Xtra News Community 2
November 12, 2019, 02:19:30 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Welcome to Xtra News Community 2 — please also join our XNC2-BACKUP-GROUP.
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links BITEBACK! XNC2-BACKUP-GROUP Staff List Login Register  

Britain is in crisis … so a stupid moron goes blundering in…


Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Britain is in crisis … so a stupid moron goes blundering in…  (Read 42 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30332


Having fun in the hills!


« on: June 02, 2019, 08:39:14 pm »


from The Washington Post…

Britain is in crisis. So why is President Trump coming to visit?

Hint: It's all about the pictures.

By ANNE APPLEBAUM | 6:09PM EDT — Friday, May 31, 2019

Queen Elizabeth II and President Donald J. Trump inspect an honor guard during a welcome ceremony at Windsor Castle in July 2018. — Photograph: Ben Stansall/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Queen Elizabeth II and President Donald J. Trump inspect an honor guard during a welcome ceremony at Windsor Castle in July 2018.
 — Photograph: Ben Stansall/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


BRITAIN is in the grip of an unprecedented political meltdown, a crisis on a scale that was unthinkable even six months ago. The prime minister has resigned and is leaving office within days. Support for the two historic political parties, Labour and Conservative, is at an all-time low. In hastily planned European Parliament elections last week, the brand new Brexit Party came in first, while two anti-Brexit parties, the tiny Liberal Democrats and the even tinier Greens, came in second and fourth. The ruling Tory party finished a distant fifth.

In total, votes for anti-Brexit parties outstripped votes for the Brexit Party, though the country remains committed to withdrawal from the European Union. Some polls show that if parliamentary elections were held tomorrow, the Liberal Democrats would be the overall winners. More than a dozen people are running open campaigns for the Conservative Party leadership, members of the Labour Party are openly fighting with one another, and the government has ceased to make decisions of any kind.

And, next week, President Trump is arriving. Why?

Clearly, he's not coming to town to conduct any important business, to do any deals or negotiate any treaties: There isn't anybody to negotiate with. He might issue some threats — he reportedly plans to say he will cut off intelligence cooperation with Britain if it continues to do business with the Chinese company Huawei — but the British cabinet isn't in a position to coordinate a response, so it hardly matters. Nor will his presence enhance the fabled, albeit somewhat shop-worn, Anglo-American relationship. His last visit to Britain was a PR catastrophe. He insulted the prime minister, he embarrassed Queen Elizabeth II, and he even managed to annoy The Sun newspaper, a Rupert Murdoch-owned tabloid that attacked him as “Fake Schmooze”. At the time of his last visit, 77 percent of Britons disapproved of the U.S. president, and there is no reason to think those numbers have improved.

From London's point of view, the visit makes no sense, either. British attempts to humor Trump, to engage him, have all failed. The soon-to-be-ex-prime minister Theresa May's efforts to forge a relationship with Trump backfired, adding to her widespread unpopularity. Aware of his toxicity, the leaders of the Labour and Liberal Democrat parties have said they will not attend a state banquet in his honor. The duchess of Sussex — the British royal family member formerly known as the American actress Meghan Markle — has also indicated that she will not meet the president of the United States.

But other members of the royal family have, it seems, no choice. A state visit, as opposed to a working visit, implies extensive time spent with the Queen, who is head of state, up to and including that Buckingham Palace banquet. And this, it seems, is the point.

Trump will not accomplish anything, either for the United States or for Britain. But he will achieve something that is, for him, actually more important. He will be photographed with some uniquely recognizable, world-class celebrities: the Queen, Prince Charles, Prince William, Prince Harry. They will all be there, doing their duty, because they have to. And Trump's compulsive, narcissistic need to be the center of attention will be serviced.

Of course, this is not the first time that American diplomacy and foreign policy have been bent and twisted to serve the obsessions of Trump. Remember: The bank of television cameras and the flash of lightbulbs were what most impressed him about his Singapore summit with Kim Jong Un. “Are you getting a nice photo…,” he said to the cameramen at the summit. “So we look nice and handsome and beautiful and perfect?” Just recently, he used an equally pointless trip to Japan for the same purpose: He got to be the first foreign leader photographed standing next to Japan's recently crowned emperor and empress. Other than that, he spent the entire trip tweeting about his political enemies back home.

