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Jolly good stuff: a free airshow…


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Kiwithrottlejockey
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Having fun in the hills!


« on: May 03, 2020, 04:32:17 pm »


from The Washington Post…

Military jets salute workers on front line as more
coronavirus cases and deaths are reported


The Washington D.C. region confirmed 103 additional covid-19 fatalities on Saturday.

By FENIT NIRAPPIL, SAMANTHA SCHMIDT and MICHAEL E. RUANE | 6:13PM EDT — Saturday, May 02, 2020

The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds fly over the Washington region on Saturday in a salute to front-line covid-19 responders. — Photograph: Salwan Georges/The Washington Post.
The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds fly over the Washington region on Saturday in a salute to front-line covid-19 responders.
 — Photograph: Salwan Georges/The Washington Post.


AS military jets streaked overhead in salute to covid-19 first responders, the District, Maryland and Virginia reported 103 additional coronavirus deaths on Saturday, bringing the regional death toll to 2,107.

The increases in fatalities and cases have been on par with daily rises over the past week.

Maryland disclosed 59 more deaths and 1,001 newly confirmed cases. In all, Maryland has reported 1,251 confirmed and probable deaths from covid-19, the disease the novel coronavirus causes, and 24,473 confirmed cases.

Virginia added 35 deaths and 830 more cases. Virginia has 616 confirmed and probable fatalities and nearly 18,000 cases.

The District disclosed nine additional deaths and 139 newly positive test results. The nation's capital has nearly 4,800 cases and has lost 240 residents to the virus.


Spectators turned out on the front of the Lincoln Memorial to watch the fly over by the Navy's Blue Angels and the Air Force's Thunderbirds. — Photograph: John McDonnell/The Washington Post.
Spectators turned out on the front of the Lincoln Memorial to watch the fly over by the Navy's Blue Angels and the Air Force's Thunderbirds.
 — Photograph: John McDonnell/The Washington Post.


The Blue Angels and the Thunderbirds fly over the city, past the Washington Monument and the House of Representatives, to honor medical workers during the covid-19 pandemic, in Washington, D.C. — Photograph: Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post.
The Blue Angels and the Thunderbirds fly over the city, past the Washington Monument and the House of Representatives, to honor medical
workers during the covid-19 pandemic, in Washington, D.C. — Photograph: Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post.


The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds are seen during a flyover to salute frontline covid-19 responders in Arlington, Virginia. — Photograph: Salwan Georges/The Washington Post.
The Blue Angels and Thunderbirds are seen during a flyover to salute frontline covid-19 responders in Arlington, Virginia.
 — Photograph: Salwan Georges/The Washington Post.


People watch as the Blue Angels and the Thunderbirds, perform a joint flyover near the Washington Monument. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.
People watch as the Blue Angels and the Thunderbirds, perform a joint flyover near the Washington Monument.
 — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.


Meanwhile, across sunny skies, the Navy's Blue Angels and the Air Force's Thunderbirds jet demonstration teams criss-crossed the area in tribute to those on the front lines of the pandemic.

On the Mall and along the Georgetown waterfront, among other places, people gathered in the pleasant spring weather to watch, as the 12 jets left twisting white contrails against the blue sky.

Elsewhere, a modest crowd of “Reopen Maryland” protesters staged a rolling demonstration from Frederick to Salisbury to pressure Maryland Governor Larry Hogan (Republican) to lift restrictions imposed to contain the pandemic.

The protest and car caravan began at Francis Scott Key Mall in Frederick and proceeded to Salisbury, where people were addressed by Representative Andy Harris (Republican), who voiced his support.

Few wore masks. Many wore yellow “Reopen Maryland” T-shirts, which had been handed out in Frederick. One man wore a T-shirt that read, “Tyranny Response Team”.

The group wants to reverse the economic standstill caused by efforts to slow the virus, and protesters called for the reopening of schools and houses of worship, saying the measures are too broad and socially destructive.


People record the flyover with their phones. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.
People record the flyover with their phones. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.

Spectators near Columbia Heights in the District watch the jets Saturday. — Photograph: Oliver Contreras/for The Washington Post.
Spectators near Columbia Heights in the District watch the jets Saturday. — Photograph: Oliver Contreras/for The Washington Post.

“Ladies and gentlemen,” Harris said to those assembled at a Salisbury mall around 2:30 p.m. “I can't go to church on Sunday. Because, unbelievably in America, I have been told that you can't practice your religion.”

“And the state has decided if my religion is essential or non-essential,” he said, according to a feed from WBOC-TV in Salisbury.

