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When is Windows 7 coming out?


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Author Topic: When is Windows 7 coming out?  (Read 1512 times)
dragontamer
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« on: April 16, 2009, 09:13:26 am »

I'm seriously needing to look at upgrading but don't want Vista. 

My puter is getting slower to open applications - and mis-opening stuff.  I've cleaned up heaps and taken the desktop back to bald and bland.  I've cleaned it physically as well as tidying up applications and storage.  Deleted emails to help Outlook (Pffft) and banned the kids from downloading any more games or files.

2 nights ago it decided that it would type everything 'siht ekil'.  I mean WTF?  I had to reboot to get it to unjam.  It was funny in some ways (Mr DT was trying to search pianos on trademe but trademe couldn't recognise onaip and he was getting himself all in a lather) but I have huge work commitments and so does Mr DT using this machine so I need it to run at least semi-properly.

I hate waiting.  I don't do waiting. 
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Lovelee
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« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2009, 09:21:55 am »

DT i dont think its your operating system.

Have you tried commecting another keyboard - in regard to the backwards typing?

Have you done what daz suggested to find out whats running hard?


He said - do the control/alt/delete and click on processes - then click on the top column for memory usage - clicking till you get the program that is using the most at the top ..

Then post the top 4 in here for Daz to check out.

I have problems with my comp going slow also - it takes me a bit to get sorted but i do manage eventually.

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donquixotenz
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STILL TILTING


« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2009, 10:34:46 am »

Most of the stuff today need at least 1 gb ram and heading toward 3 gb
either an upgrade of os or new grunt machine will definately needed for win 7 even vista needs pretty up to date hardware like mediacentre cards and ram. also memory at 250gb soon gets full if saving vid and high res pics so have added a terrabyte aux hard drive to store files.......just adding that sped things up a fair bit
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DazzaMc
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« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2009, 12:22:14 pm »

I'm running 7 on an old laptop here - 256MB of ram - and it's quicker than my main machine (which is a beast)!!
It's puts it to shame actually...


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DazzaMc
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« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2009, 12:27:15 pm »

See here for the hardware spec's and others...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_7#Hardware_requirements
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dragontamer
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« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2009, 12:47:32 pm »

According to the Windows 7 Center, the release candidate is scheduled to be publicly released by the end of May

ooo - May 2009?

Lovelee - I'm ugrading my system, not just my os.  I don't want to update my system with a vista os.  I want to wait for 7.  I do have a basic understanding of computers.  Wink
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Lovelee
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« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2009, 02:37:45 pm »

I wouldnt want vista either - thought I read something bout it being dropped.

Sorry DT - i figure we all have to have some knowledge bout comps- if we dont we houldnt be turning it on (like driving a car) I was just trying to get one step in in case Daz suggested it - I find doing that when the comps slowing down, often I can find whats doing it - and sort it out.

 Roll Eyes
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Nitpicker1
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« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2009, 03:33:52 pm »

Dragon, I hate to mention this in the company of so many who are more experienced than I


does your system need a driver upgrade by any chance?  Embarrassed
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dragontamer
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« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2009, 04:14:49 pm »

nah nitz - I keep everything up to date, it needs me spend some $$ and get a good build with new components all round.  It's done well, and been built up as far as it can, but I'm well overdue for a new computer and I'm fairly stable on what I want, it's just the os that I'm iffy about.  I'd rather wait than go with vista.  I just don't think it's going to let me wait too long.

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Nitpicker1
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« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2009, 05:07:47 pm »

Quote
I'd rather wait than go with vista.  I just don't think it's going to let me wait too long.

Yep, me too. I backed up all my old stuff into seagate's 320GB external hd until things got so bad I was dragged into Vista and a new lappy. There are some good deals around lately, and vista is doing ok on it, seems to have no problems with +twice+ the grunt of the old 386 and dedicated graphics partition as well.

You might be well advised to leap in while the going's good, and change to Win 7 when it's wrinkles are ironed out: whaddya know, by then ya might even like vista. I do now, 'cos all my peripheral's drivers are updated.

A printer and webcam were part of the package that came with mine, they're in storage hoping I can find them if I need them. I am on the lookout for a similar deal in desktops.

