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Obituaries


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Lovelee
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« Reply #75 on: August 26, 2009, 08:00:19 pm »

Senator Ted Kennedy has died of brain cancer at age 77.

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« Reply #76 on: August 29, 2009, 05:16:33 pm »

Sir Jack Harris dies aged 103


Sir Jack Harris, who ran one of the country's biggest import/export businesses, has died at the age of 103.

NZ's oldest first-time author, Sir Jack published his "Memoirs of a Century" two years ago, spanning 100 years since his grandfather set up a business in New Zealand during the goldrush era.

After celebrating his 103rd birthday on July 23, he commented: "I am in my 104th year, have lived a long time and am really quite well -- not bad really for an old chap. Must be in the blood."

He died at a rest home in Whitby, near Porirua, on Wednesday.

Born in London in 1906 and educated at Cambridge, Sir Jack Wolfred Ashford Harris inherited his baronetcy from his father, Liberal MP Sir Percy Harris, in 1952.

Moving to New Zealand to save the family business during the depression, he met his wife-to-be Patricia Clapin Penman Harris , a liberal feminist, atheist, columnist and writer, on a ship to Australia.

Sir Jack's first impression of Wellington was unfavourable.

"It was very small, rundown. I thought I had come to the end of the world.

But Sir Jack made a huge impact as a pioneering manufacturer and civic leader in New Zealand, becoming chief executive of Bing Harris and Co import/exporters.

Tragedy struck in 1996 when his beloved Waikanae homestead Te Rama went up in flames, along with hundreds of precious artworks and antiques.

Sir Jack and his wife, who died six years ago, had a daughter and two sons.

A service for Sir Jack will be held at Waikanae Funeral Home on Thursday.

http://nz.news.yahoo.com/a/-/top-stories/5889125/sir-jack-harris-dies-aged-103/
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« Reply #77 on: September 01, 2009, 06:49:49 pm »

NEW YORK - A wire-haired dachshund that held the record as the world's oldest dog has died on Long Island at age 21 - or 147 in dog years.

Chanel died Friday of natural causes at her owners' home in Port Jefferson Station, a village 50 miles (80 kilometers) east of New York City.

Guinness World Records officials honored Chanel as the world's oldest dog in May at a 21st birthday bash hosted by a pet food company at a Manhattan dog hotel and spa.

Owners Denice and Karl Shaughnessy adopted Chanel from a pet shelter in Virginia, when she was 6 weeks old.

They say Chanel in her later years wore tinted goggles for her cataracts and favored sweaters because she was sensitive to the cold. But they say she remained lively for her age.




http://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=10594552&ref=rss
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« Reply #78 on: September 14, 2009, 11:48:03 pm »

Kiwi Battle of Britain flying ace dies

Squadron Leader John Pattison, one of the few remaining New Zealanders who flew in the Battle of Britain, has died in Hastings at the age of 92.

Shot down by an enemy fighter during the battle and badly wounded, he recovered to have a distinguished war and be made a member of the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) and win the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) and France's Legion d'Honneur.

He also commanded 485 (NZ) Spitfire Squadron late in the war.

Mr Pattison, who worked on his father's Waipawa farm pre-war, learned to fly on Tiger Moths at Bridge Pa, Hastings, and had logged just 20 hours when World War 2 began.

He volunteered immediately and after getting his wings in April 1940 and commission the following month sailed for England in June 1940.

Desperately short of pilots as the Battle of Britain developed, Mr Pattison and others like him were rushed through training by the Royal Air Force and posted to active squadrons.

Mr Pattison had just three hours on a Miles Master trainer and then the briefest conversion course on Spitfires, before joining 266 Squadron on August 27 at the height of the battle.

Thrown in against hordes of enemy aircraft, Pattison's squadron became split up on his first operational flight and the New Zealander became lost over the Thames Estuary.

