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America's “pariah” president…


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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« on: August 28, 2018, 11:12:47 pm »


from the print edition of the Los Angeles Times…

Unwelcome president: The shunning of Trump

The U.S. president as a pariah.

By NOAH BIERMAN | Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Flowers and cards for Senator John McCain sit outside his office in Phoenix. McCain let it be known that he did not want President Trump at his funeral. — Photograph: Robyn Beck/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Flowers and cards for Senator John McCain sit outside his office in Phoenix. McCain let it be known that he did not want President Trump at his funeral.
 — Photograph: Robyn Beck/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


WASHINGTON D.C. — Senator John McCain's decision to exclude President Trump from his funeral is an extraordinary moment on its own, a posthumous rebuke from an American icon who regarded the presidency as sacred, and believed its current occupant defiles that office.

Yet Trump's exclusion from such high-profile events of mourning and celebration — where American presidents are typically counted on to stand in for an entire nation — is emerging as a pattern over his 19 months in office.

Trump, the outsider who rode the politics of grievance, resentment and insults to election, and into the Oval Office, is becoming for many a pariah president. To be unwelcome at funerals, cultural celebrations and victory parties is another unprecedented aspect of his presidency; aides to recent White House occupants could not recall similar snubs, even for presidents during times of unpopularity or investigations.

The slights have come in all forms, spanning ideologies.

In April, Trump was asked to stay away from the funeral of Barbara Bush, wife to one president and mother of another, leaving it to former Presidents Clinton and Obama to serve as national consolers to the Bush family. In December, he opted to skip the president's traditional attendance at the annual Kennedy Center Honors gala after several of the artists being feted threatened a boycott.

The British royal family dispensed with inviting foreign dignitaries to Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's wedding in May partly to avoid having to invite Trump, whom Markle had attacked as “divisive” and “misogynistic.” Trump canceled the usual White House celebration for the NFL's Super Bowl champions when he learned most of the Philadelphia Eagles players were unwilling to attend. Only months earlier the Golden State Warriors had passed on their own invitation to celebrate their 2017 NBA championship title at the White House.

Trump has used such rejection to his advantage to mobilize his supporters. He complains to them, as he's done at political rallies as recently as this month, that the “elites” will never accept them — the “deplorables” — the term he co-opted from Hillary Clinton to highlight their sense of the disapproval shown by the nation's political and cultural establishment for Trump and his core supporters.

“You ever notice they always call the other side …‘the elite’?” Trump said at a Minnesota rally in June. “The elite. Why are they elite? I have a much better apartment than they do. I'm smarter than they are. I'm richer than they are. I became president and they didn't. And I'm representing the greatest, smartest, most loyal, best people on Earth — the deplorables.”

The riff drew loud applause, as it often does.

Yet friends and allies say he is also deeply wounded, seeing the snubs as part of a larger effort to delegitimize his presidency.

“Trump's pique is genuine. None of it is a put-on,” said Michael Caputo, a former political advisor. “He has the same deep and abiding disdain for the elites that each and every one of the ‘deplorables’ have today.”

The resentment was a constant throughout his career in business and entertainment, where he was dismissed as more of a boastful, tabloid-seeking showman than the serious mogul he believed himself to be.

“I am sure that he is aggravated that the political establishment still will not accept him,” said one long-time friend who asked not to be identified given the sensitivity of the subject. “What he really doesn't understand is that their objection is cultural as well as political and that they will never accept him.”


The British royal family did not invite foreign dignitaries to Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's wedding partly to avoid having to invite Trump. — Photograph: Phil Noble/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
The British royal family did not invite foreign dignitaries to Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's wedding partly to avoid having to invite Trump.
 — Photograph: Phil Noble/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


But critics say Trump created the isolation by his occasionally outrageous behavior, by reveling in a politics that feeds conspiracy theories, humiliates rivals and disdains basic notions of civility.

“He lacks any kind of humility. He kind of takes pride in kicking people around. So when people then strike back, he shouldn't be disappointed, because in many ways he's asked for it,” said Leon E. Panetta, who served in Congress and in the Clinton and Obama cabinets.

Trump's response to McCain's death on Saturday afternoon was just the sort of break from presidential tradition and civility that alienates many.