BTW, have ya still got the 'siht ekil' poking it's head in?

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DazzaMc
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« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2009, 05:10:39 pm »

Just do a re-install of XP for now - XP's ok for an OS.

Wait until SP1 for Windows 7 before you jump over to it...  that's what I would recommend anyway.

 Smiley
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dragontamer
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« Reply #11 on: April 16, 2009, 06:18:59 pm »

Quote
BTW, have ya still got the 'siht ekil' poking it's head in?

I don't know what he did to set it off, and it hasn't repeated itself for me.  He's hamfisted at the best of times so lord knows what he did.

I sometimes think he should have his own keyboard - you know the one - 2 buttons - one for music one for the other.
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Magoo
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« Reply #12 on: April 27, 2009, 06:32:10 am »

http://www.stuff.co.nz/technology/2364390/Windows-7-early-version-out-this-week
Windows 7 early version out this week
Reuters
Last updated 05:00 27/04/2009

Microsoft said a version of its long awaited Windows 7 operating system will be made available this week.

The version, known as a 'release candidate', or RC, essentially means the world's largest software company is in the final stages of completing the operating system, the successor to the unpopular Windows Vista.

Microsoft said the RC will be available for download by program developers and IT professionals subscribing to the MSDN and TechNet networks on April 30 and available more broadly on May 5.

The company has still not said when the finished version would begin to be installed on PCs or available to buy in shops, but the company's chief financial officer said on Thursday it could be as early as July.

That would allow Microsoft to capitalize on back-to-school sales and set it up for a strong holiday shopping season. Microsoft's operating systems, installed on the vast majority of the world's PCs, are still the backbone of the company, providing more than half of its US$4.4 billion profit last quarter.

Vista, launched to the public in 2007, was incompatible with some low-power machines and perceived by many to be too complicated. Rival Apple ridiculed Microsoft's problems with the system in a series of popular TV ads.

Windows 7, which has been getting good reviews in limited public tests over the last few months, is much cleaner looking and features an array of new touch-screen functions. Microsoft says it will also interact better with digital cameras and music players.

Wish I waited to buy my laptop now.  Angry
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2009, 08:10:18 pm »


Windows 7 — Microsoft's antidote to Vista

Associated Press | Tuesday, 21 April 2009

Julie Larson-Green hopes you'll like Windows 7. If not, well, now you and a billion other people know who to blame.

Microsoft is counting on Larson-Green, its head of "Windows Experience," to deliver an operating system that delights the world's PC users as much as its last effort, Vista, disappointed them. She's in charge of a wide swath of the system, from the way buttons and menus work to getting the software out in January as scheduled.

Given Microsoft's history, Larson-Green's plan seems downright revolutionary: Build an operating system that doesn't require people to take computer classes or master thick manuals.

"We want to reduce the amount of thinking about the software that they have to do, so that they can concentrate all their thinking on the task they're trying to get done," Larson-Green said in an interview.

Microsoft relies on Windows for half its profit, which helps fuel money-losing operations like the pursuit of Google online. Windows was still profitable after Vista's 2007 launch, but its poor reception dinged the software maker's reputation at a critical time.

Vista was designed for powerful, pricier PCs just as nimble rivals like Google were releasing web-based programs that could run on inexpensive computers. Microsoft appeared to be clinging to an endangered world order that spawned its operating system monopoly.

What's more, Vista's initial incompatibility with many existing programs and devices, and its pestering security warnings, exposed Microsoft to ridicule in Apple commercials that helped Macintosh computers gain market share. Businesses didn't give up Windows, but many delayed upgrading to Vista.

Microsoft's executives have since distanced themselves from Vista, acknowledging its flaws. Now the company needs Windows 7 to widen that distance even more.

You probably don't know her name, but if you're using Office 2007, the sleeper hit of the Vista era, you're already familiar with Larson-Green's work. She was the one who banished the familiar system of menus on Word, Excel and other programs in favor of a new "ribbon" that shows different options at different times, depending on what a user is working on. It seemed risky, but it was grounded in mountains of data showing how people used the software.

Focusing on real customers might seem obvious, but Microsoft's programs more often have reflected the will of techie insiders.

