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Mein Führer MUST be applauded …… or else!!!


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Author Topic: Mein Führer MUST be applauded …… or else!!!  (Read 286 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« on: February 06, 2018, 06:08:40 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Trump calls Democratic lawmakers who didn't
applaud him ‘treasonous’, ‘un-American’


The president went off script during an address designed
to tout the benefits of the Republican tax package.


By ANNE GEARAN and JOHN WAGNER | 5:21PM EST — Monday, February 05, 2018

President Donald Trump waves after speaking on tax policy during a visit to Sheffer Corp., on February 5th, in Blue Ash, Ohio. — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.
President Donald Trump waves after speaking on tax policy during a visit to Sheffer Corporation, on February 5th, in Blue Ash, Ohio.
 — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.


BLUE ASH, OHIO — President Trump on Monday lambasted Democrats who did not applaud as he relayed positive numbers about black and Hispanic unemployment during his State of the Union address, accusing them of being “un-American” and “treasonous”.

“Even on positive news like that, really positive news like that, they were like death and un-American,” Trump said here as he went off script during a speech on tax cuts. “Somebody said ‘treasonous’. I mean, yeah, I guess, why not? Shall we call that treason? Why not? I mean, they certainly didn't seem to love our country very much.”

The president's incendiary assessment came in the middle of a speech designed to tout the benefits of the Republican tax-cut package, which Trump said set off “a tidal wave of good news that continues to grow each day.”

As he spoke, Trump made no mention of the remarkably volatile day on Wall Street that ended with the Dow Jones industrial average plunging more than 1,150 points. Trump frequently cites the Dow's record rise over the last year as evidence that his tax cut and deregulation programs are working.

Though a White House spokesman told reporters beforehand it was not a political speech, the event in many respects resembled Trump's freewheeling campaign rallies at which he pingpongs from one subject to another.

Trump touted a Republican Senate candidate, Representative James B. Renacci (Ohio), and reveled in the crowd's chant of “U-S-A.”

Besides assailing the “dead silence” of Democrats at his State of the Union speech last week, Trump recounted his 2016 election victory in Ohio, talked up Republican prospects in the 2018 elections and referred to reports that Hillary Clinton's discarded smartphones were destroyed by hammers during her tenure as secretary of state.

Trump also praised the work of Representative Devin Nunes (Republican-California), whose controversial memo accusing the FBI of surveillance abuses was released last week with Trump's blessing.

“Oh but did we catch them in the act or what?” Trump said. “You know what I'm talking about. Oh, did we catch them in the act. They are very embarrassed. They never thought they were going to get caught. We caught them. We caught them. It's like so much fun, like the great sleuth.”

In his State of the Union address, Trump touted rates of unemployment for blacks and Hispanics that he said were the “lowest in the history of the country.”

Democrats have argued that Trump is taking undue credit for a trend that began under President Barack Obama. Since the end of the recession, the unemployment rates for all Americans have fallen, including those of blacks and Hispanics.

The black unemployment rate was at its lowest point in history in December after it was more than cut in half during the last three-quarters of Obama's presidency. The unemployment rate for black Americans actually jumped in January, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

Trump said on Monday Democrats had decided in advance not to applaud.

“It was a game, you know they play games,” Trump said. “They were told, don't even make a facial movement.”

Trump said he noticed one lawmaker who was “putting his hands together.”

“He was probably severely reprimanded, don't you think?” Trump said, complaining that Democrats “would rather see Trump do badly, ok, than our country do well…. It's very selfish.”

Democrats reacted angrily to the president's characterization of treason, a crime punishable by death.

“Whether I chose to applaud or not applaud is a First Amendment right that our forefathers wrote down and that generations before me have sacrificed many a life for,” said Senator Jon Tester (Democrat-Montana). “And I would just say the president's out of line with that statement.”

In an unusual double-themed trip, first lady Melania Trump on Monday accompanied the president to Cincinnati, where she toured opioid addiction facilities at Cincinnati Children's Hospital.

President Trump, meanwhile, toured Sheffer Corporation, a cylinder manufacturer outside Cincinnati, which gave its 126 employees $1,000 bonuses that management said were made possible by the package signed into law by Trump in December.