Everywhere he goes, Trump is bored by working meetings and rude to those who attend them. He can't make deals or negotiate because he doesn't know enough about the issues. But where there is empty pomp and circumstance — a French Bastille Day parade, or the Queens' Guard standing at attention outside Windsor Castle — he is impressed and pleased. The logistics of this visit, like any presidential visit, are immense. The British state will spend 18 million pounds (about $22 million) on his security; the U.S. taxpayer will spend many multiples of that sum; hundreds of hours will have been wasted on planning. And all so that one man's fragile ego can be boosted for another day.


__________________________________________________________________________

• Anne Applebaum is a columnist for The Washington Post and a prize-winning historian with a particular expertise in the history of communist and post-communist Europe. She is also a professor of practice at the London School of Economics, where she runs ARENA, a research project on disinformation and 21st-century propaganda. She is the author of several books, including “Red Famine: Stalin’s War on Ukraine”, “Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe” and “Gulag: A History”, which won the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction. Both “Gulag” and “Iron Curtain” were nominated for the National Book Award. Applebaum is a former member of The Washington Post's editorial board, a former deputy editor of The Spectator magazine, and a former Warsaw correspondent of The Economist. She has lectured at many universities, including Yale, Harvard, Columbia, Oxford, Cambridge, Zurich and Humboldt. She writes regularly for The New York Review of Books, Foreign Affairs and many other publications.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Paul Waldman: How Trump will ruin the 75th anniversary of D-Day

 • Helaine Olen: What the attempt to hide the USS John S. McCain shows about Trump — and his staff

 • Dana Milbank: Donald Trump knows the true meaning of sacrifice

 • Max Boot: Trump shows his contempt for the men and women in uniform

 • Brian Klaas: Trump has forgotten what D-Day was all about


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/global-opinions/britain-is-in-crisis-so-why-is-president-trump-coming-to-visit/2019/05/31/e4eab7da-83ca-11e9-933d-7501070ee669_story.html
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 

Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30332


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2019, 08:39:30 pm »


from The Washington Post…

Britain is at its most delicate political moment in years.
Now here comes Trump.


On the eve of his state visit, he praised Boris Johnson and Nigel Farage.

By ANNE GEARAN and GRIFF WITTE | 6:37PM EDT — Friday, May 31, 2019

British flags fly on Friday in London in preparation for the state visit by President Donald J. Trump that begins on Monday. — Photograph: Frank Augstein/Associated Press.
British flags fly on Friday in London in preparation for the state visit by President Donald J. Trump that begins on Monday.
 — Photograph: Frank Augstein/Associated Press.


IF BREXIT — the most agonizing, paralyzing political crisis suffered by America's closest ally in decades — is a gas can, President Trump may be a match.

Trump's long-delayed state visit to Britain collides with the nadir, at least so far, of Britain's long and tortuous withdrawal from the European Union. That Trump is an eager cheer-leader for Britain's exit — with his own theories about how it should be done — could complicate matters during the visit that begins on Monday with lots of royal pomp and circumstance.

Add that Trump is a past critic of Brexit casualty Prime Minister Theresa May, scalped by her ruling Conservatives but still on the job for the duration of this trip. And he is chummy with Brexit frontmen Nigel Farage and Boris Johnson, the front-runner to be the next prime minister. Neither is on public schedule, but they may turn up somewhere.

The expectation in Britain is that Trump won't be able to help himself from lobbing a grenade or two into the country's delicate political moment.

“He'll say dreadful things about Brexit that will upset at least half the British population,” said Adam Thomson, a former British ambassador to NATO.

But Thomson said Trump may find any intervention has the opposite impact of what he hopes, because he is so deeply unpopular in Britain.

“An endorsement of Boris Johnson will hurt, not help, Boris,” said Thomson, who is now director of the London-based European Leadership Network. “Praise for a no-deal Brexit will hurt, not help, no-deal Brexiteers.”

Trump embarrassed May during a less showy working visit in July by criticizing her approach to Brexit in a tabloid interview, saying she had failed to take his advice about how to execute the divorce and praising her rival Johnson.

“This comes at such a difficult moment,” said Heather Conley, director of the Europe program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. “We don't know if there were lessons learned from their approach last year.”

Maybe, or maybe not.

Even before lifting off, Trump lauded Johnson and Farage.

“Nigel Farage is a friend of mine; Boris is a friend of mine,” Trump said on Thursday, noting the strong performance of Farage's Brexit Party in European Parliament elections. “Maybe it's not my business to support people, but I have a lot of respect for both of those men.”

He followed that with an interview with The Sun tabloid, in which he did not offer a full endorsement but was quoted as saying: “I think Boris would do a very good job. I think he would be excellent…. I don't know that he is going to be chosen, but I think he is a very good guy, a very talented person. He has been very positive about me and our country.”