One reason is that Windows' dominance relies heavily on third-party software developers who keep churning out compelling new programs. To give those developers as many options as possible for reaching PC users, over the years Windows spawned confusingly redundant features.

For example, you can tweak antivirus software settings by opening the program; by clicking on shortcuts from the desktop, task bar or "Start" menu; by responding to notifications that pop up uninvited from the bottom-right corner of the screen; or by poking around in a control panel.

Another bit of dysfunction stemmed from Microsoft's corporate structure. Windows employs thousands of people divided into groups that focus on search, security, networking, printing — the list goes on. With Vista and earlier versions, each group built the best solutions for its isolated goals. For example, two separate groups added similar-looking search boxes to Vista's control panels and its Start menu. Yet typing the same query into both boxes produced completely different results.

Larson-Green, a 16-year Microsoft veteran, grew up in tiny Maple Falls, Wash., about 100 miles north of the software maker's headquarters in Redmond. She waited tables to put herself through Western Washington University, then took a job in 1987 answering customer support calls at Aldus, a pioneering software company in Seattle.

During six years at Aldus, Larson-Green worked her way into software development and earned a master's in computer science on the side. But she credits her waitressing and customer-service work for making her good at her current job.

"The primary things that help you create a good user experience are empathy, and being able to put yourself in the place of people who are using the products," she said. "User interface is customer service for the computer."

Larson-Green, 47, is engaging and eager in person — to the point that in one interview, she couldn't keep from repeatedly interrupting her boss, Steven Sinofsky, as he sketched the history of Windows. But while giving product demos on stage, she lacks the showman's panache that a surprising number of Microsoft employees display. At a developer conference last year, she seemed nervous as she showed off Windows 7's new features.

Later, she explained that as a woman, she worried that honing the softer skills of marketing might prompt colleagues to take her less seriously as a technologist. Larson-Green has spent her Microsoft career working deeply on many Microsoft programs, including the internet Explorer web browser.

When she landed in the Office software group a few years ago, Larson-Green was dubious that much could be done to improve the software, which dominates the market for "productivity" programs.

"I felt like it had been that way for a long time, (and) everyone was pretty happy with it," she said.

Yet customers weren't quite as happy with Office as they might have thought.

For years Microsoft had tested software with focus groups and gathered comments and complaints from customers. But around the time Larson-Green joined the Office team, Microsoft was trying a more precise way of garnering feedback. By deploying special software — with user permission — on computers running Office programs, Microsoft could track how people used their PCs day after day.

That helped explain one puzzle in Redmond: why Office users often asked Microsoft for features that were already in the software. The tracking data showed there were functions very few people had discovered deep in the menus and toolbars in Office.

More research and testing yielded a solution — the ribbon, which displayed different commands depending on what the PC user was doing. Then Larson-Green pushed Microsoft to get even more radical: to release Office 2007 without the hedge of a "classic mode" that would emulate the old look and feel for people who didn't like the changes.

It worked. Just as Vista was a magnet for complaints, Office 2007 won accolades from software critics and regular users. Larson-Green proved she had the stomach to challenge a Microsoft legacy.

Her reward? The assignment to help fix Windows. When Sinofsky was tapped to lead the Windows division, replacing retiring Jim Allchin, Sinofsky drafted Larson-Green to come along, in a new position created for her.

"Some people are great at having ideas, and (have) no discipline. Some people are great at discipline, not much at ideas," Microsoft Chief Executive Steve Ballmer said in an interview. "She's got both of those genes."

Larson-Green's team began with centralized planning, in contrast with the old culture that let Windows subgroups set their own agendas. For example, in the past, different groups worked on home networking.

One group decided how Windows would share files among multiple computers at home; another group figured out how to get shared printers up and running. As a result, the steps for networking PCs and printers were inconsistent — and harder for PC users to master.

As she did with Office, Larson-Green sought insights in a daunting mass of data.

Vista was the first version of Windows to include the remote-tracking software that had helped Microsoft hone Office, and nearly 11 million Vista users had let their PC activities be logged. Larson-Green's team also surveyed more than 250,000 people around the world and showed other users prototypes, some as simple as sketches on paper.

From these billions of data points emerged big ideas that got boiled down into eight design principles. Larson-Green had them printed on folded slips of paper as reminders for everyone in the group.

