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A Riddle


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Author Topic: A Riddle  (Read 2631 times)
Magoo
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« Reply #50 on: April 06, 2009, 08:00:01 pm »

The rooster?  Grin
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HisMajesty
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« Reply #51 on: April 07, 2009, 12:45:55 pm »


That was a genuine riddle. Any takers?
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Magoo
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« Reply #52 on: April 07, 2009, 12:54:50 pm »

The egg came first.
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HisMajesty
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« Reply #53 on: April 07, 2009, 01:30:43 pm »



Correct!
Can you elaborate?
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Magoo
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« Reply #54 on: April 07, 2009, 01:48:47 pm »

I am working on the theory that a human develops from a fertilised egg.... so would not a chicken be an egg also.
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DazzaMc
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« Reply #55 on: April 07, 2009, 02:00:09 pm »

I am working on the theory that a human develops from a fertilised egg.... so would not a chicken be an egg also.

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« Reply #56 on: April 07, 2009, 02:07:59 pm »


Not a riddle....

Eggs originated from the water - back when life was pretty much contained to the oceans.
Fish eggs anyone? - that's where it ALL started (including us dorky Humans).

The little critters back then took a liking to the relative safety of the land for laying their eggs, but their little bub's kept drying out and kicking the bucket so over time the shell formed which is designed to keep the moisture in...

 Smiley


Just think - if those little critters hadn't have discovered the land way back then, then we would all probably be living like Sponge Bob Square Pants!
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Magoo
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« Reply #57 on: April 07, 2009, 02:17:38 pm »

Quote
Fish eggs anyone? - that's where it ALL  started (including us dorky Humans).
 
    Oh I know a couple of silly old trouts  Grin
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HisMajesty
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« Reply #58 on: April 07, 2009, 02:19:46 pm »


Yeah...just imagine a world with no drownings! Animal meat would've been expensive to buy as going to land to hunt for animals, freeze them, then bring them back to sea would be an expensive excercise!
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Lovelee
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« Reply #59 on: April 07, 2009, 02:38:36 pm »


Not a riddle....

Eggs originated from the water - back when life was pretty much contained to the oceans.
Fish eggs anyone? - that's where it ALL started (including us dorky Humans).

The little critters back then took a liking to the relative safety of the land for laying their eggs, but their little bub's kept drying out and kicking the bucket so over time the shell formed which is designed to keep the moisture in...

 Smiley


Just think - if those little critters hadn't have discovered the land way back then, then we would all probably be living like Sponge Bob Square Pants!


Wheres the proof that eggs originated from water?
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Shef
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« Reply #60 on: April 07, 2009, 03:51:57 pm »

PMSL  Yeah Dazza, L'lee wants a link
LOL
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Magoo
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« Reply #61 on: April 07, 2009, 04:20:56 pm »

But thats the missing link. Grin
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Lovelee
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« Reply #62 on: April 07, 2009, 04:46:12 pm »

PMSL  Yeah Dazza, L'lee wants a link
LOL

hahahaha  nice one!

OO hey - dont bother wif a link if its just yer opinion 
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Laughter is the best medicine, unless you've got a really nasty case of syphilis, in which case penicillin is your best bet.
Shef
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« Reply #63 on: April 07, 2009, 05:13:49 pm »

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« Reply #64 on: April 18, 2009, 12:20:08 pm »

New Fossils Of Extremely Primitive 4-Legged Creatures Close The Gap Between Fish And Land Animals



ScienceDaily (June 27, 2008) — New exquisitely preserved fossils from Latvia cast light on a key event in our own evolutionary history, when our ancestors left the water and ventured onto land. Swedish researcher Per Ahlberg from Uppsala University and colleagues have reconstructed parts of the animal and explain the transformation in the new issue of Nature.

It has long been known that the first backboned land animals or "tetrapods" - the ancestors of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, including ourselves - evolved from a group of fishes about 370 million years ago during the Devonian period. However, even though scientists had discovered fossils of tetrapod-like fishes and fish-like tetrapods from this period, these were still rather different from each other and did not give a complete picture of the intermediate steps in the transition.

In 2006 the situation changed dramatically with the discovery of an almost perfectly intermediate fish-tetrapod, Tiktaalik, but even so a gap remained between this animal and the earliest true tetrapods (animals with limbs rather than paired fins). Now, new fossils of the extremely primitive tetrapod Ventastega from the Devonian of Latvia cast light on this key phase of the transition.

