Xtra News Community 2
August 14, 2018, 06:26:52 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Welcome to Xtra News Community 2 — please also join our XNC2-BACKUP-GROUP.
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links BITEBACK! XNC2-BACKUP-GROUP Staff List Login Register  

A 20-hour visit to Aoraki-Mt Cook National Park during Easter 2008


Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: A 20-hour visit to Aoraki-Mt Cook National Park during Easter 2008  (Read 5384 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #50 on: February 02, 2009, 07:09:18 pm »

Looking down at the terminal face of Franz Josef Glacier from above the lower icefall at 10:44am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

Looking down at the terminal face of Franz Josef Glacier from above the lower icefall.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #51 on: February 02, 2009, 07:10:05 pm »

The Baumann Glacier on the western flanks of the Fritz Range between the Franz Josef and Fox Glaciers and above the Waikukupa Valley as viewed at 10:45am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

The Baumann Glacier on the western flanks of the Fritz Range between the Franz Josef and Fox Glaciers and above the Waikukupa Valley.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #52 on: February 02, 2009, 07:11:05 pm »

Crossing over the Victoria Glacier, the view is downstream of the glacier looking towards the Victoria Falls which drops the meltwater of the Victoria Glacier onto the lower Fox Glacier — 10:46am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

Crossing over the Victoria Glacier, the view is downstream of the glacier looking towards the Victoria Falls which drops the meltwater from the Victoria Glacier
onto the lower Fox Glacier.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #53 on: February 03, 2009, 02:08:16 pm »

Flying across the huge névé of Fox Glacier, past Pioneer Ridge, past the upper icefall and trunk of Fox Glacier, then across the vast Albert Glacier (part of the Fox névé) and over Paschendale Ridge and past the Castries Glacier and Mount Du Fresne towards the numerous valley glaciers south of Franz Josef and Fox glaciers.



Flying across the huge névé of Fox Glacier looking up towards the Main Divide of the Southern Alps with Pioneer Ridge prominent towards the right-hand side of the photograph at 10:47am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

Flying across the huge névé of Fox Glacier looking up towards the Main Divide of the Southern Alps with Pioneer Ridge prominent towards
the right-hand side of the photograph.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #54 on: February 03, 2009, 02:09:10 pm »

Looking down the upper icefall and trunk of Fox Glacier as it descends towards the lowland rainforest as viewed at 10:47am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

Looking down the upper icefall and trunk of Fox Glacier as it descends towards the lowland rainforest.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #55 on: February 03, 2009, 02:10:05 pm »

Looking down the upper icefall and trunk of Fox Glacier as it descends towards the lowland rainforest as viewed at 10:47am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

Looking down the upper icefall and trunk of Fox Glacier as it descends towards the lowland rainforest.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #56 on: February 03, 2009, 02:10:58 pm »

Looking down over the upper icefall of Fox Glacier while flying across the top of the glacier trunk at 10:47am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

Looking down over the upper icefall of Fox Glacier while flying across the top of the glacier trunk.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #57 on: February 03, 2009, 02:12:08 pm »

The Albert Glacier, part of the huge névé of Fox Glacier, looking towards the Main Divide of the Southern Alps at 10:48am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

The Albert Glacier, part of the huge névé of Fox Glacier, looking towards the Main Divide of the Southern Alps at the top of the picture.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #58 on: February 03, 2009, 02:13:11 pm »

Flying over the Castries Glacier with Mount Du Fresne prominent on the Fox Range at 10:48am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

Flying over the Castries Glacier with Mount Du Fresne prominent on the Fox Range.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #59 on: February 04, 2009, 02:49:14 pm »

Continuing south from Fox Glacier, flying along the western side of the Main Divide over numerous valley glaciers in Westland National Park with some awesome views of the western side of Mounts Dampier and Aoraki-Mount Cook, as well as the Balfour Face (and glacier) of Mount Tasman, we eventually began descending in preparation for flying a standard circuit pattern prior to landing on the Horace-Walker Glacier on the southern flanks of the Sierra Range.



