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America's straight-as-a-die G-man: Robert S. Mueller III


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Author Topic: America's straight-as-a-die G-man: Robert S. Mueller III  (Read 87 times)
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« on: March 25, 2019, 07:38:48 pm »


from the print edition of the Los Angeles Times…

Mueller remains silent to the end

After submitting his report, tight-lipped special counsel stays true to form.

By CHRIS MEGERIAN and DAVID LAUTER | Sunday, March 24, 2019

Robert Mueller's style is unlike that of past special prosecutors. — Photograph: J. Scott Applewhite Associated Press.
Robert Mueller's style is unlike that of past special prosecutors. — Photograph: J. Scott Applewhite Associated Press.

WASHINGTON D.C. — The end of a sprawling investigation that has riveted the nation usually calls for a news conference from the person in charge, but Robert S. Mueller III chose a different approach on Friday.

The special counsel sent a security officer to the Justice Department to deliver his long-awaited final report on the Russia case, then joined his wife and another couple for a quiet dinner in a favorite neighborhood restaurant.

With no photographers or TV cameras in sight, they sat in a secluded booth as cable news and social media exploded with speculation and accusations.

It was a fitting conclusion for the man whose tenure as the least talkative — yet most talked-about — public figure in Washington is drawing to a close.

Mueller, 74, is expected to step down as special counsel in the coming days, and only a skeleton crew is left in the office at this point. His report, which remains confidential for now, caps nearly two years of investigating Russian political interference, any potential conspiracy with Donald Trump's campaign and whether the president obstructed justice.

During that time, Mueller was practically a ghost. Sometimes a snapshot would emerge of him — sitting down at an Apple store, or coincidentally waiting for a flight at the same airport gate as Donald Trump Jr.

Otherwise he was at most a blurry figure, captured behind his car window as he pulled up to the special counsel's office in the early mornings. His name often appeared at the bottom of indictments and court filings — all told, 34 people were charged — but his subordinates did the talking during court proceedings.

Mueller's only public comment has been a single sentence, when he was appointed as special counsel nearly two years ago in May 2017, and the statement was as plain as the white shirts that he's made his official uniform.

“I accept this responsibility and will discharge it to the best of my ability,” Mueller said.

He issued no statement on Friday when he submitted his report.

Trump often raged at Mueller's work, repeatedly calling the Russia investigation a “witch hunt” and describing him as “a conflicted prosecutor gone rogue.” But even the president, a former reality television star, would probably give his chief antagonist one of his favorite compliments — that Mueller was from “central casting.”

Mueller's history of public service, reticence and rectitude provided a sharp contrast to Trump's life of tabloid shenanigans, bombast and garish wealth.

A Princeton University graduate, Mueller volunteered for the Marines and served as an infantry officer in the Vietnam War, receiving a Bronze Star for valor and a Purple Heart after being shot in the leg.

He became a federal prosecutor after the war and rose through the ranks at the Justice Department. Eventually he served for a dozen years as FBI director under presidents of both parties, George W. Bush and Barack Obama, after Obama and Congress agreed to a special law to extend Mueller's term beyond the 10-year limit.

Mueller was working in private practice when Trump fired his successor as FBI director, James B. Comey, on May 9, 2017. In a move to preserve the independence of the Russia investigation, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein appointed Mueller to serve as special counsel.

Since then, Mueller's silence has been the counterweight to Trump's blizzard of Twitter screeds, and the special counsel's office earned a reputation as the rare leak-proof operation in Washington.

Mueller's reserve was also a marked shift from two of the highest-profile special prosecutors of the past generation — Lawrence E. Walsh, who spent seven years examining the Iran-Contra scandal of the Reagan administration, and Kenneth W. Starr, whose investigation of Bill Clinton and his White House lasted four years.


Kenneth Starr, the special prosecutor who investigated Bill Clinton and his White House, spoke publicly about his work during the four-year examination. — Photograph: Ken Cedeno Knight-Ridder Tribune.
Kenneth Starr, the special prosecutor who investigated Bill Clinton and his White House, spoke publicly about his work
during the four-year examination. — Photograph: Ken Cedeno Knight-Ridder Tribune.