“I didn't wake up in Communist China. I didn't wake up in North Korea this morning. And tomorrow morning, I should be able to go to the church of my choice.”

“I am a physician,” Harris added. “Let me tell you something: It is safe to begin to reopen Maryland…. There are not 2 million people going to die in the United States. In Maryland, the estimate would have been 20,000 to 40,000 people dying.”

The crowd chanted, “Open it up! Open it up!”


Spectators on the steps of the Library of Congresss watch as the Blue Angels and the Thunderbirds fly in formation over the city. — Photograph: Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post.
Spectators on the steps of the Library of Congresss watch as the Blue Angels and the Thunderbirds fly in formation over the city.
 — Photograph: Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post.


People watch the fly over by the Navy's Blue Angels and the Air Force's Thunderbirds at the Lincoln Memorial. — Photograph: John McDonnell/The Washington Post.
People watch the fly over by the Navy's Blue Angels and the Air Force's Thunderbirds at the Lincoln Memorial.
 — Photograph: John McDonnell/The Washington Post.


The Blue Angels, and theThunderbirds fly over Washington D.C. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.
The Blue Angels, and theThunderbirds fly over Washington D.C. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.

Heather, Ryan, and Sawyer Zempel, 5, watch the flyover. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.
Heather, Ryan, and Sawyer Zempel, 5, watch the flyover. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.

But others in the area disagreed.

“Everybody wants to get back to normal,” said Amy K. Liebman, director of environmental and occupational health for the Migrant Clinicians Network office in Salisbury. “Everyone would love to see a reopened Maryland.”

“But we're not ready,” she said on Saturday.

Covid-19 cases have risen sharply in the past two weeks in the Salisbury area, which is home to the Eastern Shore's large chicken industry.

“We need to see it going in the other direction before we start taking measures to reopen,” Liebman said. “That really includes someone standing up for the workers who are fueling our local economy.”

“How do we reopen at the same time that all of our essential workers are fully protected?” she said.


People walk around and exercise on the National Mall after the flyover. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.
People walk around and exercise on the National Mall after the flyover. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.

The workforce in the area's chicken processing plants is made up of many Hispanic, Haitian and African American employees, she said.

“I am very concerned about the workers who are on our front lines here, those who are scared, those who desperately need to earn a paycheck,” she said. “If you skim the racial breakdown of our [covid-19] cases, it's disproportionately impacting Latino and Hispanic workers.”

“What we need to be looking at is, how can these workers work safely?” she added. “What changes need to take place? And what do they need to be provided?”

Safe distancing in the chicken plants needs to be enforced, Liebman said. Ventilation should be checked, reliable protective gear should be provided, and testing should be extensive.

“What we need to ensure is that we reopen safely and that we don't cause more people to get sick and some people to die,” she said.


__________________________________________________________________________

Teddy Amenabar and Sam Mallon contributed to this report.

Fenit Nirappil covers D.C. government and politics for The Washington Post's local politics team. Before moving to the D.C. beat, he was part of a team of reporters covering the governor's race and other elections in Virginia. Since joining The Post in 2015, he has written stories across the Washington region spanning breaking news, campaigns and government accountability. Nirappil was educated at Northwestern University where he earned a B.S. in journalism and political science; and at American University where he was awarded a M.S.J. in journalism.

Samantha Schmidt is a reporter focused on gender and family issues for The Washington Post. She previously worked on The Post's Morning Mix team, and as a reporting fellow for The New York Times. Educated at Indiana University, Schmidt was awarded a B.A. in journalism and Arabic. She speaks fluent Spanish and Arabic.

Michael E. Ruane is a general assignment reporter at The Washington Post who also covers Washington institutions and historical topics. He has been a general assignment reporter at the Philadelphia Bulletin, an urban affairs and state feature writer at the Philadelphia Inquirer, and a Pentagon correspondent at Knight Ridder newspapers. He was part of The Washington Post team which won the Pulitzer Prize in 2008 for coverage of the Virginia Tech shooting and he is also co-author with Sari Horowitz of the book Sniper: Inside the Hunt for the Killers Who Terrorized the Nation. Ruane holds a B.A. and M.A. in istory from Villanova University; and he is a Nieuman fellow at Harvard University.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Blue Angels and Thunderbirds fly over D.C.

 • Smallest caseload to biggest death toll: Coronavirus decimates D.C.'s poorest ward

 • PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY: Blue Angels and Thunderbirds fly over D.C. area


https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/military-jets-salute-workers-on-the-front-line-of-the-pandemic-as-more-covid-cases-and-deaths-are-reported/2020/05/02/e8049ca2-8c74-11ea-9dfd-990f9dcc71fc_story.html
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