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SAUSAGES


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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« on: November 05, 2009, 05:54:43 pm »


Mango and chilli chicken sausage — NZ's best

The Press | 5:00AM - Thursday, 05 November 2009

WINNING BANGER: Chris Timbs' mango and chilli chicken sausage has been judged New Zealand's very best snarlers. — DEAN KOZANIC/The Press.

WINNING BANGER: Chris Timbs' mango and chilli
chicken sausage has been judged New Zealand's
very best snarlers. — DEAN KOZANIC/The Press.


A customer's question led to Christchurch butcher Chris Timbs making New Zealand's best sausage.

Representing Peter Timbs Butchery and Delicatessen, at Edgeware Road, Timbs has won the supreme award in the Great New Zealand Sausage Competition with his mango and chilli chicken sausage.

Timbs, who has been a butcher for 15 years, said it was a last-minute decision to enter the chicken banger.

"I just did it randomly," he said. "A customer had said, ‘Why don't you make chicken sausages?’ And I went along with it."

"I thought mango and chicken would be nice and tweaked the recipe over the last couple of months."

Timbs, who learnt his trade in father Peter's shop and in Germany, said the secret to a good sausage was in using quality ingredients.

"Gone are the days where you put rubbish in sausages. We use quality spices imported from Germany," he said. "We don't extend our sausages with meal, so they are also gluten-free. We source our meat from different places but get the best we possibly can."

Timbs' streaky bacon had already been voted best bacon for 2009, and he has his sights on other prizes.

"We'd love a salami competition. We make good salami."


http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/lifestyle/3034632/Mango-and-chilli-chicken-sausage-NZs-best
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Magoo
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« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2009, 03:58:02 pm »

That is a very good snossage shop and the last time I was in there they had about 35 different flavours of sausage.      The rest of their meat is very good too.
The butchers aren't bad either.  Grin

Meet a butcher-in-the-buff
The Press
Last updated 22:36 19/09/2008

Christchurch butcher-in-the-buff Ryan Mornin, 26, celebrated World Nude Day yesterday amongst the mince and tenderloins at Peter Timbs Meats in Edgeware.

Mornin, who said he had always been comfortable in his own skin, put up with a lot of double-entendre meat-based jokes in response to his nudity.

"I heard it all," he said. "I got things like, `watch out which sausage you bag up' and `be careful what meat you slice'. Customers know it's just a bit of a laugh."

Mornin said he left the shop only once to visit the bakery next door. He was careful not to walk too fast in case a breeze lifted his apron. He would have been unable to get his knickers in a knot had that happened.

Although the butcher keeps in shape, Mornin promised to get his kit off for future national nude days even if he developed an overhang belly.

Shop manager David Timbs said that of the 12 butchers on staff, Mornin was the only one brave enough to get naked.

"And it was done in a tasteful way," he said.

"We had a group of seniors who come in every Friday morning and it made their week."

Timbs said no-one took offence but a couple of customers rang the shop to ask whether they knew they had a nude butcher in store.

And, sorry ladies, the buff butcher of Edgeware is spoken for.
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2009, 07:53:29 pm »


Ellerslie sausage maker snags gold award

By MELANIE VERRAN - East And Bays Courier | 5:00AM - Wednesday, 25 November 2009

SAUSAGE SAVVY: Butcher Ian Groves won a gold award at the Great New Zealand Sausage Competition for his traditional pork sausage. — AMELIA JACOBSEN/Auckland Suburban Newspapers.

SAUSAGE SAVVY: Butcher Ian Groves won a gold award at the Great New Zealand Sausage Competition
for his traditional pork sausage. — AMELIA JACOBSEN/Auckland Suburban Newspapers.


An Ellerslie butcher is savouring the knowledge that he makes the best traditional pork sausage in the country.

Ian Groves, the owner of Ellerslie Meats, won gold for his pork sausage, as well as bronzes for his gourmet apricot and chicken and boerwors creations at the Great New Zealand Sausage Competition.

After contesting the title for the last seven years, the elite prize is a welcome reward.

"One year we got five silvers and two bronze but this is the first year we've got a gold," he says.

"It's a bit of a buzz."

So what's the secret to making a fine sausage?

"Good meat. And you have to love what you're doing," Mr Groves says.

A butcher for 32 years, he's owned the store, which specialises in organic and gluten-free meat, for eight years.