President Donald J. Trump slammed British Prime Minister Theresa May, left, in an interview published during his trip to Britain in July. — Photograph: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg News.
President Donald J. Trump slammed British Prime Minister Theresa May, left, in an interview published during his trip to Britain in July.
 — Photograph: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg News.


Anti-Trump protesters are planning to fly a giant balloon depicting the U.S. president as a baby during the president's state visit. — Photograph: Tolga Akmen/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Anti-Trump protesters are planning to fly a giant balloon depicting the U.S. president as a baby during the president's state visit.
 — Photograph: Tolga Akmen/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


Trump said that “other people have asked me for an endorsement,” while declining to specify who. A dozen Tories have announced bids for the top job.

Trump was also critical in the interview of May's handling of the Brexit negotiations, saying that “the U.K. allowed the European Union to have all the cards. And it is very hard to play well when one side has all the advantage.”

Smart money is betting Farage and Johnson turn up at a Tuesday night dinner hosted by Trump pal Woody Johnson, the U.S. ambassador to Britain, at Winfield House, the stately park-like U.S. residence in central London.

Also on the trip agenda: Trump will spend time with Queen Elizabeth II and the royal family, observe commemorations of the 75th anniversary of D-Day in Portsmouth, England, and Normandy, France, and stay overnight at his golf course in Ireland.

May passed along the Queen's invitation for a state visit following Trump's first week on the job, back in January 2017. But the threat of mass protests and the topsy-turvy nature of politics in Britain ever since have made it awkward to consummate. Repeated delays followed.

Now that it's happening, it will lack many of the typical trappings.

Trump, for instance, will not stay at Buckingham Palace, which is under construction. He and first lady Melania Trump are not slated for a ceremonial carriage ride afforded other state guests — security concerns have been cited. And their formal welcome will not be at Horse Guards Parade, the usual venue, but in the palace's private grounds.

Trump also won't address Parliament. The U.S. side does not appear to have formally requested the privilege. Had it done so, House of Commons Speaker John Bercow indicated the answer would have been ‘no’.

Londoners opposed to Trump's views on Europe, NATO, trade, human rights, climate change and other matters plan mass street demonstrations during the visit. The 20-foot Trump Baby balloon that miffed the president in July may fly again. Activists hoisted the diaper-clad (“nappy-clad” to Londoners) blimp for a test run but are awaiting a permit to fly it above crowds that organizers said could reach 250,000 in London.

A senior U.S. official who briefed reporters about the trip downplayed any concern over protests or Trump's unpopularity in Britain.

Meanwhile, some British political figures have declined invitations to a Buckingham Palace banquet, citing differences with Trump. And American-born royal and former actress Meghan Markle, who called Trump “misogynistic” ahead of the 2016 election, is not expected to attend events with other members of the royal family.

A British official would say only that Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, is on maternity leave and is not making public appearances. The official cited diplomatic custom in requesting anonymity to discuss plans for the visit.

In The Sun interview, Trump called Meghan “nasty”.


Ahead of Donald Trump's visit, workers construct fences around the U.S. ambassador's residence in Regent's Park. — Photograph: Hannah McKay/Reuters.
Ahead of Donald Trump's visit, workers construct fences around the U.S. ambassador's residence in Regent's Park.
 — Photograph: Hannah McKay/Reuters.


President Donald J. Trump was impressed with the Bastille Day parade in Paris on July 14, 2017, seen above. — Photograph: Saul Loeb/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
President Donald J. Trump was impressed with the Bastille Day parade in Paris on July 14, 2017, seen above.
 — Photograph: Saul Loeb/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


The Trumps will visit Westminster Abbey on Monday, and will lay a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior ahead of the ruffles-and-flourishes banquet.

Trump sees May on Tuesday; by Friday, she'll be out as Conservative Party leader, though she'll stay on as prime minister until a successor is chosen this summer. With her tenure ticking down, it is unlikely the talks will accomplish much. But she will be hoping for a clear endorsement from Trump of a future U.S.-Britain trade deal, which she could cite as an achievement amid the overall gloom of Brexit purgatory.

National security adviser John Bolton, who arrived in London days ahead of Trump, told Sky News on Thursday that the president “looks forward to a day the U.S. and the U.K. can negotiate a bilateral agreement that will be beneficial to both countries.” But Bolton signaled that even symbolic commitments may have to wait until there's a new prime minister: “It's going to be up to the Conservative Party … to pick a new leader and then to see what happens in the negotiation process with the European Union.”

