particular break in Antarctica's ice shelf.

Some have contended there's little proof that the break, which will reduce the size of the Larsen C more than scientists have observed previously, reflects the advance of climate change. Ice shelves do, after all, break off sometimes.

“We do not need to press the panic button for Larsen C. Large calving events such as this are normal processes of a healthy ice sheet, ones that have occurred for decades, centuries, millennia — on cycles that are much longer than a human or satellite lifetime,” Helen Amanda Fricker, an Antarctic scientist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, wrote recently.

But others disagree.

“Of course this is due to climate warming in the peninsula,” Eric Rignot, a NASA and University of California, Irvine expert on Antarctica, said in an email.

Antarctica has seen an increase in breaks in its ice shelves in recent years.

The Larsen A ice shelf, far closer to the northern tip of the Antarctic peninsula — and therefore, warmer latitudes — collapsed in 1995. In 2002, the same thing happened with Larsen B, its southern cousin, situated slightly closer to the South Pole.

Now, Larsen C, still farther toward the South Pole and subject to somewhat cooler temperatures, has seen a major break.

But there are big gaps in scientists' knowledge about what might have disturbed the Larsen C ice shelf.

Recent studies have suggested that the ice of Larsen C has begun to flow more quickly to the sea through the shelf in recent years. The ice shelf has also been thinning, and its surface has been getting lower in the water, suggesting that it might be melting from below.

But Fricker presented data to suggest that the ice shelf has since begun to thicken again.

“Yes, I agree Larsen C is ‘next in line’ southward after Larsen A and B,” Fricker said by email. “However, there is actually no research showing that Larsen C is getting thinner and flowing faster. In fact, in recent years, it is the opposite.”

There is a similar debate over whether this individual break will destabilize the ice shelf and lead to further disintegration.

According to Rignot, Larsen C holds back around 1 centimeter of global sea level rise in the form of glaciers feeding into the remaining ice shelf. If the ice shelf were to continue to disintegrate, this ice might flow more rapidly into the sea.

An even larger fear is the southward and poleward progression of ice shelf collapse, Rignot said, pointing out that farther south there are ice shelves that, by stabilizing glaciers, are currently preventing vastly more sea-level rise than Larsen C does.

Larsen C is among Antarctica's largest ice shelves but  pales in comparison to the Ross Ice Shelf and Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf. Earlier this month, scientists reported a major melt event that occurred several years ago atop the surface of the Ross Ice Shelf accompanied by at least some rainfall, which also gave them concern.

Scientists will be watching the break closely and trying to glean lessons about what to expect from other potentially vulnerable ice shelves in Antarctica.

“While it might not be caused by global warming, it's at least a natural laboratory to study how breakups will occur at other ice shelves to improve the theoretical basis for our projections of future sea-level rise,” said NASA's Tom Wagner, who directs the agency's polar programs.


• Chris Mooney reports on science and the environment for The Washington Post.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/07/05/an-iceberg-the-size-of-delaware-is-about-to-break-off-of-antarctica
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« Reply #628 on: July 07, 2017, 01:50:16 am »

........"Scientists are divided about the impact of climate change on this particular break in Antarctica's ice shelf.

Some have contended there's little proof that the break, which will reduce the size of the Larsen C more than scientists have observed previously, reflects the advance of climate change. Ice shelves do, after all, break off sometimes.

"We do not need to press the panic button for Larsen C. Large calving events such as this are normal processes of a healthy ice sheet, ones that have occurred for decades, centuries, millennia — on cycles that are much longer than a human or satellite lifetime,” Helen Amanda Fricker, an Antarctic scientist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, wrote recently."....

..... ...So really you are just doing the same as CNN....It is not proven to have anything to do with climate change yet you put it in the climate change thread....you are in the business of  creating FAKE NEWS😉
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« Reply #629 on: July 09, 2017, 02:35:29 pm »

South Island enjoying that global warming feeling


The South Island is shivering at the moment, even as the world is roasting under ever increasing global warming.

Police are telling southern drivers “don’t go out” after reports of black ice and car crashes after parts of the South Island plunged to minus 10 degrees Celsius overnight.

Heavy fog shrouded Auckland on Saturday morning and domestic flights were cancelled ahead of the series decider between the All Blacks and the British and Irish Lions.

Fog restrictions at the airport have been lifted.