Starr talked publicly about his work, at one point holding a widely televised, impromptu news conference at the end of his suburban Washington driveway.

Clinton allies accused Starr's prosecutors, who included Brett M. Kavanaugh, now a Supreme Court justice, of routinely leaking secret grand jury testimony in an effort to force the president to resign. The investigation ultimately led the House to impeach Clinton, who was then acquitted by the Senate.

Starr consistently denied any improper actions. But in 1998, as the Clinton impeachment proceedings were taking place, U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson ruled that members of his staff had engaged in “serious and repetitive” violations of grand jury secrecy rules. Johnson threatened contempt proceedings against Starr staffers in one case, but an appeals court overturned that portion of her order, ruling that she had applied too strict a standard and that the way Starr's staff dealt with the press was “troubling” but not illegal.

A special master who investigated the leak allegations wrote a report of his findings that was never released and remains under seal.

Walsh investigated the Iran-Contra scandal, in which Reagan administration officials facilitated the sale of arms to Iran to fund the right-wing Nicaraguan rebel group known as Contras at a time when U.S support for the rebels was forbidden by law.

Walsh ultimately indicted 14 people, winning 11 convictions.

Several of the convictions were overturned on appeal. And at the end of his presidency, George H.W. Bush, who was vice president at the time the scandal unfolded, pardoned the rest of those convicted, including the secretary of Defense at the time of the scandal, Caspar Weinberger.

Walsh, whose investigation was ongoing at that point, publicly criticized Bush for his action, holding a news conference in which he said that “the Iran-Contra cover-up, which has continued for more than six years, has now been completed.”

In his final news conference several months later, at which Walsh released a 566-page report and 785 pages of supporting documents, he said Bush and other Reagan administration officials had thwarted his investigation.

Reagan, in a statement at the time, said Walsh had become “vindictive” and had “used his office to harass individuals and otherwise to damage the lives of the persons he was given license to investigate.”

Both Walsh and Starr served under an independent counsel statute that expired in 1999. That statute gave them more freedom than Mueller, who is supervised by the Justice Department, headed by Trump appointees.

But Mueller's tight- lipped approach still stands out in a city packed with people of supersized egos and camera-ready ambitions.

It's unclear whether Mueller will be able to maintain his silence in the coming weeks and months.

Attorney General William Barr is expected to provide Congress with a summary of the special counsel’s conclusions as soon as this weekend, but that's unlikely to satisfy House Democrats eager for a more complete — and public — picture. Some have already talked about bringing Mueller to Capitol Hill to testify.

Mueller's restraint undoubtedly helped inoculate him from some criticism from Trump's allies, who were quick to criticize any whiff of political bias from investigators. They mostly targeted secondary figures instead, perhaps a recognition that they were unlikely to tarnish the special counsel himself.

House Republicans focused their ire on Peter Strzok, a former FBI agent, and Lisa Page, a former FBI lawyer, who exchanged anti-Trump text messages while working at the agency during the 2016 campaign.

Mueller removed Strzok from the special counsel's office when the messages came to light, but critics said Strzok's involvement tainted the probe.

Mueller himself managed to win some unlikely praise from the president's camp, including from Abbe Lowell, a lawyer for Jared Kushner, Trump's son-in-law and White House advisor.

During a recent panel discussion, Lowell said, “I don't know of a special counsel who's done it better.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Los Angeles Times staff writer Noah Bierman contributed to this report.

• Chris Megerian is based in Washington, D.C., where he writes about the special counsel investigation for the Los Angeles Times. He previously covered the 2016 presidential campaign and the 2015 United Nations summit on global warming in Paris. As a reporter in Sacramento, he has also written about Governor Jerry Brown, climate change policies, California politics and state finances. Before joining the L.A. Times in January 2012, he spent three years covering politics and law enforcement at the Star-Ledger in New Jersey. He grew up in Massachusetts and graduated from Emory University in Atlanta.

• David Lauter is the Los Angeles Times' Washington bureau chief. He began writing news in Washington in 1981 and since then has covered Congress, the Supreme Court, the White House under Presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton and four U.S. presidential campaigns. He lived in Los Angeles from 1995 to 2011, where he was the L.A. Times' deputy Foreign editor, deputy Metro editor and then assistant managing editor responsible for California coverage.