After lowering the flag to half-staff on Sunday, by Monday the White House had raised it fully, weaponizing the visual sign of respect even as flags remained lowered at federal buildings throughout Washington D.C., including the Capitol. Aides did not respond to requests to explain the decision.

Trump also declined initially to issue the usual official proclamation honoring McCain or to answer reporters' questions about him in three appearances at the White House on Monday. Instead, he spent the weekend playing golf and tweeting about the strength of the economy and his own popularity, despite polls to the contrary.

However, after petitions of protest from the nation's leading veterans’ organizations, the White House later on Monday released a proclamation that flags would remain at half-staff until McCain's burial on Sunday.

It also issued a statement from the president, expressing respect for McCain's service. Later, Trump told evangelical conservatives at the White House for dinner, “We very much appreciate everything that Senator McCain has done for our country.”

In Arizona, McCain's longtime confidant, Rick Davis, read a farewell statement from the deceased senator, which served as McCain's final shot at Trump's brand of politics.

“We weaken our greatness when we confuse our patriotism with tribal rivalries that have sown resentment and hatred and violence in all the corners of the globe,” McCain wrote. “We weaken it when we hide behind walls, rather than tear them down, when we doubt the power of our ideals, rather than trust them to be the great force for change they have always been.”

John Weaver, a top advisor in McCain's 2000 and 2008 presidential campaigns, noted in an interview that McCain chose Republican George W. Bush and Democrat Barak Obama, two men from different parties who defeated him in those presidential races, to deliver eulogies at his funeral. He said McCain probably wanted to send a message that politics could get ugly, but not so ugly that fellow Americans become enemies.

Weaver also said McCain probably “sloughed off” Trump's attacks on his military service and heroism.

McCain's animus “was more about his concern about where [Trump] was taking the country and his attacks on innocent people, on average people, on people who have sacrificed at the highest level,” Weaver said, highlighting Trump's 2016 attacks on the parents of Humayun Khan, who died while serving in Iraq.

Trump tends to view such fights in terms of winning and losing. Even after he denigrated McCain's heroism as a Vietnam prisoner of war and disparaged the Khans after they criticized him — attacks that many people, at the time, said would sink Trump's candidacy — Trump won his party's presidential nomination and the election. Given that, he believes his style is validated.


__________________________________________________________________________

L.A. Times staff writer Eli Stokols in Washington D.C. contributed to this report.

• Noah Bierman covers the White House in Washington, D.C. for the Los Angeles Times. Before joining the newspaper in 2015, he worked for the Boston Globe in both Boston and Washington, covering Congress, politics and transportation in the immediate aftermath of the Big Dig. He has also reported on higher education, crime, politics and local government for the Miami Herald, the Palm Beach Post and the Duluth (Minnesota) News-Tribune. Bierman is a native of Miami who attended Duke University.

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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2018, 03:17:54 pm »


from The Washington Post…

President non grata: Trump often unwelcome and unwilling
to perform basic rituals of the office


The lack of invitation to John McCain's funeral is the latest in a line of snubs
in both directions, from public displays of mourning to cultural celebrations.


By ASHLEY PARKER | 6:49AM EDT — Tuesday, August 28, 2018

President Donald J. Trump remains silent and crosses his arms when asked by reporters for his thoughts about the death of Senator John McCain. — Photograph: Saul Loeb/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
President Donald J. Trump remains silent and crosses his arms when asked by reporters for his thoughts about the death of Senator John McCain.
 — Photograph: Saul Loeb/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


SHUNNED at two funerals and one (royal) wedding so far, President Trump may be well on his way to becoming president non grata.

The latest snub comes in the form of the upcoming funeral for Senator John McCain (Republican-Arizona), which, before his death, the senator made clear he did not want the sitting president to attend. That the feeling is mutual — Trump nixed issuing a statement that praised McCain as a “hero” — only underscores the myriad ways Trump has rejected the norms of his office and, increasingly, has been rejected in turn.

Less than two years into his first term, Trump has often come to occupy the role of pariah — both unwelcome and unwilling to perform the basic rituals and ceremonies of the presidency, from public displays of mourning to cultural ceremonies.

In addition to being pointedly not invited to McCain's funeral and memorial service later this week — while former presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush will both eulogize the Arizona Republican — Trump was quietly asked to stay away from former first lady Barbara Bush's funeral earlier this year. He also opted to skip the annual Kennedy Center Honors last year amid a political backlash from some of the honorees and has faced repeated public rebuffs from athletes invited to the White House after winning championships.