Many of the principles come back to Larson-Green mantras of "user in control." The team tried to build an operating system people could use without studying first, one that would let them get right to reading the news or sending e-mail without dragging them down a rabbit hole of settings and configurations. A system with manners, not one that constantly interrupts with bubbles, boxes and warnings that, data showed, people ignored or raced to close.

The Windows groups agreed in principle but old habits often reared up. Many Windows teams still wanted to be able to create alert bubbles for their functions.

"We've probably talked to every team in Windows about, `No no no no, we don't want you to pop your notifications. Windows is not going to use these notifications to tell users things,'" said Linda Averett, a Windows user experience manager.

Larson-Green is already planning Windows 8, though her team continues to tweak the Windows 7 user interface. Signs point to a possible release months ahead of schedule, though Microsoft still says the official plan is for January.

Microsoft's marketing machine will pore over piles of charts to decide whether Windows 7 is a success. Larson-Green says her measure will be the conversations she overhears at Best Buy and comments posted by bloggers.

"I think people are going to like it," she said. Her voice rose a few notes when she added, "I hope so."


http://www.stuff.co.nz/technology/2346774/Windows-7-Microsofts-antidote-to-Vista
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #14 on: May 06, 2009, 08:11:54 pm »


Windows 7: It's Vista done right

The Sydney Morning Herald | Tuesday, 05 May 2009

David Flynn gets hands-on with the latest version of Microsoft's operating system and explains how to score a free copy to test for yourself.

One of the handiest features in any piece of Windows software is the "undo" button, which lets you step back in time to delete some typing, reverse a misguided photo edit or change some other ill-advised action.

With the latest version of its Windows operating system, Microsoft reaches for a real-life undo button to correct the many mistakes of Windows Vista.

Despite its many improvements and some superb new features, Windows 7 is essentially a faster, friendlier and generally better version of Vista. It's Vista done right.

But the proof of the pudding is in the tasting, which is why Microsoft will release a free version of Windows 7 tomorrow. It's not the finished product Windows 7 isn't expected to make its official debut until the end of this year - but this test edition, which Microsoft has dubbed "Release Candidate 1", is a polished piece of work that's almost ready for prime time.

Microsoft is offering it up as a free sample. You can download and install it on your PC.

Its motive? To win back confidence in Windows in the hope of encouraging upgrades to either the new OS upon its release or buying a shiny new PC designed for Windows 7 this Christmas. At the very least Microsoft hopes to keep customers from jumping ship to Apple and its elegant yet powerful Mac OS X.

For all that, what strikes you most about Windows 7 is that it looks and feels pretty much like Windows Vista. Yet it's several degrees smoother and more streamlined, less intrusive and even more "natural".

"We wanted to reduce the amount of thinking about the software that [people] have to do, so that they can concentrate on the task they're trying to get done," explains Julie Larson-Green, who is in charge of what Microsoft calls the "Windows Experience".

That all-encompassing term extends from how the desktop looks to the way that Windows itself works. In an ideal world, and the world of Windows that Larson-Green is striving for, it's all about the person using the computer and what they want to do. In her own words, it's about putting the user, rather than the computer, "in control".

That said, Microsoft has added some welcome tricks. HomeGroups makes it a snap to set up a home network for connecting desktop and laptop PCs, sharing libraries and printers and even being able to play music and video clips that reside on another computer in the network. Libraries make it easier to keep track of your documents, music and photos regardless of where they happen to be.

An enhanced taskbar running along the foot of the screen is packed with subtle finesses and visual cues to help you manage and switch between programs, while the Activity Centre groups together all of Windows' bothersome notifications and pop-up alerts and tucks them away into a corner of the screen.

Windows 7 is certainly speedier than Vista and in some cases even than Windows XP. In testing, we found it started almost 20 per cent faster than Vista, was quicker to wake from its standby or sleep state and needed significantly less memory.

Take it for a test drive around the block

WANT to try Windows 7 for yourself? Head to http://microsoft.com/downloads tomorrow and you'll find a link to the Windows 7 Release Candidate. Two versions will be up for grabs but the one you'll want is the 32-bit edition weighing in at 2.4GB. (The 64-bit version is for advanced users with very high-end PCs. If you need 64-bit Windows you'll know it; if not, then you almost certainly don't need it.)

