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North Korea threatens nuke test if UN doesn't apologise


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Author Topic: North Korea threatens nuke test if UN doesn't apologise  (Read 254 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #25 on: January 11, 2016, 11:14:55 am »



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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #26 on: January 11, 2016, 12:19:05 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Powerful US bomber flies over S. Korea as standoff deepens

By FOSTER KLUG and AHN YOUNG-JOON | 1:31PM EST - Sunday, January 10, 2016

A U.S. Air Force B-52 bomber flies over Osan Air Base in Pyeongtaek, South Korea on Sunday, January 10th, 2016. — Photograph: Ahn Young-joon/Associated Press.
A U.S. Air Force B-52 bomber flies over Osan Air Base in Pyeongtaek, South Korea on Sunday, January 10th, 2016. — Photograph: Ahn Young-joon/Associated Press.

OSAN AIR BASE, South Korea — A powerful U.S. B-52 bomber flew low over South Korea on Sunday, a clear show of force from the United States as a Cold War-style standoff deepened between its ally Seoul and North Korea following Pyongyang’s fourth nuclear test.

North Korea will read the fly-over of a bomber capable of delivering nuclear weapons — seen by an Associated Press photographer at Osan Air Base near Seoul — as a threat. Any hint of America's nuclear power enrages Pyongyang, which links its own pursuit of atomic weapons to what it sees as past nuclear-backed moves by the United States to topple its authoritarian government.

The B-52 was joined by South Korean F-15 and U.S. F-16 fighters and returned to its base in Guam after the flight, the U.S. military said.

“This was a demonstration of the ironclad U.S. commitment to our allies in South Korea, in Japan, and to the defense of the American homeland,” said Admiral Harry B. Harris Jr., commander U.S. Pacific Command, in a statement. “North Korea's nuclear test is a blatant violation of its international obligations.”

White House chief of staff Denis McDonough said the B-52 flight was intended to underscore to South Korean allies “the deep and enduring alliance that we have with them.” Interviewed on CNN's “State of the Union”, McDonough said the United States would work with South Korea, Japan, China and Russia “to deeply isolate the North Koreans” and “squeeze” them until they live up to prior commitments to get rid of their nuclear weapons.

“That's the baseline requirement they have to rejoin the international community,” McDonough said. “Until they do it, they'll remain where they are which is an outcast — unable to provide for their own people.”

The B-52 flight follows a victory tour by North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to celebrate the country's widely disputed claim of a hydrogen bomb test. Kim is seeking to rally pride in an explosion viewed with outrage by much of the world and to boost his domestic political goals.

There was no immediate reaction from North Korea's state media to the B-52 fly-over, which also happened after North Korea's third nuclear test in 2013.


A U.S. Air Force B-52 bomber accompanied by South Korean F-15 and U.S. F-16 fighters flies over Osan Air Base in Pyeongtaek, South Korea on Sunday, January 10th, 2016. — Photograph: Ahn Young-joon/Associated Press.
A U.S. Air Force B-52 bomber accompanied by South Korean F-15 and U.S. F-16 fighters flies over Osan Air Base in Pyeongtaek, South Korea
on Sunday, January 10th, 2016. — Photograph: Ahn Young-joon/Associated Press.


Kim's first public comments about last week's test came in a visit to the country's military headquarters, where he called the explosion “a self-defensive step” meant to protect the region “from the danger of nuclear war caused by the U.S.-led imperialists,” according to a dispatch on Sunday from state-run Korean Central News Agency.

“It is the legitimate right of a sovereign state and a fair action that nobody can criticize,” Kim was reported as saying during his tour of the People's Armed Forces Ministry.

The tone of Kim's comments, which sought to glorify him and justify the test, is typical of state media propaganda.

But they also provide insight into North Korea's long-running argument that it is the presence of tens of thousands of U.S. troops in South Korea and Japan, and a “hostile” U.S. policy that seeks to topple the government in Pyongyang, that make North Korea's pursuit of nuclear weapons absolutely necessary.