Police in the south have warned drivers “not to go out on the roads” due to widespread black ice.

Police said there were reports of “numerous crashes” in the lower South Island, in Central Otago, Southland, and Te Anau.

“Drivers are urged not to go out on the roads at the moment in parts of the Southern district.

“You often won’t realise you are heading towards black-ice before you hit it, making it potentially lethal to drive on the roads at the moment.”

Treacherous black ice was reported on State Highway 6, SH8, SH94 and SH97.

“It’s not even wise to go out walking or cycling as the footpaths will be affected too. It’s been raining again overnight, so it’s more than dangerous than usual if you are trying to drive in these conditions.

“If you don’t have to go out anywhere today please stay in until it’s safe to head out and check weather forecasts before making tracks,” police said.

Ain’t global warming grand? How grand?

Temperatures plunged overnight, with the coldest spot at Mt Cook airport, where the overnight low was -11.3C.

In Central Otago, the low was -6.3 in Alexandra while Wanaka and Queenstown got down to -3C.


Mt Cook’s temperature did not break any records but it was the eighth coldest overnight July low at the airport since 1993.

In winter 2015, Mt Cook airport plunged to -15C.

Christchurch was around the freezing point, or slightly below zero, and it’s record low was -6.6C in 1980.

But hang on…we’ve had “unprecedented warming” since 1980 haven’t we? Haven’t we?

 Fairfax
Cameron Slater
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #630 on: July 09, 2017, 05:47:54 pm »


Yeah, you just keep on posting shit.

Intelligent people are pissing themselves laughing at your ignorance and stupidity.
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« Reply #631 on: July 09, 2017, 08:02:55 pm »

Ktj....."Intelligent people are pissing themselves laughing at your ignorance and stupidity."

...well I have only seen one  intelligent person here lately....is that who you mean🙄

I think that if you believe this site has a large readership then you are even more deluded that I previously thought....😳

In REALITY....😉...it's only you , me and one or two others🙄
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #632 on: July 17, 2017, 12:36:12 am »


from the Los Angeles Times....

Winter's snow is disrupting this Sierra Nevada summer

The shadow of winter in the Sierra summer — record snowmelt has disrupted seasonal activities.

By LOUIS SAHAGUN — Photography by MARK BOSTER | Friday, July 14, 2017



EVEN WHEN snowbound and inaccessible to vehicles, the rustic Tioga Pass Resort on the crest of the Sierra Nevada range offered homemade pie, a wood-burning stove and plump sofas to relax on after a day of backcountry skiing.

But the winter of 2017 was more than the log cabin lodge, just two miles east of Yosemite National Park, could bear.

Trails, roads and campgrounds throughout the Sierra high country were hit hard by snow and runoff from one of the largest snowpacks in recorded history, leaving public agencies scrambling and summer visitors feeling lost. At Tioga Pass Lodge, established in 1914, loyalists' hopes of kicking back on a sunny afternoon have taken a particularly tough wallop.

Entombed in 20 feet of hard pack known as “Sierra cement,” the lodge “suffered severe crunch injuries,” said Dave Levy, manager of the resort, which is owned by a consortium of investors.

A team led by Levy used shovels to dig down through the snow to reach the kitchen door. Sheared structural support beams appeared like ghostly shadows in the glare of a flashlight.

“Inside, the bad news was much worse,” he said. “Doors won't open, windows are shattered, floors are warped, the roof sags. We may reopen sometime next year, but it won't be easy fixing a place built like a jigsaw puzzle with antiquated construction techniques.”

A creek running through the property leased from the U.S. Forest Service is surging over its banks with snowmelt, undermining the foundations of the lodge and several cabins surrounding it.


In early July, two standup paddle boarders skim along the icy waters of Tioga Lake off Highway 120.
In early July, two standup paddle boarders skim along the icy waters of Tioga Lake off Highway 120.

Snowbanks still line the road in early July near Tioga Lake.
Snowbanks still line the road in early July near Tioga Lake.

Over the July 4th weekend, as thousands of summer vacationers streamed into the mountains with coolers, bicycles, fly rods and barbecues, the runoff in streams peaked.

But with many popular trails and campgrounds still closed because of safety and health concerns, rangers struggle to keep up with visitors arriving each day with the question: “Where can we find a place to camp?”