He makes about 1000kg of sausages a week in 15 varieties.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/local-news/3092138/Ellerslie-sausage-maker-snags-gold-award
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« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2013, 03:15:42 pm »


Sausage and tarragon frittata

By LAURA FAIRE - Food & Wine @ Fairfax NZ | Sunday, 24 March 2013

SAUSAGE & TARRAGON FRITTATA: French tarragon is a great dance partner to the fennel in the sausages.
SAUSAGE & TARRAGON FRITTATA: French tarragon is a great dance partner to the fennel in the sausages.

HOT WEATHER has become a taboo subject. Whereas before I could always rely on a few thoughtless mentions of the temperature to open my column, the sight of the charred paddocks on my recent travels from Pukehina to Russell have slowed my pen.

Two months ago I was researching a column on the cost of watering an urban vegetable garden, but now it seems insensitive to complain. Having water is the thing.

The scaremongering that this type of weather system is here to stay is certainly not helping. Thankfully you can't trust a long-range forecast. Be it good or bad there are always many who suffer and a few who profit.

This adage rings true in the garden as well. Although my tomatoes are looking even nastier than they should at this time of year and my soft herbs are in window boxes set in partial shade, a few other plants are thriving. Perpetual dryness is no trouble for the lavender or the thyme and my Vietnamese mint is rioting out of control.

Happily putting on a good show is my little french tarragon plant. It has struggled and straggled the last few years, not fond of our constant house moving. A good stint in one spot and an arid summer is what it needed. Tarragon is a plant that needs very little. Neither a fan of excess water or good quality soil it is happier in a forgotten pot than in a well-watered fertile bed. For all its preferred neglect it is a giver.

Filled with flavour it imparts generously to other ingredients. Because the plant loses its leaves in winter it is often preserved as an infused vinegar or a dried herb. For the same reason it is also often presumed dead and discarded, but if you leave that little bundle of sticks in the ground it will burst back to life late the following spring. When buying tarragon look for "french" tarragon — it is more compact, upright and flavour-packed than the commonly available "russian" tarragon.

Famous as part of bearnaise sauce, oddly along with the winter herb chervil, tarragon is frequently overlooked. Perhaps because of its anise notes, one of the more polarising flavours in the herb world. I was dubious of tarragon for a long time because, as a student, I had rendered a lasagne inedible with an over zealous dose of dried tarragon. Beef and tarragon is a poor flavour combo in the first place and with such a thin purse it was hard to excuse.

Fresh tarragon is a lot more forgiving. It pairs wonderfully with seafood or chicken, easily infuses into a vinegar, is lovely in an oil, hits an interesting note chopped through a salad and is a great friend of eggs. Baked into an egg dish like this frittata it becomes a great dance partner to the fennel in the sausages, lifts the egg flavour and complements the sweetness of cooked tomato.

The sneaky thing about this frittata is that it all happens in one dish. It's a classic rush-job lunch filled with fresh lovely ingredients and satisfying flavours. You can happily knock it together and throw it in the oven without a second glance.


______________________________________

SAUSAGE AND TARRAGON FRITTATA

need to know

Main ingredient: Sausages.
Type of dish: Quick and easy.
Course: Starter.
Cooking time: 30 minutes to 1 hour.
Serves: 4-6.


Ingredients:

  • ½ onion, peeled and cut into wedges
  • 6 free-range pork and fennel sausages
  • 1 truss of little ripe tomatoes
  • 8 eggs, beaten
  • 2 Tbsp cream or milk
  • 2 tsp chopped fresh tarragon or ½ tsp dried
  • ½ tsp chopped fresh rosemary or a pinch of dried
  • 1 small potato, cut into wedges
  • 1 Tbsp water
  • ¼ cup grated cheese
  • Extra cheese

Method:

  • Preheat the oven to 180 degrees Celsius.

  • Place potato, onion and sausages in an ovenproof dish and roast for 15 minutes. Turn everything part way through.

  • Nestle the tomatoes into the cooked potatoes, onions and sausages.

  • Beat the eggs, cream, tarragon, rosemary, water and cheese together and pour into the hot dish.

  • Bake for 10 minutes. Sprinkle with a little cheese and bake for a further 10-15 minutes until puffed and golden.

  • Serve with a crisp green salad with a hint of chopped tarragon just to make the most of it.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/food-wine/recipes/8449468/Recipe-Sausage-and-tarragon-frittata
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BorisSanobabitz
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« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2014, 04:14:42 pm »

OMG! how can I live without sausage
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donquixotenz
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« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2014, 12:02:19 am »

Oh I would die for some real Frankfurt sausages rather than these incredibly poor imitations that we find in the supermarket "Deli" section.
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