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« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2019, 08:20:23 pm »


from The Washington Post…

Trump owes Mueller an apology

Mueller is a real-life Atticus Finch. Trump will never understand that kind of honor.

By DAVID VON DREHLE | 9:02PM EDT — Sunday, March 24, 2019

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III walks past the White House after attending St. John's Episcopal Church on Sunday. — Photograph: Cliff Owen/Associated Press.
Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III walks past the White House after attending St. John's Episcopal Church on Sunday.
 — Photograph: Cliff Owen/Associated Press.


HARPER LEE understood, as she wrote To Kill a Mockingbird that many people would have trouble understanding her hero, Atticus Finch. Others talk; he acts. Others equivocate; he stands firm. Others sell out and call it victory; he suffers defeat without complaint because he would rather lose the world than lose his dignity and integrity.

Though such people are rare indeed, a society cannot manage without them. And so Lee has Miss Maudie Atkinson, the shrewdest of the Maycomb neighbors, explain Atticus to his own offspring. “There are some men in this world who are born to do our unpleasant jobs for us,” she says. “Your father's one of them.”

Robert Swan Mueller III is one, too — and not in the safe pages of fiction but in the hot kitchen of real life. For nearly two years as special counsel investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election, Mueller has endured a nearly constant barrage of insults and character assassination from a Twittering President Trump and his boot-licking propagandists.

There is only one explanation for the president's relentless attacks. He thought that Mueller was likely to throw the book at him. And there are only two explanations for that expectation. Either Trump knew he deserved it, or Trump assumed Mueller would sink to his own level of mendacity and self-serving to pervert justice. The idea that a public servant, indeed, a team of public servants, would quietly discharge a mission with honor was utterly beyond Trump's fathoming.

The country had an unpleasant job that needed doing. The president of United States had surrounded himself with people who lied about their contacts with highly placed Russians. He had fired the director of the FBI, James B. Comey, and within hours he personally assured the Russian ambassador that he did so to shut down an inquiry into these lies. It was possible all this could be explained as the product of incompetence and naivete, because Trump had been utterly unprepared for the presidency and was surrounded by gangsters and clowns. But it was also possible something intentional was going on.

Someone had to sort out the facts. The task would be exhausting, it would be thankless, and it would likely end in some degree of vilification.

Mueller's report has not yet been published, and there will be more to say about it when more of it has been seen. Perhaps parts of it will remain secret for years, if not decades. But we can say that Mueller ran the tightest ship Washington has seen in a very long time, leakproof and diligent. And it appears he was more than fair to the president and the first family. According to Attorney General William P. Barr, Mueller alleged no collusion with the Russians — even though Donald Trump Jr. replied to an overt offer of Russian campaign assistance with a chipper “I love it.”

That seems more than fair. Maybe the president will apologize now for his many months of attacks on the silent Mueller. “I'm sorry,” Trump might say, “I guess you weren't on a witch hunt after all. I guess you didn't hire a bunch of partisan hacks, as I repeatedly charged. Thank you for doing your job with honesty and integrity.

Or maybe not.

From the beginning, Mueller's honor was something the president would never understand, much less appreciate. Though contemporaries, the two men occupy different worlds and always have. As young men, Mueller volunteered for service in Vietnam while Trump conjured a case of “bone spurs.” Mueller compiled a stellar academic record; Trump sent his personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, to threaten any school that might try to make his record public. Mueller devoted his career to his country; Trump was always and only out for himself.

The sad irony is that Trump will now wrap himself in Mueller's credibility to defend against further investigations. And while that might not be legally sufficient, the armor will probably serve well politically. After all, Trump said there was no collusion, period. If Mueller indeed found no collusion, the result will be a credibility infusion for a president who sorely needs one as he heads into his re-election campaign.

An honest person might be troubled by the incongruity, but we're not talking about an honest person. We're talking about President Trump. He appears content to go on disparaging the Mueller investigation, while at the same time claiming “total exoneration” by Mueller's conclusions. Attack Mueller, embrace Mueller — it's all the same to a man whose self-absorption turns everyone into instruments of his own fleeting impulses. Or tries to, anyway.

