Xtra News Community 2
June 22, 2018, 09:33:35 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Welcome to Xtra News Community 2 — please also join our XNC2-BACKUP-GROUP.
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links BITEBACK! XNC2-BACKUP-GROUP Staff List Login Register  

CHOCOLATE WARS: Cadbury's vs Whittaker's


Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: CHOCOLATE WARS: Cadbury's vs Whittaker's  (Read 3097 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« on: July 13, 2009, 12:54:09 am »


See also the following thread posted to the General Forum at XNC2....

Alert to shoppers: Never mind the price, feel the weight



Why Cadbury leaves a bitter taste

Zoo pulls products from shops, restaurant

By CATHERINE WOULFE and KERRIE WATERWORTH - Sunday Star Times | Sunday, 12 July 2009

CHOCOLATE WARS Cadbury products are off the shelves at Auckland Zoo because orang-utans, such as its resident Intan, are losing their habitats due to palm-oil farming. — JOHN SELKIRK.

CHOCOLATE WARS: Cadbury products are off the shelves at Auckland Zoo because orang-utans,
such as its resident Intan, are losing their habitats due to palm-oil farming. — JOHN SELKIRK.


A CONSUMER backlash is mounting over Cadbury's decision to add palm oil to its chocolate, with Auckland Zoo pulling the confectionary giant's products from its shops and restaurant because of concern over the damage palm oil production does to rainforests.

Users of social networking sites have set up "boycott Cadbury" groups, and plans are under way for a petition urging Parliament to warn consumers about palm oil. And Green MP Sue Kedgley has waded into the debate, urging people to vote with their wallets.

Auckland Zoo conservation officer Peter Fraser says the problem with palm oil is that to produce it, rainforest is being cleared in South East Asia. That means the endangered orang-utans are losing their habitat and the zoo predicts that if palm oil production continues at its current pace, none of the animals will be left in the wild in 10 years.

Keepers at the zoo are also weaning themselves off other products containing palm oil, like Tim Tams, instant noodles, Milo and even shaving cream. The zoo has also published an orang-utan-friendly shopping list on its website.

The zoo is also removing palm oil products from animal feed: the three orang-utans unknowingly behind the boycott now get tiny amounts of palm oil-free chocolate as rewards. But the flamingos are stuck with palm kernel feed, admits Fraser. "We're looking for replacements for that, but we haven't yet found them."


Cadbury's Monkey Puzzle

Wellington Zoo's commercial development manager Beth Houston supported Auckland Zoo's stance. "Anything they are doing to help rainforest species is good by us."

Wellington Zoo has Sumatran tigers and gibbons, which are also affected by deforestation. While Wellington Zoo had not gone as far as to boycott products, it worked closely with food suppliers to encourage "ethical purchasing".

Cadbury recently started adding palm oil to its chocolate, which appears as "vegetable fat" on the packaging. It also downsized its 150g and 250g bars about 20%. While critics said adding palm oil and shrinking the bars were cost-cutting moves, the Cadbury website said this was done "for a number of reasons".

Spokesman Daniel Ellis said consumer feedback showed the vegetable fat improved the chocolate's texture. He said Cadbury was a member of the Roundtable for Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO)  a body tasked with ensuring responsible and sustainable palm oil crops.

"While we understand the passion some members of the community have about palm oil, we believe that the palm oil we use is sourced in a sustainable manner and we hope that people will take the time to understand that."

He said Cadbury's palm oil was sourced primarily from Malaysia  not from Sumatra, Borneo or any of the other regions where the orang-utan is under threat.

"We really do understand that some people would prefer we hadn't changed the chocolate."

Fraser said though that RSPO had made "minimal" progress towards sustainability and belonging to it did not mean the palm oil Cadbury used was sustainable. He said just 4% of the oil produced worldwide was certified sustainable.

New Zealand natural history film-maker Judith Curran was scathing of RSPO, calling it "an incredibly clever public relations exercise". Curran, who spent five years filming orang-utans for the Animal Planet series Orangutan Island, pointed consumers to the Greenpeace website, which claimed RSPO was behind illegal clearing of rainforests.

Chocolate-producing rival Whittaker's is loving the palm oil spat. Marketing manager Philip Poole said Whittaker's had been experiencing unusually high demand since Cadbury's recipe change. "Although cocoa butter is more expensive, it's our pure cocoa products that give our chocolate its very distinctive premium-quality taste."