Sheffer CEO Jeff Norris, who led Trump on his tour, appeared earlier during Monday on Fox News, taking a dig at House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi's description of the tax-related bonuses as “crumbs”.

“We consider that fine dining,” Norris said.

Trump continued the ridicule, telling the Ohio crowd that Pelosi is “our secret weapon.”

“She's a rich woman who lives in a beautiful house in California who wants to give all of your money away,” Trump said to laughter.

Trump played up the tax cuts in his State of the Union address last week, claiming the package will have broad benefits, although it is weighted toward the wealthy and big corporations. February is when Trump has promised that Americans will begin seeing slightly larger paychecks because of the changes.

The Republican package passed in December as the most unpopular bill in decades, but a Monmouth University poll last week showed a significant swing toward the bill. Although 26 percent of Americans approved of the package in mid-December, support in the latest Monmouth poll rose to 44 percent.


__________________________________________________________________________

John Wagner reported and Erica Werner contributed to this report from Washington.

• Anne Gearan is a White House reporter for The Washington Post.

• John Wagner is a national political reporter covering the White House for The Washington Post.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Trump: Democrats' behavior during State of the Unin speech was ‘un-American’

 • VIDEO: Trump's speech on taxes, Democrats and the mid-terms, in three minutes


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/trump-to-visit-ohio-company-that-gave-out-1000-bonuses-following-tax-overhaul/2018/02/05/a2cec73c-0a91-11e8-8b0d-891602206fb7_story.html
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2018, 06:09:05 pm »


Talk about a tin-pot dictator, eh?
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« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2018, 08:56:44 pm »

so wrong
a dictator would have dragged those worthless american hating traitors outside and shot the lot of them
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« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2018, 10:00:47 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Trump's ‘marching orders’ to the Pentagon: Plan a grand military parade

At the president's direction, officials say they have begun planning a large-scale military event in Washington,
inspired by France's Bastille Day celebration.


By GREG JAFFE and PHILIP RUCKER | 7:49PM EST — Tuesday, February 06, 2018

French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife Brigitte Macron, left, and President Donald J. Trump and first lady Melania Trump, right, stand in front of American and French flags held by soldiers at the end of the annual Bastille Day military parade last July. — Photograph: Stephen Crowley/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife Brigitte Macron, left, and President Donald J. Trump and first lady Melania Trump, right,
stand in front of American and French flags held by soldiers at the end of the annual Bastille Day military parade last July.
 — Photograph: Stephen Crowley/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


PRESIDENT TRUMP's vision of soldiers marching and tanks rolling down the boulevards of Washington is moving closer to reality in the Pentagon and White House, where officials say they have begun to plan a grand military parade later this year showcasing the might of America's armed forces.

Trump has long mused publicly and privately about wanting such a parade, but a January 18th meeting between Trump and top generals in the Pentagon's tank — a room reserved for top-secret discussions — marked a tipping point, according to two officials briefed on the planning.

Surrounded by the military's highest-ranking officials, including Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman General Joseph F. Dunford Jr., Trump's seemingly abstract desire for a parade was suddenly heard as a presidential directive, the officials said.

“The marching orders were: I want a parade like the one in France,” said a military official who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the planning discussions are supposed to remain confidential. “This is being worked at the highest levels of the military.”

Shows of military strength are not typical in the United States — and they don't come cheap. The cost of shipping Abrams tanks and high-tech hardware to Washington could run in the millions, and military officials said it was unclear how they would pay for it.

A White House official familiar with the planning described the discussions as “brainstorming” and said nothing was settled. “Right now, there's really no meat on the bones,” said the official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe internal discussions.

After The Washington Post first published this story, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders issued a statement confirming that plans are underway.

“President Trump is incredibly supportive of America's great service members who risk their lives every day to keep our country safe,” Sanders said. “He has asked the Department of Defense to explore a celebration at which all Americans can show their appreciation.”

The Pentagon also confirmed the plans following The Post's initial report. “We are aware of the request and are in the process of determining specific details. We will share more information throughout the planning process,” Defense Department spokesman Thomas Crosson said in a statement.

