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Rhubarb mutter whine snivel gripe bellyache


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Author Topic: Rhubarb mutter whine snivel gripe bellyache  (Read 804 times)
Magoo
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« on: June 30, 2009, 09:13:41 pm »

If there is one thing I hate more than being cold it is being cold and there is a power cut.    From 5pm to 7pm the power went off.  Some very inconsiderate person run into a pole.    Apparently I still look OK by candlelight.
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Shef
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« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2009, 09:46:31 pm »

. You're preaching to the converted here. When we lived on the station in the middle of nowhere, it was obviously deemed that people who lived that far away from civilisation didn't care about stuff like power. So when we had heavy snow that took the power lines out, I'm sure the wankers went back to town for morning, afternoon smokos and lunch. Our longest was just under three weeks with me cooking on a three burner warehouse 'thing'.  You can only eat so much boiled food.
I did splurge and buy a gas heater today (sorry Magoo). I had it going for a couple of hours, between that and the coal range, me and the dogs are toasty warm
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Magoo
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« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2009, 09:54:07 pm »

Quote
I did splurge and buy a gas heater today
  I have got a gas heater here too which I had relegated to the workshop on account of it not being the healthiest of heats however you can guarantee that I will be down tomorrow getting a couple of the bottles filled.        Blow this all electric business.          I am very envious of the coal range.
We lived up in the foothills a couple of years back and got snowed in regularly and was glad to get out of there and thought I would be safe from the snow and power cuts at sea level.   Grin
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Shef
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« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2009, 10:12:56 pm »

I do love my coal range. It used to work so much better when we were a family. It got lit early (if indeed it got the chance to go out) But with me here on my own, by the time I've lit it, it's struggling, hence the gas heater and the very happy chookie and two dogs basking in the warmth
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Magoo
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« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2009, 10:34:39 pm »

Coal ranges are a lot of work but I am sure you will enjoy the gas too.  Instant heat is a happy dog and a happy chooky.  Grin
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Lovelee
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« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2009, 10:36:56 pm »

My stove blew while I was cooking lunch today  Undecided

Means we're on the look out for another one - about time!!  Cheesy
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Lovelee
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« Reply #6 on: June 30, 2009, 10:37:34 pm »

Candlelight is a loving light.
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Laughter is the best medicine, unless you've got a really nasty case of syphilis, in which case penicillin is your best bet.
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2009, 10:43:05 pm »




Did someone mention RhubarbMMMMMMMMMM!
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Magoo
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« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2009, 09:52:06 am »

The power went out twice more last night.  Don't know what that was about but thank god for power zappers.                A new stove.... how exciting LL.   
 Rhubarb...... someone who shall remain nameless thought he would get rid of our big old clump of barb....but to my delight it has revived itself and there is new barb popping up so there will be an extra tang in the peach cobbler afterall.   
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ssweetpea
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« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2009, 10:13:14 pm »

I have discovered one of the side effects of burning a bit of coal and big logs on the open fire.

Come the next evening the fire has a tendancy to light itself.

That and Sally doesn't come and hog the bed until the early hours of the morning.
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Shef
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« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2009, 08:19:36 pm »

LOL SP, I know what you mean. It's great when you rake over the coals and see the glowing embers. I wondered why Rusty didn't come to bed a couple of nights ago. I realised the next morning - I'd forgotton to turn the gas heater off (on it's lowest setting thank goodness Undecided ) He got quite snotty when I turned it off, I'm sure he thought I'd left it on just for him Cheesy
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Magoo
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« Reply #11 on: July 17, 2009, 09:18:14 pm »

Quote
I have discovered one of the side effects of burning a bit of coal and big logs on the open fire.
Quote
It's great when you rake over the coals and see the glowing embers.
Reminds me of when we were kids and made toast for supper on big forks bent  out of #8 fence wire on the embers and grandma put the butter on the hearth to soften and often beside a lamb that had lost its mother.     There used to be lot of family life conducted around the hearth.   
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Brownie55
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OK, so what’s the speed of dark?


« Reply #12 on: July 19, 2009, 01:29:16 am »

oooh real fires and real toast , made with real bread.
mum had a coal range until I was about 17  ...I have a  memory of her constantly sprinting past the us with a shovel full of coal.
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #13 on: July 19, 2009, 03:37:18 am »


Back in the mid-1980s I had some friends from Gisborne who went down to Southland for three years shearing. They had a rented house just out of Wairio and I headed down there a couple of times to catch up with them. The house had a coal range and a coal-fired hot-water boiler (with the range also heating the hot water). The coal mine just down the road at Nightcaps used to sell slack coal (seconds) for $5 per trailer-load, with the trailer heaped right up until it was virtually overflowing. As a result, their household energy costs were bugger-all, although it did mean stoking up the stove (and at times the hot-water boiler) all the time. But the entire house was certainly toasty-warm with no shortage of hot water both times I visited for a few days, with each visit being during winter. Being shearers, they knew how to party real hard too!
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Magoo
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« Reply #14 on: July 19, 2009, 09:07:45 am »

I don't think there is anything quite like an open fire.  $5 a trailer would keep you going for a while.  It saddens me that they are banned in favour of becoming an electric world.   
When we were in the pub in the country  the big old double coal range had been converted to diesel and it used to run day and night.   I could put a couple of legs of mutton in stout in there just ticking over and thats all  before I went to bed and by lunch time the next day they were done to a turn and my black gravy became a firm favourite of the punters.
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #15 on: July 19, 2009, 04:08:30 pm »


When I first joined the railways, most of the drivers I was working with were ex steam locomotive drivers and they used to tell some hard-case stories about what they used to get up to.

Many of them had been living in railway houses that backed onto the railway line in whichever town they were in and when they were working on coal-burning locomotives, they used to fill sacks with coal out of the locomotive tender (real top quality coal that you couldn't normally purchase through the usual town coal merchants) and chuck them over the back fence as they went past their place. None of them were ever silly enough to pay out of their own pockets for heating the house. And most of those old railway houses had coal ranges with wetbacks too. And as most people had bugger-all electric appliances back then, as far as electricity went, they were virtually only paying for electricity for lighting, a fridge, a washing machine, a radio, and maybe a record player. The real big energy costs — heating, hot water and cooking — were all covered by requisitioned coal from the locomotive tenders, which was regarded as an unofficial perk of the job.
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Magoo
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« Reply #16 on: July 19, 2009, 04:38:04 pm »

I think most of those old steamies would have pretty much been up to the same tricks along the line.  Grin   The railway houses were indeed pretty basic back then.
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #17 on: July 19, 2009, 06:10:10 pm »


They were bloody well-built houses though.

Virtually all of them were constructed of native hardwood (mostly solid rimu) at the old railways' house factory at Frankton in Hamilton, then railed around the country in kitset form and assembled on foundations on site. They also supplied them to most of the other government departments who provided housing for their workers.

There's a lot of them around the country still in bloody good condition and they seem to be in demand whenever one comes up for sale, either on a section or for removal.
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