During his tour, Kim posed for photos with leading military officials in front of statues of the two members of his family who led the country previously — Kim Jong Il and Kim Il Sung. He also sought to link the purported success of the nuclear test to a ruling Workers' Party convention in May, the party's first since 1980. He's expected to use the congress to announce major state policies and shake up the country's political elite to further consolidate his power.

World powers are looking for ways to punish the North over a nuclear test that, even if not of a hydrogen bomb, still likely pushes Pyongyang closer to its goal of a nuclear-armed missile that can reach the U.S. mainland. Many outside governments and experts question whether the blast was in fact a powerful hydrogen test.

In the wake of the test on Wednesday, the two Koreas have settled into the kind of Cold War-era standoff that has defined their relationship over the past seven decades. Since Friday, South Korea has been blasting anti-Pyongyang propaganda from huge speakers along the border, and the North is reportedly using speakers of its own in an attempt to keep its soldiers from hearing the South Korean messages.

A top North Korean ruling party official's recent warning that the South's broadcasts have pushed the Korean Peninsula “toward the brink of war” is typical of Pyongyang's over-the-top rhetoric. But it is also indicative of the real fury that the broadcasts, which criticize the country's revered dictatorship, cause in the North.

North Korea considers the South Korean broadcasts tantamount to an act of war. When Seoul Korea briefly resumed propaganda broadcasts in August after an 11-year break, Seoul says the two Koreas exchanged artillery fire.

South Korean troops, near about 10 sites where loudspeakers started blaring propaganda during Friday, were on the highest alert, but have not detected any unusual movement from North Korea along the border, said an official from Seoul's Defense Ministry, who refused to be named, citing office rules.

South Korea's Yonhap news agency said Seoul had deployed missiles, artillery and other weapons systems near the border to swiftly deal with any possible North Korean provocation. The ministry would not confirm the report, nor another by Yonhap that said North Korea had started its own broadcasts likely meant to keep its soldiers from hearing the South Korean messages.

Officials say broadcasts from the South's loudspeakers can travel about 10 kilometers (6 miles) during the day and 24 kilometers (15 miles) at night. That reaches many of the huge force of North Korean soldiers stationed near the border, as well as residents in border towns such as Kaesong, where the Koreas jointly operate an industrial park that has been a valuable cash source for the impoverished North.

While the South's broadcasts also include news and pop music, much of the programming challenges North Korea's government more directly.

“We hope that our fellow Koreans in the North will be able to live in a society that doesn't invade individual lives as soon as possible,” a female presenter said in parts of the broadcast that officials revealed to South Korean media. “Countries run by dictatorships even try to control human instincts.”

Marathon talks by the Koreas in August eased anger and stopped the broadcasts, which Seoul started after blaming North Korean land mines for maiming two soldiers. It might be more difficult to do so now. Seoul can't stand down easily, some analysts say, and it's highly unlikely that the North will express regret for its nuclear test, which is a source of intense national pride.

Responding to the North's bomb test, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry urged China, the North's only major ally and biggest aid provider, to end “business as usual” with North Korea.

Diplomats at a U.N. Security Council emergency session pledged to swiftly pursue new sanctions. For current sanctions and any new penalties to work, better cooperation and stronger implementation from China is seen as key.

It may take weeks or longer to confirm or refute the North's claim that it successfully tested a hydrogen bomb, which would mark a major and unanticipated advance for its still-limited nuclear arsenal.


Klug reported from Seoul. Associated Press writers Kim Tong-hyung and Hyung-jin Kim contributed to this report.