“We're not talking about a president going and having a rally in a state that voted against him,” said Tim Naftali, a presidential historian at New York University who previously served as the director of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum. “We're talking about a president who can't even go and participate in a ritual where presidents are usually welcomed, and that is one of the consequences of his having defined the presidency in a sectarian way.”

Trump's bitter feelings toward McCain came to dominate the first 48 hours after the senator's death, as the president ignored repeated entreaties to offer any thoughts on McCain and flew the flag above the White House at full staff for much of the day on Monday. He ultimately, and grudgingly, caved to public and private pressure on Monday afternoon and issued an official proclamation to lower the flag in honor of McCain's death.

“Despite our differences on policy and politics, I respect Senator John McCain's service to our country and, in his honor, have signed a proclamation to fly the flag of the United States at half-staff until the day of his interment,” Trump said in a statement.

Trump's conspicuous absences at McCain's and Barbara Bush's funerals offer perhaps the starkest examples of the ways in which Trump finds himself ostracized from some of the duties other presidents performed as almost de facto aspects of their job.

“It is a tearing of the fabric of the presidency that he's not invited, but I understand why he's not invited because he's personalized the presidency in a way no previous occupant of the presidency has done,” Naftali said. “Donald Trump has never accepted the fact that he is the head of state.”

A senior White House official rejected the notion of Trump as persona non grata, saying for example that it is not the norm for sitting presidents to attend the funerals of former first ladies, in part because of the disruption it causes. Obama, for instance, did not attend the funeral of former first ladies Betty Ford or Nancy Reagan when he was in office. Instead, Michelle Obama went in his place, much as Melania Trump attended Bush's funeral.

The official added that Trump has hosted and attended events not in line with traditional Republican orthodoxy, specifically pointing to his various meetings with labor unions soon after taking office, as well as his attendance at the opening of the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum last year despite controversy surrounding his visit.

Yet Trump has also found himself excluded from — or opting out of — other, more routine parts of the presidency. During a trip to the United Kingdom in June, his visit with Queen Elizabeth II was undermined by reports in the British press that she was the only member of the royal family willing to meet with him. And two months earlier, the president notably did not receive an invitation to Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's wedding, though the duo — who are reportedly no fans of Trump — eschewed nearly all political guests.


President Donald J. Trump with Queen Elizabeth II at Windsor Castle in July. No other member of the royal family met with Trump. — Photograph: Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
President Donald J. Trump with Queen Elizabeth II at Windsor Castle in July. No other member of the royal family met with Trump.
 — Photograph: Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


Trump also skipped last year's Kennedy Center Honors after three of the five honorees said they would or might boycott the traditional White House reception pegged to the celebration. And Trump has faced high-profile rebellions from athletes he had hoped to honor.

In June, for example, the president hastily disinvited the entire Philadelphia Eagles team from a White House event in honor of their Super Bowl championship after growing frustrated that, to protest some of his policies, the team had planned to send only a small delegation of players. The party went on, sort of, albeit without the guests of honor.

Previous presidents have also dealt with defectors, of course, and a number of athletes and teams have still visited Washington to be feted by Trump.

In many cases, the rejection is mutual. Trump — who prefers the comforts of his Trump-branded resorts and restaurants — rarely ventures far from his cosseted bubble. He is generally uncomfortable crossing into hostile territory and prefers to frequent places where he is likely to be lauded, rather than rebuked.

“We've kind of elected this apex predator, and you don't sit T-rex down at the dinner table,” said Alex Castellanos, a Republican media consultant and strategist. “I think civilized society doesn't want him behaving crudely at the dinner table, and he has no interest in their pretensions.”

At his recent rallies, Trump has taken to expounding on his lack of acceptance by the “elites,” proclaiming it a badge of pride. And his disdain for what he terms political correctness is similarly applauded by many of his supporters.

“The thing to realize is that Donald Trump's base revels in him playing the transgressive jerk,” said Rick Wilson, author of Everything Trump Touches Dies: A Republican Strategist Gets Real About the Worst President Ever and a veteran of Republican campaigns.

