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The REAL NZ vs the JAFAs


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Author Topic: The REAL NZ vs the JAFAs  (Read 6309 times)
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« Reply #25 on: June 23, 2009, 01:48:01 pm »

My favourite mistaken place name tale is the one my bus driver neighbour tells about a passenger who bowl up to his bus in town one day and asked if this was the bus to Taka.

My neighbour replied yes it was and duly charged the correct fare.

He noticed as they were driving through Northcote that the passenger was looking a bit puzzled and lost so alerted him when they got to Takapuna that this was the stop.

The passenger looked around and exclaimed "But this isn't Takanini".
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« Reply #26 on: July 24, 2009, 07:58:02 pm »

At least when it is stormy in Auckland workers can still get to work.

Stormy weather in Wellington

 The train line between Wellington and Wairarapa is likely to be closed until Monday as commuters face continued fallout from wild weather that struck the region.

Emergency services have this morning been mopping up after wild weather last night caused commuter chaos around Wellington, with train passengers stranded by a derailment, slips blocking major roads, and widespread flooding.

About 300 train passengers were stranded in a tunnel last night after the train's locomotive ploughed into a wall of mud and debris and derailed as it left a tunnel at Maymorn, north of Upper Hutt, about 6.20pm.

The impact knocked the engine and one carriage about a metre off the tracks. There were no reports of injury last night.

KiwiRail spokesman Nigel Parry said this morning that the derailed locomotive and carriage would be cleared over the weekend. At this stage, no trains would run between Upper Hutt and the Wairarapa till Monday morning.

Up to 1000 commuters seeking to get to Wellington from Wairarapa were left to their own devices this morning as the rail service remains out of action.

"We apologise to our customers, both for a difficult night and in advance for the service disruption that has been forced on us," passenger general manager Ross Hayward said.

Kiwirail said it was unable to charter enough buses to take up the slack leaving people to make their own way to work today.

"Given the uncertain nature of the weather and the difficulty we would have finding buses to ferry as many as a thousand passengers to Wellington, we made the decision to suspend services and review the situation at noon," Mr Hayward said.

In a statement, KiwiRail said clearing the site and repairing the track would not take long but recovering the derailed locomotive was the major impediment to the line reopening.

"Getting cranes to the site is difficult because there is limited road access. The plan at this stage is that a road or track will be built to provide access. Estimates at this stage are that the locomotive is not likely to be recovered until late Saturday or possibly Sunday."

A decision would be made this afternoon about bus services to Wairarapa
...
COMMUTERS STRANDED

Ontrack spokeswoman Ruth Larsen said the Paraparaumu line between Porirua and Wellington was closed after a slip on the tracks just north of the rail bridge in Ngauranga Gorge about 8.30am.

Buses were operating to transport commuters to and from the city.

''The slip is still coming down. We're taking the precaution of closing that line.''

The slip was affecting one of the two tracks and the situation would be reviewed at midday.

As the train was trapped last night, Wellington workers wanting to drive north to get home faced a maze of road closures and crawling traffic as heavy rain and winds gusting to 130kmh wreaked havoc.

At one stage the capital was cut off from the north. For several hours, the narrow Akatarawa Rd between Upper Hutt and Waikanae was the main route north.

A slip blocked State Highway 1 at Pukerua Bay from about 5.30pm, causing extensive delays. One lane reopened just before 8pm and at 10pm there was still a backlog of traffic. High winds closed the Rimutaka Hill Road from 8pm until about 9pm. Slips and gravel also caused road closures on SH58 between Pauatahanui and Haywards Hill, and the Paekakariki Hill Road.

In Lower Hutt, Eastern Hutt Rd was under about one metre of water. "It's like a sink . . . The roads are atrocious," Acting Senior Sergeant Steve Braybrook said.

full atricle here
http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/2669407/Commuter-woes-continue-after-stormy-weather

 Grin
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« Reply #27 on: July 24, 2009, 08:12:33 pm »

My favourite mistaken place name tale is the one my bus driver neighbour tells about a passenger who bowl up to his bus in town one day and asked if this was the bus to Taka.