He eventually tacked on to a Hurricane but ran out of fuel and made a wheels up landing on a field bristling with anti-invasion obstacles.

Mr Pattison was greeting by pitchfork-wielding farmers who thought he was a German.

Posted later to 92 Squadron at Biggin Hill, Mr Pattison was soon shot down by a Messerschmitt 109 and badly wounded by a cannon shell in the thigh and spent the next eight months in hospital.

In June 1941 Mr Pattison was posted to a training unit in Wales as an instructor but notched a black mark when he flew under the Severn railway bridge and lost three months seniority as a penalty.

In April 1942 he joined 485, one of the three squadrons in the Kenley Wing. Late that month while escorting Hurricane bombers attacking Calais, 485 was jumped by a large force of Focke-Wulf 190s and lost four Spitfires.

Mr Pattison's engine was hit and knocked out by a cannon shell and his cockpit filled with smoke.

He glided his stricken fighter across the Channel, baled out near the English coast and was rescued 90 minutes later.

After a year flying attacks over France, Mr Pattison was posted as a chief flying instructor, then joined 66 Squadron flying Spitfire IXs equipped with bombs which were used in attacking V-weapon launch sites, in the pre-invasion offensive and as cover on the D-Day landings.

In September 1944, Mr Pattison was named commanding officer of 485 Squadron, the third last of 10 485 COs. He led the New Zealanders until February 1945.

Mr Pattison returned to New Zealand in January 1946 with a record of two enemy aircraft destroyed and many ground vehicles to his credit.

He farmed for the rest of his working life in Waipawa before retiring to Havelock North.

Of his wartime flying Mr Pattison told an aviation researcher in 1993: "Wonderful times to have lived through and fantastic mates."

He recovered completely from his thigh wound but in 1993 he had a cataract operation on his right eye that his surgeon thought was caused by a metal splinter "from the exhaust of my Spitfire when coming in to land."

John Gordon Pattison, born in Waipawa January 27, 1917, and educated at Wanganui Collegiate, died on Friday. He is survived by his wife, four sons and their families.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10597264
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« Reply #79 on: September 14, 2009, 11:53:46 pm »

Ian Malcolm: Die-hard Nats supporter was a natural salesman


Ian Malcolm was a good talker, a good salesman, ever the optimist and a die-hard supporter of the National Party.

He grew up in Roseneath and went to Roseneath Primary School and Wellington Technical College.

Then, following his father, who was permanent ways engineer for Wellington City Council, he started work in 1942 as an electrical apprentice in Railways' electric track division.

After transferring to the design office in 1948, his supervisor suggested he go to night school to become an electrical engineer. Later he worked on plans for the electrification of the main trunk line between Wellington and Auckland.

Leaving Railways in 1953, he joined the National Electric and Engineering Co (NEECO) in Auckland as a power sales engineer. He was a natural salesman and by 1956 was the merchandise sales supervisor at NEECO's head office in Wellington.

He was 39 in 1966 when he was appointed managing director, a post he held until 1980 when the company was taken over by Cable Price Downer. He left rather than become involved in the restructuring - he did not want to be involved in firing people.

Keen to get back to being a salesman, he set up his own trading company, IL Malcolm Ltd. It imported and exported a range of products, but electrical motors were a mainstay as he kept the company going for 30 years.

The family home was first in Cavendish Sq, Strathmore, but after a stroke, which partially paralysed him, he and his wife moved to a house in Miramar that did not have stairs. He recovered well.

Mr Malcolm was a prolific letter writer, tendering his advice to prime ministers and putting his invariably conservative views in regular letters to the editor.

At times his advice could be unintentionally amusing, such as in the letter he wrote to prime minister Jenny Shipley on how she should tackle a United States trade barrier.

"Could I suggest that, as you have recently formed a relationship with Mr Clinton, that you give him a ring and ask for his help. In years of business I have found that sometimes, in difficult circumstances, you have to appeal to the top man."