The view just before crossing over the Balfour Range with Mount Vancouver visible, then NZ's third-highest mountain, Mount Dampier immediately in front of the High Peak of Aoraki-Mount Cook, with the South Face of Mount Hicks (St David's Dome) prominent to the right above the névé of the La Perouse Glacier (visible just beyond the ridge running across the picture from the top-left to the bottom-right) — 10:48am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

The view just before crossing over the Balfour Range with Mount Vancouver visible, then NZ's third-highest mountain, Mount Dampier immediately in front of
the High Peak of Aoraki-Mount Cook, with the South Face of Mount Hicks (St David's Dome) prominent to the right above the névé of the La Perouse Glacier
(visible just beyond the ridge running across the picture from the top-left to the bottom-right).
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #60 on: February 04, 2009, 02:49:58 pm »

Looking back towards the Balfour Face of Mount Tasman with Torres Peak to the left and the upper section (including the névé) of the Balfour Glacier below the two peaks — 10:49am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

Looking back towards the Balfour Face of Mount Tasman with Torres Peak to the left and the upper section (including the névé) of the Balfour Glacier
below the two peaks.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #61 on: February 04, 2009, 02:50:39 pm »

Looking west over the lower Balfour Valley towards the Cook River Valley (which drains the meltwaters of the La Perouse Glacier) — 10:49am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

Looking west over the lower Balfour Valley towards the Cook River Valley (which drains the meltwaters of the La Perouse Glacier).
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #62 on: February 04, 2009, 02:51:22 pm »

NZ's third-highest mountain, Mount Dampier on the skyline at the left, with the ridgeline dropping down to Green Saddle, then rising up the North Ridge of Aoraki-Mount Cook to the High Peak, then along the mile-long summit ridge to the Middle and Low Peaks (with the Sheila and Hooker Faces of Aoraki below the summit ridge) as viewed while flying above the upper La Perouse Glacier at 10:50am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

NZ's third-highest mountain, Mount Dampier on the skyline at the left, with the ridgeline dropping down to Green Saddle, then rising up the North Ridge of
Aoraki-Mount Cook to the High Peak, then along the mile-long summit ridge to the Middle and Low Peaks (with the Sheila and Hooker Faces of Aoraki
below the summit ridge) as viewed while flying above the upper La Perouse Glacier.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #63 on: February 04, 2009, 02:52:07 pm »

The Sheila and Hooker faces of Aoraki-Mount Cook on the skyline with the western side of Mount Hicks (St Davids Dome), Harper Saddle, Sturdee Peak, Mount Jellicoe and Mount Low as viewed while flying above the upper La Perouse Glacier at 10:50am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

The Sheila and Hooker faces of Aoraki-Mount Cook on the skyline with the western side of Mount Hicks (St Davids Dome), Harper Saddle, Sturdee Peak,
Mount Jellicoe and Mount Low as viewed while flying above the upper La Perouse Glacier.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #64 on: February 04, 2009, 02:53:04 pm »

About to cross the Navigator Range and fly over the Strauchon Glacier, then the Copland Valley, with the Main Divide of the Southern Alps in the background at 10:51am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

About to cross the Navigator Range and fly over the Strauchon Glacier, then the Copland Valley, with the Main Divide of the Southern Alps in the background.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #65 on: February 04, 2009, 02:53:45 pm »

A closeup view of the Pilkington Glacier below Mount Glorious on the south side of the Sierra Range while turning to fly up the Horace-Walker Glacier and enter the circuit for a landing on the névé - photo taken at 10:53am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

A closeup view of the Pilkington Glacier below Mount Glorious on the south side of the Sierra Range while turning to fly up the Horace-Walker Glacier
and enter the circuit for a landing on the névé.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #66 on: February 04, 2009, 02:54:30 pm »

Looking towards the south beyond Notable Peak and Mount Peculiar towards the distant Hooker Range peaks of Fettes, Mount Strachan, Mount Dechen and Mount Hooker at 10:54am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

Looking south beyond Notable Peak and Mount Peculiar towards the distant Hooker Range peaks of Fettes, Mount Strachan, Mount Dechen and Mount Hooker.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #67 on: February 04, 2009, 02:55:16 pm »

A view of Pioneer Peak while on the downwind leg of the circuit, descending to land on the névé of the Horace-Walker Glacier at 10:54am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

A view of Pioneer Peak while on the downwind leg of the circuit, descending to land on the névé of the Horace-Walker Glacier.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #68 on: February 04, 2009, 02:55:59 pm »