My neighbour replied yes it was and duly charged the correct fare.

He noticed as they were driving through Northcote that the passenger was looking a bit puzzled and lost so alerted him when they got to Takapuna that this was the stop.

The passenger looked around and exclaimed "But this isn't Takanini".


 Grin Grin
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« Reply #28 on: November 12, 2009, 07:40:07 am »

Helensville commuter link to be cut
By Mathew Dearnaley 4:00 AM Thursday Nov 12, 2009
 
Helensville will be left without a commuter rail link to Auckland again, amid recriminations over a failed trial costing an average $45.72c for each passenger.

The Auckland Regional Transport Authority says the link, restored 16 months ago after a 28-year drought, will be cut before Christmas after carrying about 18 city-bound passengers a day.

Auckland Regional Council sought the trial after a rail boom everywhere else on the region's rail network.

But despite the gloomy financial picture on the 30km section between Waitakere and Helensville, the council has asked staff to investigate reinstating services early next year to Huapai or Waimauku.

That is to cater for their development as regional "growth nodes" and to make some use of $1.25 million invested in station infrastructure for the trial.

The authority reported to the council's transport committee yesterday that the Helensville link - carrying one and a half return services daily to Britomart - drew an operating subsidy of 99c a kilometre per passenger. That compared with 11c for Pukekohe services and a regional average of 29c.

Norwest Rail Support Group chair Scott Osmond said the trial was a farce, after the authority ignored advice that one daily return service - leaving too early for some and heading back too late for others - would not work.

He said it took "a stab in the dark" without ascertaining travel needs.

Authority spokesman Sharon Hunter insisted community advice on a preferred timetable was followed.

Committee chairwoman Christine Rose also blamed disrupted services, and poor support by rail operator Veolia for passengers left stranded too many times, for destroying patronage.

Regional chairman Mike Lee said Helensville said he was disappointed the trial had come up short.

But councillor Joel Hayward said the transport authority had advised against starting the trial, warning it was unwise to spread limited resources too thinly before ensuring core services were running properly.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10608766

Bugger!
The time tabling, however was wrong.
It left Helensville too late to be of any use to anybody who finish work early enough to catch the train back in the evening.
Lack of a toilet was also a problem.

Here's hoping that they do run a service from Waimauku, Huapai or Kumeu.
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« Reply #29 on: November 22, 2009, 05:05:17 pm »

The house that money can't buy
By KIM KNIGHT - Sunday Star Times Last updated 05:00 22/11/2009SharePrint Text Size  Photos: John SelkirkThe sweet spot: Surrounded by mansions, Paul Firth's ramshackle seafront home, left, at Black Rock, Milford, has million-dollar views that stretch to Rangitoto Island.

PENGUINS NEST under the floorboards. A tame blackbird steals cat biscuits from the kitchen. The exterior hasn't been painted since 1974 – but the council valuation on this North Shore, Auckland, property is $3.7 million.

Owner Paul Firth turns down a potential buyer "at least once a week".

Worst house, best street. Count the country's richest among Firth's neighbours on Kitchener Rd: plastics millionaire Bill Foreman (he drops the paper past most mornings); America's Cup skipper Chris Dickson; art and antiques auctioneer Dunbar Sloane.

And Firth? "I'd say I was a poet."

The property behind his is worth $5.9 million – $2.2m in the building alone, a glass edifice that towers over Firth's place, a three-bedroom wooden house valued at (pause for effect) $100,000.

"Views are two-a-penny," says Firth. "I like the sound of the water."

He is the last of his line. Aged 65, no children, and a lifetime spent on this property where he has farewelled his mother, father, brother and, this winter, his sister Ann.

There is a poem he wrote the day she died. He keeps it on his cellphone, and reads it out loud, a sing-song storyteller with eyes to match the sea view. "Ann has gone, the whales have come, like pilgrim souls they're here..."

And another, for the young friend who will inherit this place when he goes: "Your day comes with a view and many moods to match... south winds skinning the bone."

Firth's is the house that got away. Built in 1921, and purchased by his father in 1944, there were "about a dozen like it" in the stretch between Milford's Thorne and Castor Bays. The first developers moved in with bricks and tiles – "And then gradually, the houses just went. One by one."

