Xtra News Community 2
November 22, 2018, 06:04:46 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Welcome to Xtra News Community 2 please also join our XNC2-BACKUP-GROUP.
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links BITEBACK! XNC2-BACKUP-GROUP Staff List Login Register  

TRUMP AND KIM MAKE WORLD GREAT AGAIN


Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: TRUMP AND KIM MAKE WORLD GREAT AGAIN  (Read 86 times)
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7525



WWW
« on: June 15, 2018, 05:34:44 pm »

Happy Birthday Mr Trump





meanwhile at CNN
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=rhIw5v6FLAQ
Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP

Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2018, 11:25:42 pm »


The great propaganda photograph gifted to Kim Jong-un and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) by U.S. President Donald J. Trump…


North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un shakes hands with President Donald J. Trump at the start of their historic U.S.- North Korea summit on Tuesday, June 12, 2018. — Photograph: Saul Loeb/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un shakes hands with President Donald J. Trump at the start of their historic U.S.- North Korea summit on Tuesday, June 12, 2018.
 — Photograph: Saul Loeb/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.

Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2018, 11:26:10 pm »


Yep....the leaders of two NUCLEAR powers being shown to be equals.

Exactly what North Korean dictators hereditory emperors/kings (all three of them) have always wanted since the partitioning of the Korean peninsula.

All it took was for Americans to elect a stupid, narcissistic, simpleton as their president....and it has happened.






Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2018, 11:26:38 pm »


Here's a wider-aspect version of that propaganda photograph gifted to Kim Jong-un and North Korea by America's clown president....





....hahaha.....the North Koreans will be using that picture for many years to come to show they are a “nuclear power” in the same club as the United States of America.
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2018, 11:27:10 pm »



Okay, I'll make a prediction.

In five years time, North Korea will still have their nuclear deterent, except that it will be double (or even triple) the size it is now.

Kim Jong-un will be an even bigger hero in his own country than he is now, but will still be heading a brutal regime.

China will be an even stronger economic power than it is now and will be attracting more and more of the world's brightest scientists (see THIS STORY published by The Washington Post eight days ago) and will be leading the world in many aspects of science and technology.

Meanwhile, the United States of America will have become even more tribal and will be virtually at war with itself. If he is still president, Trump will be fiddling while Rome (America) burns and the world will be edging ever closer to the eventual Thucydides Trap when America finally wakes up to the fact they are rapidly becoming the world's “former top dog” as China's economic (and military) power grows.

Oh, and trade will be flowing freely in both directions across the border between China and North Korea.

And.....Donald J. Trump will be blaming everybody in the world except himself for the situation America finds itself in.



Now: see if I'm right in five years time! Anybody want to have a bet on it?  8-)
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2018, 11:28:14 pm »


from The Washington Post....

How Trump lost the summit before the
photographers even left the room


Kim got more than he could have dreamed of.

By JENNIFER RUBIN | 8:45AM EDT — Tuesday, June 12, 2018

North Korea's Kim Jong Un and President Donald J. Trump met for the first time on June 12 in Singapore. — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.
North Korea's Kim Jong Un and President Donald J. Trump met for the first time on June 12 in Singapore.
 — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.


THE SPECTACLE of the murderous dictator Kim Jong Un on equal footing with the president of the United States — each country's flag represented, a  supposedly “normal” diplomatic exchange between two nuclear powers — was enough to turn democracy lovers' stomachs. President Trump naturally made things worse. He gushed: “It's my honor, and we will have a terrific relationship, I have no doubt.”

An honor to meet the man who maintains slave labor camps, who periodically attacks the ships of our ally South Korea and whose regime is responsible for the death of Otto Warmbier? That should stun Warmbier's parents — and every decent human being. Trump envisions a “terrific” relationship with a country that conducts mass hacking, is arguably the worst human rights violator, threatens us with nuclear weapons, detains our people and seeks the reunification of the Korean peninsula under its rule of terror. Imagine if President Barack Obama traveled to Iran, shook Ayatollah Ali Khamenei's hand, proclaimed it was a great honor and spoke about his conviction that Iran and the United States would have a terrific relationship. John Bolton and Mike Pompeo, among others, would have had a conniption.

Trump's impulsive decision to have a summit and his insatiable need for attention provided Kim with a historic victory that no other U.S. president has handed to a North Korean leader. With not a single bomb dismantled or a single gram of fissile material shipped out of the country, Kim got more than he could have dreamed of — and all before the photographers departed.

It went downhill from there. The Washington Post reports:


Quote
Trump sounded triumphant following his meeting with Kim, expressing confidence that the North Korean leader was serious about abandoning his nuclear program and transforming his country from an isolated rogue regime into a respected member of the world community.

But Trump provided few specifics about what steps Kim would take to back up his promise to denuclearize his country and how the United States would verify that North Korea was keeping its pledge to get rid of its nuclear weapons, saying that would be worked out in future talks.

This is what happens when one puts a man-child who imagines that characters such as Kim or Chinese President Xi Jinping are his “friends” or “like him” in a room alone with one of them. Giving Kim a major concession such as discontinuance of the “war games” plainly took Seoul by surprise:

Quote
The United States has conducted such exercises for decades as a symbol of unity with Seoul and previously rejected North Korean complaints as illegitimate. Ending the games would be a significant political benefit for Kim, but Trump insisted he had not given up leverage.

“I think the meeting was every bit as good for the United States as it was for North Korea,” Trump said, casting himself as a leader who can secure a deal that has eluded past presidents.

South Korea's presidential office seemed blindsided by the announcement on the joint exercises.

“We need to try to understand what President Trump said,” a spokesman for South Korean President Moon Jae-in said.

Trump swore that he would not repeat the errors of the past. U.S. presidents got worthless agreements in 1994 when “Pyongyang committed to freezing its illicit plutonium weapons program in exchange for aid” and again in 2005 when North Korea “pledged to abandon ‘all nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programs’ and return to the Non-Proliferation Treaty.” The bland statement that Trump obtained seemed almost identical to these past, useless agreements with vows to undertake “complete denuclearization of the Korean peninsula” and commit to a “lasting and stable peace.” That sounds like the same pablum we've gotten before. The difference here is that Trump removed North Korea's stigma as a pariah state, and for good measure, decided to discontinue joint war games with Seoul, which are an “irritant” to the North Koreans. That's it.