The hard recovery ahead

“Nearly every campground in the area has problems,” said Deb Schweizer, a spokeswoman for the Inyo National Forest. “There are broken water systems and sewer lines, gates that bent under the weight of so much snow, washed-out bridges and trails, damaged roads, fallen trees, downed power lines.

“It's taken an incredible amount of co-operative efforts by multiple agencies to open as many campground facilities and roads as possible — and we're opening more every day,” she said.


Massive snowbanks damaged the main building at the Tioga Pass Resort off Highway 120.
Massive snowbanks damaged the main building at the Tioga Pass Resort off Highway 120.

Many of the campsites in the Tioga Lake Campground are still flooded, and the roads in and out are still blocked by snow.
Many of the campsites in the Tioga Lake Campground are still flooded, and the roads in and out are still blocked by snow.

In the meantime, the Forest Service has been promoting its “dispersed camping” rules, which allow visitors to pitch a tent on certain undeveloped forest lands. This strategy has brought only despair to Dwayne Beaver, leader of the volunteer fire department in Lee Vining, about 10 miles west of the Tioga Pass.

“It's costing our fire department money — and lots of lost sleep,” he said. “That’s because whenever someone needs a rescue, or inexperienced campers build an unauthorized fire in a ring of rocks, we have to scramble to deal with it.”

Signs of the snowpack-fueled deluge are visible in most of the watersheds draining the Sierra Nevada. Smallmouth bass and other fish, for example, were found floating belly-up in a stretch of the Lower Owens River near the town of Lone Pine — suffocated by mud and debris flows, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power reported.

But Southern California Edison and the DWP, which operate extensive networks of dams, diversions and hydroelectric plants across the Sierra range, say that things are not as bad as they could have been.

With snowpack levels at 241% of normal, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti in March issued an emergency declaration allowing the DWP to take immediate steps to “armor” its vulnerable Los Angeles Aqueduct in Owens Valley and $1-billion dust-control project on dry Owens Lake, which L.A. tapped to slake its thirst in the last century.

Preparing for the worst, engineers and heavy-equipment operators worked furiously to empty reservoirs and clean out ditches and pipelines to keep them from being overwhelmed by flooding.


The snow is melting faster than the giant pumps can remove water from Agnew Lake in the mountains above June Lake.
The snow is melting faster than the giant pumps can remove water from Agnew Lake in the mountains above June Lake.

On Thursday, SCE officials launched a helicopter to survey three century-old reservoirs operating under water-level restrictions that state and federal regulators had required in part because the area is prone to earthquakes.

The reservoirs — Agnew Lake, Gem Lake and Waugh Lake — are used to store water and generate power at the SCE's Rush Creek Hydroelectric Project near the town of June Lake.

From 1,000 feet above Agnew Lake, elevation 8,500 feet above sea level, 12 massive water pumps were clearly visible, sending torrents of snowmelt over the spillway and into Rush Creek, one of Mono Lake's major tributaries. Heavy-duty helicopters had flown them in, engineers had assembled them and the utility officials now were pleased to see them working smoothly.

“It took two weeks to design that pumping system and another six weeks to build it,” said Terry Maddox, an SCE energy systems engineer. “It handled the peak flows of snowmelt, and now the worst is over.”

As a precaution, however, the Inyo National Forest has closed nearby hiking trails through to September 1st, warning that higher-than-normal water levels make the reservoirs especially vulnerable to seismic activity.

The costs of the unprecedented efforts to counter the threat of destructive flooding this year are expected to be passed on to rate payers, officials for the DWP and Southern California Edison said.


Nora Livingston, lead naturalist guide for the Mono Lake Committee, walks through a field of seep monkey flowers blooming in the Horse Meadows area in the Mono basin near Lee Vining.
Nora Livingston, lead naturalist guide for the Mono Lake Committee, walks through a field of seep monkey flowers blooming in the
Horse Meadows area in the Mono basin near Lee Vining.


A white-lined Sphinx moth pollinates a field of seep monkey flowers.
A white-lined Sphinx moth pollinates a field of seep monkey flowers.

Moths the size of hummingbirds

The wet winter added 2½ feet of water to Mono Lake, nesting grounds for thousands of California gulls, and it transformed the surrounding meadowlands into wildflower panoramas.

Nora Livingston, 27, a naturalist with the nonprofit Mono Lake Committee, has been revising her guided tours to highlight new natural wonders that seem to crop up daily.