Three whales slid by the front door on the Tuesday morning the Sunday Star-Times visited. We first knocked on the gate a fortnight earlier, curious about the ramshackle hut with the jungle of a garden alongside the coastal walkway pocked with McMansions. Firth wrote our number on the side of his house with a piece of chalk and promised to call.

"I'll live here till the day I die," he says. "I think it would be nice to be on a farm, but it is a bit isolated and I'm a social sort of person. You'd be amazed at how many people I've spoken to this morning. Ten people have given me plant cuttings in the last six months."

Some of this year's $9000 rates bill will be paid for by moviemakers. Sam Neill played Mr Jones here for a week, Under the Mountain's good guy, with Rangitoto in a direct line of sight.

Ad Feedback "Isn't it amazing," says Firth. They had lunch together, the unassuming millionaire and the country's most famous actor.

Firth has worked intermittently over the years, in the chemical and horticulture industries, and in Auckland's demolition yards. He fell off a building in 1974 and still has the scars on a bandaged leg. He thought he might have become a mathematician and was studying when his brother, Mark, died of a heart condition, aged 21.

"That changed everything. I was at university, I'd passed in the first year and after that I just passed the odd exam and maybe it had nothing to do with Mark not being here, but..."

There's a picture of Mark in the living room, painted by their father, Clifton Firth (eldest son of the man who established Firth Concrete), who trained at Elam School of Art and became a style photographer, shooting Auckland glitz and glamour from the 1930s to the 1970s.

Once, this coastal house was a hotbed of bohemia. "Clifton would invite people in, and drink, and poor old mother had to feed them." Poet, painter and fabric designer ARD "Rex" Fairburn, and poet and communist newspaper editor RAK Mason were among those who partied here.

Firth remembers his father making a badge for the one-millionth walker along the coastal track and, another time, instructing his wife Melva Martin to call the harbour board and congratulate a captain on his brilliantly lit ship.

"How about telling the other men to light their ships up," Melva apparently said. Firth adopts the voice of a sea-dog and recalls the captain's reply: "Lady, would you tell another woman how to dress?"

As a boy on this beach, Paul Firth looked at the stars through a home-made telescope, sailed in tin canoes and swam off the rocks. Today, the last of the Kitchener Rd Firths lives quietly, drinking tea and wine with visitors, walking his dog Dede, reading the books he buys at auction for $1 a piece – and resolutely refusing to sell his piece of paradise.

Another poem, this one from his father. It's called "A Walk with Paul": "Have you ever noticed the way the waves change their song when you turn the corner and listen? They scud up the beach, calling into the night, to those who were there with us when we started out..."

http://www.stuff.co.nz/sunday-star-times/news/3085490/The-house-that-money-can-t-buy/

I have often wondered about this house as I walk past. It is a little gem that I hope the council has the sense to protect.
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« Reply #30 on: November 27, 2009, 07:17:44 am »

This is for all those who ride Shank's Pony. Walkers in other words:

Brian Rudman: Take a hike, you pesky walkers
By Brian Rudman 4:00 AM Friday Nov 27, 2009
 
 What about the walkers? A few days ago, the blueprint for the Auckland Transport Agency was unveiled. This is the $1 billion-a-year organisation that will preside over the new Super City's roads, footpaths and public transport networks.

The document contains three pages of charts and lists, itemising involvement in everything from road maintenance and parking enforcement to railway station surveillance and rolling stock asset management. But there's not a word about pedestrians.

Given that practically every one of us, if only for the quick dash down the road at lunchtime for a sandwich, is a walker, it's a glaring omission. But perhaps not unexpected, given the new master-plan seems covered in the DNA of the very traffic engineers who, over the past 50 years, have made Auckland the car-centred hellhole it is.

This isn't a guidebook to a brave and exciting new world, more a recipe for more of the same writ large. Signalling a more pedestrian-friendly environment would have been a good starting point. Best of all, looking out for pedestrians wouldn't cost a bundle.