__________________________________________________________________________

Read more on this topic:

 • Facts about B-52 bomber, which flew over South Korea

 • South Korea resumes anti-North Korea propaganda broadcasts


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/kim-visits-military-as-koreas-slide-into-cold-war-standoff/2016/01/09/7c5a8212-b732-11e5-8abc-d09392edc612_story.html
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« Reply #27 on: January 11, 2016, 05:04:20 pm »

Just delete the N Korean leadership and install democracy....problem solved Grin
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« Reply #28 on: July 26, 2017, 03:25:22 am »

NORTH KOREA

China reportedly preps for crisis along border with North Korea
Published July 25, 2017 Fox News
 
NOW PLAYING
US tests anti-ballistic missile system in response to NKorea
The Chinese military has reportedly been building up defenses along its border with North Korea that coincide with warnings by President Trump that he is considering military action over Pyongyang’s nuclear weapons push.

The Wall Street Journal, citing a review of official military and government websites and interviews with experts, reported that Beijing has built bunkers to protect against nuclear blasts, established a new border brigade and a 24-hour surveillance of the mountainous frontier.

The preparations are intended to respond to worst-case scenarios, like an economic collapse, nuclear contamination or a conflict, the experts told the paper.

The Chinese government has not spoken out about the report of preparations. An official from its defense ministry said in a statement that the forces “maintain a normal state of combat readiness and training.”

“Military means shouldn’t be an option to solve the Korean Peninsula issue,” a Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman said.

Mark Cozad, who works at the Rand Corp think tank, told the paper these preparations “go well beyond” creating a buffer zone at the border.

“If you’re going to make me place bets on where I think the U.S. and China would first get into a conflict, it’s not Taiwan, the South China Sea or the East China Sea: I think it’s the Korean Peninsula,” he said.

The Trump administration is searching for more effective ways to ramp up pressure on North Korea over its nuclear weapons program. Pyongyang’s recent successful test of an intercontinental ballistic missile — the first by the North — has created even more urgency as the U.S. seeks to stop North Korea before it can master the complex process of putting a nuclear warhead atop a missile capable of hitting the United States.

President Trump has expressed frustration that his initial strategy — enlisting China’s help and influence to squeeze the North economically and diplomatically — has not yielded major results. Trump’s administration is also considering other economic steps including “secondary sanctions” that could target companies and banks — mostly in China — that do even legitimate business with North Korea, officials said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report
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« Reply #29 on: July 27, 2017, 11:50:33 pm »


Excellent news....yet another country will shortly have a nuclear deterrent against American aggression, just like America has a nuclear deterrent against aggression from other countries.



from The Washington Post....

North Korea could cross ICBM threshold next year,
U.S. officials warn in new assessment


“Alarming” advances in its missile program are forcing analysts to dramatically alter their forecasts.

By ELLEN NAKASHIMA, ANNA FIFIELD and JOBY WARRICK | 1:38PM EDT - Tuesday, July 25, 2017



NORTH KOREA will be able to field a reliable, nuclear-capable intercontinental ballistic missile as early as next year, U.S. officials have concluded in a confidential assessment that dramatically shrinks the timeline for when Pyongyang could strike North American cities with atomic weapons.

The new assessment by the Pentagon's Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), which shaves a full two years off the consensus forecast for North Korea's ICBM program, was prompted by recent missile tests showing surprising technical advances by the country's weapons scientists, at a pace beyond what many analysts believed was possible for the isolated communist regime.

The U.S. projection closely mirrors revised predictions by South Korean intelligence officials, who also have watched with growing alarm as North Korea has appeared to master key technologies needed to loft a warhead toward targets thousands of miles away.

The finding further increases the pressure on U.S. and Asian leaders to halt North Korea's progress before Pyongyang can threaten the world with nuclear-tipped missiles. President Trump, during his visit to Poland this month, vowed to confront North Korea “very strongly” to stop its missile advances.

The DIA has concluded that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un will be able to produce a “reliable, nuclear-capable ICBM” program sometime in 2018, meaning that by next year the program will have advanced from prototype to assembly line, according to officials familiar with the document. Already, the aggressive testing regime put in place in recent months has allowed North Korea to validate its basic designs, putting it within a few months of starting industrial production, the officials said.