Mrs Shipley thanked him graciously.

Asked before the last election if he would still vote National if the party were led by a monkey, he said he would "as they would replace him if he wasn't any good".

He was community spirited and generous with his time and money, supported the Salvation Army, served on the boards of Queen Margaret College and the Boys & Girls Institute and was a Rotarian for more than 35 years. He is survived by his wife.
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Ian Leith Malcolm,  businessman: born Wellington,  February 6, 1927; married Elizabeth  Tait 1953, 1 son 2 daughters; died Wellington, August 16, 2009, aged 82.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/national/obituaries/2857667/Ian-Malcolm-Die-hard-Nats-supporter-was-a-natural-salesman
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« Reply #80 on: September 15, 2009, 02:50:32 pm »

Actor Patrick Swayze has died after a long battle with pancreatic cancer. He was 57.

Publicist Annett Wolf says Swayze died this morning with his family by his side.

He spoke out about his illness in March 2008, but continued working on TV series The Beast as he underwent treatment.

In an interview broadcast in January 2009, Swayze said that he might have only two years to live.

Swayze became a star in 1987 after his performance in Dirty Dancing.

The 1990 film Ghost cemented his status as a screen favourite.

He was married to Lisa Niemi for 34 years, but the couple did not have children


http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/09/15/2686147.htm
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« Reply #81 on: September 17, 2009, 06:43:36 pm »

Mary Travers of 1960s folk trio Peter, Paul and Mary, has died, according to her publicist. She was 72.

Travers died from side effects of treatment from a bone-marrow transplant after battling leukemia, publicist Heather Lylis said.

The singer was born in Louisville, Kentucky, in November 1936 and grew up in New York's Greenwich Village. As a teenager, she performed in a Broadway review, but stepped on to the folk music scene in the 1950s. She emerged as an iconic folk singer while performing with Peter Yarrow and Noel Paul.

Peter, Paul and Mary came together while singing "Mary Had a Little Lamb" in Noel Paul's New York City apartment. They went on to play gigs at coffee houses and later on the radio.

"As a performer, her charisma was a barely contained nervous energy -- occasionally (and then only privately) revealed as stage fright," Paul said.

Their music reflected the 1960s and the 1970s, a time of turmoil as the civil rights and anti-war movements moved into full swing.

Travers applied her recognition to rally behind those progressive movements. In 1963, the trio performed its hit song "If I Had a Hammer" at the Washington march where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his famed "I Have a Dream Speech," her publicist said.

"We've learned that it will take more than one generation to bring about change," Travers once said. "The fight for civil rights has developed into a broader concern for human rights, and that encompasses a great many people and countries. Those of us who live in a democracy have a responsibility to be the voice for those whose voices are stilled."

Travers advocated against U.S. government moves in Central America in the 1980s. She went on a mission to El Salvador and later spoke out against the country's regime. She also opposed American funding of a militant group in Nicaragua set on overthrowing an elected government there, according to her publicist.

Peter, Paul and Mary recorded hits still recognized now, including "Leaving on a Jet Plane," "Puff the Magic Dragon" and "Where Have All the Flowers Gone." They performed together for nearly 50 years, winning five Grammys and releasing 13 Top 40 hits, six of them in the Top 10 charts.

Their debut album, "Peter, Paul and Mary" was on the Top 10 chart for 10 months. Travers also recorded four solo albums in the 1970s.

Their last performance was in New Brunswick, New Jersey, on May 20.

Those closest to Travers say she valued her friendships.

"Perhaps the most remarkable aspect of my relationship with Mary Travers over the last almost 50 years is how open and honest we were with each other, and I include Noel Paul Stookey in this equation," Yarrow said in a statement.

"Such honesty comes with a price, but when you get past the hurt and shock of realizing that you're faulted and frequently wrong, you also realize that you are really loved and respected for who you are, and you become a better person."