Just a few cans of white paint for some new zebra crossings and the fiddling of the phasing cards in key traffic lights to give pedestrians an even share of the roadway would have been a signal that, at last, those on foot are being valued equally with those behind the wheel.

 Walking to work last week, I got a reminder of the pedestrian's worth in the greater scheme of things. The Victoria St footpath beside the park, west of the flyover, had been blocked off without warning. This forced me to cross the road and run the gauntlet of one of the most pedestrian-unfriendly intersections in the land, the Franklin Rd-Union St-Victoria St circus.

To its credit, Auckland City's traffic department listened to my subsequent "suggestions", and is promising "pedestrian warning signs" there and at the Nelson-Victoria St intersection - both of which give free left turns for cars at corners which are blind - for both pedestrians and cars.

I'm holding out for zebra crossings at least, but my hopes aren't high. Pedestrians have long been seen by traffic planners as, if not exactly road kill, then at least as pests.

I'll never forget Transport Minister Paul Swain arriving in Auckland six years ago to open the latest stage of the Grafton Gully motorway. Just the week before, he had launched Labour's high-minded draft strategy document Getting there - on foot, by cycle. In it, he declared "not all journeys can be made on foot or by cycle, but there is scope for many of us to walk and cycle more. Around 30 per cent of motor vehicle trips are for distances of less than 2km". Having preached the gospel according to Shanks's pony, he then stepped from his limousine to cut the ribbon on a motorway system which cut all pedestrian access between the CBD and the Domain, home of the city's biggest tourist attraction, the Auckland War Memorial Museum.

The new extension of Wellesley St, tunnelling under Symonds St, would have provided the perfect low-gradient pedestrian shortcut from Queen St to the Domain. Some of us jumped up and down about it at the time, but the traffic engineers said no one would use it. They argued that walkers already had access across Grafton Bridge, a lengthy circular route-march uphill to the south, or up and over Albert Park, through the university and down Grafton Rd. The planners and politicians even refused to contemplate bus lanes here, so car-obsessed were they. Instead, they commandeered historic Grafton Bridge and said buses and pedestrians could share it.

Pedestrians in Auckland are so off the planners' radar that they don't even bother with traffic counts to find out how many of us there are, or where we go. Potholes are repaired overnight on roads, but footpaths remain in a perilous state for years.

If you think that's an exaggeration, take a walk up the south side of Wyndham St from Queen St - hardly an obscure backwater lane.

It's a sign of where the humble pedestrian fits in transport planners' priorities. Maybe the politicians and officials from the outer cities will bring a new culture into the Super City. But there's no hint of that in the new blueprint.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10611957&pnum=0

Interestingly North Shore City council carried out a servey a couple of years back to find out if ratepayers wanted a city that was easy to drive a car in, a city that was easy to cycle in or a city that was easy to walk in.
Walking won hands down.
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« Reply #31 on: January 25, 2010, 03:19:43 pm »


I guess us REAL NZers are going to be exposed to whinging JAFAs on this evening's television news bulletins....Wink


http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/3260068/Power-out-in-Auckland
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« Reply #32 on: January 25, 2010, 03:50:46 pm »


I guess us REAL NZers are going to be exposed to whinging JAFAs on this evening's television news bulletins....Wink


http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/3260068/Power-out-in-Auckland

Stand by for a swarm of births in October?

Gas leak in West Auckland
By CLIO FRA
NCIS
Stuff.co.nz
15:33 25/01/2010

Houses have been evacuated and roads cordoned off after a contractor hit a gas pipe in West Auckland.

Waitakere Police said the pipe burst on the corner of Ranui Station Rd and Swanson Rd this afternoon.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/3259952/Gas-leak-in-West-Auckland

Houses in the immediate area and a public library have been evacuated.

Inspector Chris Robinson said the leak was expected to take at least two hours to fix.
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« Reply #33 on: January 25, 2010, 04:03:16 pm »


As expected....

The first news item on TV1's 6:00pm news bulletin was the power outage in JAFAville.

The first news item on TV3's 6:00pm news bulletin was the power outage in JAFAville.

Meanwhile, there is a murder case in the REAL NZ that JAFAs seem to think is less important than their latté machines not working!