Trump is expected to press May on at least a couple of fronts that the prime minister would prefer to avoid. He is likely to renew his push for Britain to keep Chinese telecommunications firm Huawei out of its 5G networks, something May's government has resisted. And he has indicated he'll raise his allegation that Britain worked with the Obama administration to “spy” on his 2016 campaign. British officials have dismissed the claim as baseless.

“It is hard to imagine anything, including a Trump visit, making British politics worse than they are now,” said Amanda Sloat, a former State Department official who specializes in Europe at the Brookings Institution. “He sees the European Union as an economic foe, welcomes Britain's decision to leave the E.U. and has taken a predatory approach to bilateral trade talks.”

On Wednesday, Trump is scheduled to visit Portsmouth, the British port city where thousands of Allied troops embarked for the D-Day invasion in June 1944.

From there he'll fly to Ireland — his first visit to the country since becoming president. A planned visit there in the fall was canceled amid protests. He'll be staying clear of the crowds this trip, as he plans to stay at his private golf club. He'll meet briefly with Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar at Shannon Airport — a compromise location, after the Irish reportedly balked at being Trump's guests at his club.

On Thursday — the official anniversary of D-Day — Trump will take part in another commemoration, this one at the Normandy American Cemetery in France, where 9,380 U.S. military personnel are buried. He'll meet with French President Emmanuel Macron and then return to his golf course.

The relationship between the two leaders has cooled, though Trump still talks admiringly of a Bastille Day parade he attended with Macron and has sought to bring something similar to Washington D.C.

Trump received heavy criticism during his last trip to France, for a commemoration of the 100th anniversary of World War I, when he canceled a visit to an American cemetery due to rain.

A senior U.S. official who briefed reporters on Thursday brushed off questions about whether it might be better to postpone Trump's British visit until after British politics settles down a bit.

“There is no better time to have a visit to the United Kingdom than the 75th anniversary of D-Day,” the official said, adding later that “you can't very well postpone D-Day” for the sake of political convenience.


__________________________________________________________________________

Griff Witte reported from London. Karla Adam in London contributed to this report.

Anne Gearan is a White House correspondent for The Washington Post, with a focus on foreign policy and national security. She covered the Hillary Clinton campaign and the State Department for The Post before joining the White House beat. She joined the paper in 2012 from the Associated Press, where she served as chief diplomatic correspondent, Pentagon correspondent, White House reporter and national security editor. She has also covered the Supreme Court.

Griff Witte is The Washington Post's Berlin bureau chief. He has previously served as the paper's deputy foreign editor, and as bureau chief in London, Kabul, Islamabad and Jerusalem. His award-winning reporting for The Post has taken him to more than two dozen countries, where he has covered wars, elections, uprisings, revolutions, disasters both natural and man-made, and everyday life. Before joining The Washington Post, Witte was a reporter for the Miami Herald. He also served as the researcher for Steve Coll's Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001. He has taught classes on foreign correspondence at Georgetown and Princeton.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Want to inherit Britain's Brexit mess? A lot of candidates do, with fractures over how to fix it.

 • House Speaker John Bercow on Theresa May, Brexit and why he won't leave — yet

 • Prime minister hopeful Boris Johnson to appear in court over allegations he lied in the Brexit campaign


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/britain-is-at-its-most-delicate-political-moment-in-years-now-here-comes-trump/2019/05/31/edc3083c-8233-11e9-b585-e36b16a531aa_story.html
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7978



WWW
« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2019, 09:36:47 pm »

Briton is a shithole prison a great place to be stabbed to death
Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30332


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2019, 12:36:32 am »


Excellent. A great place for somebody to stab Trump to death.

It would be no great loss.
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7978



WWW
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2019, 06:26:11 am »

and the best part is it's against the law to defend yourself 
Grin hahaha welcome to libtard mother England
Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30332


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2019, 02:52:16 pm »


from the New Zealand Listener…

Theresa May is gone, but boogieman Boris looms

Relief at Theresa May's Brexit exit has been replaced
by fear at who might replace her: Boris Johnson.


By ANDREW ANTHONY | Sunday, June 02, 2019

Boris Johnson. — Photograph: Getty Images.
Boris Johnson. — Photograph: Getty Images.

LIKE ALL THE BEST HORROR FILMS, contemporary British politics moves with a slow but inexorable logic. When you see a strange-looking buffoon in the first scene, it's a safe bet that he'll turn out to be the psycho in the gruesome finale.