The inspiration for Trump's push is last year's Bastille Day celebration in Paris, which the president attended as a guest of French President Emmanuel Macron. Trump was awestruck by the tableau of uniformed French troops marching down Avenue des Champs-Elysees with military tanks, armored vehicles, gun trucks and carriers — complete with fighter jets flying over the Arc de Triomphe and painting the sky with streaks of blue, white and red smoke for the colors of the French flag.


President Trump and his wife, Melania Trump, attend the traditional Bastille Day military parade in Paris last July. — Photograph: Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images.
President Trump and his wife, Melania Trump, attend the traditional Bastille Day military parade in Paris last July. — Photograph: Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images.

Aboard Air Force One en route home from Paris in July, aides said Trump told them that he was dazzled by the French display and that he wanted one at home.

It was still on his mind two months later when he met with Macron on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly in New York.

“It was one of the greatest parades I've ever seen,” Trump told reporters. “It was two hours on the button, and it was military might, and I think a tremendous thing for France and for the spirit of France.”

Seated next to Macron, Trump added: “We're going to have to try to top it.”

Several administration officials said the parade planning began in recent weeks and involves White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly, but they cautioned that it is in the preliminary stages. D.C. officials said they had not been notified of parade plans.

A date has not been selected, although officials said Trump would like to tie the parade to a patriotic holiday. Officials are weighing weather patterns as well as competing events, such as the massive annual Independence Day celebration on the Mall.

Trump officials had discussed Memorial Day on May 28th, and July 4th, but the Pentagon prefers Veterans Day on November 11th — in part because it would coincide with the 100th anniversary of the victorious end of World War I and therefore be less associated with the president and politics. “That's what everyone is hoping,” said the military official.

It is unclear what role Trump would play, whether he may perhaps serve as a grand marshal or observe the spectacle from a reviewing stand.

The location is still being discussed, though Trump has said he would like it to proceed along Pennsylvania Avenue, which links the Capitol and the White House. It would be the same route as Trump's inaugural parade and pass by his family's showpiece: Trump International Hotel.

Even before he was sworn in as president, Trump was dreaming of America's war machine on display in front of the White House or Capitol.

“We're going to show the people as we build up our military,” Trump said in an interview with The Washington Post before his inauguration. “… That military may come marching down Pennsylvania Avenue. That military may be flying over New York City and Washington, D.C., for parades. I mean, we're going to be showing our military.”


Troops march over Arlington Memorial Bridge as they head toward the Pentagon during the National Victory Day Parade on June 8th, 1991. The parade celebrated the end of the Gulf War. — Photograph: Doug Mills/Associated Press.
Troops march over Arlington Memorial Bridge as they head toward the Pentagon during the National Victory Day Parade on June 8th, 1991.
The parade celebrated the end of the Gulf War. — Photograph: Doug Mills/Associated Press.


But big military parades — even those launched with the best of intentions — carry risks and troublesome historical echoes.

With a few exceptions — such as President George H.W. Bush's 1991 parade down Constitution Avenue celebrating victory in the Persian Gulf War — presidents have avoided displays of military hardware that are more associated in the American mind with the Soviet Union's Red Square celebrations or, more recently, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's efforts to show off his Taepodong missiles.

“I don't think there's a lack of love and respect for our armed forces in the United States,” said Douglas Brinkley, a presidential historian at Rice University. “What are they going to do, stand there while Donald Trump waves at them? It smacks of something you see in a totalitarian country — unless there's a genuine, earnest reason to be doing it.”

The White House official rejected the suggestion that some associate a military parade with strongmen, saying it would be a “celebration of the men and women who give us freedom.”

“That's the opposite of a totalitarian government,” the official said.

Weaponry on the streets of Washington is not unheard of. Presidents Harry S. Truman and John F. Kennedy had military equipment during their inaugural parades, in 1949 and 1961 respectively, during key junctures in the Cold War, said Michael Beschloss, another presidential historian.

“Set against the backdrop of American history, it does seem to hark back to the harsh days of the Cold War,” Beschloss said. “Those parades were a counterpoint to the parades in front of Lenin's tomb at Red Square … One reason the Soviets had those parades was to distract the world from the fact that the Soviet military was actually much weaker than the Soviets were claiming.”

But generally, the United States has shied away from parading its military assets, calculating that doing so was not necessary for the world's preeminent superpower.