In remarks afterward, Trump insisted that Kim “loves his people,” a ludicrous statement that sounds like something Pyongyang's propaganda shop issued. Kim is a brutal tyrant who imprisons, starves and represses his own people. Trump then said something remarkably honest: “I may be wrong, I mean I may stand before you in six months and say, ‘Hey I was wrong’,” said Trump. He continued,”I don't know that I'll ever admit that, but I'll find some kind of an excuse.” That's right: He will.

The president of the United States was fleeced, and worse, has no doubt impressed upon Kim that this country can be played for fools and strung along. Trump gave Kim newfound legitimacy and Kim's nuclear weapons program can go on and on.

In all of this, Pompeo, Trump's secretary of state, bears a good deal of the responsibility for excessive happy talk. He apparently was led along as well, resulting in the decision to put Trump in the room with Kim. Pompeo has insisted that this would not be a repeat of past errors. He's right on that. This is much, much worse. National security adviser Bolton, who tried his best to disrupt the meeting, can feel some measure of satisfaction. Having seen his advice spurned and the disastrous results that followed, he might consider quitting. He would be a powerful, independent voice to explain the peril in which we now find ourselves with a president who alienates allies and gives tyrants around the globe reason to celebrate.


__________________________________________________________________________

Jennifer Rubin writes the Right Turn blog for The Washington Post, offering reported opinion from a center-right perspective. She covers a range of domestic and foreign policy issues and provides insight into the conservative movement, the Republican Party and threats to Western democracies. Rubin, who is also an MSNBC contributor, came to The Post after three years with Commentary magazine. Prior to her career in journalism, Rubin practiced labor law for two decades, an experience that informs and enriches her work. She is a mother of two sons and lives in Northern Virginia.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: The historic Trump-Kim Singapore summit, in 3 minutes

 • Greg Sargent: The good and the bad from Trump’s North Korea summit

 • Anne Applebaum: Trump and Kim got what they wanted. The rest of the world, not so much.

 • Erik Wemple: Dennis Rodman and Chris Cuomo make a little history of their own on North Korea summit night


https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/right-turn/wp/2018/06/12/how-trump-lost-the-summit-before-the-photographers-even-left-the-room
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2018, 11:28:47 pm »


from The Seattle Times....

Trump gets cozy with North Korea's despot

After the G7 summit, President Donald Trump flew to Singapore to meet
with Kim Jong Un. The two leaders signed a joint declaration pledging
to work toward peace and to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula.


By DAVID HORSEY | 11:24AM PDT — Tuesday, June 12, 2018



AFTER a truncated trip to the G7 summit in Canada during which he antagonized America's European and Japanese allies and insulted Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, President Donald Trump flew to Singapore for one-on-one talks with Kim Jong Un, North Korea's dictator. Having shown extreme discomfort in the company of the elected leaders of democratic countries, Trump was, by contrast, all smiles with the murderous young despot. Trump said it was a “very great honor” to be with Kim and insisted that they now had “a very special bond”. On MSNBC, Mike Murphy, veteran GOP political operative, observed that “Republican heads would be exploding” if a Democratic president had done what Trump has done.

__________________________________________________________________________

• See more of David Horsey's cartoons at The Seattle Times HERE.

https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/trump-gets-cozy-with-north-koreas-despot-while-picking-fights-with-canadas-trudeau-and-other-allies
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2018, 11:29:05 pm »


from The Washington Post....

EDITORIAL: No more concessions

America needs tangible commitments from North Korea. So far, Trump hasn't gotten them.

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD | 11:44AM EDT — Tuesday, June 12, 2018



THE Singapore summit was, without question, a triumph for Kim Jong Un and his North Korean regime. A dictator who has ordered the murder of his own family members, and who oversees a gulag comparable to those of Hitler and Stalin, was able to parade on the global stage as a legitimate statesman, praised by the president of the United States as “very talented” and worthy of trust. President Trump offered Mr. Kim a major concession, the suspension of U.S. military exercises with South Korea, and spoke of his wish to withdraw U.S. troops from the country. Mr. Kim, meanwhile, did not commit to the “complete, verifiable and irreversible” denuclearization the United States has demanded — nor to any other change in his regime's criminal behavior.

The two leaders agreed to begin a diplomatic process to “work towards complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula”. That is certainly preferable to the slide toward war that appeared to be underway last year, and it can be hoped that it will eventually lead to steps by North Korea to dismantle its arsenal. But Mr. Trump has placed a large bet on a cruel and unpredictable ruler whose motives and aims are far from clear — and who has shown no sign of altering North Korea's commitment to nuclear weapons or its deceptive negotiating tactics.

By far the most substantive result of the summit was Mr. Trump's sudden announcement of a freeze on U.S.-South Korean military exercises — a concession that apparently took the South Korean government and the U.S. military by surprise. With backing from China and Russia, which seek to diminish U.S. strategic standing in Asia, North Korea has long sought an end to the exercises — and until Tuesday, this and previous U.S. administrations had flatly rejected the idea. Now, Mr. Trump has adopted it — and, remarkably, used Pyongyang's language in describing the “war games” as “provocative”.




Mr. Trump portrayed his concession as an exchange for North Korea's destruction of a test site for missile engines. But that demolition took place before the summit — and it is in no way comparable to the freezing of exercises, which could signal that the U.S.-South Korean security relationship is up for negotiation alongside North Korea's arsenal. Mr. Trump's further contention that stopping the maneuvers “will save us a tremendous amount of money” will deliver another shock to Asian and European countries that depend on the United States for defense.