The DIA and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence declined to address any classified assessments.

But Scott Bray, ODNI's national intelligence manager for East Asia, said in a statement: “North Korea's recent test of an intercontinental range ballistic missile — which was not a surprise to the intelligence community — is one of the milestones that we have expected would help refine our timeline and judgments on the threats that Kim Jong Un poses to the continental United States. This test, and its impact on our assessments, highlight the threat that North Korea's nuclear and ballistic missile programs pose to the United States, to our allies in the region, and to the whole world. The intelligence community is closely monitoring the expanding threat from North Korea.”

One of the few remaining technical hurdles is the challenge of atmospheric “re-entry” — the ability to design a missile that can pass through the upper atmosphere without damage to the warhead. Long regarded as a formidable technological barrier for impoverished North Korea, that milestone could be reached, beginning with new tests expected to take place within days, U.S. analysts said. U.S. officials have detected signs that North Korea is making final preparations for testing a new re-entry vehicle, perhaps as early as Thursday, a North Korean national holiday marking the end of the Korean War.

“They're on track to do that, essentially this week,” said a U.S. official familiar with the intelligence report who, like others, insisted on anonymity to discuss sensitive military assessments.

North Korea has not yet demonstrated an ability to build a miniaturized nuclear warhead that could be carried by one of its missiles. Officials there last year displayed a sphere-shaped device the regime described as a miniaturized warhead, but there has been no public confirmation that this milestone has been achieved. Preparations reportedly have been underway for several months for what would be the country's sixth underground atomic test. The last one, in September, had an estimated yield of 20 to 30 kilotons, more than double the explosive force of any previous test.

North Korea startled the world with its successful July 4th test of a missile capable of striking parts of Alaska — the first such missile with proven intercontinental range. The launch of a two-stage “Hwasong-14” missile was the latest in a series of tests in recent months that have revealed startlingly rapid advances across a number of technical fields, from mastery of solid-fuel technology to the launch of the first submarine-based missile, current and former intelligence officials and weapons experts said.

“There has been alarming progress,” said Joseph DeTrani, the former mission manager for North Korea for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence and a former special envoy for negotiations with Pyongyang. “In the last year they have gained capabilities that they didn't have, including ones that we thought they would not have been able to obtain for years.”

The July 4th missile test also caught South Korea's intelligence service off guard, prompting a hasty revision of forecasts, according to South Korean lawmakers who have received closed-door briefings. “The speed of North Korea's ICBM missile development is faster than the South Korean Defense Ministry expected,” said lawmaker Lee Cheol-hee of the left-wing Minjoo party, who attended an intelligence committee briefing after the July 4th test.

The South Korean government, which is actively trying to engage the regime in Pyongyang, has declined to call the most recent test a success. North Korea still has not proved it has mastered some of the steps needed to build a reliable ICBM, most notably the re-entry vehicle, Lee said.

Still, officials across the political spectrum acknowledged that North Korea is rapidly gaining ground. “Now they are approaching the final stage of being a nuclear power and the owner of an ICBM,” said Cha Du-hyeogn, who served as an adviser to conservative former president Lee Myung-bak.

U.S. spy agencies have detected multiple signals that North Korea is preparing to test a re-entry vehicle. Analysts believe that the July 4th test was intended to demonstrate range — the ability of its new two-stage ICBM prototype to reach altitude and distance milestones — while the new launch will seek to validate engineering features designed to protect the warhead as it passes through the upper atmosphere and then is delivered to a distant target.

The latest designs appear to cobble together older systems — including portions of a missile frame used to launch satellites into orbit — with a more advanced engine that North Korea began testing earlier this year. Much of the technology is based on old Soviet-era designs that have been reworked by what U.S. experts describe as an increasingly capable cadre of homegrown engineers, goaded along by a leadership that has pursued nuclear weapons and delivery systems with single-minded zeal.