Wilson added that with McCain in particular, the funeral snub perhaps stings more than most, in part because Trump can't abide not being the main focus of adulation. “You know what is making Donald Trump the craziest right now is he's not the center of attention,” Wilson said. “He's crawling the damn walls because they're running story after story on John McCain and he hates it because he's not the center of attention.”

Trump also has sometimes struggled in the role of consoler in chief, another key demand of the presidency. When he visited hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico last year, he drew widespread scorn for describing his trip as “lovely” and tossing paper towels into the crowd as if shooting baskets, even as his administration struggled to cope with the deadly tragedy. He came under condemnation again this year when, during a listening session for those affected by the Parkland school massacre, he held note cards with a basic reminder of emotional empathy printed in black Sharpie: “I hear you.”

Andrew H. Card, chief of staff under President George W. Bush, said that he struggles with the current political climate in part because he was raised to believe the president, whoever he or she is, is deserving of respect, and that he thinks both sides are to blame.

“When the president doesn't appear welcoming, it's his problem, he's created a problem,” Card said. “When others refuse to accept an invitation, I think that's wrong.”

But, he added, a paradox is that Trump in many ways has created the environment he now chafes against. “I do think the president gives permission for what I would consider to be rude behavior,” Card said, “and yet he reacts so poorly to other people's rude behavior.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Ashley Parker is a White House reporter for The Washington Post. She joined The Post in 2017, after 11 years at The New York Times, where she covered the 2012 and 2016 presidential campaigns and Congress, among other things.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Here's why Trump can't perform his job


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/president-non-grata-trump-often-unwelcome-and-unwilling-to-perform-basic-rituals-of-the-office/2018/08/28/302b60ee-aa16-11e8-a8d7-0f63ab8b1370_story.html
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« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2018, 04:36:39 pm »


from The Washington Post…

McCain behaved like a hero. Trump is behaving like a vengeful brat.

Perhaps John McCain's absence will make Americans realize what we've lost.

By KATHLEEN PARKER | 5:13PM EDT — Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Senator John McCain (Republican-Arizona) at a rally in Hanoverton, Ohio, in 2008. — Photograph: Melina Mara/The Washington Post.
Senator John McCain (Republican-Arizona) at a rally in Hanoverton, Ohio, in 2008. — Photograph: Melina Mara/The Washington Post.

THE WORLD seems already a lesser place with the passing of Senator John McCain.

The ensuing deluge of accolades and tributes — notwithstanding the president's limp and late acknowledgment of McCain's service to the nation — has revealed a level of reverence we don't see often. Despite traits and qualities that sometimes earned McCain enemies among friends, the past few days have been filled with a sense that we've lost something more than the man; we've lost one of the few remaining remnants of the American honor code.

A stalwart patriot who gave nearly his all to the country he so loved, McCain reminded us of the values that formed a nation: hard work, self-sacrifice, bravery, strength, and goodness of intention and spirit. McCain's life’s work embodied all of these at various times, and we release him from Earth's bonds with not a little trepidation that we won't see his likes again.

His courage, primarily, seems to have set him apart from most other late notables. That, and his toughness, which was recognized even by the former director of the North Vietnamese prisoner-of-war camp where McCain spent more than five years. Retired Colonel Tran Trong Duyet remarked on his former captive's death by recalling how much he liked him personally “for his toughness and strong stance,” and grew fond of him later for his efforts to build relations between Vietnam and the United States.

McCain fared less well with the president of the United States, who has behaved like a vengeful brat the past few days. Perhaps he is aiming for consistency rather than compassion, or maybe he's simply undone by the inevitable contrasts — a larger-than-life hero versus the trite bully whom even pulpits find distasteful. It was just three years ago that Donald Trump cast doubt on McCain's heroism, telling the Family Leadership Summit in Iowa that he was a hero only because he was captured: “I like people that weren't captured,” said the future president.

Trump also once demeaned all Vietnam vets by telling Howard Stern in 1997 that avoiding sexually transmitted diseases was “my personal Vietnam.” For good measure, Trump added, “I feel like a great and very brave soldier.”

And this is our commander in chief, who this week couldn't cough up a kind word for McCain — nor maintain the White House flag at half-staff for more than a day — until, apparently, he could no longer bear the torture of harsh critics shoving condemnation under his thin skin.