"Ventastega was first described from fragmentary material in 1994; since then, excavations have produced lots of new superbly preserved fossils, allowing us to reconstruct the whole head, shoulder girdle and part of the pelvis", says Professor Per Ahlberg at the Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Uppsala University.

The recontructions made by Professor Ahlberg and Assistant Professor Henning Blom together with British and Latvian colleagues show that Ventastega was more fish-like than any of its contemporaries, such as Acanthostega. The shape of its skull, and the pattern of teeth in its jaws, are neatly intermediate between those of Tiktaalik and Acanthostega.

"However, the shoulder girdle and pelvis are almost identical to those of Acanthostega, and the shoulder girdle is quite different from that of Tiktaalik (the pelvis of Tiktaalik is unknown), suggesting that the transformation from paired fins to limbs had already occurred. It appears that different parts of the body evolved at different speeds during the transition from water to land", says Per Ahlberg.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080625140643.htm
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« Reply #65 on: April 18, 2009, 12:22:10 pm »

Newly Found Species Fills Evolutionary Gap Between Fish And Land Animals




ScienceDaily (Apr. 6, 2006) — Paleontologists have discovered fossils of a species that provides the missing evolutionary link between fish and the first animals that walked out of water onto land about 375 million years ago. The newly found species, Tiktaalik roseae, has a skull, a neck, ribs and parts of the limbs that are similar to four-legged animals known as tetrapods, as well as fish-like features such as a primitive jaw, fins and scales.

These fossils, found on Ellesmere Island in Arctic Canada, are the most compelling examples yet of an animal that was at the cusp of the fish-tetrapod transition. The new find is described in two related research articles highlighted on the cover of the April 6, 2006, issue of Nature.

"Tiktaalik blurs the boundary between fish and land-living animal both in terms of its anatomy and its way of life," said Neil Shubin, professor and chairman of organismal biology at the University of Chicago and co-leader of the project.

Tiktaalik was a predator with sharp teeth, a crocodile-like head and a flattened body. The well-preserved skeletal material from several specimens, ranging from 4 to 9 feet long, enabled the researchers to study the mosaic pattern of evolutionary change in different parts of the skeleton as fish evolved into land animals.

The high quality of the fossils also allowed the team to examine the joint surfaces on many of the fin bones, concluding that the shoulder, elbow and wrist joints were capable of supporting the body-like limbed animals.

"Human comprehension of the history of life on Earth is taking a major leap forward," said H. Richard Lane, director of sedimentary geology and paleobiology at the National Science Foundation. "These exciting discoveries are providing fossil 'Rosetta Stones' for a deeper understanding of this evolutionary milestone-fish to land-roaming tetrapods."

One of the most important aspects of this discovery is the illumination of the fin-to-limb transition. In a second paper in the journal, the scientists describe in depth how the pectoral fin of the fish serves as the origin of the tetrapod limb.

Embedded in the fin of Tiktaalik are bones that compare to the upper arm, forearm and primitive parts of the hand of land-living animals.

"Most of the major joints of the fin are functional in this fish," Shubin said. "The shoulder, elbow and even parts of the wrist are already there and working in ways similar to the earliest land-living animals."

At the time that Tiktaalik lived, what is now the Canadian Arctic region was part of a landmass that straddled the equator. It had a subtropical climate, much like the Amazon basin today. The species lived in the small streams of this delta system. According to Shubin, the ecological setting in which these animals evolved provided an environment conducive to the transition to life on land.

"We knew that the rocks on Ellesmere Island offered a glimpse into the right time period and the right ancient environments to provide the potential for finding fossils documenting this important evolutionary transition," said Ted Daeschler of the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, a co-leader of the project. "Finding the fossils within this remote, rugged terrain, however, required a lot of time and effort."

The nature of the deposits where the fossils were found and the skeletal structure of Tiktaalik suggests the animal lived in shallow water and perhaps even out of the water for short periods.

"The skeleton of Tiktaalik indicates that it could support its body under the force of gravity whether in very shallow water or on land," said Farish Jenkins, professor of organismic and evolutionary biology at Harvard University and co-author of the papers. "This represents a critical early phase in the evolution of all limbed animals, including humans -- albeit a very ancient step."

The new fossils were collected during four summers of exploration in Canada's Nunavut Territory, 600 miles from the North Pole, by paleontologists from the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, the University of Chicago and Harvard University. Although the team has amassed a diverse assemblage of fossil fish, Shubin said, the discovery of these transitional fossils in 2004 was a vindication of their persistence.