She is survived by her husband, Ethan Robbins; her daughters Alicia and Erika; her sister, Ann Gordon; and her granddaughters Wylie and Virginia.

http://www.cnn.com/2009/SHOWBIZ/Music/09/17/obit.mary.travers/index.html?eref=rss_topstories

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« Reply #82 on: September 17, 2009, 06:57:50 pm »

Keith Floyd.....one of the first celebrity chefs

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/8256260.stm
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liquor up front,poker at the rear
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« Reply #83 on: October 15, 2009, 11:39:39 pm »

Al Martino, the smooth-voiced baritone who had a string of hits in the 1950s and ’60s with sentimental ballads like “Here in My Heart” and “Spanish Eyes” and then found wider fame as Johnny Fontane, the wedding singer in “The Godfather,” died on Tuesday at his home in Springfield, Pa. He was 82.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/15/arts/music/15martino.html?ref=todayspaper
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« Reply #84 on: October 23, 2009, 11:24:11 am »

Don Lane - (i'll find a link soon)

This dude (american/aussie) funny as and on late night TV in OZ for deacdes with Moonface (Bob Newton)

Saw him show up that key bender guy some years ago .... he screamed at him 'your a charlatan and a bloody fake'  tossed all the keys all over the studio, told him to piss off.  Then had to come back and aplogise - this was all live TV  Grin
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« Reply #85 on: October 24, 2009, 10:36:15 am »

The funny man seen many times on popular game shows died at a New York hospice, said Paul Dver, Sales' longtime friend and manager.

"We have lost a comedy American icon," Dver said. "I feel the personal loss, and I also feel the magic that he had around him being gone. That's a much more severe loss than a loss of a friend."

Sales was known for his long-running children's show "Lunch With Soupy Sales," which started in 1953 and began his trademark slapstick pie-throwing antics. The comedy show featured skits that culminated in Sales getting walloped with pies in the face. What are your memories of Sales?

"Soupy was the last of the great TV comics when you talk about Ernie Kovacs, Red Skelton, right down to Howdy Doody," Dver said. "But it was bigger than that, because he used a children's format aimed at the kids and then he would forget he was doing a kids' show and do a wild, unrehearsed, wacky improv for a half-hour every day for 15 years."

He could also inflame the authorities. One New Year's Day, upset at being asked to work, he asked his youthful audience to send him those "green pieces of paper" from their parents' wallets. Though he didn't receive much -- he told The New York Times he received only a few dollars -- he was suspended for a week for the prank.

Later in his career, he was a regular on TV game shows, such as "Hollywood Squares," "To Tell the Truth" and "What's My Line?"

http://edition.cnn.com/2009/SHOWBIZ/TV/10/23/soupy.sales/index.html?eref=rss_topstories
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« Reply #86 on: November 02, 2009, 08:51:45 am »

Radio pioneer Bickerstaff found dead by trick-or-treaters


Halloween trick-or-treaters were given a fright when they found talkback radio personality Tim Bickerstaff dead in his Whitianga home on Saturday.

The teenagers saw the 67-year-old diabetic through a window, but when their door-knocking failed to rouse him, they entered the house and set off his medic alert bracelet, the New Zealand Herald reported.

He died of a massive heart attack, his men's health products company Herbal Ignite said today.

Bickerstaff became known as an outspoken radio host and sports critic during 40 years on the airwaves.

He began his broadcasting career as a TV sports reporter with the New Zealand Broadcasting Service in Rotorua, Dunedin and Wellington.

He then worked for 3DB in Melbourne in the 1960s before he returned to Auckland with his young family and began broadcasting with Radio I.

Bickerstaff pioneered talkback on Sportsline with Geoff Sinclair on Radio 1 before moving onto more general talkback with his two-hour Radio Pacific show.

He and wife Sue separated 15 years ago, and she and their children Scott and Brenda live in Queensland.