Bringing her Subaru to a stop along a dirt road near Lower Horse Meadows, Livingston said, “Follow me. I want to show you something truly amazing.”

Moments later, she was striding along a meandering wetlands edged with sage that had been bone-dry for years. Now, yellow seep monkey flowers blossomed in a half-mile-long swath.

With the flowers have come swarms of Western tiger swallowtail butterflies and Sphinx moths the size of hummingbirds. Birds such as lazuli buntings and mountain bluebirds feast on the insects attracted to the flowers.

Reaching out as if to embrace the vista, Livingston said, “This would not have happened without all that snow and high water on the mountains.”


The warm colors of sunset are reflected in the pools of water next to a tributary of Bishop Creek. A wet winter and heavy snowmelt have caused the water levels to rise in the creeks and rivers in the Owens Valley and throughout the Sierras.
The warm colors of sunset are reflected in the pools of water next to a tributary of Bishop Creek. A wet winter and heavy snowmelt have caused
the water levels to rise in the creeks and rivers in the Owens Valley and throughout the Sierras.


• Louis Sahagun is a staff writer at the Los Angeles Times. He covers issues ranging from religion, culture and the environment to crime, politics and water. He was on the team of L.A. Times writers that earned the Pulitzer Prize in public service for a series on Latinos in Southern California and the team that was a finalist in 2015 for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news. He is a CCNMA: Latino Journalists of California board member, and author of the book, Master of the Mysteries: the Life of Manly Palmer Hall.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • After the drought, the ‘Killer Kern’ river is a different beast

 • The Kings River flooded from snowmelt that couldn't be measured or predicted

 • Skiers hit the slopes in bikini tops as California's endless winter endures a heat wave


http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-flooding-sierra-nevada-20170714-htmlstory.html
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« Reply #633 on: August 03, 2017, 12:43:35 pm »

...oh no....the "climate change conspiracy theorists" busted again🙄


Aussie Bureau of Meteorology caught manipulating data, full inquiry underway
by Cameron Slater on August 3, 2017 at 11:30am


The Aussie Bureau of Meteorology has been busted manipulating data.


 
The Australian reports:

The Bureau of Meteorology has ordered a full review of temperature recording equipment and procedures after the peak weather agency was caught tampering with cold winter temperature logs in at least two locations.

The bureau has admitted that a problem with recording very low temperatures is more widespread than Goulburn and the Snowy Mountains but rejected it has ­attempted to manipulate temperature records.


The bureau’s chief executive, Andrew Johnson, has called for an urgent review and the immediate replacement of recording equipment at a number of undisclosed sites. The action was outlined in a letter to federal Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg and follows weeks of turmoil over why data showing minus 10.4C readings at Goulburn and Thredbo went missing.

Bush meteorologist Lance Pidgeon blew the whistle on the missing data after watching the minus 10.4C Goulburn recording from July 2 disappear from the bureau’s website. “The temperature dropped to minus 10.4, stayed there for some time and then it changed to minus 10 and then it disappeared,” Mr Pidgeon said.

He relayed his concerns to scientist Jennifer Marohasy, who has queried the bureau’s treatment of historical temperature data. After questions were asked, the bureau restored the original recording of minus 10.4C to its website. A bureau spokeswoman said the low recording had been checked for “quality assurance” before being posted.

The bureau said limits were set on how low temperatures could go at some stations before a manual check was needed to confirm them. “The bureau’s quality ­control system, designed to filter out spurious low or high values was set at minus 10 minimum for Goulburn which is why the record automatically adjusted,” a bureau spokeswoman said.

“The error was picked up yesterday internally and quality control processes are being reviewed for those stations where temperatures below minus 10 are possible.”

Dr Johnson told Mr Frydenberg the failure to record temperatures of minus 10.4C at Goulburn on July 2 was due to equipment being “not fit for purpose”.

Sounds like a cover-up is underway.

Dr Johnson said failure to record the very low temperatures had “been interpreted by a member of the community in such a way as to imply the bureau sought to manipulate the data record”.

“I categorically reject this ­implication,” he said.

The bureau’s handling of temperature data and the homogenisation of records to form a national average has been controversial.

It has said warmer minimum temperatures were one reason for the upward trend in average temperatures due to climate change.

Homogenisation is another word for manipulation.

Dr Marohasy said Dr Johnson’s claims of equipment failure were easily disproven by the screen shots that showed the very low temperatures before being “quality assured” out.