There is no law or regulation preventing Trump from putting on a military parade, but there are plenty of potential complications that military leaders are likely to raise with the president. One worry is practical: that 70-ton tanks built for the battlefield would chew up Pennsylvania Avenue blacktop.

The military might also want to weigh in on the kind of equipment on parade. One concern is that big displays of missile launchers might evoke Pyongyang-style nationalism more than American patriotism.

A parade would probably be interpreted as another stroke of nuclear gamesmanship. Tensions between North Korea and the United States have risen over the past year as Trump and Kim have taunted each other with playground nicknames and threats.


A North Korean Taepodong-class missile is displayed during a military parade marking the 60th anniversary of the Korean War armistice in Pyongyang on July 27th, 2013. — Photograph: Ed Jones/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
A North Korean Taepodong-class missile is displayed during a military parade marking the 60th anniversary of the Korean War armistice in Pyongyang
on July 27th, 2013. — Photograph: Ed Jones/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


After Kim warned last month that he had a “nuclear button” on his desk, Trump replied: “Will someone from his depleted and food starved regime please inform him that I too have a Nuclear Button, but it is a much bigger & more powerful one than his, and my Button works!”

The White House official said a parade would have nothing to do with Trump's feuds with Kim but would be designed as a broad show of strength to send a warning to all of America's adversaries.

Then there are the domestic pitfalls. At a time when Mattis and his top generals have been complaining about the state of military readiness and lobbying Congress for more money, pulling equipment off line for a costly parade could send the wrong signal.

There are personal risks for Trump, as well. Although he attended a military high school, Trump did not serve in the armed forces, avoiding the draft during the Vietnam War by claiming bone spurs. Critics have called Trump disingenuous for basking in the military's glory.

Honoring the troops without politicizing their service has long been a dilemma for presidents. President Barack Obama's frequent focus on wounded troops fighting to resume their lives struck the wrong chord with some conservatives.

One of George W. Bush's biggest blunders as president came in 2003 when he landed on an aircraft carrier bearing a “Mission Accomplished” banner to claim victory in the Iraq War.

Former aides say Bush would have loved a big parade, but they recognized a problem: The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan never ended. Such subtleties — the United States is now dropping bombs in seven countries — don't seem to have factored into Trump's calculations.

With the mid-term elections approaching and Trump's approval ratings at historic lows, the lure of honoring the troops is powerful.

“Who flipped the coin for the Super Bowl on Sunday?” asked Peter Feaver, a former Bush White House official and professor at Duke University. “It was Medal of Honor winners. Why? The military brings us together.”

But Feaver also issued a warning for Trump, who is known for his excesses.

“A military parade,” he said, “is the kind of thing that can easily be overdone.”


__________________________________________________________________________

• Greg Jaffe is a national security reporter for The Washington Post, where he has been since March 2009. Previously, he covered the White House and the military for The Post.

• Philip Rucker is the White House Bureau Chief for The Washington Post. He previously has covered Congress, the Obama White House, and the 2012 and 2016 presidential campaigns. He joined The Post in 2005 as a local news reporter.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Trump wanted a parade. He might get one.

 • The Fix: A grand military parade might be the most thoroughly Trump moment of this presidency

 • The military parade that Trump envisions was more common in another era


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/trumps-marching-orders-to-the-pentagon-plan-a-grand-military-parade/2018/02/06/9e19ca88-0b55-11e8-8b0d-891602206fb7_story.html
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« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2018, 10:07:53 pm »


What an awesome spectacle. Perhaps the American troops could goose-step their way along Pennsylvania Avenue. They could even try to out-goose-step (ie....kick their feet higher) than North Korean troops do as they parade in front of Kim Jong-un in Pyongyang. Trump could stand on a podium outside number 1600 and jut his jaw out in an attempt to copy Mussolini.

Imagine that, eh? Cadet Bone Spurs, who turned into a draft-dodging yellow-bellied, gutless-wonder coward when his country need him, revelling in the glory of the military he refused to serve with when his country needed him because he was terrified he'd be petrified with fear in the face of the enemy.

