Xtra News Community 2
November 21, 2018, 11:29:55 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Welcome to Xtra News Community 2 — please also join our XNC2-BACKUP-GROUP.
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links BITEBACK! XNC2-BACKUP-GROUP Staff List Login Register  

WWII bombers fly into Seattle, Washington…


Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: WWII bombers fly into Seattle, Washington…  (Read 10 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« on: June 24, 2018, 02:59:33 pm »


from The Seattle Times…

World War II aircraft soar into Seattle

The Wings of Freedom Tour, featuring four World War II bomber
and fighter aircraft, landed at the Museum of Flight in Seattle
on Friday. They'll be available to explore through Sunday.


By SARAH WU | 6:00AM PDT — Saturday, June 23, 2018

Fred Radke hangs on as he rises up through the hatch atop a World War II B-17 bomber flying over Seattle on Friday. The emergency hatch is removed for the flight to provide natural air conditioning inside the bomber and is over the radio operator's compartment. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.
Fred Radke hangs on as he rises up through the hatch atop a World War II B-17 bomber flying over Seattle
on Friday. The emergency hatch is removed for the flight to provide natural air conditioning inside the
bomber and is over the radio operator's compartment. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.


BOB HAGENBAUGH, 97 and DICK NELMS, 95, haven't flown a B-17 Flying Fortress since the end of World War II. Pilots with the Wings of Freedom Tour took the two veterans back to their happy place on Friday afternoon before landing the iconic four-engine bomber for public tours.

After crossing the bomb bay on the catwalk, Hagenbaugh and Nelms stood gripping the seats of the pilot and co-pilot in the cockpit as they looked out at the views from 12,000 feet up.

Four World War II bomber and fighter aircraft — B-17, B-24, B-25 and P-51 — flew to Boeing Field as part of the Collings Foundation's nationwide tour. The organization strives to bring “living history” to over 110 cities annually, according to spokesperson Hunter Chaney. It costs around $4,000 to operate and maintain each plane per hour.




Most of the crew members volunteer their time.

Eric White, the flight engineer, took a three-week vacation to volunteer, which was in part possible because his employer is “a huge World War II enthusiast.”

“Being able to fly these airplanes is like being entrusted with a national treasure,” White said.  “I never had an opportunity to serve in the military but coming out here and honoring the veterans is a way to give back.”

Nelms, who flew 35 missions over Germany with the Eighth Air Force, recalled the stressful conditions he once flew in.

“Coming back alive — that was my favorite moment,” Nelms said. “You really didn't know until you landed.”

The pilot, Mac McCauley, has flown over 7,000 hours in a B17. “This was the first model I ever built as a kid,” he said.

McCauley's landing was so smooth that those in the back didn't know the plane had touched ground.

“I would have rather been flying,” Nelms said. “But he's a good pilot.”

Upon landing, the crew was greeted by a crowd gripping $20 bills, eager to explore the storied bomber and fighter aircraft.

Stan Orr, 82, who worked at Boeing for 37 years, has visited the Wings of Freedom exhibits five times with his wife, Pris.

Orr said he loves “the roar of the piston engines and the anticipation of waiting for these ancient and great planes to take off.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Former B-17 pilot Dick Nelms flew 35 missions over Germany in World War II. He waits to board the famed bomber called the Flying Fortress. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.
Former B-17 pilot Dick Nelms flew 35 missions over Germany in World War II. He waits to board the famed bomber called the Flying Fortress.
 — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.


Downtown Seattle and the I-90 floating bridge can be seen from the front gunner's position as the World War II B-17 bomber banks over the city on Friday. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.
Downtown Seattle and the I-90 floating bridge can be seen from the front gunner's position as the World War II B-17 bomber banks over the city on Friday.
 — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.


Videographers Jeff Pinell, left, and Doug Pigsley photograph from the radio operator's compartment of the B-17 bomber. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.
Videographers Jeff Pinell, left, and Doug Pigsley photograph from the radio operator's compartment of the B-17 bomber.
 — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.


Arriving from Bremerton, the World War II B-17 bomber is guided to a parking position outside Seattle's Museum of Flight on Friday. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.
Arriving from Bremerton, the World War II B-17 bomber is guided to a parking position outside Seattle's Museum of Flight on Friday.
 — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.


The World War II B-17 bomber was not pressurized and compartments were fairly tight. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.
The World War II B-17 bomber was not pressurized and compartments were fairly tight. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.

Former B-17 bomber pilot Bob Hagenbaugh, 97, says he hadn't been aboard the plane for 72 years. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.
Former B-17 bomber pilot Bob Hagenbaugh, 97, says he hadn't been aboard the plane for 72 years. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.

Wheels are chocked for safety after the B-17 bomber arrived from Bremerton on Friday. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.
Wheels are chocked for safety after the B-17 bomber arrived from Bremerton on Friday. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.

Former World War II B-17 bomber pilot Dick Nelms squeezes through the door to the radio operator's compartment. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.
Former World War II B-17 bomber pilot Dick Nelms squeezes through the door to the radio operator's compartment. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.

Former B-17 pilots Bob Hagenbaugh, left, and Dick Nelms took up positions behind the flight deck for a short flight over Seattle. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.
Former B-17 pilots Bob Hagenbaugh, left, and Dick Nelms took up positions behind the flight deck for a short flight over Seattle.
 — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.


Oil seepage from the four radial engines is wiped off after each flight of the B-17 bomber. The first flight of a B-17 took place 82 years ago. They were built from 1936 to 1945. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.
Oil seepage from the four radial engines is wiped off after each flight of the B-17 bomber. The first flight of a B-17 took place 82 years ago.
They were built from 1936 to 1945. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.


The B-17 bomber, left, frames a World War II B-24 Liberator bomber as it arrives at the Museum of Flight on Friday. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.
The B-17 bomber, left, frames a World War II B-24 Liberator bomber as it arrives at the Museum of Flight on Friday. — Photograph: Alan Berner/The Seattle Times.

__________________________________________________________________________

Sarah Wu is a staff reporter at The Seattle Times. Sarah, who began working at The Times in December 2016, is originally from Canada.

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/wwii-aircraft-soar-into-seattle
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 


Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Open XNC2 Smileys
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum

Buy traffic for your forum/website
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy
Page created in 0.125 seconds with 11 queries.