So be it. What Mueller has done is more important than that.

He was called under difficult circumstances to drill straight down to a bedrock of facts and tell us, without bias, without slant, what he found. This was his job — our job — and it has been unpleasant indeed.


__________________________________________________________________________

• David Von Drehle is a columnist for The Washington Post, where he writes about national affairs and politics from a home base in the Midwest. He joined The Post in 2017 after a decade at TIME magazine, where he wrote more than 60 cover stories as editor-at-large. During a previous stint at The Washington Post, Von Drehle served as a writer and editor on the National staff, in Style, and at the Magazine. He is the author of a number of books, including the award-winning bestseller Triangle: The Fire That Changed America. He lives in Kansas City with his wife, journalist Karen Ball, and their four children.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • The Washington Post's View: Trump did not collude with Russia. But he's wrong to say Mueller exonerated him.

 • Jennifer Rubin: What Barr's letter about the Mueller report says and doesn't say

 • E.J. Dionne Jr.: Six takeaways from Barr's letter about Mueller's probe

 • James Downie: Republicans trapped by transparency

 • The Washington Post's View: Mueller has submitted his report. Now Barr must share it with the rest of us.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/trump-owes-mueller-an-apology/2019/03/24/0c991498-4e97-11e9-a3f7-78b7525a8d5f_story.html
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« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2019, 05:23:22 pm »


Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III closed his long and contentious Russia investigation with no new charges, ending the probe that has cast a shadow over Donald J. Trump's presidency. — Photograph: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images.
Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III closed his long and contentious Russia investigation with no new charges, ending the probe that has cast a shadow
over Donald J. Trump's presidency. — Photograph: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images.


Mueller exits St. John's Episcopal Church, across from the White House, after attending services. — Photograph: Cliff Owen/Associated Press.
Mueller exits St. John's Episcopal Church, across from the White House, after attending services. — Photograph: Cliff Owen/Associated Press.

Mueller exits St. John's Episcopal Church with his wife, Ann Mueller. —  Photograph: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images.
Mueller exits St. John's Episcopal Church with his wife, Ann Mueller. — Photograph: Photograph: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images.

The Muellers walk to their car after attending Sunday church service. — Photograph: Cliff Owen/Associated Press.
The Muellers walk to their car after attending Sunday church service. — Photograph: Cliff Owen/Associated Press.

Robert and Ann Mueller. — Photograph: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images.
Robert and Ann Mueller. — Photograph: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images.

The Muellers walk past Lafayette Square in front of the White House. — Photograph: Cliff Owen/Associated Press.
The Muellers walk past Lafayette Square in front of the White House. — Photograph: Cliff Owen/Associated Press.

Mueller walks past the White House. — Photograph: Cliff Owen/Associated Press.
Mueller walks past the White House. — Photograph: Cliff Owen/Associated Press.

Mueller gets into his car after Sunday church service near the White House. — Photograph: Cliff Owen/Associated Press.
Mueller gets into his car after Sunday church service near the White House. — Photograph: Cliff Owen/Associated Press.

The White House is seen behind security barriers. — Photograph: Cliff Owen/Associated Press.
The White House is seen behind security barriers. — Photograph: Cliff Owen/Associated Press.
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« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2019, 05:48:54 pm »


from The Washington Post…

Pictures of Robert Mueller tell the story of a man who is finally free

Photos captured him after church near the White House on Sunday,
but particularly telling is one from before his report was turned in.


By ROBIN GIVHAN | 4:38PM EDT — Monday, March 25, 2019

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III is looking swell after completing his lengthy report and delivering it to Attorney General William P. Barr at the Justice Department. — Photograph: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images.
Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III is looking swell after completing his lengthy report and delivering it to Attorney General William P. Barr
at the Justice Department. — Photograph: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images.


HE has moved on. Robert S. Mueller III is free. And he looks delighted — or at least at peace.

There he was on Sunday morning strolling out of St. John's Episcopal Church across from Lafayette Square, across from the White House, with his square jaw framing a smile and his salt-and-pepper hair neat but not perfect. He filed out of church with the other congregants, some of them in baseball caps and cowboy hats, sweatshirts and lumberjack plaid. But in his white shirt and dark pinstriped suit with a discreet tie, Mueller looked like himself — or at least the version that we have gotten to know, a man who would not come to work or come to Jesus without a tie.

