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Haw Haw Haw … “Played like a Fiddle!”


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Author Topic: Haw Haw Haw … “Played like a Fiddle!”  (Read 28 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« on: June 17, 2018, 12:04:49 pm »




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Kiwithrottlejockey
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Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2018, 08:51:27 pm »


ROFLMAO....Kim Jong-un and President Xi Jinping are plotting the next episode in the ongoing saga of “playing Donald J. Trump like a fiddle!”



from The New York Times....

Kim Jong-un Visiting China for Third Time Since March

The North Korean leader's trip, announced on Tuesday by Chinese state media,
comes a week after his landmark summit meeting with President Trump in Singapore.


By JANE PERLEZ | 11:16PM EDT — Monday, June 18, 2018

North Korea's leader, Kim Jong-un, visited China in March and May this year. Chinese state media reported that he would make a two-day visit to China starting on Tuesday. — Photograph: Korean Central News Agency/via Reuters.
North Korea's leader, Kim Jong-un, visited China in March and May this year. Chinese state media reported that he would make
a two-day visit to China starting on Tuesday. — Photograph: Korean Central News Agency/via Reuters.


BEIJING — North Korea's leader, Kim Jong-un, arrived in China on Tuesday to begin a two-day visit, his third such trip since March.

Mr. Kim's trip comes one week after his landmark summit meeting in Singapore with President Trump.

Xinhua, China's official news agency, announced the visit on Tuesday amid reports that a special flight of Air Koryo, the North Korean state-run airline, was expected to land in Beijing. Mr. Kim's previous trips to China were not announced until after they were over.

Mr. Kim's visit comes as a trade war between the United States and China is intensifying, giving him an opening to play one power against the other — a tactic he appears to be using as the United States presses him to destroy his nuclear arsenal.

“The visit is taking place against the backdrop of the upcoming full-blown trade war,” said Cheng Xiaohe, a Korea expert at Renmin University in Beijing.

On his first visit to China, in March, Mr. Kim arrived to Beijing aboard an armored train, and he spent two days in the capital for talks with President Xi Jinping. In May, Mr. Kim visited the port city of Dalian, also spending time with Mr. Xi.

In recent weeks, Mr. Kim has seemingly reversed years of North Korean foreign policy. Last week he met with President Trump in Singapore, the first time a leader of North Korea and a sitting American president have held talks.

Now, Mr. Kim finds himself in what analysts see as an enviable position, with leverage over the region's two great rivals.

In their joint declaration after meeting in Singapore, Mr. Trump and Mr. Kim pledged to move ahead with the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula. But the wording of the agreement has been widely criticized as vague, with no clear timelines.

The Americans insist that sanctions will remain in place until the North completely dismantles its weapons program. But China has suggested that the Singapore meeting alone was a good-will measure than should prompt the easing of sanctions.


__________________________________________________________________________

Jane Perlez is The New York Times bureau chief in Beijing. She writes about China's foreign policy, in particular its relations with the United States and its Asian neighbors. Her first foreign assignment for The N.Y. Times was in East Africa covering civil conflict and famine. She has served as bureau chief in Kenya, Poland, Austria, Indonesia and Pakistan. She was a member of the team that won the Pulitzer Prize in 2009 for reporting in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

• A version of this article appears in The New York Times on June 19, 2018, on Page A9 of the New York print edition with the headline: “Kim in China For 3rd Visit Since March”.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • The Trump-Kim Summit Was Unprecedented, but the Statement Was Vague

 • Trump and Kim See New Chapter for Nations After Summit

 • Kim's Second Surprise Visit to China Heightens Diplomatic Drama

 • Kim Jong-un Met With Xi Jinping in Secret Beijing Visit


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/18/world/asia/kim-jong-un-china-north-korea.html
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2018, 04:35:12 pm »


Fuck, I'm still pissing myself laughing over how Kim Jong-un “played Donald J. Trump like a fiddle” 'cause Trump is so dumb he doesn't even know when he is being played.







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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2018, 06:48:44 pm »


from The Seattle Times…

Trump asks Pompeo to delay visit to North Korea

By MATTHEW LEE and ZEKE MILLER — Associated Press | 10:53AM PDT — Friday, August 24, 2018

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump walk across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington D.C. on Friday, August 24, 2018, to board Marine One helicopter for a short trip to Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland, en route to Columbus, Ohio. — Photograph: Pablo Martinez Monsivais/Associated Press.
President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump walk across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington D.C. on Friday, August 24, 2018,
to board Marine One helicopter for a short trip to Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland, en route to Columbus, Ohio.
 — Photograph: Pablo Martinez Monsivais/Associated Press.


WASHINGTON D.C. — President Donald Trump said on Friday he has directed Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to delay a planned trip to North Korea, citing insufficient progress on denuclearization.

Trump put some blame on Beijing, saying he does not believe China is helping “because of our much tougher Trading stance.”

The surprise announcement appeared to mark a concession by the president to domestic and international concerns that his prior claims of world-altering progress on the peninsula had been strikingly premature.