So it is that a large part of the nation has long dreaded the idea of Boris Johnson becoming prime minister, at the same time knowing in their souls that it was bound to happen. When Theresa May finally announced her resignation last month, after enduring the worst premiership in modern history, there was a collective sigh of relief, swiftly followed by a sharp intake of breath.

Now all that stands between Johnson and his tirelessly nurtured ambition is the Conservative party's baroque voting procedure. Let me try to explain. Johnson is the overwhelming favourite among the Tory party membership, who ultimately decide who will become leader, and therefore prime minister. He's so far ahead of any other candidate that if it were a sporting event, it would be cancelled due to lack of competition.

But although the membership, which is made up mostly of the over-sixties, is ga-ga for the floppy haired, Latin-quoting maverick, they only have the deciding vote when the leadership race is whittled down to two contestants. Before that, there are various rounds of voting, depending on the number of candidates — at time of writing, nine have declared. As with musical chairs, whoever finishes last drops out.

Now, the complicating factor is that, although Johnson is a hero to the pensioners who fill the membership ranks, he is widely disliked by his fellow Tory MPs. And that's a problem for him, because they are the people who vote in the initial rounds before the two finalists go before the membership.

Those who have worked alongside Johnson don't trust him. In the 2016 leadership contest, Michael Gove, a Brains from Thunderbirds lookalike, entered the race at the last minute because, he said, Johnson was “unfit” to be prime minister. Gove was one of Johnson's closest allies and a good friend. You can imagine what his enemies — and there is no shortage of them in Westminster — think of him.


__________________________________________________________________________

There was a big boor named Boris…
__________________________________________________________________________

At this stage, I should make a full personal disclosure. I know Johnson a bit. Or rather, I'm friends with his sister. Back in 2016, I went on a skiing trip with him. It was a few months before the fateful European Union referendum, and each evening our après-ski involved heated discussions on whether to leave or remain.

There were three remainers, including Johnson's sister and me. We tried everything to dissuade him of his intention to back Brexit, but he batted away all our arguments with the firm confidence that leaving the EU would be a breeze. “They need our market more than we need theirs,” he kept saying.

Well, he was wrong about that. But although often accused of changing his opinion to whichever position benefits him most, Johnson has become an ever-more-determined Brexiteer. This is partly why the membership are so keen that he become prime minister, even though he was rather hopeless as foreign minister.

Shortly before landing that job, he won a magazine competition for writing a rude limerick about the Turkish president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan:

There was a young fellow from Ankara
who was a terrific wankerer
'till he sowed his wild oats
with the help of a goat
but he didn't even stop to thankera.


One of his first official visits as foreign secretary was to Turkey. That's the kind of comic situation that endears Johnson to his fans and exasperates those who hanker for a grown-up politician to take the UK out of this waking nightmare. So, what now? I don't know, but I doubt we'll be going skiing again any time soon.


__________________________________________________________________________

Andrew Anthony is a feature writer for the Observer and is married to a New Zealand. He regularly writes for the Bulletin From Abroad column, published in the weekly New Zealand Listener magazine.

• This article was first published in the June 8, 2019 issue of the New Zealand Listener.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related articles from the New Zealand Listener:

 • Theresa May resigns: How the UK leadership race could play out from here by Tom Quinn

 • Why George Soros is a target of the far right by Stuart McMillan


https://www.noted.co.nz/currently/world/theresa-may-gone-boogieman-boris-johnson-looms
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30332


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2019, 02:55:10 pm »


Imagine having stupid fuckwits in charge on opposite sides of the Atlantic Ocean…

Donald J. Trump in America and Boris Johnson in Britain.

Instead of merely having a comedy show at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington D.C., we'd also have a comedy show at 10 Downing Street in London.

Wouldn't that be a hoot as the world pissed themselves laughing at both STUPID America and STUPID Pommyland, eh?





Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30332


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2019, 11:51:20 am »


I hope the Queen had the good sense to have Buckingham Palace thoroughly disinfected after it was contaminated by America's stupid wannabe emperor…



Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7978



WWW
« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2019, 08:07:07 pm »

fiddling with your widdle again like a stupid cunt
Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30332


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #9 on: June 07, 2019, 12:06:32 am »


Those soldiers fucked up: they should have stuck one of those bayonets right through Trump's neck while they had the chance



Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 30332


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #10 on: June 07, 2019, 12:07:06 am »


Britain is the club that Trump resents but desperately wants to join



Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7978



WWW
« Reply #11 on: June 07, 2019, 10:54:55 am »

you are dreaming again wake up you stupid sick dog
Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Open XNC2 Smileys
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum


Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy
Page created in 0.094 seconds with 16 queries.