JAFAs....Roll Eyes
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« Reply #34 on: January 25, 2010, 04:18:21 pm »

Omigod, forget about Haiti, the poor JAFA's.

Shall we set up a donation site?
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« Reply #35 on: January 25, 2010, 05:01:20 pm »

It is a grid emergancy.

It isn't just Auckland, it is Northland and part of the Waikato as well.

My suburb was in the list shown on the lead story on TV3 but our power was back by then. We were out for 25 minutes.

Mr sp and I are well used to this sort of thing as we have both worked in the telecommunication industry. We are expecting the power to go off again as Transpower seems to be in "brownout" mode.

Remember that Auckland has only one power station (guess what - it is off line for maintenance) and Northland doesn't have any.

Wellington can be supplied from two directions, from central North Island and from South Island, Auckland and Northland are not.

*********
Transpower declares grid emergency, rolling blackoutsNZPA
January 25, 2010, 6:08 pm
 

Rolling power outages are under way tonight between Waikato and Northland after a fire below transmission lines led Transpower to declare a grid emergency.

The company had directed Vector to reduce pressure on the electricity network, causing power to be cut to thousands of homes in Auckland.

Areas around Auckland, the North Shore, Manukau and Waitakere were currently affected, Vector chief executive Simon Mackenzie said.

Vector was unable to advise the exact time and place outages would occur but would try to keep customers informed, he said.

Customers were advised to listen to radio for updates and prepare for power cuts.

Transpower was unsure when normal operations would resume, but was aiming to have power restored by 7pm, chief executive Patrick Strange told Radio New Zealand.

He said a fire in trees below a major transmission line south of Hamilton had occurred while a powerstation and a line from Huntly to Auckland were down for maintenance, leading to the emergency.

Transpower was working flat out to get the lines back up, he said.

Traffic lights in Auckland were affected by the outage, and police were identifying major intersections and deploying staff to direct traffic, police northern communications Inspector Chris Robinson said.

Water supplies in some areas had also been affected.

Newmarket Business Association chief executive Cameron Brewer said power to half of Newmarket's businesses was cut about 4.45pm.

The outage [did] nothing to inspire confidence in the security of electricity supply into Auckland, he said.

"Power cuts seem to have become a regular event in Auckland and it's fast becoming beyond a joke.''

Meanwhile, Tauranga residents had been advised to conserve water following a major electrical fault at the Joyce Road Water Processing Plant.

The city's water supply was being used faster than it can be supplied, Tauranga City Council said.

Some areas in Mount Maunganui, Papamoa, Welcome Bay and Ohauiti were likely to experience a lack of water pressure.

Some areas might not receive any water supply tonight, the council said.

Water supply to the affected areas had been switched over to the Oropi Water Processing Plant while repairs were made.
http://nz.news.yahoo.com/a/-/top-stories/6719058/transpower-declares-grid-emergency-rolling-blackouts/
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« Reply #36 on: January 25, 2010, 05:08:44 pm »

TV3 news has reported that there has been a delay because the farmer who owns the land where the fire is wouldn't give access. Police have been involved. 
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« Reply #37 on: January 25, 2010, 05:11:54 pm »

Am watching Campbell Live right now and am just pissing myself laughing at the prospect of Jafa's running around thinking the sky is about to fall on their heads of yet another power cut.
The rest of New Zealand doesn't care about a Jafa power cut.
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« Reply #38 on: January 25, 2010, 05:15:27 pm »

Sorry to say that is not the case except in TV hype land.

The problem is that we are getting used to this sort of thing happening.


Is that a good thing given that you are talking about a third of the population of NZ?
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« Reply #39 on: February 20, 2010, 01:04:27 pm »


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« Reply #40 on: February 21, 2010, 08:11:38 pm »

You may mock but Auckland has something that throws the much boasted about features of other towns and cities into mediocrity.

Where else can you hop in a boat or catch a watertaxi and watch the sun rise as you travel over calm waters to wealth of sparsely inhabited islands, some of which are home to rare birds. At a much low cost than a trip to one island in Wellington harbour.