What made McCain a hero isn't that he endured immense suffering. It doesn't take a hero to be shot down or captured. We tend to over-use the term these days. The definition of a hero is someone who supersedes the ordinary call of duty and puts his or her own life in peril, or takes a dangerous risk, for the sake of another.

McCain was a hero because he refused early release when it was offered as a propaganda strategy once his captors learned that his father was a Navy admiral. McCain repeatedly declined, saying he would go only if those captured before him were also released. This singular act of self-abnegation is no one's to question, least of all President Trump's, whose military title is so misplaced that one marvels at the self-control of military leadership, for many of whom nausea must be a constant companion.

No question. McCain could be difficult. He occasionally vexed his fellow Republicans by voting against them, notably in a stage-crafted thumbs-down on the Senate floor last summer when he returned to Washington to vote against the repeal of Obamacare. Sometimes he seemed to relish his “maverick” designation perhaps too much. And he wasn't always wise, as when he surrendered to pressure and selected then-Alaska Governor Sarah Palin as his vice-presidential running mate, rather than Joe Lieberman, whom he preferred.

Strangely, toward the end, he was viewed by many as part of the establishment swamp that Trump came to drain. He was a hawkish, pro-immigration centrist when the GOP base was increasingly becoming a hard-right, isolationist bulwark against civility, dignity and the reality of globalization. Thus, McCain and Trump were full-throated foes, each standing his ground on opposing shores of American rectitude.

It is a tragedy that McCain, the warrior-hero, should exit the stage just when his model of citizenship is so needed. But perhaps by his leaving and the eulogies to follow, more Americans will recognize what it really takes to make America great again — and who clearly doesn't get it.


__________________________________________________________________________

Kathleen Parker writes a twice-weekly column on politics and culture for The Washington Post. In 2010, she received the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary for “her perceptive, often witty columns on an array of political and moral issues, gracefully sharing the experiences and values that lead her to unpredictable conclusions.” A Florida native, Parker started her column in 1987 when she was a staff writer for the Orlando Sentinel. She joined The Washington Post Writers Group in 2006. She is the author of Save the Males: Why Men Matter, Why Women Should Care (2008). Further honours include the H.L. Mencken Writing Award in 1993.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/mccain-behaved-like-a-hero-trump-is-behaving-like-a-vengeful-brat/2018/08/28/32404564-aaf9-11e8-b1da-ff7faa680710_story.html
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« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2018, 06:23:39 pm »

hero my arse

McCain's nickname was songbird

heres the recording proving he was a fake propaganda tool

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« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2018, 12:33:30 pm »


John McCain served his country when he was needed.

Donald J. Trump displayed his gutless cowardice and hid from the draft.

Yet he now thinks he is fit to command the military he refused to serve in.

Kinda says it all about the gutless wonder Trump, eh?

He isn't even fit to lick the mud on John McCain's boots lest he contaminate them.
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« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2018, 03:49:02 am »


Mclame

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« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2018, 02:58:55 pm »


John McClain = HERO

Donald J. Trump = YELLOW-BELLIED GUTLESS COWARD
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« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2018, 11:23:08 pm »

now you're a fucken war hero that fights for the commie scumbag losers

why dont you pull your head out your arsehole?
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« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2018, 11:24:34 pm »

KTJ=WANKER Grin
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« Reply #9 on: September 08, 2018, 08:34:21 am »


You can call me all the names you like.

It still doesn't change the FACT that John McCain was a hero whereas Trump is a gutless wonder.
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« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2018, 06:33:50 pm »

its like you a dead subject
instead of talking bullshit
stfu
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« Reply #11 on: September 10, 2018, 08:26:41 am »


John McCain SERVED HIS COUNTRY with DISTINCTION.

Donald J. Trump showed he is a gutless coward and has only ever LEECHED OFF HIS COUNTRY FOR HIS OWN PERSONAL GAIN.

In other words, one of those is somebody who has always served, the other is just another grubby, greedy, selfish twat.

End of story.
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« Reply #12 on: September 12, 2018, 04:50:21 am »

Trump is a winner
you well you're are a gutless blowhard low IQ moron piss-ant loser Cheesy
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« Reply #13 on: September 12, 2018, 02:38:44 pm »


SNIGGER ... yeah, Trump is a winner alright.

Vladamir Putin and Kim Jong-un both KNOW Trump is a winner, 'cause Trump sucked their dicks!!



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