It was early on Mueller's day of rest, and the attorney general had yet to release the principal conclusions from Mueller's nearly two-year-long Russia investigation. But no matter. The TV pundits and anchors were already on air guessing and prognosticating and vamping until there was actual news to report. Photographers were outside St. John's, and they were doing their best to frame Mueller with the White House in the background — such irresistible symbolism, after all. But Mueller seemed unwilling to cooperate. He was in proximity of the White House but he remained as disconnected as could be. His gaze was cast away from it. He was looking forward, not back. He was a man walking off into a sunny day, a man patiently waiting for tour buses to pass, for traffic to clear, as he made his way to his car alongside his wife, Ann.


Robert Mueller and his wife Ann wait to cross a street after church. — Photograph: Cliff Owen/Associated Press. Robert Mueller is a man who comes to work and to church in a tie. — Photograph: Cliff Owen/Associated Press.
LEFT: Robert Mueller and his wife Ann wait to cross a street after church. | RIGHT: Robert Mueller is a man who comes to work and to church in a tie.
 — Both photographs: Cliff Owen/Associated Press.


Mueller still has not spoken in public. We have only the pictures to tell us the story of his moods. How are you feeling, Mr. Mueller? You look smashing and so surely, you must feel swell.

For so long, the only pictures of Mueller were those of him looking like the consummate professional, the man in the crisp white shirt, the dark suit and tie. His expression was neutral. He was sharp, but he was also a cipher. He was not a man prone to flashes of sartorial exoticisms. There was nothing to parse other than he looked the part of an FBI man — a government man. That was the image ingrained in our fevered brain — a no-nonsense, imperturbable fella.

He was respected and ballyhooed. Derided and dismissed. Mueller's look was reassuring mostly because it accurately reflected his demeanor. His clothes didn't peacock and neither did he. And for this, we were grateful. He was the calm in the storm of leaks and Tweets.

Whether one viewed Mueller as an avenging angel or a relentless witch hunter, his clothes said he was Mueller: righteous seeker of facts.

On Thursday, however, the story took a turn. The public saw a very different Mueller than it had grown accustomed to.

A photographer captured him before sunrise arriving at his office wearing a baseball cap and high-collared, zip-up jacket. A navy tie was barely visible. From the front, Mueller was half hidden by his car's lowered sun visors. Shot through the windows and looking vaguely like surveillance footage, the image made Mueller appear focused and intense. He also looked tired. (That's also, perhaps, a bit of emotional transference. Mueller seemed fatigued because we were exhausted — tired of the speculation. But mostly, tired of the waiting.)


Mueller arrives at his office on Thursday. This was the last glimpse the public had of Mueller before he turned in his Russia report. — Photograph: Mark Wilson/Getty Images.
Mueller arrives at his office on Thursday. This was the last glimpse the public had of Mueller before he turned in his Russia report.
 — Photograph: Mark Wilson/Getty Images.


That picture was the last the public saw of Mueller before he turned in his report. It was the final image of the investigator investigating. And if there was one startling aspect it was that Mueller looked so regular, so relatable. In all those other photographs, the ones that basically all looked the same except for the color of the tie — red or blue — Mueller came across like a spy novel version of super prosecutor — such a perfect specimen of a law man that if he had been crafted by Hollywood, audiences would have rejected him as too pat.

But in his baseball cap, through the tinted windows of his car, which gave his face an almost grayish, greenish cast, he looked like a man who has been laboring — like someone who has dug up the truth as best as it could be ascertained by a mere human.

He didn't look tormented or particularly stressed. The facts are not stressful, it's only the interpretation of them that becomes fraught. He possessed the demeanor of a man whose mind has been taxed, if not his body.

His expression gave no indication of whether Mueller was expecting to be photographed or was surprised by the camera. But by going out in public draped in such informality, he'd made a decision that he was at least accepting of folks possibly getting a peek at the personal weight of the investigation.

The baseball cap picture announced an end — of something. In the cinematic telling of this story, this is the red herring signaling that the case is closed when it's really just the beginning of the more gripping part of the tale.