Compared with that gift, North Korea's commitments at the summit look meager indeed. A joint statement said Mr. Kim “reaffirmed his firm and unwavering commitment to complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula”. That language is actually weaker and less specific than what Pyongyang offered in several previous agreements — which it then flouted. North Korea's definition of denuclearization, as laid out in numerous previous talks with U.S. officials, envisions a far-reaching U.S. strategic retreat, including the removal of the American defense umbrella from both South Korea and Japan. There was no mention in the statement of U.S. terms for disarmament: not a word about verification, or irreversibility, or timelines.

The diplomatic process that will now begin ought to be aimed at delivering tangible North Korean commitments and meaningful actions. The United States should be seeking a full declaration of the regime's arsenal and nuclear facilities, as a start; without it, showy demolitions of test sites are meaningless. And Mr. Trump should refrain from offering Mr. Kim any further unilateral concessions.


__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: The historic Trump-Kim Singapore summit, in about 2 minutes

 • Josh Rogin: The biggest winner of the Trump-Kim summit is China

 • Greg Sargent: The good and the bad from Trump's North Korea summit

 • Jennifer Rubin: How Trump lost the summit before the photographers even left the room

 • Anne Applebaum: Trump and Kim got what they wanted. The rest of the world, not so much.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/global-opinions/the-singapore-summit-was-a-victory-for-kim-jong-un/2018/06/12/3731e970-6e44-11e8-bd50-b80389a4e569_story.html
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2018, 11:34:44 pm »


Yep....Kim Jong-un played Donald J. Trump like a fiddle and the stupid dumbfuck lapped it all up.

He has cancelled joint military operations with South Korea and Japan, yet North Korea has given nothing except words which they will ignore.

And they'll still be a nuclear power with a nuclear deterent they can use to waste American cities with in a final lash of the dragon's tail if America attacks them.

And now they've invited Trump to visit Pyongyang as their guest and Trump is lapping it up.

Just like the Chinese have already done, the North Koreans will pander to Trump's big ego by giving him a HUGE military parade (complete with thousands of goose-stepping North Korean troops), a state banquet and lots of pomp & ceremony.....and Trump will gush with pride and fly home singing the praises of Kim Jong-un and North Korea. Yet they still will have given him nothing. The North Koreans have learnt from the Chinese that when dealing with a simpleton idiot like Trump, you chuck him a few bones, but give him nothing whatsoever of substance and the dumbfuck will be too stupid to realise he is being played like a fiddle.

It's the world's greatest comedy show and it's happening in our time too!!
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2018, 11:35:18 pm »


from The New York Times....

EDITORIAL: Trump Gushes Over North Korea

The rest of the world holds its breath.

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD | Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Illustration by Oliver Munday/The New York Times.
Illustration by Oliver Munday/The New York Times.

AFTER months of venomous barbs and apocalyptic threats of war, the meeting between President Trump and the North Korean leader, Kim Jong-un, was unquestionably a relief, with its handshakes and effusive politeness.

Mr. Trump deserves credit for setting in motion a process that for the time being will keep the two adversaries talking to each other. But the statement he signed with Mr. Kim was strikingly spare, with little evidence of any substantial progress despite Mr. Trump's claim that it was “comprehensive”.

For now, all we know is that Mr. Trump has made major concessions, while Mr. Kim made fewer commitments than North Korea has made to past administrations and merely reaffirmed a goal of “denuclearization” that North Korea first announced in 1992. For his part, Mr. Trump announced he would provide North Korea with security guarantees and suspend joint military exercises with South Korea. As he gushed about the virtues of the North Korean dictator, just a day after he savaged some of America's closest democratic allies, he even endorsed the North Korean view of such joint exercises as “provocative”.

Yes, the meeting deserves to be described as historic, and the president clearly reveled in the political theater of doing something none of his predecessors did — meeting a North Korean leader and proclaiming a new era between two countries that have been enemies since the Korean War. He also delighted in once again presenting himself as a deal maker: tackling one of the world's most intractable security challenges, the threat of North Korea's arsenal of up to 60 nuclear weapons and the missiles on which to deliver them.

The results of this first meeting fell short of both Mr. Trump's own criteria for a baseline agreement with North Korea and of commitments the North has made in previous agreements with previous administrations.

In the statement, which ran little more than one page, the two leaders aimed to build a “lasting and robust peace” on the Korean Peninsula. The security guarantees that Mr. Trump promised to provide North Korea are in response to a longstanding demand from a regime that fears an American invasion, while Mr. Kim reaffirmed his “firm and unwavering commitment to complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.”

The term “security guarantees” was not explained, but in providing them to allies like South Korea and Japan, the United States has committed to use military force to come to their defense. It seems highly unlikely that would apply in the case of North Korea, and it shouldn’t.

Mr. Trump later told a news conference that he still hoped at some point to withdraw the 28,500 American troops from South Korea. He said he intended to halt American war games held routinely with South Korea because they are “expensive” and “provocative”.

But it seems that he failed to forewarn both the Pentagon and President Moon Jae-in of South Korea, a grievous mistake, especially with an ally who is directly affected by the decision and played a central role in causing the Kim-Trump meeting to happen. While Mr. Moon hailed the meeting's outcome in general, stunned South Korean officials worried that Mr. Trump was making concessions too fast. The South Korean Defense Ministry said it was seeking to clarify the president's intentions.

In past arms agreements, American governments have routinely insisted that international inspectors be able to rigorously verify compliance. That was certainly the case with the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, which imposed unprecedented 24/7 monitoring on Iran's activities and which Mr. Trump has reneged upon.

The joint statement with North Korea lacked Mr. Trump's previous mantra-like demand that denuclearization not just be complete but also be verifiable and irreversible. It also contained no definition of “denuclearization”, which the United States and North Korea interpret differently.

More specific and powerful language can be found in a now-defunct 2005 agreement in which North Korea “committed to abandoning all nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programs and returning, at an early date, to the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons” and to International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards. Even that language was called weak at the time by many Republicans, and in any case, the North Koreans did not abide by it.

Mr. Trump criticized the Iran nuclear deal for addressing only the nuclear threat and ignoring ballistic missiles, Iran's regional role and human rights abuses. But the North Korea statement ignored similar non-nuclear issues, a startling omission given the North Korean regime's brutality toward its people, development of ballistic missiles that can hit the United States and history of arms trafficking. The statement also omitted any specific reference to a possible peace treaty ending the Korean War.