She said claims the omission of the very low temperatures did not affect the national temperature record were also easily disproven.

“While Goulburn station is not a listed ACORN-SAT station, it is used to homogenise Canberra and Canberra is an ACORN-SAT station,” Dr Marohasy said.

The bureau did not respond to questions about how widely the quality control system had been applied and at what upper temperature the cut-off had been set.

Dr Marohasy has evidence of the initial minus 10.4C recording at Thredbo before it was deleted for quality ­assurance.

“This either reflects an extraordinary incompetence, or a determination to prevent evidence of low temperatures,” Dr Marohasy said.

Sounds like they’ve been caught red-handed.

 

-The Australian
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #634 on: August 10, 2017, 11:30:55 am »

Theory proposed in the eighties. Models developed around said theory predicting runaway warming.
Models proved wrong by observations. Theory is a failure. The planet has been steadily heating since the last iceage, as one would expect. Only thing keeping the global warming show going is politically driven grant money (like billions).
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« Reply #635 on: August 10, 2017, 11:36:39 am »

This is how Co2 works on earth's atmosphere:
For every DOUBLING of Co2 you get a 1.1C increase in the earth's mean temperature.

Think about that.

Before the coal and oil burning era there was about 280ppm CO2 in the atmosphere. Now there's about 400ppm. In 50 years oil and gas seemingly will run very low.
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« Reply #636 on: August 10, 2017, 11:39:16 am »

Co2 is only 0.04% of the earth's atmosphere.

97% of that is NOT produced by humans (not that that's a game changer anyway, but it helps to get some perspective).
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« Reply #637 on: August 10, 2017, 11:46:23 am »

I used to be a warmunist.

Now I'm a lukewarmer. Yeah it's slowly warming, as it has since the last ice age, but there is no reason to panic.
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« Reply #638 on: August 10, 2017, 11:55:32 am »

Co2 directly can't cause runaway global warming. Theories have to be invented on how this reality non-alarming Co2 caused warming is supposedly "amplified" by feedbacks (eg more warmth causes more clouds therefore more heat is trapped in the atmosphere. But the warming as detected by weather balloons and satellites (which don't lie) show unremarkable warming (certainly not worth wasting trillions deindustrialising).
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« Reply #639 on: August 10, 2017, 12:03:41 pm »

Oh and the 97% consensus is a major propaganda plank in the warmunist house of cards. What those "studies" did was take a bunch of research papers then state 97% agreed that man was the main contributor heating the planet. This was done by mislabelling sceptic work as being part of this phoney consensus. People the waved this "97%" shonky propaganda exercise around as "proof" that the world is going to hell in a handbasket. The study was a fraud and the only thing scientists in it actually agreed on was that the planet was warming and humans had SOME influence.

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« Reply #640 on: August 10, 2017, 09:06:49 pm »


from The Washington Post....

EDITORIAL: This is how bad things could get
if Trump denies the reality of climate change


Recent studies provide a glimpse at the dangerous future ahead.

By EDITORIAL BOARD | 7:45PM EDT - Tuesday, August 08, 2017

Parched ground at the Guadalteba reservoir during a strong drought in Ardales, Spain. — Photograph: Jon Nazca/Reuters.
Parched ground at the Guadalteba reservoir during a strong drought in Ardales, Spain. — Photograph: Jon Nazca/Reuters.

OVER THE NEXT WEEK OR SO, the Trump administration must decide whether to approve or suppress a major federal climate change report. Though scientists have signed off on its findings, including that the average U.S. temperature has spiked in the past several decades and that humans have almost certainly played a predominant role, President Trump and Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt have indicated they simply do not believe the experts.

Even as the federal climate assessment has been under review, the warnings have grown starker.

A paper published last week in Nature Climate Change offered a harrowing view. International negotiators committed in Paris to keeping global temperature rise below 2 degrees Celsius, the point past which experts warn warming could be very dangerous. Analysts from the University of Washington and the University of California at Santa Barbara found that there is only a 5 percent chance the world will achieve that goal.

Instead of predicting how technology or policy might change, the researchers looked at how nations have done until now and inferred from those trends what will happen in the future. As economies expand, they emit more planet-warming carbon dioxide into the air. Fortunately, over time economies also produce more efficiently, using less fuel and therefore emitting less carbon dioxide for every widget assembled or mile driven. By projecting population growth, economic expansion and carbon efficiency into the future, the analysts came up with a rough guide to where the global temperature will be at the end of the century.

