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Jumpin' Jack not so flash…


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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« on: April 05, 2019, 06:15:09 pm »


from The Telegraph…

Why doesn't Mick Jagger slow down? Because he can't.

It's too soon to write off ‘rock's sexiest frontman’.

By NEIL McCORMICK | 8:07PM GMT — Tuesday, 02 April 2019

Sir Mick Jagger performing in Berlin last summer. — Photograph: Agence France-Presse.
Sir Mick Jagger performing in Berlin last summer. — Photograph: Agence France-Presse.

IS IT TIME for Jumping Jack Flash to sit down and put his feet up? News that Sir Mick Jagger is to undergo surgery to replace a heart valve will have come as a surprise to anyone who has seen the Rolling Stones on stage in recent years, where their hyperactive frontman still  incessantly jiggles and jerks about as if his bandmates filled his underpants with itching powder for a joke.

Jagger may be 75 and sporting a face the texture of a leather suitcase rescued from a skip but he cavorts with more energy than most performers half his age. Keith Richards, Charlie Watts and Ronnie Wood fire up the riffs but it is Jagger who personifies the physical vitality of the greatest rock and roll band in the world, still moving with the limber grace of a dancer and the energy of an athlete. He still wiggles his hips, for God's sake, when most of his generation have had theirs replaced.

It is a little discussed aspect of the Jagger-Richards axis how they embody contrary aspects of rock's eternal spirit. Richards stands at a perilous angle and plays as if he is about to keel over, his disregard for his physical appearance reflecting rock's devil-may-care cool. He looks like he's ready to blow cigarette smoke in the face of the Grim Reaper. However, the electrifying energy of Jagger's performances are a living testament to the immortal spirit that first fired up the Sixties rock revolution. When the septuagenarian Jagger hollers “I can't get no satisfaction, no, no, no” you know he's not just complaining that his local chemist ran out of Viagra.

But it turns out a Rolling Stone can gather moss, or at least furred arteries. The Stones have had to postpone the North American leg of their No Filter tour, which would have seen them play to a million fans over six weeks. Note that the operative word there is postpone, not cancel.


Sir Mick Jagger will reportedly undergo heart valve replacement surgery. — Photograph: Matt Cardy.
Sir Mick Jagger will reportedly undergo heart valve replacement surgery. — Photograph: Matt Cardy.

Jagger's statement said “I will be working very hard to get back onstage as soon as I can.” Reports from Miami, where the band had gathered to rehearse, suggest that Jagger has told friends he feels great and is already bored of taking it easy. He has been photographed on the beach with his ballerina girlfriend, Melanie Hamrick (31) and their two-year-old son Deveraux, Jagger's eighth child. Somehow, I really don't think he is ready to slow down.

Plenty of Jagger's contemporaries have announced retirements over the past year, including Neil Diamond (through ill health), Paul Simon and Elton John, although he's dragging it out for at least three years with a very long goodbye, yellow brick road. Ozzy Osbourne had to postpone his own farewell tour due to ill health. Black Sabbath have already packed it in, and Rush, Kiss, Lynyrd Skynyrd and Blue Oyster Cult have all been taking final, extended bows.

But there is another option, for the star who still wants to perform but finds the rigours of the road increasingly testing on their stamina and tinnitus: the unplugged show. Bruce Springsteen performed a solo acoustic residency in a Broadway Theatre for over a year, grossing over $113 million from 236 shows and still making it home to spend every night in his own bed.

Those kind of numbers might appeal to Jagger, who is notoriously focussed on the bottom line. But can you really see him sitting on a stool while Keith strums his way through Tumbling Dice, Brown Sugar or Honky Tonk Women? I have watched Jagger sing emotive ballads like Wild Horses without being able to stay still.

In the explosive early years of the Stones, Jagger was the sexiest frontman in rock and roll, at once camp and athletic, with an act pitched somewhere between the swagger of James Brown and affected mincing of a drag act, exuding a femininity that made his masculinity more assured.


With fellow stones Ronnie Wood, Keith Richards and Charlie Watts in 2016. — Photograph: Reuters.
With fellow stones Ronnie Wood, Keith Richards and Charlie Watts in 2016. — Photograph: Reuters.

Sir Mick Jagger in Dublin last May. — Photograph: Redferns.
Sir Mick Jagger in Dublin last May. — Photograph: Redferns.

Almost every front man ever since has been influenced by Jagger, either pushing his flamboyance further in the style of Jim Morrison, David Bowie, Freddie Mercury and Steven Tyler or finding tough masculine alternatives, from the physical exuberance of Bruce Springsteen and Bono to the threatening stillness of Liam Gallagher.

As Jagger's youthful beauty waned, he compensated with even more physically energetic movement. The first time time I saw the Rolling Stones, at an open air show in 1982, he was wearing bicycle shorts and racing from one end of the vast stage to the other. I didn't know if I was at a rock gig or a marathon. It has been estimated that he was covering up to 10 miles a show during that tour. When I asked Keith Richards about his songwriting partner's health last year, he didn't mention his heart but did say he worried “about his joints from all that jogging”.