Expect the download to run fairly slow as millions of other Windows users are also trying to grab it. If your ISP allows "off peak" downloads then take advantage of this and leave your PC running and downloading overnight.

The downloaded file arrives in what's called an ISO format and needs to be burned onto a DVD before you can use it. You'll need special CD/DVD burning software such as Nero or Roxio, or you can grab the simple and free ImgBurn program (from http://imgburn.com).

Pop a blank DVD into your PC, launch ImgBurn and write the ISO image file to the blank disc. This creates a Windows 7 installation DVD that can be used just like any other software CD or DVD. Load the DVD into your computer and reboot the PC to start the installation of Windows 7.

But there's a catch. Your PC will need to be running Windows Vista with Service Pack 1 in order to install Windows 7. You can't upgrade from Windows XP, or from the earlier Beta 1 edition of Windows 7.

Any Windows Vista PC is easily capable of running Windows 7 in fact, you'll be surprised how much faster that PC becomes once Windows 7 is loaded. It'll also work on most computers that run Windows XP as long as the system is no more than about five years old. Any PC with 1GB of memory and a 1.4GHz processor will be sufficient.

The installation is fairly fast and smooth. No special software key or code is needed. You even get to choose which edition of Windows 7 you want to install, from the basic Starter version to the bells-and-whistles Windows 7 Ultimate.

We suggest Home Premium for home users, Professional for businesses and Ultimate for anyone who wants the works with egg and beetroot.

You'll also need to download additional software for email, working with digital photos and editing home movies. These have been removed from Windows 7 as a way to push users towards Microsoft's online Windows Live services. After starting Windows 7, it will provide links for downloading Windows Live Mail and Windows Live Photo Gallery.

If you want to assess Windows 7's new XP Mode there are two other files to fetch. One is a small 5MB file containing the Windows Virtual PC beta software, the other is the 450MB Windows XP Mode installer. Make sure you get the 32-bit version of both files. Run the Windows Virtual PC installer to set up the environment in which your "virtual X" will live and then run the Windows XP Mode installer to create the "virtual hard disk" image of Windows XP on your Windows 7 system.

Of course, we suggest that your experimentation with Windows 7 takes place on a spare PC rather than your main home PC. This preview of the next-gen Windows looks quite complete but is nonetheless a test version - things can and likely will go wrong.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/technology/2385181/Windows-7-Its-Vista-done-right



Seven-step guide to downloading Windows 7

By DAVID FLYNN - The Sydney Morning Herald | Wednesday, 06 May 2009

Want to try Windows 7 for yourself?

1. Head to http://microsoft.com/downloads tomorrow and you'll find a link to the Windows 7 Release Candidate. Two versions will be up for grabs but the one you'll want is the 32-bit edition weighing in at 2.4GB. (The 64-bit version is for advanced users with very high-end PCs. If you need 64-bit Windows you'll know it; if not, then you almost certainly don't need it.)

Expect the download to run fairly slow as millions of other Windows users are also trying to grab it. If your ISP allows "off peak" downloads then take advantage of this and leave your PC running and downloading overnight.

2. The downloaded file arrives in what's called an ISO format and needs to be burned onto a DVD before you can use it. You'll need special CD/DVD burning software such as Nero or Roxio, or you can grab the simple and free ImgBurn program (from http://imgburn.com).

Pop a blank DVD into your PC, launch ImgBurn and write the ISO image file to the blank disc. This creates a Windows 7 installation DVD that can be used just like any other software CD or DVD. Load the DVD into your computer and reboot the PC to start the installation of Windows 7.

3. But there's a catch. Your PC will need to be running Windows Vista with Service Pack 1 in order to install Windows 7. You can't upgrade from Windows XP, or from the earlier Beta 1 edition of Windows 7.

Any Windows Vista PC is easily capable of running Windows 7 in fact, you'll be surprised how much faster that PC becomes once Windows 7 is loaded. It'll also work on most computers that run Windows XP as long as the system is no more than about five years old. Any PC with 1GB of memory and a 1.4GHz processor will be sufficient.