By Sunday morning, Mueller was back to his usual public self. He seemed rested. Secure in his facts. Now that he'd delivered his report, he was detached from it. It was in other hands, whether God's or flawed humans' hands. He was prepared to merely watch the next part of the story unfold.


__________________________________________________________________________

Robin Givhan is The Washington Post's fashion critic. She writes about fashion as a business, as a cultural institution and as pure pleasure. She is the 2006 Pulitzer Prize winner for criticism and author of The Battle of Versailles: The Night American Fashion Stumbled into the Spotlight and Made History. In addition to The Washington Post, Givhan has worked at Newsweek, Daily Beast, Vogue magazine and the Detroit Free Press. During her most recent tenure at The Washington Post, in addition to fashion, Givhan covered Michelle Obama during the first year of the administration.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY: See photos of Robert Mueller in Washington after delivering his report


https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/pictures-of-robert-mueller-tell-the-story-of-a-man-who-is-finally-free/2019/03/25/6c6d62be-4f0c-11e9-88a1-ed346f0ec94f_story.html
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« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2019, 08:10:59 am »

DEM WITCH HUNT LIES AND ALL THE FAKE NEWS AND CORRUPTION PROVING THE WERE ALL BULLSHIT

trump was right

revenge and hammer time








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« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2019, 05:43:41 pm »


Release the FULL REPORT so we can see that the summary of the more-than-300-pages is a 4-page bullshit-on-behalf-of-Trump wankery.
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« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2019, 03:25:43 am »

yes KTJ you are a flat-earther

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller II and his Democratic team of highly paid lawyers  talked to 500 witnesses spent $25 million, produced 1 million pages of documents
and found trump guilty of nothing, no wrongdoing no Russian collusion zip nada

the left wing corrupt fake news media have been barking like mad dogs about trump colluding with Russia for over 2 years spewing out their deep state hate Trump propaganda and it all came to nothing because it was all lies

yes there is now proof that the deep state swamp needs to be drained, heads need to roll, and the fakers and the leakers all need to face their day of reckoning, some need to face jail time for treason

there is proof that the Hillary Clinton campaign colluded with Russians the FBI, CIA, NSA and other foreign governments using the five-eyes spying system which we are part of to try and get trump overthrown with the mega help of MSN left wing media propaganda.

Yes, the left is self-destructive "The Dems dug a big hole and fell in it themselves".

 All thanks to media brainwashing of the gullible American dumbed down public and the young people brainwashed in the schools by radical communist teachers
its all coming apart at the seams, "It's Clean-up Time"
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« Reply #7 on: March 31, 2019, 07:30:04 pm »


There is a huge coverup under way, facilitated by Trump's arse-licker Attorney-General who is desperately hiding the damaging stuff in Mueller's report.



from The New York Times…

Mueller Report Exceeds 300 Pages, Raising
Questions About Four-Page Summary


The page count suggests the special counsel detailed his conclusions
beyond Justice Department requirements. And it raises questions
about what the attorney general might have left out of his summary.


By NICHOLAS FANDOS, ADAM GOLDMAN and KATIE BENNER | Thursday, March 28, 2019

William P. Barr, the attorney general, delivered his summary of the special counsel investigation to Congress on Sunday. — Photograph: Sarah Silbiger/The New York Times.
William P. Barr, the attorney general, delivered his summary of the special counsel investigation to Congress on Sunday.
 — Photograph: Sarah Silbiger/The New York Times.


WASHINGTON D.C. — The still-secret report on Russian interference in the 2016 election submitted last week by the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, was more than 300 pages long, the Justice Department acknowledged on Thursday.

Mr. Barr wrote to Congress on Sunday offering what he called the “principal conclusions” of the report — including that Mr. Mueller had not found that the Trump campaign had taken part in a conspiracy to undermine the election. But he had notably declined to publicly disclose its length.

The total of 300-plus pages suggests that Mr. Mueller went well beyond the kind of bare-bones summary required by the Justice Department regulation governing his appointment and detailed his conclusions at length. And it raises questions about what Mr. Barr might have left out of the four dense pages he sent to Congress.