I reckon somebody should organise an exhibition documenting the Commander-in-Chief's brave military service to coincide with the military parade in Washington D.C. They could put a huge, blank canvas on display to wow the people with Trump's military prowess and bravery. Hilarious, eh?






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« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2018, 10:41:42 am »

you are he who whines too much about how stupid you are
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« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2018, 06:41:25 pm »



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« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2018, 03:14:35 am »

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« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2018, 10:27:24 am »


A good template for Donald J. Trump's proposed “wankfest” military parade for Washington D.C. ……


A screen grab taken from North Korea’s KCTV on February 8th shows members of the military taking part in a parade, with missiles displayed, in Pyongyang. — Photograph: Korean Central Television/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
A screen grab taken from North Korea’s KCTV on February 8th shows members of the military taking part in a parade, with missiles displayed, in Pyongyang.
 — Photograph: Korean Central Television/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.








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« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2018, 11:13:31 am »

MoonBat Tiny Dick Parade



Moonbat Fashion Show

« Last Edit: February 09, 2018, 11:29:13 am by Im2Sexy4MyPants » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2018, 02:23:47 pm »


Only stupid wankers need HUGE military parades to stroke their ego and compensate for their tiny-little needle-dick (and small hands to go with the miniscule dick).

Donald J. Trump and Kim Jong-un are two birds of the same feather.

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« Reply #11 on: February 09, 2018, 04:44:42 pm »



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« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2018, 08:52:54 pm »


from The Washington Post....

What's Trump's parade really about? His bottomless insecurity.

It's for the president's ego, not the military.

By EUGENE ROBINSON | 7:50PM EST — Thursday, February 08, 2018

President Donald J. Trump, French President Emmanuel Macron and others attend the Bastille Day military parade on July 14th, 2017, in Paris. — Photograph: Joel Saget/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
President Donald J. Trump, French President Emmanuel Macron and others attend the Bastille Day military parade on July 14th, 2017, in Paris.
 — Photograph: Joel Saget/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


WELL, of course the president who claimed bone spurs to dodge the Vietnam War wants the biggest, bestest military parade ever, with lots of tanks and rockets and flags — zillions of flags — and fighter jets screaming overhead. Why is anyone surprised?

We should have seen it coming. And be careful, parade-watchers: As far as Dear Leader Trump is concerned, anyone who fails to cheer as the bands play and the troops march by will surely be guilty of treason.

It was entirely predictable to learn, thanks to The Washington Post, that Trump has been hectoring the nation's top military leaders to give him a huge martial parade down Pennsylvania Avenue, complete with heavy weapons. Trump envisions a display of military might like the parades we used to see file past the Kremlin reviewing stand in the days of the Soviet Union — and like the somewhat less grim procession he jealously witnessed in Paris on Bastille Day.

Trump has already matched North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un in dangerous, unhinged rhetoric. Now it appears he hopes to surpass his rival in linear mileage of meaningless military display.

It is hard to imagine any other president summoning his generals to demand not a better strategy in Afghanistan, not a detailed plan for success in Syria, but rather an elaborate entertainment that gives him an opportunity to be seen reviewing the troops. In this reality-show presidency, it sounds like the kind of extravaganza that one could imagine as a series finale. If so, bring it on.

Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders issued one of her customary useless explanations on Wednesday. “President Trump is incredibly supportive of America's great service members who risk their lives every day to keep our country safe,” she said in a statement. “He has asked the Department of Defense to explore a celebration at which all Americans can show their appreciation.”

We've had military parades in the capital before, but generally they have been staged to mark a victory — the rout of Saddam Hussein's forces in the 1991 Gulf War, for example. At present, we don't have a fresh victory to celebrate — or even a vaguely recent one. Trump wants the pomp without the usual circumstance.

Again, why should anyone be shocked that Trump would care much about style and not at all about substance? The only question is whether the parade idea is evidence of his alleged political genius or his delicate and damaged psyche. I vote for the latter.

There is a semi-plausible argument that Trump could consciously use such a patriotic extravaganza as a wedge, the way he has used the national anthem protests in the NFL. It could be a with-me-or-against-me ploy. If you support the parade, you love America; if you don't, you don't.