Kim vowed in January to successfully test a nuclear-capable ICBM in 2017, achieving a long-sought goal that North Koreans believe will serve as the ultimate deterrent against threats to the communist regime's survival. At the time, the U.S. intelligence community's formal assessment still held that a credible ICBM threat would not emerge until 2020 at the earliest.

“North Korea's timeline moved faster than we expected,” said the U.S. official familiar with the new DIA assessment. “We weren't expecting an ICBM test in July.”

Former U.S. officials and weapons experts said a successful test of a nuclear-capable ICBM would dramatically raise the stakes in the North Korean crisis, putting new pressure on North Korea's neighbors and increasing the risk of miscalculation. “The danger is that decision time and warning is greatly reduced when North Korea has the weapons, and that escalation can happen quickly,” said Jon Wolfsthal, senior director for arms control and non-proliferation with the Obama administration's National Security Council.

The specter of a nuclear-armed, ICBM-capable Kim “takes the risk to a new level but does not change the nature of the threat we have faced for some time,” Wolfsthal said. “We have to deter North Korea from ever using any nuclear weapons and make clear that any move to use these weapons is suicide.”


• Ellen Nakashima is a national security reporter for The Washington Post. She focuses on issues relating to intelligence, technology and civil liberties.

• Anna Fifield is The Washington Post's bureau chief in Tokyo, focusing on Japan and the Koreas. She previously reported for the Financial Times from Washington DC, Seoul, Sydney, London and from across the Middle East.

• Joby Warrick joined The Washington Post's national staff in 1996. He has covered national security, the environment and the Middle East and currently writes about terrorism. He is the author of two books, including 2015's Black Flags: The Rise of ISIS which was awarded a 2016 Pulitzer Prize for non-fiction.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Report: North Korea can strike U.S. with nuclear ICBM by next year

 • VIDEO: Why does North Korea hate the U.S.? Look to the Korean War.

 • GRAPHIC: North Korea showed off a lot of missiles. What might be their targets?

 • The message behind the murder: North Korea's assassination sheds light on chemical weapons arsenal

 • Twenty-five million reasons the U.S. hasn't struck North Korea

 • Kim Jong Un's rockets are getting an important boost — from China


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/north-korea-could-cross-icbm-threshold-next-year-us-officials-warn-in-new-assessment/2017/07/25/4107dc4a-70af-11e7-8f39-eeb7d3a2d304_story.html
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« Reply #30 on: July 28, 2017, 01:58:43 am »

Ktj..."Excellent news....yet another country will shortly have a nuclear deterrent against American aggression, just like America has a nuclear deterrent against aggression from other countries."

...mmm....maybe...but hard to see America living with that situation..especially if they can reach America.....I think Mr Un may be a bit to unpredictable....certainly would not like to be a resident of Seoul or Tokyo🙄
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« Reply #31 on: July 28, 2017, 01:47:11 pm »


Other countries have to live with the situation that America has a shitload of nuclear-armed ICBMs capable of reaching their country.

And don't forget that America is the ONLY country in the world which has shown by their past actions that they are prepared to actually USE nuclear weapons to exterminate tens of thousands of human beings in the blink of an eye. No other country in the world which possesses nuclear weapons has ever done that.

So it's good that other countries have the ability to hit back and waste a few million Americans if America ever carries out aggression against them.