4. The installation is fairly fast and smooth. No special software key or code is needed. You even get to choose which edition of Windows 7 you want to install, from the basic Starter version to the bells-and-whistles Windows 7 Ultimate.

We suggest Home Premium for home users, Professional for businesses and Ultimate for anyone who wants the works with egg and beetroot.

5. You'll also need to download additional software for email, working with digital photos and editing home movies. These have been removed from Windows 7 as a way to push users towards Microsoft's online Windows Live services. After starting Windows 7, it will provide links for downloading Windows Live Mail and Windows Live Photo Gallery.

6. If you want to assess Windows 7's new XP Mode there are two other files to fetch. One is a small 5MB file containing the Windows Virtual PC beta software, the other is the 450MB Windows XP Mode installer. Make sure you get the 32-bit version of both files. Run the Windows Virtual PC installer to set up the environment in which your "virtual X" will live and then run the Windows XP Mode installer to create the "virtual hard disk" image of Windows XP on your Windows 7 system.

7. Of course, we suggest that your experimentation with Windows 7 takes place on a spare PC rather than your main home PC. This preview of the next-gen Windows looks quite complete but is nonetheless a test version things can and likely will go wrong.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/technology/digital-living/2389233/Seven-step-guide-to-downloading-Windows-7



No date set yet for Windows 7 release

By CHRIS GARDNER - Waikato Times | Wednesday, 07 May 2009

ON TRIAL: Enlighten Design chief executive Damon Kelly, in Hamilton, was given the chance to trial Windows 7 Beta. The trials generated more than 200 terrabites of feedback.

ON TRIAL: Enlighten Design chief executive Damon Kelly,
in Hamilton, was given the chance to trial Windows 7 Beta.
The trials generated more than 200 terrabites of feedback.


Microsoft appears to be in the final stages of completing its Windows 7 operating system, making a release candidate available for download yesterday, but the final release date is still in question.

Microsoft chief financial officer Chris Liddell said last week the replacement for Windows XP and Windows Vista could be released as early as July but Auckland-based Windows business group manager Ben Green was sticking to a January 2010 release. July is the favourite among commentators, allowing Microsoft to capitalise on back-to-school sales in the northern hemisphere.

Since releasing a downloaded version of Windows 7 Beta in January, Mr Green said Microsoft had received 200 terrabites of feedback from users and incorporated their suggestions into the release candidate.

That is the equivalent to receiving feedback every 15 seconds.

Windows 7, which has been getting good reviews in limited public tests, is much cleaner looking than Vista and is compatible with PCs fitted with a touch-screen.

Microsoft says Windows 7, which it hopes will replace Windows XP as the workhorse since its introduction in 2001, will also interact better with digital cameras and music players.

Mr Green said Windows 7 had a Windows XP mode, which would encourage consumers with only XP-compatible software to get on board, as well as remote media streaming.

Remote media streaming will enable Windows 7 users to access digital files on their home PC from anywhere in the world.

Mr Green said Microsoft would release two main versions of Windows 7, as well as Starter for low-end netbooks.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/technology/digital-living/2389722/No-date-set-yet-for-Windows-7-release
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dragontamer
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« Reply #15 on: May 06, 2009, 11:34:16 pm »

Of course, we suggest that your experimentation with Windows 7 takes place on a spare PC rather than your main home PC.

**sigh**
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #16 on: May 07, 2009, 12:12:47 am »


I've got a beta version of Windows 7 on a DVD and they give the same advice....don't install it on a computer you love, but instead use an old computer to play with it. Incidentally, the DVD comes with a warning that if the beta version of Windows 7 is installed on a computer, it will die completely (the W7 operating system) at the end of September. So MS obviously have taken measures to ensure that people don't use the beta version of Windows 7 indefinitely.
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Magoo
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« Reply #17 on: May 07, 2009, 07:29:30 am »

Well the warning to use it on an old PC was enough to deter me from looking at it.  I have two desk PCs and 2 laptops and won't be experimenting on any of them as I have them networked.
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« Reply #18 on: May 07, 2009, 08:44:46 am »

Yeh I had a look a couple of days ago and decided against it.
Im quite happy with what we have now.
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Magoo
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« Reply #19 on: May 07, 2009, 10:29:02 am »

