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THE CCP IS A CRIMINAL ORGANISATION WORSE THAN THE NAZI'S


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Author Topic: THE CCP IS A CRIMINAL ORGANISATION WORSE THAN THE NAZI'S  (Read 30 times)
Im2Sexy4MyPants
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« on: July 21, 2020, 04:24:05 pm »

WELCOME TO CHINA'S NEW CENTURY it turns out that their LEADER'S are THIEVES and MASS MURDERER'S  Grin WHO KNEW Huh?


China's Commie rulers are really DUMB sneaking all their stolen loot out of the country, WHY ? because they think China is about to go down the gurgler lol

Now everyone hates them< which is great,THANK YOU VERY MUCH Covid_19 CCP'S Kung-Flue
their people are sick of the Thugs

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Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP

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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2020, 07:22:53 pm »


Meanwhile, America is lead by a moron who is a stupid “Fake President” who has turned his country into a failed state.

Guess who will be taking advantage of America's leadership deficit?

I'll tell you: North Korea, Russia, Iran, China, and many others.

That's what happens when you have a stupid dumbarse leader.

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If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2020, 02:20:15 pm »


from The Press…

In praise of a good sausage but not a pre-cooked one

Intrepid columnist Joe Bennett finds out how a good sausage is made.

By JOE BENNETT | 5:00AM — Wednesday, 22 July 2020

The vast moustache of German statesman Otto von Bismarck has Joe Bennett thinking of sausages. — Photograph: London Steroscopic Company/Getty Images.
The vast moustache of German statesman Otto von Bismarck has Joe Bennett thinking of sausages.
 — Photograph: London Steroscopic Company/Getty Images.


IT IS better for the public not to know, said Bismarck, how laws or sausages are made.

So when Rob, who owns the local supermarket, invited me to see how sausages were made, I was wary. But then I cocked an ear, put it to the ground and heard the unmistakable call of columnar duty.

I like a good sausage but I also don't mind a bad one. The only cure for a hangover is a fry-up. And the right sausage for such a fry-up, to go with the bacon, the eggs, the grease-puddle and the fried tomato that takes the skin off the roof of your mouth, is a bad sausage, the cheapest, the all but meatless, the one that looks like sofa-stuffing but lacks its flavour.


Joe Bennett says the only cure for a hangover is a good fry-up. — Photograph: Unsplash.
Joe Bennett says the only cure for a hangover is a good fry-up. — Photograph: Unsplash.

For, as any gastroenterologist will tell you, such a sausage works by leaching out the toxins, drawing them into itself in the manner of a black hole sucking in stars.

Nevertheless good sausages are better than bad ones and good sausages abound. From the black pudding of Lancashire to the milky veal of Vienna, from the crimson chorizo of Pamplona to the nostril-pink dog of New York, from the great wursts of Munich to the baby wieners of Prague, from the bangers of my low youth to the boerewors​ of the high veldt, all are fine by me.

I draw the line only at the pre-cooked sausage, the beast you’ll find on sale outside the hardware store on a Sunday morning, wrapped in bread and smeared with red, in aid of junior softball. I will not touch it. It's not the painted zebra-stripes that I object to, nor yet that it bounces when dropped.


If sausages are pre-cooked, they are not for Joe Bennett. — Photograph: Rohan Thomson/Getty Images.
If sausages are pre-cooked, they are not for Joe Bennett. — Photograph: Rohan Thomson/Getty Images.

It's the name. Pre-cooked is merely cooked, just as pre-planned is planned, and I cannot swallow redundancy, even for junior softball. The pre sticks in my throat.

Did you know that there's a company in Christchurch that makes sausage flavourings? Neither did I till Rob took me backstage. The recipe for the sausages we made was one sachet of flavourings to a heap of minced beef and a heap of minced pork. Then into the machine went the mix.

When an American pig is slaughtered, most of it stays at home. But its intestine is removed, washed, checked for flaws, salted, dried, bundled with several hundred others, vacuum-packed, kissed goodbye and sent on its OE.


Guillaume Vannini pierces a sausage at The Honest Sausage, at Wakapuaka in Nelson. — Photograph: Virginia Woolf.
Guillaume Vannini pierces a sausage at The Honest Sausage, at Wakapuaka in Nelson. — Photograph: Virginia Woolf.

And it was one of these American intestines that Rob ruched over a spout at the base of the machine in the manner of a woman ruching a nylon stocking over her toe. He tied off the end, turned the handle, and filled the stocking, keeping steady pressure so it didn't bulge and burst.

When he was done he tied off the other end and what we had was exactly like one of those balloons magicians make toy animals out of, except this balloon was three metres long and weighed five kilos.

All expertise is good to watch and that includes knitting with meat. Rob made a loop the size of two sausages, passed a third through the gap, flipped one, purled one, knitted two together, held out the result and said, “Here, Joe, you have a go”.


Columnist Joe Bennett is better at eating sausages than making them.
Columnist Joe Bennett is better at eating sausages than making them.

After I had had a go, Rob thought it might be simpler if we started again from scratch. I offered to sweep the floor but he said the cleaners would be in that evening.

Ten minutes later, and without my help, he had produced a knitted skein of sausages like the ones that cartoon dogs traditionally filch from cartoon butchers. And they were as plumply beautiful as Bismarck's vast moustache.


__________________________________________________________________________

• Julian “Joe” Bennett is a writer, columnist and retired English school teacher living in Lyttelton, New Zealand. Born in England, Bennett emigrated to New Zealand when he was twenty-nine.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/opinion/122195695/in-praise-of-a-good-sausage-but-not-a-precooked-one
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If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 

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