But a celebratory military parade with nothing to celebrate could also highlight the gulf between Trump's campaign promises and his actions. He pledged to wind wars down and bring the troops home; he has done quite the opposite. A claim of final victory over the Islamic State — perhaps Trump's most likely boast — would be made to look empty and foolish by the next terrorist attack.

Trump is more a creature of instinct than calculation. My guess is that both his narcissism and his authoritarianism are at play in his need to honor himself with a parade.

Despite his boastful tweetstorms, the president clearly realizes that his approval ratings are historically low. He is so unpopular that he will not even risk a state visit to London to open the new U.S. Embassy there for fear of being humiliated by mass protests. The campaign-style rallies he so enjoys do not appear well-designed to advance a political agenda; they do, however, boost his spirits and massage his ego.

Imagine all the love he would feel while reviewing a miles-long parade whose participants all had the sworn duty to show him respect as commander in chief. He would be saluted and serenaded to his heart's content. It would be an egomaniac's heaven.

Trump's big parade would also be a massive display of power — not so much the nation's as his own. There is not a soul on Earth who doubts the overwhelming strength of the U.S. military. I can think of one soul, however, who is insecure enough in his own authority that he accuses members of Congress who do not stand and applaud him of treason.

Trump seems shocked to learn that the legislative and judicial branches do not have to do whatever he says. The military marching bands do, though.


__________________________________________________________________________

• Eugene Robinson writes a twice-a-week column on politics and culture for The Washington Post, contributes to the PostPartisan blog, and hosts a weekly online chat with readers. In a three-decade career at The Post, Robinson has been city hall reporter, city editor, foreign correspondent in Buenos Aires and London, foreign editor, and assistant managing editor in charge of the paper's Style section.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Trump wants a military parade. What can the Pentagon give him?

 • Mattis says he owes Trump options on a military parade but won't share his feelings about one

 • Paul Waldman: Trump wants a big parade (for himself). It's a surpassingly dumb idea.

 • Jennifer Rubin: First, a military parade. Will a mock uniform with epaulets be next?

 • Karen Tumulty: The most disturbing thing about Trump's parade plan


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/whats-trumps-parade-really-about-his-bottomless-insecurity/2018/02/08/017f7bc4-0d16-11e8-8b0d-891602206fb7_story.html
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« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2018, 11:44:57 am »

more stupid bullshit for brain dead zombies from the wp=wanker pissants
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« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2018, 01:16:21 pm »



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« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2018, 12:13:25 am »

Whatever the left tries on trump always backfires on them

Trump is champion at trolling the whore fake news media

be so funny when your dumb arse commie clowns end up wearing handcuffs
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2018, 04:40:56 pm »


from The Washington Post....

To North Korea, Trump's military parade will look like fear, not strength

Kim Jong Un will think his trolling is working.

By JEFFEY LEWIS | 10:29AM EST — Saturday, February 10, 2018

A military parade Thursday in Pyongyang, North Korea. — Photograph: Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service/Associated Press.
A military parade Thursday in Pyongyang, North Korea. — Photograph: Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service/Associated Press.

I SPEND A LOT OF TIME watching military parades. It's not because I particularly like them — in fact, I find them tedious and jingoistic — but because often they are a source of valuable information about countries such as Russia, China and North Korea, where that's usually hard to come by. Analysts like me scrutinize both the military hardware on display and the leaders watching the parade.

The Russians, Chinese and North Koreans know we're watching, of course. That's part of the game — parades are massive propaganda efforts that these governments mount to convey a certain message both to their own people and to the rest of the world. Our job as analysts is to decipher the message Moscow, Beijing or Pyongyang is trying to send, and then scrutinize it closely to discover the things that they perhaps don't want us to notice.

Last year, for instance, we caught a glimpse of Kim Jong Un's sister working frantically behind the scenes, which was one of the first hints that she was an important person behind the throne. This weekend, we see her representing her brother at the Olympics.

Squint hard enough at the details in a parade, and you may catch a glimpse of the future.

Parades in places like China and North Korea only make sense if we understand the broader propaganda context in which they take place. And from my experience analyzing parades there, I can predict how the military parade President Trump wants to hold in Washington this year might play in Moscow, Beijing or Pyongyang.

It will not, despite what Trump may think, be seen as a sign of American confidence.