I have xp home  on the two desktops, I have xp pro on the toshiba A10 laptop and have vista home on the Compaq V3000 and I am quite used to vista now and don't really mind it.  Don't know what all the hassle was with it once the compatibility issues were sorted out.   People can be resistant to change.
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #20 on: May 07, 2009, 11:45:51 am »


I think a lot of people have short memories. When XP was first released, it was far from a bed of roses. I had a workmate and a friend who both purchased new computors just after XP was released and as they were both a wee bit tending towards computer illiteracy, they asked me to setup their new computors. I ran into all sorts of problems with the then new XP operating system and I know of heaps more people who had problems with it initially. I managed to get both of the computers I setup running sweet, then about three months later, purchased a new PC myself with XP on it and used the knowlege gained from setting up the earlier systems to avoid the pitfalls. There were a lot of complaints about XP until MS released SP1. In many ways, Vista was no different apart from being a much more complex operating system that put high demands on computer hardware. I purchased a laptop with Vista installed not long after the system was released and set it up very carefully, disabling everything I decided I was unlikely to use and I have had minimal problems with it. And I imagine Windows 7 will also have a number of pitfalls until SP1 is released sometime into the future.
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Magoo
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« Reply #21 on: May 07, 2009, 12:15:13 pm »

I haven't had any trouble with Vista and compatibility.  I have left is as it is with the exception of dumping Nortons.    The only program I had problems with was Corel Painter X.1 and Paint Shop Pro 7, 9 and 10 and now those issues have been addressed and patches installed.
I am sure you are right about 7... there will be hiccups initially.
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donquixotenz
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« Reply #22 on: May 07, 2009, 08:50:09 pm »

I run vista business....no problems at all paintshop pro no problems agree nortons is a pain in the r's but not only with vista have been using microsoft live one care which integrates anti spam, defender, and antiviris it scans updates all in the background and causes bugger all problems and is the only one I have found that works properly with office and does not slow it down badly like nortons did, it also does not rearange files and hard drive like norton did.
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Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body.

But rather, to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming...

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Please note: IMHO and e&oe apply to all my posts.
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« Reply #23 on: July 02, 2009, 10:13:27 pm »

I'm using it right now.... and shit it's nice!
It's like Vista but sssooooooo much better.

I have it installed on an old laptop - 1.3GHz/768RAM, 40GB HD and shit it runs well! It's far better/faster and nicer than the XP Pro which was on here...

Ill be using over the next few days - will report back what I find.

 Smiley

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Newtown-Fella
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« Reply #24 on: July 23, 2009, 10:53:29 am »

Windows 7 is ready, says Microsoft ''

EATTLE - Microsoft says Windows 7 is complete. The software maker sent the final code for its next computer operating system to manufacturers, and said it's still on track for an Oct. 22 launch.

Mike Angiulo, a general manager in the Windows group, said in an interview that getting up and running on a Windows computer will be "a lot smoother" than it was when Windows Vista launched in 2007.

At the time, Microsoft boasted about the number of programs and devices that would work with Vista, but many PC users found their existing software, printers, scanners, cameras and other hardware didn't function after the switch.

Microsoft said one reason Windows 7 should be an easier launch is that at its core, the new version is a lot like Vista.

If a company updated a product to work with Vista in the last few years, it should also work with Windows 7.

Windows 7 has also progressed in an orderly way, which means outside companies have had more time to make sure their products will work.

Vista was plagued by changes to Microsoft's plans, leaving partner companies scrambling to keep up.

The new operating system will launch into a much tougher climate than Vista did.

PC shipments are expected to fall this year for the first time since 2001, as the economic crisis has forced businesses to slash technology spending.

Microsoft built in a way for companies to run older, Windows XP programs in Windows 7, in an attempt to avoid losing those corporate customers that skipped Vista altogether because critical software wasn't compatible.

Companies that have long-term agreements to buy Microsoft software in bulk will be able to download and start installing Windows 7 in a few weeks, Microsoft said.

Then starting Oct. 22, Windows 7 will come on new PCs, and will be available for people to buy separately and install on their existing machines.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=10586139
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