During an hour-long news conference in which Mr. Trump was unusually friendly toward the reporters he regularly scorns, he dismissed concerns about vagueness and expressed a surprising confidence that despite past North Korean failings, Mr. Kim would meet his commitments.

Mr. Kim's wins were obvious. He got what his father and grandfather never did — a meeting with an American president, the legitimacy of being treated as an equal as a nuclear power on the world stage, country flags standing side by side. And while American sanctions remain in place, Mr. Trump has delayed imposing new ones and other countries are expected to begin easing theirs.

Mr. Trump insisted he secured concessions from Mr. Kim, including a nuclear and missile test suspension that is already in its seventh month, and the destruction of a missile test site and an engine test site. The latter two will have to be independently verified. But what about the main goal, denuclearization? “We're starting that process very quickly — very, very quickly — absolutely,” Mr. Trump said.

Mr. Trump now fully owns this issue and seems seized with the need to resolve it peacefully. That is to the good. It will now be the difficult work of his negotiators, led by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, to reach a carefully drawn, detailed agreement on the questions that truly matter, including the timing and scope of denuclearization and the future of the missile program.


__________________________________________________________________________

The editorial board represents the opinions of the board, its editor and the publisher. It is separate from the newsroom and the Op-Ed section.

• A version of this editorial appears in The New York Times on June 13, 2018, on Page A24 of the New York print edition with the headline: “A Grand Stage for Trump and Kim”.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/12/opinion/trump-north-korea-summit-nuclear.html
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #10 on: June 15, 2018, 11:35:29 pm »


from The New York Times....

EDITORIAL: Why the North Korea Meeting Was the Trumpiest Moment So Far

The meeting was classic Trump: enormous hype, ulcer-inducing suspense,
oceans of self-congratulation, ending with grandiose, fuzzy promises.


By THE EDITORIAL BOARD | Tuesday, June 12, 2018

President Donald J. Trump answering a final question in Singapore on Tuesday. — Photograph: Win McNamee/Getty Images.
President Donald J. Trump answering a final question in Singapore on Tuesday. — Photograph: Win McNamee/Getty Images.

AS A model for diplomacy, the Singapore Summit had its highs and lows. But as a platform for displaying the singular performance art of Donald Trump, it was a solid 10.

President Trump was on his best behavior, as is so often the case when he is dealing with dictators. Gone was the chest-thumping, insult-hurling ranter who had threatened to light up “Little Rocket Man” with a “fire and fury like the world has never seen”. Instead, Mr. Trump unleashed his version of a charm offensive on Kim Jong-un.

With the world looking anxiously on, Mr. Trump was flattering — gushing even — about his North Korean counterpart. The two leaders were all smiles and friendly pats, and that 13-second handshake, complete with Mr. Trump's Clintonesque elbow grab, seemed to go on forever.

Mr. Trump was even more effusive about Mr. Kim after their session, sounding more like he was deconstructing a blind date than analyzing a diplomatic meeting.

“We had a great chemistry,” he told the journalist Greta Van Susteren. “You understand how I feel about chemistry. It's very important. I mean, I know people where there is no chemistry. No matter what you do, you just don't have it. We had it right from the beginning.”

Mr. Trump's chumminess with one of the globe's most notorious despots would have been noteworthy under any circumstances. It was all the more striking coming on the heels of the president slamming Justin Trudeau, the prime minister of Canada — one of America's closest allies — as “weak”, “meek” and “very dishonest”. But from a Trumpian perspective, the contrast makes perfect sense.

Whatever he does or does not understand about history or policy or statecraft, Mr. Trump has a keen sense of how to engage authoritarian thugs who crave respect and legitimacy. It's how he's wired. The grand show of respect, the fawning language, the pomp and circumstance — it all melts this president's butter and inclines him favorably toward his flatterers. He considers himself a strong leader, and such blatant ego-stroking is how he likes to be handled. Why wouldn't the same hold true for the likes of Mr. Kim — or Vladimir Putin?

That said, from all we know of Mr. Trump, it is doubtful this display of admiration was purely — or even largely — a matter of diplomatic maneuvering. Mr. Trump has a deep and abiding fondness for strongmen. The more ruthlessly they have had to act to hold on to power, the more he respects them. Just look at his response on Tuesday when Hallie Jackson of NBC News asked why, considering all of Mr. Kim's atrocities, Mr. Trump was comfortable praising him as “talented”.

“Well, he is very talented,” Mr. Trump said. “Anybody that takes over a situation like he did at 26 years of age and is able to run it, and run it tough. I don't say it was nice.”

It's not that Mr. Trump doesn't grasp the depths of Mr. Kim's butchery — he just thinks such cruelty shouldn't get in the way of a good deal. As he said in his post-game news conference, the waterfront real estate possibilities are awesome: “They have great beaches. You see that whenever they're exploding their cannons into the ocean, right? I said, ‘Boy, look at that view’. And I explained, I said instead of doing that, you could have the best hotels in the world right there.”

Dealing with men like Mr. Kim is, on some level, comfortable ground for Mr. Trump. Such negotiations are a higher-stakes, global version of the world he came up in, one of cutthroat real estate developers and shady businessmen and mobsters. That is the arena Mr. Trump knows, and the one he respects.

The world sneers at strongmen like Mr. Kim, Mr. Putin and Rodrigo Duterte, the president of the Philippines, regarding them as uncivilized thugs, and Mr. Trump feels similarly disrespected. Dispositionally speaking, these are Mr. Trump's people. As such, the president feels more confident and less defensive with these people than he does with leaders with whom, from a geopolitical perspective, he is on more equal footing. This is especially true of Mr. Kim, a global pariah from a devastatingly poor and dysfunctional nation to whom Mr. Trump can feel superior in every way.

Plus, Mr. Trump is way taller than Mr. Kim. And for this president, size does matter.

