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Recommended Reading


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Author Topic: Recommended Reading  (Read 69 times)
DazzaMc
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« on: May 29, 2009, 08:52:56 pm »

The Universe — Order without Design

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"You are about to read, or at least you are holding in your hands, a very remarkable book. Calle has put together an amazing and incredible voyage of discovery, one that takes us back to the very beginning of time and space itself. This is an important story that we are all part of, the story of our universe’s very beginnings, its growth, and its possible fates. This informative and entertaining book engages the reader with a perfect balance of broad and deeply compelling discussions. For Calle has the wonderful gift of making the subject of cosmology accessible to all those interested in learning more about the place we call home - our universe."

SCOTT VANGEN
NASA Alternate Payload Specialist Astronaut


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"Understanding the origin and evolution of the universe is the pursuit of modern cosmology. It has taxed our greatest thinkers since the beginning of history. In The Universe—Order Without Design, Carlos Calle provides a delightfully readable and authoritative account of our past and present descriptions of the universe and gives exciting ideas about possible solutions to current cosmological puzzles. Calle shares his excitement about understanding how nature works and provides clear, accurate descriptions of some of the strangest concepts in modern physics and cosmology. This engaging book is accessible to anyone interested in understanding modern science."

Dr. SAMUEL T. DURRANCE
Former Astronaut and Professor of Physics and Space Sciences
Florida Institute of Technology


Is the universe designed for life? Physicists have discovered that many seemingly unconnected phenomena, which took place millions of years apart, played a crucial role in the development of life on Earth. Does such evidence reveal a purpose behind the order of the universe?

NASA senior research scientist Carlos I. Calle explores this tantalizing question and many more in this wide-ranging introduction to the very latest and sundry theories about the origins and evolution of the enormous cosmos. From the big bang to the possibility of a “big crunch” he renders the complexities of theoretical physics beautifully lucid for the lay reader.

Calle begins by reviewing the milestones of 20th-century astrophysics: the confirmation of the big bang theory in the 1960s by the discovery of cosmic background radiation; the inflationary theory of universe expansion, which NASA observations have recently confirmed; the formulation of the essential laws of physics that govern the unfolding of all physical processes, from subatomic fluctuations to the formation of galaxies; and physicists’ attempts to unify all the forces of nature.

Now, at the start of the 21st century, questions have been raised about the origins of the laws of physics. Do they suggest a Grand Designer, or is their existence a natural outcome of some automatic process? Calle lays out the cosmological models based on M-theory, which suggests that our particular universe may be one of an unimaginable number of universes, each with its own set of physical laws. According to one of the most promising models, the big bang may not be the moment of creation but the bridge to a past filled with endless cycles of universe creation and destruction.

Calle also provides an exciting look at Stephen Hawking’s fascinating proposal that the universe had no origin—and that present-day observers may influence the very nature of reality.

Did the universe require a prime mover—the Grand Designer—to create the planets, the stars, and the galaxies?  The Universe—Order without Design will give you plenty of food for thought.


Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 304 (color illustrations)

ISBN: 978-1-59102-714-0
Shipping Weight: 2lbs




Author Bio:
Carlos I. Calle, PhD (Merritt Island, FL), is the director of the NASA Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory, a senior research physicist at the NASA Kennedy Space Center, and the author of Coffee with Einstein, Einstein for Dummies, Superstrings and Other Things, and numerous scientific papers.

http://www.prometheusbooks.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=1915
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DazzaMc
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« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2009, 08:56:38 pm »

Bill Brysons "A Short History of Nearly Everything"
Bryson describes graphically and in layman's terms the size of the universe, and that of atoms and subatomic particles. He then explores the history of geology and biology, and traces life from its first appearance to today's modern humans, placing emphasis on the development of the modern Homo sapiens. Furthermore, he discusses the possibility of the Earth being struck by a meteor, and reflects on human capabilities of spotting a meteor before it impacts the Earth, and the extensive damage that such an event would cause.

He also focuses on some of the most recent destructive disasters of volcanic origin in the history of our planet, including Krakatoa and Yellowstone National Park. A large part of the book is devoted to relating humorous stories about the scientists behind the research and discoveries and their sometimes eccentric behaviours. Bryson also speaks about modern scientific views on human effects on the Earth's climate and livelihood of other species, and the magnitude of natural disasters such as earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, hurricanes, and the mass extinctions caused by some of these events.
“Stylish [and] stunningly accurate prose. We learn what the material world is like from the smallest quark to the largest galaxy and at all the levels in between . . . brims with strange and amazing facts . . . destined to become a modern classic of science writing.”
—The New York Times

“Bryson has made a career writing hilarious travelogues, and in many ways his latest is more of the same, except that this time Bryson hikes through the world of science.”
—People

“Bryson is surprisingly precise, brilliantly eccentric and nicely eloquent . . . a gifted storyteller has dared to retell the world’s biggest story.”
—Seattle Times

“Hefty, highly researched and eminently readable.”
—Simon Winchester, The Globe and Mail

“All non-scientists (and probably many specialized scientists, too) can learn a great deal from his lucid and amiable explanations.”
—National Post

"Bryson is a terrific stylist. You can’t help but enjoy his writing, for its cheer and buoyancy, and for the frequent demonstration of his peculiar, engaging turn of mind.”
—Ottawa Citizen

“Wonderfully readable. It is, in the best sense, learned.”
—Winnipeg Free Press
 
 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Short_History_of_Nearly_Everything



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pantherrr0
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« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2009, 04:39:48 am »

Also of  course  S Hawkings  Universe in a nutshell  and A breif history of time
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DazzaMc
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« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2009, 11:54:36 am »

Yep - I've got those in EBook format - I should post download links.

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