I would show you a picture of this gorgious scene but my camera was in my pack in the bow.

Where else has a beach like Piha, and before you start, Auckland has several other beaches also much like Piha i.e. Whatipu, Karekare, Te Henga (aka Bethalls), White's Beach, O'Neills Beach, Muriwai...

Then there are beautiful east coast beaches in the shelter of the Hauraki Gulf...

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« Reply #41 on: February 22, 2010, 02:55:49 pm »


Still doesn't change the fact the place is full of JAFAs.


(And Asians....when I was up there a few weeks ago, Queen Street was full of Asians....it was a case of “spot the whitie!”  Shocked)
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« Reply #42 on: February 22, 2010, 09:09:12 pm »


Still doesn't change the fact the place is full of JAFAs.


(And Asians....when I was up there a few weeks ago, Queen Street was full of Asians....it was a case of “spot the whitie!”  Shocked)
It is also full of ex-South Islanders, former Wellingtonians, past 'Nakiites, previous BOPites, relocated Waikatoanians, once were East Coasters, no longer Hawkes Bayers etc.

Most of those you call Jafas weren't born here. A large number didn't grow up here either yet here we are by choice or job location.

I take it that you went into Queen St and probably around lunch time. Most Jafas avoid the place and only gen Y and asians live in all those apartments owned by Mum and Dad property investers from south of the Bombay Hills.
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« Reply #43 on: February 22, 2010, 09:22:59 pm »

Oddly enough we seem to have a lot of ex-Jafa's down here. 

The conversations usually go:

"I'm from Auckland"

"Oh".

lol

There are a fair few refugees from Wellington too.  We seem to cope well with the Norwester - it's the same as Wellington's wind but warmer.  Grin
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« Reply #44 on: February 22, 2010, 09:36:29 pm »


Still doesn't change the fact the place is full of JAFAs.


(And Asians....when I was up there a few weeks ago, Queen Street was full of Asians....it was a case of “spot the whitie!”  Shocked)
I take it that you went into Queen St and probably around lunch time. Most Jafas avoid the place and only gen Y and asians live in all those apartments owned by Mum and Dad property investers from south of the Bombay Hills.


I was sleeping in Queen Street....in a hotel directly across the road from the Town Hall.

I'll be sleeping in the same hotel again the weekend before Easter when I make another brief visit to JAFAville (or should that be ASIAville?).

BTW....would you like a couple of free tickets to the “invite only” inauguration of the new Town Hall Organ on Sunday 21st March?

I've been invited to the civic do (the letter inviting me is signed by none other than Banks Wanks) and offered two free tickets, but I've got other plans that weekend (I'll be in Christchurch). I've got to RSVP them by 1st of March if I wish to claim those two seats.
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« Reply #45 on: March 11, 2010, 05:30:32 pm »

Rodney to fight super city inclusion
11/03/2010 13:28:01
 
Related AudioRelated Stories

Picture - NZ Herald
The Mayor of Rodney is vowing to fight confirmation the northern boundary of Auckland's super city will include her district.


The Local Government Commission has today confirmed the boundaries of the new Auckland. Despite opposition from many locals, Rodney is in.


Mayor Penny Webster says her council is meeting this afternoon to map out its next step.


"A lot of people in Rodney feel that they haven't been listened to. I mean there's still a lot of angst that we shouldn't be part of the city."


Ms Webster says her council will consider its own plan of action as soon as this afternoon.


"We have been asked by the Northern Action Group to support a local bill putting the northern part of Rodney into Kaipara."


Ms Webster says the council is also looking at putting in a local bill itself, to keep Rodney out of Auckland.


The southern boundary of the new city will see a significant chunk of Franklin become part of the Waikato District. However, the Karioitahi Beach and Paparimu areas will stay with Auckland.


Waikato Mayor Peter Harris says when his district inherits a significant chunk of Franklin, it also inherits massive debt. He says rates could double, if Auckland does not pick up the tab.


"We have issues of roading. We have 50 percent of their roads for 25 percent of the people so there some imbalances there that we're trying to address. It's important that we win this battle."