As for why Mr. Trump is so committed to tackling the North Korea tangle, there are a couple of key Trumpian impulses at play — beyond whatever concerns the president may have long harbored regarding nuclear proliferation, of course. Most simply, Mr. Trump loves a deal. Cutting big deals on his own is what he thought the presidency was going to be all about. The realization that he must contend with the squabbling foot-draggers in Congress has been a constant source of frustration to him on the domestic front. But on foreign policy, he has way more wiggle room to make his mark.

More tempting still, Mr. Trump loves big risks and long shots. He sees them as no-lose propositions: If he fails with North Korea, who can fault him, really? After all, it was an impossible mission, at which all his predecessors failed. In discussing his decision to trust Mr. Kim, Mr. Trump displayed an impressive dose of self-awareness on this point: “I may be wrong. I mean, I may stand before you in six months and say, ‘Hey, I was wrong’. I don't know that I'll ever admit that, but I'll find some kind of an excuse.”

But if he somehow can pull off this trick, boy oh boy, won't everyone be amazed. This is ultimately what makes North Korea so irresistible to Mr. Trump. There are indeed lots of bad actors and dangerous regimes and looming threats on the world stage. But which regime is seen as the most unpredictable, the most isolated, the craziest of crazy? If Mr. Trump can crack this nut, he'll surely get the adulation — not to mention the Nobel Peace Prize — that he is so desperate for.


__________________________________________________________________________

The editorial board represents the opinions of the board, its editor and the publisher. It is separate from the newsroom and the Op-Ed section.

• A version of this editorial appears in The New York Times on June 13, 2018, on Page A24 of the New York print edition with the headline: “To the President, Another Tyrant to Admire”.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Trump Made Kim a Movie Trailer. We Made It Better.


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/12/opinion/north-korea-trump-singapore-style.html
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #11 on: June 15, 2018, 11:35:43 pm »


from The New York Times....

Trump Was Outfoxed in Singapore

The United States made important concessions to North Korea, and got nothing tangible.

By NICHOLAS KRISTOF | Tuesday, June 12, 2018

President Donald J. Trump and Kim Jong-un of North Korea on Sentosa Island in Singapore on Tuesday. — Photograph: Doug Mills/The New York Times.
President Donald J. Trump and Kim Jong-un of North Korea on Sentosa Island in Singapore on Tuesday. — Photograph: Doug Mills/The New York Times.

IT SURE LOOKS as if President Trump was hoodwinked in Singapore.

Trump made a huge concession — the suspension of military exercises with South Korea. That's on top of the broader concession of the summit meeting itself, security guarantees he gave North Korea and the legitimacy that the summit provides his counterpart, Kim Jong-un.

Within North Korea, the “very special bond” that Trump claimed to have formed with Kim will be portrayed this way: Kim forced the American president, through his nuclear and missile tests, to accept North Korea as a nuclear equal, to provide security guarantees to North Korea, and to cancel war games with South Korea that the North has protested for decades.

In exchange for these concessions, Trump seems to have won astonishingly little. In a joint statement, Kim merely “reaffirmed” the same commitment to denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula that North Korea has repeatedly made since 1992.

“They were willing to de-nuke,” Trump crowed at his news conference after his meetings with Kim. Trump seemed to believe he had achieved some remarkable agreement, but the concessions were all his own.

The most remarkable aspect of the joint statement was what it didn't contain. There was nothing about North Korea freezing plutonium and uranium programs, nothing about destroying intercontinental ballistic missiles, nothing about allowing inspectors to return to nuclear sites, nothing about North Korea making a full declaration of its nuclear program, nothing about a timetable, nothing about verification, not even any clear pledge to permanently halt testing of nuclear weapons or long-range missiles.

Kim seems to have completely out-negotiated Trump, and it's scary that Trump doesn't seem to realize this. For now Trump has much less to show than past negotiators who hammered out deals with North Korea like the 1994 Agreed Framework, which completely froze the country's plutonium program with a rigorous monitoring system.

Trump made a big deal in his news conference about recovering the remains of American soldiers from the Korean War, but this is nothing new. Back in 1989, on my first trip to North Korea, officials there made similar pledges about returning remains, and indeed North Korea has returned some remains over the years. It's not clear how many more remain.

Trump claimed an “excellent relationship” with Kim, and it certainly is better for the two leaders to be exchanging compliments rather than missiles. In a sense, Trump has eased the tensions that he himself created when he threatened last fall to “totally destroy” North Korea. I'm just not sure a leader should get credit for defusing a crisis that he himself created.

There's still plenty we don't know and lots of uncertainty about the future. But for now, the bottom line is that there’s no indication that North Korea is prepared to give up its nuclear weapons, and Trump didn't achieve anything remotely as good as the Iran nuclear deal, which led Iran to eliminate 98 percent of its enriched uranium.

There was also something frankly weird about an American president savaging Canada's prime minister one day and then embracing the leader of the most totalitarian country in the world.

“He's a very talented man,” Trump said of Kim. “I also learned that he loves his country very much.”

In an interview with Voice of America, Trump said “I like him” and added: “He's smart, loves his people, he loves his country.”

Trump praised Kim in the news conference and, astonishingly, even adopted North Korean positions as his own, saying that the United States military exercises in the region are “provocative”. That's a standard North Korean propaganda line. Likewise, Trump acknowledged that human rights in North Korea constituted a “rough situation,” but quickly added that “it's rough in a lot of places, by the way.” (Note that a 2014 United Nations report stated that North Korean human rights violations do “not have any parallel in the contemporary world”.)

Incredibly, Trump told Voice of America that he had this message for the North Korean people: “I think you have somebody that has a great feeling for them. He wants to do right by them and we got along really well.”

It's breathtaking to see an American president emerge as a spokesman for the dictator of North Korea.

One can argue that my perspective is too narrow: That what counts in a broader sense is that the risk of war is much less today than it was a year ago, and North Korea has at least stopped its nuclear tests and missile tests. Fundamentally, Trump has abandoned bellicose rhetoric and instead embraced the longstanding Democratic position — that we should engage North Korea, even if the result isn't immediate disarmament.