• Additional reporting by Tony Wall.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/sunday-star-times/news/2585983/Why-Cadbury-leaves-a-bitter-taste
Report Spam   Logged

Social Buttons

Shef
Moderator
Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 1407



« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2009, 07:54:40 pm »

Quote
He said just 4% of the oil produced worldwide was certified sustainable.
Angry
Report Spam   Logged

Success is getting what you want. Happiness is wanting what you get.
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2009, 08:37:03 pm »


As I posted in the other thread; a couple of weeks ago I was listening to an interview on Radio NZ National with a nurtitionist from Otago University who analysed Cadbury's chocolates (from the Dunedin factory) and discovered that the vegetable oil that had appeared in the list of ingredients on the wrapping was actually palm oil. She had immediately contacted Cadbury's over her findings and they confirmed they had switched to using palm oil, but refused to discuss the matter any further with her. Radio NZ National attempted to interview someone from Cadbury's about it, but were denied an interview about the subject.

Right then and there, I decided to ditch eating Cadbury's chocolates and switch to Whittaker's (who still use cocoa butter in their chocolate recipes). Apart from the environmental aspects, I've heard that palm oil isn't good for you, so that's another reason to avoid Cadbury's. And it would appear that Cadbury's are now suffering from a consumer backlash.

I guess Cadbury's loss is Whittaker's gain....serves Cadbury's them right!
Report Spam   Logged
Kiwithrottlejockey
Guest
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2009, 10:47:17 pm »


Report Spam   Logged
pantherrr0
Senator
Bloody-Good Member
*
Posts: 264


« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2009, 11:44:47 am »

i think Cadbury might have stood on the wrong side of a falling palm with this one
Report Spam   Logged
Nitpicker1
Guest
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2009, 06:46:54 am »

When our local schoolkids came with their fundraiser Cadbury  Milk and Caramellow Chocolate I asked them where it was made all three of them answered in unison with the obvious reply. 

So I had them read the label.
Report Spam   Logged
Magoo
Guest
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2009, 07:12:38 am »

I heard on the radio this morning that Cadburys are not getting their palm oil from rainforest areas.
"While we understand the passion some members of the community have about palm oil, we believe that the palm oil we use is sourced in a sustainable manner and we hope that people will take the time to understand that."
He said Cadbury's palm oil was sourced primarily from Malaysia not from Sumatra, Borneo or any of the other regions where the orang-utan is under threat.
http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/2585908/Zoo-bars-Cadbury-products
Report Spam   Logged
donquixotenz
Senator
Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 2335


STILL TILTING


« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2009, 08:05:26 am »

I do not care where they get their Pam oil from apart from it being ecco unfriendly the addition of it in their chocholate has turned me off as Crudbury's chocholate now tastes Like shite.
Whittakers 4 eva
Report Spam   Logged

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body.

But rather, to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming...

WOW, What a Ride!"

Please note: IMHO and e&oe apply to all my posts.
Magoo
Guest
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2009, 08:49:58 am »

 Grin  I get a migraine if I eat chokky so I have to walk past it...sigh. 
Report Spam   Logged
Nitpicker1
Guest
« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2009, 08:58:38 am »

http://xtranewscommunity2.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,1135.msg37787.html#msg37787
Report Spam   Logged
Brownie55
Global Moderator
Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 2717


OK, so what’s the speed of dark?


« Reply #10 on: July 20, 2009, 10:01:19 pm »

Lots of reasons not to buy it and it does taste terrible.
Report Spam   Logged

I almost had a psychic boyfriend, but he left me before we met.
Ferney
Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 2776



« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2009, 04:13:17 pm »

I've never been a great fan of chocolate.    If someone offered me chocolate and a packet of raisins......I'd choose the raisins.   Grin
...but the best chocolate I have eaten is an Irish one.  Think its Lilly Obriens and you can get it here sometimes.        I remember my late MIL loving NZ made Cadburys chocolate saying it was better than Cadburys UK 
Report Spam   Logged
Magoo
Guest
« Reply #12 on: July 23, 2009, 07:15:55 am »

Would you eat chokky made with camel milk?         My stomach did a 380 thinking about it.
http://www.stuff.co.nz/oddstuff/2662541/Camel-chocolates-going-global
Report Spam   Logged
ssweetpea
Senator
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7431



WWW
« Reply #13 on: July 24, 2009, 09:19:17 am »

What gets me about this is that cocoa butter is what you get out of cocoa beans along with cocoa.