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« Reply #32 on: July 28, 2017, 06:55:01 pm »

Ktj....." America is the ONLY country in the world which has shown by their past actions that they are prepared to actually USE nuclear weapons"

....yeah...thank Christ for that eh....they probably saved a lot of kiwi lives...oh but I forgot you have a cradle to grave position with a public service...so what the fuck would you care...."living life on the edge"....to you is getting out of bed in the morning without pissing the bed😉...yeh
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« Reply #33 on: August 08, 2017, 11:54:42 pm »

...informative report...China's reason for not wanting change...fear of democracy and freedom for its people😳


President Trump, tell China on Twitter it has 30 days to comply on North Korea sanctions - or else
By Harry J. Kazianis

Published August 07, 2017
FoxNews.com
According to a newly released survey by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, 75 percent of Americans feel North Korea’s nuclear program is a critical threat facing the United States. And unfortunately for the Trump administration, its recent efforts to rein in the so-called “hermit kingdom,” while the boldest of any administration to date, are likely to fall short of stopping Pyongyang from developing an even more powerful nuclear weapon along with ever more advanced missiles to strike the U.S. homeland.

But before we dissect what Team Trump got wrong when it comes to North Korea—and how they can still get it right—we need to give credit where credit is due.

This administration dared do what no other has in the past: name Pyongyang its number one foreign policy priority. With no silver bullet at the ready to solve what is clearly the ultimate Pandora’s Box—boobytrapped with what can only be described as a nuclear armed fuse—President Trump delivered on a campaign promise to tackle the biggest threats facing America today. With North Korea now six to eighteen months away from building a hydrogen bomb, challenges like ISIS, Russia, the Syrian Civil War or anything else seem to pale in comparison. Just the amount of analysis and news coverage dedicated to the dastardly deeds of Kim Jong Un alone is a win—shining a much-needed spotlight onto a regime that should have been tossed into the scrap heap of history long-ago.

If history tells us anything, China has never, ever, enforced UN Security Council resolutions when it comes to North Korea.

It seems, at least for the time being, the Trump administration has decided to follow the most obvious path of trying to restrain North Korea, attacking the lifeblood of the Kim regime: its exports to the outside world. Over the weekend, the U.S. led an international coalition passing a tough UN Security Council resolution that one senior White House official described to me as “sanctions on Hulk Hogan-style steroids.”

Yikes.

On the surface, the sanctions do seem quite muscular. The move, supported by China as well as Russia, take away roughly one-third of North Korea’s export revenue, or a billion dollars, from an economy that is roughly worth only fourteen billion. Considering the fact that Pyongyang’s economy is the size of tiny Laos, this has all the appearances of a devastating response to North Korea’s two recent long-range missile tests.

Except it’s not. You see, there is a fatal flaw when it comes to applying sanctions to North Korea: almost all of Pyongyang’s exports go to its Communist brother-in-arms, China. And if history tells us anything, China has never, ever, enforced UN Security Council resolutions when it comes to North Korea. In fact, it seems quite clear this latest sanctions action will be what all the other sanctions resolutions end up being: a scrap of worthless paper.

The simple fact is Beijing is likely more afraid of North Korea than we are. Senior Chinese officials have told me time and time again they fear that if they put too much pressure on the Kim regime it could collapse—and they would own the problems that would create. As one Chinese official told me last week: “The great rule we learned from you [the United States] when it comes to international politics is that if you break it, you own it. We aren’t going to risk collapsing the North Korean regime. We don’t want to deal with that nightmare. We will apply pressure, but you will never be happy with how far we are willing to go.”

From there—at least the way Beijing sees it—it could get even worse. China also fears creating a situation where if North Korea were to collapse there could be a civil war, where rival factions fire atomic or chemical weapons at each other—and millions would likely perish. They also don't want countless scores of refugees to feed or, at some point in the future, a united Korea that is allied with America that would be a powerful counterweight to Beijing.

For China, a divided Korea, even as dangerous as it is, suits their interests in some respects. We aren’t talking much about the South China Sea or Taiwan, for instance, so Beijing does gain an important advantage on other issues if North Korea takes up all the foreign policy bandwidth in Asia.

Despite these challenges, which I would argue are inflated from China’s point of view—Beijing could easily offer alternative options to help the international community push back against a common threat, like getting Kim to the negotiating table—China’s strategy seems quite clear. Beijing wants to ensure the status quo holds for at least the short- to medium-term.