The 1994 Agreed Framework, for example, didn't denuclearize North Korea or solve the human rights issues there, but it still kept the regime from adding to its plutonium arsenal for eight years. Imperfect processes can still be beneficial, and the ongoing meetings between the United States and North Korea may result in a similar framework that at least freezes the North Korean arsenal.

Of all the things that could have gone badly wrong in a Trump administration, a “bloody nose” strike on North Korea leading to a nuclear war was perhaps the most terrifying. For now at least, Trump seems to have been snookered into the same kind of deeply frustrating diplomatic process with North Korea that he has complained about, but that is far better than war.

Even so, it's still bewildering how much Trump gave and how little he got. The cancellation of military exercises will raise questions among our allies, such as Japan, about America's commitment to those allies.

The Trump-Kim statement spoke vaguely about efforts “to build a lasting and stable peace regime on the Korean peninsula,” whatever that means. But that was much less specific than the 1994 pledge to exchange diplomatic liaison offices, and the 2005 pledge to work for a peace treaty to end the Korean War.

In January 2017, Trump proclaimed in a tweet: “North Korea just stated that it is in the final stages of developing a nuclear weapon capable of reaching parts of the U.S. It won't happen!” But in fact it appears to have happened on Trump's watch, and nothing in the Singapore summit seems to have changed that.

All this is to say that Kim Jong-un proved the more able negotiator. North Korean government officials have to limit their computer time, because of electricity shortages, and they are international pariahs — yet they are very savvy and shrewd, and they were counseled by one of the smartest Trump handlers of all, President Moon Jae-in of South Korea.

My guess is that Kim flattered Trump, as Moon has, and that Trump simply didn't realize how little he was getting. On my most recent visit to North Korea, officials were asking me subtle questions about the differences in views of Mike Pompeo and Nikki Haley; meanwhile, Trump said he didn't need to do much homework.

Whatever our politics, we should all want Trump to succeed in reducing tensions on the Korean Peninsula, and it's good to see that Trump now supports engagement rather than military options. There will be further negotiations, and these may actually freeze plutonium production and destroy missiles. But at least in the first round, Trump seems to have been snookered.


__________________________________________________________________________

• Nicholas Kristof has been a columnist for The New York Times since 2001. He grew up on a farm in Oregon, graduated from Harvard, studied law at Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, and then studied Arabic in Cairo. He was a long-time foreign correspondent for The N.Y. Times and speaks Chinese, Japanese and other languages. Mr. Kristof has won two Pulitzer Prizes for his coverage of Tiananmen Square and the genocide in Darfur, along with many humanitarian awards such as the Anne Frank Award and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize. With his wife, Sheryl WuDunn, he has written several books, most recently A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity (September 2014) about how to make a difference. Their last book, Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide, was a No.1 best seller. Mr. Kristof, who has lived on four continents and traveled to more than 150 countries, was The New York Times' first blogger and has millions of followers across social media platforms. Mr. Kristof and Ms. WuDunn are the parents of Gregory, Geoffrey and Caroline. Mr. Kristof enjoys running, backpacking and having his Chinese corrected by his children. Read his blog, On the Ground. Follow him on Google+, Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. His column appears every Sunday and Thursday.

• A version of this article appears in The New York Times on June 13, 2018, on Page A25 of the New York print edition with the headline: “Trump Was Outfoxed in Singapore”.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Trump and Kim See New Chapter for Nations After Summit


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/12/opinion/trump-kim-summit-north-korea.html
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #12 on: June 15, 2018, 11:36:39 pm »


Yep....Donald J. Trump was totally outfoxed by Kim Jong-un in Singapore alright.

It's great entertainment watching a simpleton & dumbfuck like Trump being made a fool of.

Yet he's too stupid to even realise he has been played. Hilarious, eh?
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #13 on: June 15, 2018, 11:37:15 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Trump and Kim meet, shake — and lie through their teeth

At the summit, the hotelier-in-chief traded American authority and legitimized a petty provocateur. For what?

By KATHLEEN PARKER | 6:21PM EDT — Tuesday, June 12, 2018

President Donald J. Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at Sentosa Island on June 12 in Singapore. — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.
President Donald J. Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at Sentosa Island on June 12 in Singapore. — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.

WELL, IT HAPPENED: The president and the dictator met, shook hands, looked each other in the eye, smiled for the cameras — and lied through their teeth.

The visuals, we witnessed; the lies we infer — from experience, history and redundant prescience.

But the summit was definitively historic. Let us count the ways.

Donald Trump, the unlikeliest president in U.S. history, traveled to Singapore to meet with the leader of North Korea, which no other American president has done (for excellent reasons), and hand-delivered to Kim Jong Un — an untrustworthy, murdering, torturing, enslaving, nuclearized global menace who starves his people and regularly threatens the United States and its allies — what he covets most.

Trump gave him power.

It's true, as you say, Mr. President, that you've done what no other would. You've traded American authority and legitimized a petty provocateur. For what? For the possibility, as you suggested, of a beachfront hotel overlooking the Yellow Sea, the Sea of Japan or, in the event of a peaceful reunification with South Korea, the East China Sea?

But for the minor matter of trademarks, Ivanka's swimsuits are sure to be a hit.

Don't get me wrong. I'd love to be mistaken. I'm not lobbying for failure, but there's little reason to believe that Kim will honor Trump's expectations — or vice versa. The so-called agreement includes nothing substantive to justify optimism — no defining terms of what denuclearization would look like, no outline for verification, not even a timeline.

All we have is Trump's assurance that Kim is a really good guy, which former NBA star Dennis Rodman already told us; that Kim is “very talented”, meaning God-knows-what, though certainly he's a visionary when it comes to coiffure. Lest we overlook Rodman's imperious role in North Korean relations, his presence in Singapore wearing a PotCoin T-shirt is being credited for the cryptocurrency's sudden surge.

As though June 12, 2018, needed a cartoonish flourish.