By replacing it with palm oil Cadbury's aren't just changing a separate ingredient. They are extracting the cocoa butter and selling it as a byproduct, it is worth quite a bit, and replacing the amount needed with a cheaper vegetable fat i.e. plam oil.

Manufacturing Cocoa
High quality cocoa powder must be easily dissolved and have good flavor. The beans used for the manufacture of cocoa are selected especially for this purpose.

After roasting and winnowing (removing the outer shell from the cacao beans) they are ground making cocoa liquor. The heat which is generated melts the cocoa fat thus generating a liquor, and sometimes additional heating is employed. The liquor hardens to unsweetened chocolate when it cools below 95 degrees F / 35 degrees C.

Pressure is employed to the cocoa liquid (while slightly heated) to remove some of the fat which is also called cocoa butter. The remaining cocoa solids contains 10-25% cocoa butter depending on brand. The solids are then ground to cocoa powder.
http://www.cacaoweb.net/manufacturing-cocoa.html



The seeds of the cacao tree have an intense bitter taste, and must be fermented to develop the flavor.

After fermentation, the beans are dried, cleaned, and roasted, and the shell is removed to produce cacao nibs. The nibs are then ground and liquified, resulting in pure chocolate in fluid form: chocolate liquor. The liquor can be further processed into two components: cocoa solids and cocoa butter. Pure, unsweetened chocolate contains primarily cocoa solids and cocoa butter in varying proportions. Much of the chocolate consumed today is in the form of sweet chocolate, combining chocolate with sugar. Milk chocolate is sweet chocolate that additionally contains milk powder or condensed milk. "White chocolate" contains cocoa butter, sugar, and milk but no cocoa solids (and thus does not qualify to be considered true chocolate).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chocolate
Report Spam   Logged

The way politicians run this country a small white cat should have no problem http://sally4mp.blogspot.com/
Nitpicker1
Guest
« Reply #14 on: July 24, 2009, 09:29:29 am »

What gets me about this is that cocoa butter is what you get out of cocoa beans along with cocoa.

By replacing it with palm oil Cadbury's aren't just changing a separate ingredient. They are extracting the cocoa butter and selling it as a byproduct, it is worth quite a bit, and replacing the amount needed with a cheaper vegetable fat i.e. plam oil.

Manufacturing Cocoa
High quality cocoa powder must be easily dissolved and have good flavor. The beans used for the manufacture of cocoa are selected especially for this purpose.

After roasting and winnowing (removing the outer shell from the cacao beans) they are ground making cocoa liquor. The heat which is generated melts the cocoa fat thus generating a liquor, and sometimes additional heating is employed. The liquor hardens to unsweetened chocolate when it cools below 95 degrees F / 35 degrees C.

Pressure is employed to the cocoa liquid (while slightly heated) to remove some of the fat which is also called cocoa butter. The remaining cocoa solids contains 10-25% cocoa butter depending on brand. The solids are then ground to cocoa powder.
http://www.cacaoweb.net/manufacturing-cocoa.html



The seeds of the cacao tree have an intense bitter taste, and must be fermented to develop the flavor.

After fermentation, the beans are dried, cleaned, and roasted, and the shell is removed to produce cacao nibs. The nibs are then ground and liquified, resulting in pure chocolate in fluid form: chocolate liquor. The liquor can be further processed into two components: cocoa solids and cocoa butter. Pure, unsweetened chocolate contains primarily cocoa solids and cocoa butter in varying proportions. Much of the chocolate consumed today is in the form of sweet chocolate, combining chocolate with sugar. Milk chocolate is sweet chocolate that additionally contains milk powder or condensed milk. "White chocolate" contains cocoa butter, sugar, and milk but no cocoa solids (and thus does not qualify to be considered true chocolate).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chocolate


By replacing it with palm oil Cadbury's aren't just changing a separate ingredient. They are extracting the cocoa butter and selling it as a byproduct, it is worth quite a bit, and replacing the amount needed with a cheaper vegetable fat i.e. plam oil.
sheesh, we're really being scammed in more ways than one.