Bickerstaff began Herbal Ignite 13 years ago, and the company said it was Bickerstaff's willingness to be upfront and controversial about erectile dysfunction which led him to launch natural supplements and help other men talk about their health.
http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/3020963/Radio-pioneer-Bickerstaff-found-dead-by-trick-or-treaters
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« Reply #87 on: November 17, 2009, 10:25:40 am »

Edward Woodward
Edward Woodward, who died on November 16 aged 79, was a fine actor whose talents tended sometimes to be obscured by the huge popular successes of his bleak television series, Callan and The Equalizer.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/culture-obituaries/tv-radio-obituaries/6581645/Edward-Woodward.html
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« Reply #88 on: November 17, 2009, 10:32:35 am »

                         
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« Reply #89 on: November 17, 2009, 12:09:49 pm »

Another victim of prostrate cancer.         Ronnie Corbet once made the observation that it was because of Edward Woodward there was a D in the english language otherwise he would have been Ewar Woowar. 
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« Reply #90 on: November 17, 2009, 12:12:07 pm »

RIP Edward Woodward.

I loved him as Callan and always thought that he would make the PERFECT Bodyguard when he was the Equaliser.
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« Reply #91 on: December 27, 2009, 04:19:05 pm »

Last of Kon-Tiki crew dies


The last member of the 1947 Kon-Tiki raft expedition, Knut Haugland, has died in Norway.

The expedition, in which six people crossed the Pacific on a balsawood raft, was launched by anthropologist Thor Heyerdahl to demonstrate that South Americans in pre-Colombian times could have settled in Polynesia.

Mr Haugland first came to prominence as a member of the Norwegian resistance in World War II, the BBC reports.

He was honoured by the British for his part in helping disrupt Nazi Germany's plans to create heavy water for its nuclear weapons programme.

After the war he was recruited by Thor Heyerdahl as a radio operator for the Kon-Tiki expedition.

The crew sailed a raft made of traditional materials across the Pacific from Peru.

Thor Heyerdahl died in 2002 at his home in Italy, at the age of 87.


http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/stories/2009/12/27/1245da74a9e5
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« Reply #92 on: December 27, 2009, 06:17:30 pm »

I've been hunting for a Obituary Mention of Jack Guard (the boat builder) who died last week in Nelson... if anyone stumbles across it could they please post it in here?

Thanking you!
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« Reply #93 on: January 12, 2010, 09:06:04 am »

Art Clokey, Animator Who Created Gumby, Dies at 88
Art Clokey, the animator who half a century ago created Gumby, that most pliant of pop-cultural figures, died on Friday at his home in Los Osos, Calif. He was 88.
 
His son, Joe Clokey, said he died in his sleep.

Asparagus green and fashioned from clay, Gumby made his television debut in 1956 on “The Howdy Doody Show.” The next year, he became the star of “The Gumby Show,” in which he embarked on a string of gently quixotic adventures with his supple steed, Pokey. The series was one of the first extended uses of stop-motion animation on television.
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/11/arts/television/11clokey.html?ref=todayspaper
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« Reply #94 on: January 12, 2010, 09:10:15 am »

 Sad  Aww I loved Gumby!!
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« Reply #95 on: January 26, 2010, 02:00:45 pm »

Wellington identity Bill Brien dies

 Celebrated Wellington publican, policeman and rugby stalwart Bill Brien has died aged 73.

Mr Brien, who witnessed New Zealand's last execution in 1957 and ran the city's Rose and Crown pub for 19 years, was renowned for his community work.

He was awarded Rotary International's highest award in 2000 and made a member of the New Zealand Order of Merit in 2008. He suffered a stroke in late 2008, and died on Sunday night.

Francie Russell, his partner of 16 years, described Mr Brien as a "very generous person" who loved Wellington. He helped numerous city community and sporting organisations through his long-term role as a trustee with Pub Charity.