Thus far, it appears that the United States is allegedly giving more than it's allegedly getting. In addition to Trump agreeing to end what he called the “provocative” and “tremendously expensive” military exercises in the region, he also mentioned removing some 30,000 U.S. troops from South Korea, delivering a win to China and, seemingly, surprising U.S. military leadership in Korea.

The American command “has received no updated guidance on execution or cessation of training exercises, to include this fall's scheduled Ulchi Freedom Guardian,” U.S. Forces Korea spokeswoman Lieutenant Colonel Jennifer Lovett said in a statement.

Translation: What did he just say?!

The devil, as always, is in the propaganda — a four-minute video, styled like a movie trailer, that Trump showed Kim in which the two leaders are presented as world saviors. And the art of the deal in this case is in keeping with Trump's narcissistic personality disorder. He views the world through the lens of his own self-interest.

Thus, Trump tried to tempt Kim with his real estate developer's perspective. Explaining to reporters later, he said: “They have great beaches. You see that whenever they are exploding their cannons into the ocean. I said, ‘Boy look at that view’. Wouldn't that make a great condo? … I said, ‘Instead of doing that, you could have the best hotels in the world’.”

There's undeniable logic to this approach, even if it could benefit Trump directly. Aggressive nuke-mongering and tourism tend not to mix well. A great, big, beautiful hotel or condo building — or dozens — bearing the name Trump could help resuscitate North Korea's lifeless economy. And the rest of the world could exhale.

While some nations have issued congratulatory post-summit statements at absolutely no risk to themselves, others such as Iran were more circumspect. Said Iranian spokesman Mohammad Bagher Nobakht: “We don't know what type of person the North Korean leader is negotiating with. It is not clear that he [Trump] would not cancel the agreement before returning home” — a caveat not lacking in merit.

Meanwhile, the International Atomic Energy Agency stands at the ready to begin verification activities as warranted. Trump, too, has promised to stay on top of the deal, telling reporters: “We're going to have to check it. We will check it. Total and complete.”

That is just super awesome, Mr. President.

And if the deal should collapse any minute now?

Trump is prepared for that, too.

“I may be wrong,” he said to reporters. “I mean I may stand before you in six months and say, ‘Hey I was wrong’. I don't know that I'll ever admit that, but I'll find some kind of an excuse.”

Indeed. Total and complete, exploding cannons and all.


__________________________________________________________________________

Kathleen Parker writes a twice-weekly column on politics and culture for The Washington Post. In 2010, she received the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary for “her perceptive, often witty columns on an array of political and moral issues, gracefully sharing the experiences and values that lead her to unpredictable conclusions.” A Florida native, Parker started her column in 1987 when she was a staff writer for the Orlando Sentinel. She joined The Washington Post Writers Group in 2006. She is the author of Save the Males: Why Men Matter, Why Women Should Care (2008). Further honours include the H.L. Mencken Writing Award in 1993.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/trump-and-kim-meet-shake--and-lie-through-their-teeth/2018/06/12/11eb3c9a-6e7e-11e8-bf86-a2351b5ece99_story.html
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #14 on: June 15, 2018, 11:37:45 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Kim Jong Un pulls off a magic trick

The North Korean leader was publicly embraced by the world's most powerful nation.

By DAVID IGNATIUS | 7:55AM EDT — Tuesday, June 12, 2018

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and President Donald J. Trump in Singapore on June 12. — Photograph: Korean Central News Agency/Reuters.
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and President Donald J. Trump in Singapore on June 12. — Photograph: Korean Central News Agency/Reuters.

CREDIT President Trump for seizing the diplomatic moment at the Singapore summit. But the person who most shaped this extraordinary encounter was North Korean leader Kim Jong Un — who is indeed, as Trump said on Tuesday, a “very talented” young man who has achieved something that “one out of 10,000 probably couldn't do.”

It's almost a magic trick, what Kim has accomplished: He has obtained Trump as a partner in rebranding his poor, brutally autocratic country as a modern condo-resort investment project. He has offered a vague promise to “work toward complete denuclearization” and somehow persuaded Trump to describe the thin, half-page summit communique as a “very comprehensive” agreement.

Perhaps this deal will lead eventually to the complete, verifiable, irreversible denuclearization the president had proclaimed was his goal. But for now, Kim has given up very little militarily, in return for a public embrace from the world's most powerful nation. Most important, Kim has received, again at minimal cost, a pledge that the United States will halt joint military exercises with South Korea, undercutting the most significant check against his regime.

Trump celebrated his skill as a dealmaker after Tuesday's summit: “That's what I do. My whole life has been deals, I've done great at it.” But more striking was this latest demonstration of his calling as a reality-television star, with a born actor's flair for the dramatic and a self-mesmerizing ability to speak every line, however dubious, as if it were true.

Maybe this is “The Apprentice: Korean Dictator Edition”, in which Trump is the mentor for an up-and-coming “big guy”. Watching the clasped elbows and back pats, you could almost forget that Kim had killed an uncle and a half brother on his road to Singapore. Trump explained his respect for “anybody that takes over a situation like he did at 26 years of age and is able to run it and run it tough.” Kim, you're hired!

I don't mean to minimize the summit's potential benefit for the world. The world is safer than it was a week ago, and Trump is getting some deserved global applause.

But we should see the Singapore meeting for what it is: Kim set this ball rolling five years ago, with a little-noticed call for “denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula” and “high-level talks” with the United States. Since then, Kim has deftly maneuvered the twists and turns — defying a threat of “fire and fury” obliteration from Trump last year to complete development of a nuclear-tipped missile that could threaten America. Once Kim had obtained this capability in November, he began to pivot toward negotiations.

It was a breathtaking piece of mutual audacity for Kim and Trump to push each other to the edge of the cliff and then walk back. But by Tuesday, it was clear that Kim was getting more than he was giving, and that Trump wanted the summit so badly, he was prepared to swallow some of his earlier demands. This seems like the sort of deal — opening the door for Pyongyang in exchange for unanchored promises — that national security adviser John Bolton has been warning about for 25 years.