Answering those questions is likely to prove difficult for lawmakers and the public. Mr. Barr has indicated to two congressional chairmen that it will most likely take weeks to redact the report for classified and grand jury information the department deems unfit for public consumption.

But Justice Department officials, including some from the attorney general's office, could examine the report before sending any documents to Congress for possible material the president could claim as privileged, according to a department official.

The practice is not unusual, but it would most likely create another tranche of material from Mr. Mueller's investigation to be withheld from Congress and kick off a fight between lawmakers and the administration that would further delay a resolution. No plans have been made for a review, the official said, and it was not clear whether Mr. Barr would be personally involved.

If the Justice Department were to deem certain aspects of Mr. Mueller's report to be subject to executive privilege, Democrats in Congress would almost certainly contest the assertion and force Mr. Trump to actually claim the privilege — and risk a court challenge — or not. Law enforcement officials had no plans to show White House officials the report before it was sent to Congress, the Justice Department official said.

Democrats, who like all other lawmakers have not seen the report, have already all but accused Mr. Barr of covering up damaging information it contains. They have specifically focused on an apparent difference between the views of Mr. Barr and Mr. Mueller on whether Mr. Trump obstructed justice. Democrats have demanded that the attorney general make the full report and evidence public.

“For Mr. Barr to quickly issue a four-page report in his attempt to try to exonerate Mr. Trump, and now to delay the release of an over 300-page report written by Mueller so the American people and we senators and congressmen can see what was written, has too much of the odor of political expediency to help the man who appointed him, President Trump,” Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the Democratic leader, said in a speech on the chamber floor.

Republicans have adopted a more trusting stance of Mr. Barr, indicating that they believe he will make appropriate judgments about what should and should not be shared.

The new ballpark page length came about a week after a senior Justice Department official told reporters that the report was “comprehensive.”

Representative Jerrold Nadler of New York, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, added the description “very substantial” after talking to Mr. Barr on Wednesday, although neither he nor any other member of Congress has seen the report and he declined to give a page count. Andrew Napolitano, a legal analyst for Fox News and a favorite of Mr. Trump, caused a stir on Wednesday when he said multiple times on the air that the report was 700 pages.




Kerri Kupec, a Justice Department spokeswoman, confirmed the length of the document after The New York Times reported it, citing American officials who spoke anonymously because they were not authorized to discuss details of the report.

Mr. Barr had told Mr. Nadler on their Wednesday call that the report was more than 300 pages long, Ms. Kupec said.

Other blockbuster government reports in recent decades have been lengthy. At 445 pages, the independent counsel Ken Starr's report on President Bill Clinton had to be trucked to Capitol Hill in September 1998.

The 9/11 commission report ran 567 pages with notes on the circumstances and fallout of the September 11 attacks.

Even the Justice Department inspector general seems to have outwritten Mr. Mueller of late. Michael E. Horowitz released a scathing report last summer on the F.B.I.'s handling of an investigation into Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server as secretary of state that preoccupied Congress for weeks.

Mr. Horowitz's report was 568 pages.

By contrast, the Watergate “road map” sent to Congress by the grand jury investigating President Richard M. Nixon and his associates was only 62 pages. Sent to lawmakers in 1974, the court report was not unsealed by a federal judge and made public until last year.

Mr. Mueller probably collected and generated hundreds of thousands if not millions of pages of paper during his investigation. Congress has made clear it would eventually like access to all of them, but the Justice Department could have good reason to block the release of some, leaving it once again to the courts to determine who sees what.

Members of Mr. Barr's and Mr. Mueller's teams are currently reviewing the full report to redact information that they do not believe should be made public for intelligence or other reasons. Mr. Barr has told lawmakers in recent days that it will take weeks to make more of Mr. Mueller's findings public.


__________________________________________________________________________

Nicholas Fandos is a reporter at The New York Times' Washington bureau covering Congress.

Adam Goldman reports on the F.B.I. for The New York Times and was part of a team that won a Pulitzer Prize in 2018 for national reporting on Russia's meddling in the presidential election. Previously, he covered national security for The Washington Post and worked on the investigative team at the Associated Press, where he and his colleagues revealed the New York Police Department's Muslim spying programs. Their reporting on the department won the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting. Adam is the co-author of Enemies Within: Inside the NYPD's Secret Spying Unit and bin Laden's Final Plot Against America He lives in Washington D.C.