He is survived by two children from a previous relationship, daughter Josephine Brien, 46, and son John Brien, 43. "We'll all miss him very much," Ms Russell said.

Mr Brien grew up on a dairy farm near Thames and joined the police at the urging of a local officer. After only a year in the job, he had to assist at the 1957 hanging of Walter James (Jim) Bolton, the last man executed by New Zealand.

He still felt ambivalent about it when he spoke to The Dominion Post in 2005. "There are a lot of people who should be taken completely out of society, but whether the death sentence is the way to do that, I don't know," he said.

After being involved in two shootings in the 1960s, one of which left him wounded, he wrote a report that led to the founding of the armed offenders squad.

Later he became a publican, first with a syndicate that owned the Brunswick Arms, where he was almost 30 years ahead of his time when he trialled a smoking ban in 1976. He then became the face of the Rose and Crown - a watering hole for former All Blacks and a goldmine of sports memorabilia.

On the corner of Willis and Williston streets, it closed in 2003.

Mr Brien belonged to the New Zealand Sports Hall of Fame, the Halberg Trust, the Wellington Rugby Union and Athletics Wellington.

"Now that I'm retired, I have never been so bloody busy, but I wouldn't have it any other way," he told The Dominion Post in 2008.

He was a repeated finalist in Wellingtonian of the Year awards and a Rotary member for nearly 40 years.

He was the first and only patron of the Centurions Rugby Football Club, a group of devoted Wellington rugby followers. President John Burrows said his death had left a huge hole in Wellington's rugby scene. "I can't speak highly enough of him. He did so much for rugby."

Mick Bremner said Mr Brien, his friend of 50 years, had a knack of drawing people in, while still being "self-effacing".

Hospitality Association chief executive Bruce Robertson said: "He was an extraordinary bloke." Mr Brien was a publican who "knew everybody".

His funeral service will be at the Wellington Football Club, Hataitai Park, at 2pm on Friday.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/local/3260729/Wellington-identity-Bill-Brien-dies
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« Reply #96 on: February 07, 2010, 03:16:04 pm »

Jazz legend Sir John Dankworth dies, aged 82


Sir John Dankworth, a mainstay of the British jazz scene for over 60 years, has died in hospital.

The saxophonist was 82. He wrote the theme tune for The Avengers and served as musical director to the likes of Nat King Cole and Ella Fitzgerald.

Sir John, who was knighted in 2006, was married to singer Dame Cleo Laine. The couple met in 1950 while he was auditioning for singers with his band, the Dankworth Seven.

He also leaves a son and a daughter, both jazz musicians.

Sir John founded the London Symphony Orchestra Summer Pops in 1985, and was a fellow of the Royal Academy of Music.

http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/stories/2010/02/07/1247f1b4cb24
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« Reply #97 on: February 13, 2010, 07:33:58 am »

The man who invented the Frisbee, one of the world's most popular toys, has died at his home in Utah in the United States.

Walter Frederick Morrison was 90 and had been suffering from cancer.

He conceived and developed his aerodynamic plastic disc in the 1950s, and more than 200 million have been sold worldwide.

Frisbee historian Phil Kennedy says Mr Morrison got the idea from playing with a metal cake pan on the beach in California.

The platter's novel aerodynamic shape allowed it to hover briefly or travel long distances, kept aloft by its rotation.

Morrison sold the production and manufacturing rights to his "Pluto Platter" in 1957.

The name Frisbee was later adopted because that was the nickname given to the platter by college students in New England.
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« Reply #98 on: March 15, 2010, 05:08:47 pm »

Actor Peter Graves, best known for TV's "Mission: Impossible," was found dead at his home, according to a spokeswoman for the Los Angeles Police Department.

http://rss.cnn.com/~r/rss/cnn_topstories/~3/-7D5sGVb94I/index.html
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« Reply #99 on: March 16, 2010, 02:17:19 pm »



He Ping Ping, aged 21   
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