The scientists asked the Nunavut people to propose a formal scientific name for the new species. The Elders Council of Nunavut, the Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit, suggested "Tiktaalik" (tic-TAH-lick) -- the word in the Inuktikuk language for "a large, shallow water fish."

The scientists worked through the Department of Culture, Language, Elders and Youth in Nunavut to collaborate with the local Inuit communities. All fossils are the property of the people of Nunavut and will be returned to Canada after they are studied.

The team depended on the maps of the Geological Survey of Canada. The researchers received permits from the Department of Culture, Language, Elders and Youth of the Government of Nunavut, and logistical support in the form of helicopters and bush planes from Polar Continental Shelf Project of Natural Resources Canada. The National Science Foundation and the National Geographic Society, along with an anonymous donor, also helped fund the project.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/04/060406100543.htm

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« Reply #66 on: April 18, 2009, 12:23:45 pm »

Fossilized Burrows 245 Million Years Old Suggest Lizard-like Creatures In Antarctica



ScienceDaily (June 8, 2008) — For the first time paleontologists have found fossilized burrows of tetrapods -- any land vertebrates with four legs or leglike appendages -- in Antarctica dating from the Early Triassic epoch, about 245 million years ago.

The fossils were created when fine sand from an overflowing river poured into the animals' burrows and hardened into casts of the open spaces. The largest preserved piece is about 14 inches long, 6 inches wide and 3 inches deep. No animal remains were found inside the burrow casts, but the hardened sediment in each burrow preserved a track made as the animals entered and exited.

In addition, scratch marks from the animals' initial excavation were apparent in some places, said Christian Sidor, a University of Washington assistant professor of biology and curator of vertebrate paleontology at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture at the UW.

"We've got good evidence that these burrows were made by land-dwelling animals rather than crayfish," said Sidor, who is lead author of a paper describing the find, which is being published in the June edition of The Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology.

Co-authors are Molly Miller, a geology professor at Vanderbilt University, and John Isbell, a geosciences professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. The work was funded by the National Science Foundation.

Fossils of tetrapod bones from later in the Triassic period have been found in a section of Antarctica called Victoria Land, but the fossil burrows predate those bone fossils by at least 15 million years, Sidor said.

The fossilized burrows were collected in 2003 and 2005-06 from the Fremouw Formation at Wahl Glacier and from the Lashly Formation at Allan Hills, both toward the outer edges of Antarctica.

Despite the absence of fossil bones, the burrows' relatively small size prompted Sidor to speculate that their owners might have been small lizardlike reptiles called Procolophonids or an early mammal relative called Thrinaxodon.

Burrows, some containing tetrapod bones, have previously been excavated in South Africa, which is considered to be perhaps the world's richest fossil depository, and those burrows are nearly identical to the fossils unearthed in Antarctica. During the Triassic period, Antarctica and South Africa were connected as part of a supercontinent called Pangea.

Because even at that time Antarctica was substantially colder than South Africa, and because sea levels likely were higher than today, it is much rarer to find fossils there that date from as far back as the Early Triassic.

"Everywhere has a spotty fossil record, but Antarctica has an extremely spotty fossil record because it is difficult finding exposed rocks amid all the ice," Sidor said.

At the time the burrows were dug, Antarctica would have been ice free. However temperatures still would have been quite cold, since both areas where the burrows were found are within the Antarctic Circle and so experience at least one day a year of complete darkness.

"We have documented that tetrapods were burrowing, making dens in Antarctica, back in the Triassic," Sidor said. "There are lots of good reasons for burrowing at high latitudes, not the least of which is protection from the elements."

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080607232647.htm
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« Reply #67 on: April 18, 2009, 12:24:06 pm »

There!!

lol...

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« Reply #68 on: April 18, 2009, 04:38:38 pm »

LOL I dont believe it  Roll Eyes
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« Reply #69 on: April 18, 2009, 04:53:38 pm »

LOL


Tuff!


 Grin
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Newtown-Fella
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« Reply #70 on: June 18, 2009, 11:52:26 pm »

Here is a riddle for the true intellectual. Try to come up with the answer on your own.



The answer is at the bottom of the email for those who are unable to think this one through.



Here's the riddle:



At the exact same time, there are two 35-year-old men on opposite sides of the earth.



One is walking a tight rope between two skyscrapers at the 85th floor.



The other is getting oral sex from an 85-year-old toothless woman.



They are both thinking the exact same thing...



What are they both thinking?



















Dont Look Down








Dont look Down !!
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