Jagger's father was a Physical Education teacher, and it has been reported that even in his seventies Jagger's physical regime involves running eight miles a day, cycling, yoga, kickboxing, meditation and, er, ballet (the latter, presumably, under the influence of his latest flame).

Jagger was made to move. As Richards has repeatedly said, the Rolling Stones will go on until one of them keels over. Jagger will return, and when he does, don't expect him to slow down. You can't sing Start Me Up from an easy chair.


__________________________________________________________________________

Neil McCormick is a music critic for The Telegraph.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Rolling Stones tour ‘postponed’ after doctors say Mick Jagger needs medical treatment

 • Mick Jagger ‘to undergo heart surgery’ after cancelling Rolling Stones' tour

 • How long does it take to recover from Mick Jagger's heart valve replacement surgery?


https://www.telegraph.co.uk/music/artists/doesnt-mick-jagger-slow-cant
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2019, 06:15:29 pm »


from The Dominion Post…

Unlike royal royalty, rock royalty is untouchable

By ROSEMARY McLEOD | 5:00AM — Friday, 05 April 2019

Mick Jagger — the king of attitude. — Photograph: Associated Press.
Mick Jagger — the king of attitude. — Photograph: Associated Press.

IT'LL BE A SAD DAY when Mick Jagger pops his sneakers. Some people are supposed to be immortal, way up perching on clouds with the gods, and only coming down to go on tour. Which he's just had to cancel.

Knowing he's on his way to a heart valve replacement, which sounds weirdly like something done to a car, for the first time in Mick's impeccable act he seems vulnerable, even human. Which he's not really. He's a kind of kinetic clockwork animal, all sinew and sneer, the king of attitude.

Hospital is no fun. Strangers, snorers, invasive things happening, pain. But for Mick, it will be a luxury experience in a flash medical hotel. He'll have the prettiest nurses and the best surgeons the rock aristocracy can buy.

I suspect he's tiny in real life, a pocket god. His body is a marvel of skin, bone and muscle with the odd entrail tucked in somewhere, and, according to everything we're told by the health gurus, that should qualify him to live for ever. Which we hope he will, otherwise he'd be mortal like us, and we're not getting any younger.

He'll be fanned gently with feathers, eating wispy things with no calories in them. Gods don't eat as such, but we do. My most memorable hospital food offerings were grated carrot sandwiches for lunch, and a plate of boiled, peeled potato with boiled fish and boiled cauliflower for dinner. I'd have laughed if it didn't hurt.

Nothing that awful has passed through Mick's iconic lips, and never will. Rock royalty deserves the best. We mortals get the rest.

Then there's royal royalty, like the Californian duchess, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, who formerly had a real surname. She's been on the receiving end of sheer nastiness, manufactured by the English media, which is known for its cruelty and prides itself on its reputation.

It has decreed a feud between Meghan and Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, who was also once an ordinary human being with a real name. That means the media can doctor images of them to look mean, nasty and miserable for magazine covers, and they can pick on Meghan even in the last days and hours of her pregnancy, which is cruel.


Meghan, Duchess of Sussex was once an ordinary human being with a real name. — Photograph: Associated Press.
Meghan, Duchess of Sussex was once an ordinary human being with a real name. — Photograph: Associated Press.

Mick is impregnable, which makes him lucky. But being pregnant is no joke, especially in the final days and hours, during which real human women, if women I know are any guide, are given to weeping over nothing. There are people who get photographed with the huge bump beforehand, but they don't return to be photographed afterwards.

In the usual course of events, the woman who had the delightful bump now has a set of pleated theatre curtains where the bump was. We call them stretch marks. After them come varicose veins and pleated breasts if you're really in luck. These are things we don't tell young mothers-to-be. It's bad enough being pregnant without being told Grimm fairy tales.

Kate had to have her babies at the hospital where future kings are born. Meghan has opted out, to a more cottage-style hospital where she won't have to be photographed leaving with a perfect figure, professional makeup, and hair styling.

She wishes. The paparazzi will be recording each contraction, and bribing nurses to photograph the baby the instant it emerges. Security will be a nightmare.

The baby won't be king, like Kate's, but it's bound to be brown-skinned like its mother. I can't help thinking nasty British racism is at the bottom of the so-called feud, amplified by poisonous Facebook users, and the baby will be its next unfortunate target.


__________________________________________________________________________

• Rosemary Margaret McLeod is a New Zealand writer, journalist, cartoonist and columnist for The Dominion Post. McLeod has written for many of New Zealand's major publications, including North & South, the New Zealand Listener and The Sunday Star-Times.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainment/111781401/unlike-royal-royalty-rock-royalty-is-untouchable
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