“I have asked Secretary of State Mike Pompeo not to go to North Korea, at this time, because I feel we are not making sufficient progress with respect to the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula,” Trump tweeted on Friday, barely two months after his June meeting with the North's Kim Jong Un in Singapore.

Trump's comment followed a report issued on Monday by the International Atomic Energy Agency outlining “grave concern” about the North's nuclear program. It came a day after Pompeo appointed Stephen Biegun, a senior executive with the Ford Motor Company, to be his special envoy for North Korea and said he and Biegun would visit next week.

The State Department never confirmed details of the trip, but it had been expected that Pompeo would be in Pyongyang for at least several hours on Monday, according to several diplomatic sources familiar with the plan.

White House officials declined to specify what prompted Trump to call off Pompeo's trip or what had changed since the president's rose-colored-glasses assessments of the nuclear situation just days ago.

A senior White House official said Trump made the decision to cancel the visit on Friday morning during a meeting with Pompeo, Biegun, chief of staff John Kelly and National Security Adviser John Bolton, who joined by phone. Intelligence and defense officials were not in the meeting, the official said, seeming to indicate that the breakdown was diplomatic in nature. The official spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe internal deliberations.

The State Department had no immediate comment on the matter and referred questions to the White House.








Trump laid unspecified blame on China, North Korea's leading trade partner, which is widely believed to hold the greatest sway over Kim's government.

The U.S. and China have been locked in a trade dispute for months, with each side ratcheting up tariffs on imports from the other country in what may be the opening salvos of a trade war.

Trump tweeted that “Pompeo looks forward to going to North Korea in the near future, most likely after our Trading relationship with China is resolved.” He added: “In the meantime I would like to send my warmest regards and respect to Chairman Kim. I look forward to seeing him soon!”

After more a year of escalating tensions defined by nuclear and missile tests, new sanctions and “fire and fury” rhetoric, Trump made history meeting Kim earlier this year. In the run-up to the summit both nations engaged in hard-nosed negotiation, with Trump publically calling off the meeting in an effort to push Kim to agree to nuclear concessions. During the summit, the pair signed a vague joint statement in which the North agreed to denuclearize, but which left nearly all details undefined.

“There is no longer a Nuclear Threat from North Korea,” Trump declared on Twitter after the meeting.

“Before taking office people were assuming that we were going to War with North Korea. President Obama said that North Korea was our biggest and most dangerous problem,” he added. “No longer — sleep well tonight!”

Pompeo would have been hard pressed to return from Pyongyang with anything resembling progress on the denuclearization front.

Although it has halted nuclear and missile testing and taken some unrelated steps — dismantling portions of a missile engine facility and returning the suspected remains of American servicemen killed during the Korean War — its nuclear weapons program and ballistic missile development remain intact, according the U.N.'s atomic watchdog and intelligence agencies.


President Donald J. Trump and first lady Melania Trump walk to board Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland on Friday, August 24, 2018, for a trip to Columbus, Ohio to visit the National Children's Hospital, and to speak at the Ohio Republican State Party dinner. — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.
President Donald J. Trump and first lady Melania Trump walk to board Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland on Friday, August 24, 2018, for a trip to
Columbus, Ohio to visit the National Children's Hospital, and to speak at the Ohio Republican State Party dinner. — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.


In addition, recent statements from North Korean officials have ruled out any new concessions until it sees a reciprocal gesture from the U.S. beyond suspending military exercises with South Korea. North Korea has been demanding that the U.S. ease or lift crippling sanctions — something Pompeo and national security adviser John Bolton have flatly ruled out until the its nuclear program is fully and verifiably dismantled.

Other than sanctions relief, the North, backed by South Korea, has been seeking a declaration of the end of the Korean War. The conflict stopped with the signing of an armistice rather than a peace treaty, meaning the war is not technically over. Both the North and South have vowed to end the open state of hostilities, and Seoul had been hoping to persuade the Trump administration to sign off on a non-binding end-of-war declaration as a goodwill gesture that would give Kim Jong Un domestic cover to proceed with denuclearization moves.

Pompeo and other administration officials have suggested some concessions short of easing or lifting sanctions are possible before verified denuclearization, but have refused to be specific about what they could be. And they have been skeptical about an end-of-war declaration in the absence of any progress on the nuclear matter.

At the same time, lawmakers from both parties, including GOP hawks who generally support Trump, have expressed concerns about such a move, as it could be used by the North to demand the removal of U.S. troops from South Korea and potentially Japan without anything in return.

Trump had kept up the positive tone as recently as Tuesday at a campaign rally in West Virginia. There Trump maintained “we're doing well with North Korea.”

“There's been no missile launches. There's been no rocket launches,” he added.

At the same rally, Trump seemed to take a different tone too on China, saying he had withheld some criticism of China because “I wanted them to help us with North Korea and they have.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Associated Press writer Darlene Superville contributed to this report.

• Matthew Lee is a State Department correspondent at Associated Press.

• Zeke Miller is a White House reporter at Associated Press.

https://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/trump-asks-pompeo-to-delay-visit-to-north-korea
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