I had grabbed the coveted rear seats of the skiplane for myself — the best place for taking photographs from a Pilatus Porter, as you are behind the trailing edge of the wings — and with nobody else in that row, I was free to switch from side to side to get the best shots. The pilot had told me before taking off from Mount Cook Airport that I was free to undo my seat-belt after takeoff (whereas everyone else had to stay strapped in) and that I could move from side to side, just so long as I belted myself in before landing. After several false-alarms when I thought we were about to land due to the flaps being extended while low over the ice of various glaciers, I was busy taking photos when I suddenly noticed another skiplane on the Horace-Walker Glacier immediately ahead of us and realised we were about to land. I just got myself belted in about ten seconds before we touched down on the glacier and joined the people who were already there. Eventually the other skiplane departed and it was just our group on the glacier. The air temperature on the ice was up around 30°C (according to the Outside Air Temperature gauge on the skiplane's instrument panel 10 minutes after we had landed) in spite of the fact we were at around 2,600 metres above sea-level. The Aussies on the flight were complaining about the heat and starting to strip off layers of clothing — I had climbed on the plane in shorts and teeshirt as I know from past alpine tramping and climbing experience just how hot glaciers can be on a sunny day. In warm weather, glaciers can be some of the hottest places on the planet, due to the ice reflecting the heat back upwards, resulting in a super-heated layer of air extending 3-4 metres above the surface of the glacier. However, on cloudy days, the reverse can be true and freezing temperatures often prevail.



Just after landing on the Horace-Walker Glacier névé with another Pilatus Porter skiplane already on the ice — 10:55am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

Just after landing on the Horace-Walker Glacier névé with another skiplane already on the ice.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #69 on: February 04, 2009, 02:56:57 pm »

Taxiing alongside Pilatas Porter skiplane ZK-MCK (c/n.809) just after landing on the Horace-Walker Glacier — 10:56am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

Taxiing alongside Pilatas Porter skiplane ZK-MCK (c/n.809) just after landing on the Horace-Walker Glacier.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #70 on: February 04, 2009, 02:57:43 pm »

Two Pilatus Porter skiplanes of Mount Cook Skiplanes — ZK-MCT (c/n.841) and ZK-MCK (c/n.809) — on the Horace-Walker Glacier in Westland National Park at 10:59am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

Two Pilatus Porter skiplanes of Mount Cook Skiplanes — ZK-MCT (c/n.841) and ZK-MCK (c/n.809) — on the Horace-Walker Glacier.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #71 on: February 04, 2009, 02:58:38 pm »

The mile-long summit ridge of Aoraki-Mount Cook as viewed from 2,600 metres above sea-level on the névé of the Horace-Walker Glacier  at 11:00am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008..

The mile-long summit ridge of Aoraki-Mount Cook as viewed from 2,600 metres above sea-level on the névé of the Horace-Walker Glacier.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #72 on: February 04, 2009, 02:59:35 pm »

Blizzard Peak as viewed across the névé of the Horace-Walker Glacier in Westland National Park, as viewed at 11:01am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

Blizzard Peak as viewed across the névé of the Horace-Walker Glacier in Westland National Park.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #73 on: February 04, 2009, 03:00:21 pm »

A Pilatus Porter skiplane taxiing for takeoff from the Horace-Walker Glacier at 11:01am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

A Pilatus Porter skiplane taxiing for takeoff from the Horace-Walker Glacier.
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #74 on: February 04, 2009, 03:01:05 pm »

The Pilatus Porter skiplane (ZK-MCT — c/n.841) that provided the photographic platform used to take all of these aerial pictures of the mountains and glaciers of Aoraki-Mount Cook and Westland National Parks sitting on the Horace-Walker Glacier névé — 11:05am on Easter Monday, 24th March 2008.

The Pilatus Porter skiplane (ZK-MCT — c/n.841) that provided the photographic platform used to take all of these aerial pictures of the mountains and glaciers
of Aoraki-Mount Cook and Westland National Parks sitting on the Horace-Walker Glacier névé.
Report Spam   Logged

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Open XNC2 Smileys
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum

Buy traffic for your forum/website
traffic-masters
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy
Page created in 0.156 seconds with 10 queries.