Thankfully there is still time to make some important course corrections to see these sanction actions constrain North Korea’s nuclear and missile programs. Pyongyang simply can’t be allowed to continue building more and more advanced nuclear weapons and missiles. Sanctions are the best of the worst options—and they need to be enforced, unless China wants to offer a better idea.

President Trump should use his Twitter feed and tell the world Beijing has 30 days to comply with UN sanctions on North Korea—or else. He should declare: “China, I am watching your actions on North Korea—keep your word on the sanctions. The world is watching.” If Beijing does not, he should name and shame on his Twitter feed any Chinese entity that is helping North Korea evade the sanctions.

Then, he should impose unilateral sanctions on those firms, such as stopping them from using the U.S. financial system or doing any business here in America—possibly sanctioning large Chinese banks or state-owned enterprises. Then, Team Trump needs to press forward on making sure China plays by the rules on trade, pushing back in the South China Sea or over Taiwan, or wherever else Beijing is pressing its luck. That might be just the only way to get China to keep its word.
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« Reply #34 on: August 09, 2017, 12:53:16 am »

Hey Donald, are you a reincarnation of one of the old xnc2 characters?
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« Reply #35 on: August 09, 2017, 03:04:45 am »

May I know why your ask?
....are there charges pending😳
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« Reply #36 on: August 09, 2017, 11:57:54 am »

Just wondered. I left xnc2 about 10 years ago, so just wondered if you were one of the old characters I discussed things with.
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« Reply #37 on: August 09, 2017, 01:45:10 pm »

I been frequenting this place for that long.....don't remember locking horns with you though...give it time😉

....but I have been known by ....other names
...used to try and talk sense into loony...to no evail
...now I try to talk sense into the rail worker....as yet to no evail....and if I am honest....I don't like the chances

...I have never left...only ever been exterminated by the nazi dictatorship😏
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« Reply #38 on: August 09, 2017, 03:28:41 pm »

Loony? You mean the one who was mates with captain pugwash and sadly passed away?
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« Reply #39 on: August 09, 2017, 03:32:34 pm »

...yes...the good old says....takes me back....forgot about pugs🙄
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« Reply #40 on: August 09, 2017, 11:08:06 pm »

Re the USA using nukes in the past, nobody suggested that it was morally wrong that they carpet bombed Tokyo and other cities to rubble with conventional bombs (which actually caused more destruction). Never trust hippy history revisionists. They lie.
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« Reply #41 on: August 09, 2017, 11:10:44 pm »

Having said that, the whole idea of nuclear weapons arks race was that nobody would be dumb enough to use them as everyone would be bombed back to the stone age. Hence why you don't want rogue states with them. 
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« Reply #42 on: August 09, 2017, 11:51:06 pm »

Keep in mind that the Nazis were trying to develop nuclear weapons. That is the context in which the US got into that business. Imagine Hitler with nukes. Nukes are horrible but it's hard to know what to do once the genie is out of the bottle. If you disarm then there is a risk that shitbag nations won't.
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« Reply #43 on: August 11, 2017, 12:23:29 am »

...goodbye North Korea...it wasn't nice knowing you🙄


Secretary Mattis warns North Korea not to invite 'destruction of its people'

If Kim Jong Un won’t listen to President Trump, the Mad Dog could make him heel.

Secretary of Defense James “Mad Dog” Mattis echoed his boss’s fiery warning Wednesday to the dictator of North Korea with harsh rhetoric of his own. And this time, the words came from a battle-tested, four-star U.S. Marine Corps general.

“The DPRK should cease any consideration of actions that would lead to the end of its regime and the destruction of its people.”

- Gen. James "Mad Dog Mattis
“The DPRK must choose to stop isolating itself and stand down its pursuit of nuclear weapons,” Mattis said in a statement. “The DPRK should cease any consideration of actions that would lead to the end of its regime and the destruction of its people.”