Waikato District Council raised the issue at a select committee hearing last week. Mr Harris says while it got a fair hearing, it was obvious no one had considered anything south of the border.


Representation for the new council has also been decided. The 20 members will be elected from 13 wards, with 21 local boards sitting below the council.


http://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/newsdetail1.asp?storyID=172244

Positive proof that Aucklanders pay for roading in the rest of NZ rather than the other way around.
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« Reply #46 on: March 26, 2010, 10:00:52 am »

Auckland heading for driest quarter in more than 50 years
By Eloise Gibson 4:00 AM Friday Mar 26, 2010
 
Warm, sunny weather kept Auckland beaches like Okahu Bay busy over summer. Photo / Sarah IveyAuckland is headed for the driest three months since records began more than 50 years ago.

Companies supplying tank water to rural areas around the city say the past few weeks have been the busiest they can remember.

Niwa climate scientist Georgina Griffiths said 56mm of rain had fallen so far this year, the lowest of any three-month period in Auckland.

"There's no question we're going to break the three-month dry record ... The next lowest was in 1974 for that same period and it had 68mm, so we've still got 12mm to go in one week."

MetService weather ambassador Bob McDavitt said Auckland was likely to get just 3mm to 4mm of rain in the next week - about 2mm on Sunday followed by about half of that next Wednesday.

That will not be enough to surpass 1974, making this quarter the driest in memory.

Although a splash of rain this week has helped fill people's water tanks, Ms Griffiths said it was unlikely to stave off a record-dry period.

"The highs are hanging around Auckland/Northland latitude ... in the Tasman and not really letting any [rain] in. This [week] is the first of the fronts that we've seen that have produced anything, really, in three months," she said.

While gardeners struggle to keep their vegetables healthy, tank water suppliers are experiencing a boom in business.

Gary Taylor of North Harbour Water Services, who delivers to rural areas north of Albany, said the past six weeks had been the busiest in his 13 years in business.

Keren Guy of A1 Water, near Helensville, said her company was the busiest it had been since opening 3 years ago. Drivers were working late into the night to keep up.

Ms Guy said some people were so desperate, they were coming to the office to collect small containers of water for cooking until they could get a full delivery a day later.

Waiheke water supplier Tom McDaniel said the number of water trucks working on the island had risen dramatically in the past three years.

Ms Griffiths said that the past two months were exceptionally dry even looking back at Auckland weather records dating from before 1959.

"You would never have had, at this time of year or any time of year, two months in a row this dry."

Auckland's last very dry spell in 1993-4 sparked the 1994 water crisis, when residents were asked to cut down on water use.

But Ms Griffiths said that year was the third dry year in a row - this time Auckland is in a better position because 2008 was very wet.

Watercare Services said city water supplies were near normal and it would be a problem only if winter was very dry, which Ms Griffiths said was unlikely.

Less than 10mm of rain fell in the Auckland region in February, 5-10 per cent of normal. Up until 9am yesterday there was 7mm of rain in March, about 9 per cent of normal.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10634429

Waikato pipeline - all that is saving us from water restrictions
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« Reply #47 on: April 26, 2010, 08:26:23 pm »

Super City logo has arrived - Oh Yay! Undecided

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10640382

Jafas/Jaffas on sticks.

Still North Shore currently uses a logo that looks like Rangitoto has been put in prison.
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« Reply #48 on: June 04, 2010, 10:45:01 am »

Rush hour Dunedin style = more than 6 cars in sight on the motorway....and yes they do have a motorway Shocked and the rest of the roads are amazingly pot hole free.

Rush hour Auckland style = 10 minutes to get from the motorway off ramp on Albany Highway to the top of Glenfield Rd (Sunset Rd intersecton) and a further 15 minutes to get from Sunset Road to Wairau Rd and along to Manuka Rd.

25 minutes to travel 3km. Angry and 3/4 of an hour to get from Rosedale Park with a van load of B.C. 2nd XI girls hockey team to Birkenhead College.

Next time I'll take the rat route through Unsworth Heights.
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« Reply #49 on: June 04, 2010, 12:44:45 pm »

 Grin just shows you how popular Auckland is  Wink
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