Katie Benner covers the Justice Department for The New York Times. ​She has worked in The N.Y. Times' San Francisco Bureau covering Apple, venture capital and startups. She helped steer the paper's coverage of the encryption fight between Apple and the FBI and investigated how tech employees chasing the Silicon Valley dream are short-changed by executives and investors. Most recently she's written about sexual harassment in the tech industry and the legal contracts used to keep that behavior a secret​. Before coming to The N.Y. Times, Katie was a tech columnist at Bloomberg. She also spent nearly a decade at Fortune, where she covered financial markets, private equity and hedge funds. Her work includes profiles of Hank Paulson, Robert Schiller and Reid Hoffman as well as features on the 2008 financial crisis and financial fraud investigations.

• A version of this article appears in The New York Times on Friday, March 29, 2019, on Page A15 of the New York print edition with the headline: “Between Four-Page Summary and a 300-Page Report, Tantalizing Questions”.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Read Attorney General William Barr's Summary of the Mueller Report

 • The Many Problems With the Barr Letter

 • Mueller Finds No Trump-Russia Conspiracy, but Stops Short of Exonerating President on Obstruction


https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/28/us/politics/mueller-report-length.html
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« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2019, 10:34:00 pm »

Bad news for the loony left wing tinfoil hat conspiracy theorists 
and now they want to kill the messenger

Mr. Mueller had not found that the Trump campaign had taken part in a conspiracy to undermine the election  Grin

special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III must be a Russian spy for not finding Russian collusion
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« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2019, 10:50:40 pm »


The Attorney General's four-page summary of a four-hundred-page report is merely a delaying tactic while he gets rid of all the incriminating stuff from the full report.

That is how criminal organisations such as Trump's administration work.

Fortunately, the Democrat-controlled Congress has the power under America's constitution to not only use a subpoena to seize that report, but to investigate the criminal Trump organisation to an even deeper degree than Mueller did.

That is why Trump is lashing out ... because he knows it is only a matter of time before everything comes out into the open.
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« Reply #10 on: April 08, 2019, 05:03:40 am »

you're repeating fake news talking points for 2 years Dems and fake news
have been spouting the same old bullshit and your standing in it or should I say drowning in it
you are nuts Grin
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« Reply #11 on: April 08, 2019, 03:52:07 pm »


Robert S. Mueller III = brave, distinguished war hero who took a bullet for his country.

Donald J. Trump = gutless, yellow-bellied, cowardly draft-dodger who is a deluded, Walter Mitty-style military hero-wannabe.

Kinda says it all, really.
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« Reply #12 on: April 08, 2019, 11:46:05 pm »


wish you would take a bullet for our country

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« Reply #13 on: April 09, 2019, 01:10:50 pm »


The FACTS speak for themselves.

Donald J. Trump is a gutless-wonder draft-dodger.
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« Reply #14 on: April 09, 2019, 04:04:19 pm »

 Grin


so your upset with Trump for not killing your comrade the gooks, what a useless commie you turned out to be.
why have you turned against the worker's party?

Witch Hunt Over
or maybe it's time for Trump to do a witch hunt on those pesky Dem witch hunters

Yes, they spent 2 years and $25M to find Trump innocent of all crimes this was all done by
America's straight-as-a-die G-man: Robert S. Mueller III war hero he was also the Dems top witch hunter
I guess he let everyone down or was working carrying water for Putin;D

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« Reply #15 on: April 09, 2019, 06:55:12 pm »



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« Reply #16 on: April 09, 2019, 09:39:01 pm »


Gutless wonder Cadet Bone Spurs otherwise known as Donald J. Trump.






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« Reply #17 on: April 09, 2019, 11:28:13 pm »



you moan like a frustrated old bitch whos pissing on herself

even at 70
Trump could punch your lights out
that's because you're a weak-minded white trash pussy
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« Reply #18 on: April 10, 2019, 07:15:46 am »


Robert S. Mueller II = all-American HERO.

Donald J. Trump = cowardly, gutless wonder.
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