Mattis provided a powerful follow-up to Trump’s warning that Pyongyang would face “fire and fury” should it continue to test missiles, build nuclear warheads and threaten to attack the United States. Lest anyone think Trump was speaking without the counsel of his top military man, Mattis said Trump is well aware of the depth of the North Korean threat.

“President Trump was informed of the growing threat last December and on taking office his first orders to me emphasized the readiness of our ballistic missile defense and nuclear deterrent forces,” Mattis continued.

“While our State Department is making every effort to resolve this global threat through diplomatic means, it must be noted that the combined allied militaries now possess the most precise, rehearsed and robust defensive and offensive capabilities on Earth.  The DPRK regime's actions will continue to be grossly overmatched by ours and would lose any arms race or conflict it initiates.”



Tuesday's report that Pyongyang has missile-ready nukes, combined with months of missile tests and threats from Kim, has brought the world to the brink. Punishing sanctions passed last week by the U.N. only served to increase Pyongyang's hostility toward the world, and in particular, the U.S.

Kim is believed to control up to 60 nuclear weapons.

The North Korean regime has conducted 12 tests so far this year, with one ICBM test conducted in late July sending a missile 2,300 miles into space and 45 minutes into the air. It was the longest, and farthest ballistic missile test in the history of North Korea, officials told Fox News at the time.

Trump leveled his initial threat on Tuesday, after the report that North Korea is closer than previously believed to making good on its threats.

“North Korea best not make any more threats to the United States,” Mr. Trump told reporters at his golf club in Bedminster, N.J., where he is spending much of the month on a working vacation. “They will be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen.”

Referring to the volatile Kim, Trump said, “He has been very threatening beyond a normal state, and as I said, they will be met with fire and fury, and frankly power the likes of which this world has never seen before.”

Trump followed his threat with a tweet Wednesday declaring the U.S. is more than ready for a war.

“My first order as President was to renovate and modernize our nuclear arsenal. It is now far stronger and more powerful than ever before,” Trump tweeted. “Hopefully we will never have to use this power, but there will never be a time that we are not the most powerful nation in the world!”
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Donald
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« Reply #44 on: August 11, 2017, 02:32:11 pm »

Kim Jong Un needs to decide if he wants to die young.....Good to see Trump being tough...Oh-buma was too weak for 8 years.....just made the situation worse....needs sorting now🙄

Mattis: War with North Korea would be 'catastrophic'
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said Thursday that war with North Korea would be “catastrophic,” casting a dire tone after President Trump unleashed a string of warnings to the rogue nation.

"The American effort is diplomatically led, it has diplomatic traction, it is gaining diplomatic results and I want to stay right there right now," Mattis said while speaking with reporters in Mountain View, California.

"The tragedy of war is well-enough known it doesn't need another characterization beyond the fact that it would be catastrophic," Mattis continued.

Secretary Mattis’ remarks followed days of escalating threats between North Korea and the U.S. When asked about the United States’ readiness if North Korea were to take action against the U.S. or another country, KNTV reported that Mattis replied: “I don’t tell the enemy in advance what I’m going to do … We’re ready.”

JAPAN READY TO PROTECT GUAM, DEFENSE MINISTER SAYS

Mattis pointed out the United Nations Security Council’s unanimous vote last week to characterize North Korea’s statements as a “threat to the world’s community.”

“How often to do you see France, China, Russia, the U.S. voting unanimously on any issue?” Mattis asked.
Fox

Earlier Thursday, President Trump turned up the heat on North Korea by threatening stronger consequences if the regime were to attack Guam.

“Let’s see what he does with Guam,” Trump said of North Korea leader Kim Jong Un’s threats to hit the U.S. pacific territory. “He does something in Guam, it will be an event the likes of which nobody has seen before – what will happen in North Korea.”
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #45 on: August 17, 2017, 01:14:22 am »

It appears the "supreme leader" has pulled his head in somewhat.
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