They found that there is a 90 percent chance the world will warm between 2 degrees and 4.9 degrees Celsius, with a median of 3.2 degrees. Though this avoids the most alarming scenarios scientists have previously considered, it also excludes the least concerning, finding virtually no chance the Earth will keep warming below the desirable level of 1.5 degrees Celsius.

How does this translate into the real world? Some other new research provides answers. Experts at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles found that at 4.5 degrees of temperature rise by 2100, highly populated and impoverished swaths of South Asia would experience heat waves so extreme that human beings would not be able to survive without protection. At 2.25 degrees of warming, heat-wave temperatures in the region would be dangerous but not as deadly. Another new analysis from European Union researchers warned that deaths due to extreme weather across Europe could increase from about 3,000 per year to 152,000 annually if the Earth warmed 3 degrees by century’s end.

Each of these studies comes with caveats. For example, much of the risk would be averted with a strong global commitment to cutting carbon dioxide emissions, particularly if green technology became significantly cheaper, making it easier to decarbonize than in the past. Yet even if the breakthroughs do not come, or do not come fast enough, the latest research suggests it is neither unrealistic nor pointless to aim for the low end of the range of possible climate outcomes, even over 2 degrees, to at least limit the damage to the planet’s habitability. That path, however, requires leaders to admit there is a problem.


__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • The Washington Post's View: California's cap-and-trade program could offer other states guidance

 • Joel Clement: I'm a scientist. I'm blowing the whistle on the Trump administration.

 • The Washington Post's View: The dream of ‘clean coal’ is burning up

 • Robert J. Samuelson: Trump ignores the messy reality of global warming — and makes it all about him


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/this-is-how-bad-things-could-get-if-trump-denies-the-reality-of-climate-change/2017/08/08/087b8bb0-7bae-11e7-9d08-b79f191668ed_story.html
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« Reply #641 on: August 10, 2017, 10:59:46 pm »

"Each of these studies comes with caveats. For example, much of the risk would be averted with a strong global commitment to cutting carbon dioxide emissions, particularly if green technology became significantly cheaper, making it easier to decarbonize than in the past"

Even if all the Paris targets were met, it would make fuck all difference to the climate AND it would cost TRILLIONS.

The Paris targets won't be met. China and India value the wellbeing of their people over Western green/left bullshitting.

Renewables(aka unreliables) are stupidly expensive.

This is a typical "could happen" hysteria piece from the braindead media on climate 😀
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« Reply #642 on: August 10, 2017, 11:06:09 pm »

....and whatever we do in little old , insignificant NZ, will not be detectable..so let's not bother losing any sleep...
....and I am looking forward to growing mango's in Northland😜
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« Reply #643 on: August 10, 2017, 11:17:13 pm »

Enjoy the warmth while you can because if we get another little ice age then that will be very nasty.
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« Reply #644 on: August 10, 2017, 11:23:01 pm »

Ok..any idea when that will be...I'll stock up the firewood😉
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #645 on: August 10, 2017, 11:24:59 pm »

There are some solar cycle scientists who are predicting net cooling for approx three decades. I know extreme heat. Cold is a lot more ugly.
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #646 on: August 10, 2017, 11:27:48 pm »

I don't completely buy the solar cycle climate predictions but I'd say they could be right.
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Donald
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« Reply #647 on: August 10, 2017, 11:31:05 pm »

Ok..so no need to be concerned...it's part of the evolutionary process...let's just accept it...humans will one day no longer exist either by climate change, or nuclear war or whatever...is it really worth worrying about...just enjoy while it lasts😜

...but sadly...my working holiday comes to an end tomorrow...returning to NZ...hope it has warmed up a bit since mid June.....have to get some work done on the boat ready for spring😉
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #648 on: August 10, 2017, 11:46:15 pm »

Well if the warmunist cult manages to suck pollies into replacing life giving cheap reliable power with stupid expensive unreliable power and the world does cool, the a lot of poor people will die from living in frigid dwellings.
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #649 on: August 10, 2017, 11:49:52 pm »

Well living somewhere with firewood might not be such a bad idea. Numb nuts pollies are possibly going to tax the crap out of energy for the sake of appeasing the great global warming scam.
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