I think Trump is right in betting that American-led modernization and economic growth will, over time, bring political changes that can diminish a potential nuclear threat to the United States and its allies. But I wonder: Does it occur to Trump that this is precisely the bet that President Barack Obama made with the Iran nuclear agreement, also known in Trump-speak as “the worst deal ever made”? The main difference is that Obama got a real, verifiable commitment to destroy Iran's nuclear stockpile before making any major American concessions.

A final, astonishing aspect of Tuesday's summit was Trump's gratuitous swipe at South Korea, a faithful democratic ally. I don't just mean Trump's sudden decision to shelve “provocative” U.S.-South Korean military exercises; America still has plenty of military power nearby, if needed. And let's even accept Trump's insistence that “at some point” the United States should remove its roughly 30,000 troops — though their presence reassures South Korea, Japan and even China.

No, the truly amazing Trump insult was to suggest that South Korean President Moon Jae-in made his bold opening to Kim to reduce a threat to the PyeongChang Winter Olympics and thereby make money. “They weren't exactly selling tickets,” Trump said at Tuesday's news conference. “It sold like wildfire” after North Korea agreed to participate, said Trump, ever the crass merchandiser.

Diplomacy isn't always pretty. Dubious people sometimes do very good things. So let's celebrate Trump's success in Singapore and hope someone can translate President Ronald Reagan's injunction to “trust but verify” into Korean.


__________________________________________________________________________

David Ignatius writes a twice-a-week foreign affairs column for The Washington Post and contributes to the PostPartisan blog. Ignatius has also written eight spy novels: Bloodmoney (2011), The Increment (2009), Body of Lies (2007), The Sun King (1999), A Firing Offense (1997), The Bank of Fear (1994), SIRO: A Novel (1991), and Agents of Innocence (1987). Body of Lies was made into a 2008 film starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Russell Crowe. Ignatius joined The Washington Post in 1986 as editor of its Sunday Outlook section. In 1990 he became foreign editor, and in 1993, assistant managing editor for business news. He began writing his column in 1998 and continued even during a three-year stint as executive editor of the International Herald Tribune in Paris. Earlier in his career, Ignatius was a reporter for The Wall Street Journal, covering at various times the steel industry, the Justice Department, the CIA, the Senate, the Middle East and the State Department. His numerous honours and awards include the 2000 Gerald Loeb Award for Commentary; the 2004 Edward Weintal Prize; the 2010 Urbino International Press Award; the 2013 Overseas Press Club Award for Foreign Affairs Commentary; a Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Committee for Foreign Journalists; a Legion D'Honneur awarded by the French government; and as The Washington Post's foreign editor, Ignatius supervised the paper's Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of the Iraqi invasion of Kuwai. David Ignatius grew up in Washington, D.C., and studied political theory at Harvard College and economics at Kings College, Cambridge. His numerous He lives in Washington with his wife and has three daughters.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/global-opinions/kim-jong-un-pulls-off-a-magic-trick/2018/06/12/19f7d6c6-6e85-11e8-bf86-a2351b5ece99_story.html
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #15 on: June 16, 2018, 01:28:25 pm »


How Korean Central TV (from North Korea) sees the meeting between their great leader Kim Jong-un and U.S. President Donald J. Trump…





…Trump's great propaganda gift to a despot regime.....and note during that documentary Trump saluting a North Korean general.
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #16 on: June 16, 2018, 01:39:00 pm »


from The Seattle Times....

Trump praises North Korea's real estate

During his summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, President Trump
said that North Korea's beaches are a prime real estate opportunity.


By DAVID HORSEY | 10:08AM EDT Friday, June 15, 2018



KIM JONG UN runs the most ruthlessly repressive regime in the world, but, since his summit in Singapore with North Korea's leader, President Donald Trump has expressed no concern for the multitude of Kim's victims. Abandoning traditional American advocacy for human rights, Trump complimented Kim on his talent, toughness and love for his people. Such obsequious flattery was unnecessary to solicit Kim's vague promises about curtailing his nuclear weapons program, but Trump couldn't resist giving the dictator gushing praise, as well as advice about how he could exploit the country's beachside real estate.

__________________________________________________________________________

See more of David Horsey's cartoons at The Seattle Times HERE.

https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/trump-praises-north-koreas-real-estate
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7525



WWW
« Reply #17 on: June 17, 2018, 04:08:36 am »

a rigged system for morons lol

Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2018, 05:50:23 pm »


I betcha Donald J. Trump bends over and takes it up the arse from Kim Jong-un when they next meet.



Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7525



WWW
« Reply #19 on: June 19, 2018, 05:08:11 am »

Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #20 on: June 19, 2018, 11:47:36 am »


Hahaha.....only a gullible simpleton would believe North Korea has given up their nukes.

In ten years time, North Korea will still have nuclear warheads on missiles targeted at American cities as a deterent against America invading North Korea.

Kim Jong-un has played Donald J. Trump aka President Dumb like a fiddle, yet Trump is too much of a simpleton to realise it.

It's going to be hilarious when he eventually works out he has been “had”.

SNIGGER!!!




Haw Haw Haw … “Played like a Fiddle!”







Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7525



WWW
« Reply #21 on: June 19, 2018, 12:55:23 pm »

Haw Haw Haw jackass
kim plays fiddle while communism burns and fails like it normally does
Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #22 on: June 19, 2018, 07:26:31 pm »


You are obviously as much a simpleton as your stupid hero Donald J. Trump.

Only a gullible idiot would believe anything Kim Jong-un says.

A gullible idiot such as Trump and also such as yourself.
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7525



WWW
« Reply #23 on: June 28, 2018, 02:51:50 pm »


do you think trump dont know about commie lies?
msm is a perfect example they are left and lie everyday 24/7


we all know lefty's are the most  untrustworthy
vile creatures on the planet

welfare kids that grew up with no father
end up as leftwing emotional babies

Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 29259


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #24 on: June 28, 2018, 04:40:43 pm »


Haw Haw Haw … “Played like a Fiddle!”







Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 

Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Open XNC2 Smileys
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum

Buy traffic for your forum/website
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy
Page created in 0.234 seconds with 11 queries.