I'm gonna boycott the NZ made After Dinner Mints I regularly get from my supermarket, and have a second smoke after my dinner


Buggrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
Report Spam   Logged
Magoo
Guest
« Reply #15 on: August 17, 2009, 01:26:06 pm »

http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/2758975/Cadbury-stops-using-palm-oil-in-chocolate/

It would seem the people have spoken and Cadburys have listened.  They are going to stop using palm oil.
Report Spam   Logged
ssweetpea
Senator
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7431



WWW
« Reply #16 on: March 14, 2010, 02:38:19 pm »

Somewhere (can't find the thread) someone (Justic?) in this group wrote to Whittaker's asking if they would consider making a peppermint chocolate bar.


On Friday I bought a Whittaker's 72% cocoa Ghana Peppermint block of chocolate in Pak'n'Save.

I just taste tested it.


 Tongue Tongue Tongue

I am now going to fighting off husband and the one kid who so far got a taste everytime I buy a block.
Report Spam   Logged

The way politicians run this country a small white cat should have no problem http://sally4mp.blogspot.com/
ssweetpea
Senator
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7431



WWW
« Reply #17 on: March 23, 2010, 07:51:35 am »

Bye Bye Moro and Crunchie.

Moro bars latest to get alien flavour
4:00 AM Tuesday Mar 23, 2010 
 
Cadbury is warning that Moro bars could taste a little different from today.

Moro bars previously made at the company's Dunedin factory are now being made in Australia.

Cadbury NZ managing director Matthew Oldham said yesterday that making a chocolate bar in a different factory "is like making a cake in a different kitchen".

"You can't always guarantee it will turn out exactly the same."

Moro is not the first Cadbury product to be moved overseas.

The company has already upset chocolate-lovers by switching to British-made Creme Eggs, and there was growing irritation last night.

"Cadbury needs to be boycotted to the extreme," wrote one person on the Trade Me message board. "We are the customers, but we seem to be getting screwed in broad daylight."

Another wrote: "Cadbury is or was a NZ icon. Well, not any more. Bye bye, Cadbury, we are defecting!"

Mr Oldham said the production changes were essential to securing the future of the Dunedin factory and hundreds of jobs. The first batch of Australian-made Moro will be 60g bars, and 85g twin packs and share-packs will arrive on shelves during the next few weeks.


 Mr Oldham was accused online of betraying New Zealand.

It is the latest in a long line of confectionery changes in the past year. Paddle Pop icecreams have shrunk, Cadbury already reduced some chocolate blocks from 250g to 200g, while Mars reduced its Mars bars from 60g to 53g and Twix from 58g to 53g, and also produced smaller bags of M&Ms, Pods and Maltesers.

Meanwhile, Tip Top reduced the size of four of its specialty icecream tubs from 2 litres to 1.6 litres.

And not only sweet treats have been affected - Anchor reduced its cheese blocks from 1kg to 900g.

Mr Oldham said the Dunedin factory would continue making products including boxed chocolates such as Roses and Milk Tray and favourites such as Pinky and Marshmallow Eggs.

It will soon also be making Turkish Delight for the New Zealand and Australian markets.

 
Creme Egg fans say UK imports no yolk
 
Kraft gobbles Cadbury with $25b offer
Be part of the news. Send pics, video and tips to nzherald.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10633739

On the Easter egg front, I am moulding my own this year - out of Whittaker's Chocolate of course. I have got a few Cadbury mashmellow ones on standby though.
Report Spam   Logged

The way politicians run this country a small white cat should have no problem http://sally4mp.blogspot.com/
beaker
Senator
Part-Of-The-Furniture Member
*
Posts: 522



« Reply #18 on: March 23, 2010, 10:22:37 pm »

On an off topic talking about tastes.  The other day I was at the supermarket and for a change decided to get a pack of cameo creams.  I'd always liked them but didn't buy them much as I'd eat too many in a sitting.

They are disgusting now.  They look cheap and taste cheap. I managed to stomach the two I'd taken out of the packet by soaking them in my coffee.

Now tonight - Mr B is complaining that his Griffins Gingernuts are different.

Back on topic Whittakers forever.  Their Ghana chocolate is the best rich chocolate and absolutely decadent in puddings.
Report Spam   Logged

This job is a test . . . It is only a test . . . Had this been a real job . . . it would have come with raises, promotions and other signs of appreciation!!!

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Open XNC2 Smileys
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum

Buy traffic for your forum/website
traffic-masters
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy
Page created in 0.156 seconds with 14 queries.