American presidents haven't felt the need to have annual grand military parades to demonstrate either the nation's strength or convey their control over the armed forces.

Independent analysts here and abroad have so many ways to monitor U.S. defense programs and our nation's political shenanigans that we haven't really felt like the absence of parades is some kind of hole in our understanding of our country.

But parades are already a recurring leitmotif of the Trump era: One of the president's fondest memories, going by how often he mentions it, is leading cadets from his military academy in a Columbus Day parade. Trump reportedly wanted to include military vehicles in his inaugural parade, and now, having seen a grand military parade in France for Bastille Day, he's pushing the idea with the Pentagon again.

Are we really going to be looking at where John F. Kelly sits or how Trump reacts to him to determine whether Kelly is likely to remain as chief of staff or be removed in a staff purge? Or wondering whether the inclusion of an F-35 flyover means that the program no longer suffers presidential disapproval? I suppose we are.

And yet, of all the reasons to be uncomfortable with the idea of a parade, I am not bothered that the United States will look like Russia, China or North Korea. Trump is a stain on our democracy, parade or no parade.

There is a deeper, more disconcerting issue here, though, that goes beyond whatever divisions and military equipment march down Pennsylvania Avenue. In an interview with The Washington Post before his inauguration, Trump placed the issue of parades in a broader context about signaling military strength: “We're going to show the people as we build up our military. … That military may come marching down Pennsylvania Avenue. That military may be flying over New York City and Washington, D.C., for parades. I mean, we're going to be showing our military.”

But does this actually convey strength?

In North Korean state media and other sources, the line on the way the United States brandishes nuclear weapons is rather counterintuitive: Pyongyang doesn't seem to think we're acting tough. Instead, the U.S. posture is projecting a picture of what frightens Washington most of all. The North Koreans are fond of saying a “frightened dog barks loudest.” But you really get a sense of this by watching how North Korea trolled the citizens of Hawaii after the false alarm about an impending missile attack in an article titled Americans Suffer from Nuclear-phobia: “Nuclear-phobia by the nuclear force of the DPRK has now caused a tragicomedy in the U.S. … The citizens and tourists in great disarray went busy evacuating amid the heightened fear and delusion of persecution about the nuclear force of the DPRK.”

That theme — that the United States talks tough about nuclear weapons because we fear them — has been a constant among our adversaries for decades. North Korean propaganda today mirrors how the Chinese communists talked about American fears of nuclear weapons in the 1960s. Zhou Enlai even went so far as to attribute former defense secretary James Forrestal's suicide to Western nuclear anxiety: “When Secretary of Defense Forrestal, who was in charge of this issue, heard in 1949 that the Soviets had mastered atomic weapons, he was distraught, committing suicide by leaping from a building. In Western countries, most are terrified of atomic weapons.”

It would be easy to dismiss Zhou's comment as posturing, except that it was made in private — in a speech to State Council in 1955 explaining why China was starting a nuclear weapons program. We talked about nuclear weapons so much that the Chinese communists literally concluded that we must be really frightened by them. That's why, even though China built its own bomb in 1964, Mao continued to call nuclear weapons a “paper tiger.” He knew that his nonchalance was terrifying to Westerners, and he loved it.

Chinese communists then, and I think their fraternal cousins in North Korea today, both drew a simple conclusion: The United States talked so much about having, and preventing other nations from getting, nuclear weapons because nothing terrified us more than the nuclear holocaust. When the United States brandished the bomb, they saw a threat, but they also saw what threatened us.

In this way, I fear Trump's parade may backfire. A massive demonstration of military might, especially if it includes some aspect of the nation's nuclear deterrent, is only going to convince Kim Jong Un and others that the United States sees its power flagging and is frightened. It's like telling a bully our biggest fear, except we're putting it on a float and rolling it through downtown Washington.

Inexplicably, Trump and his ilk do not seem to grasp this, although they are extraordinarily intuitive bullies. Trump has made a career of taking up residence inside his enemies' heads. His supporters openly celebrate flaunting democratic norms not despite the outrage they cause, but to elicit it. “Triggering libs” is a call-to-arms for millions of red-hat wearing Trumpists: “One sure way you know [the parade] is a great idea,” one such pundit wrote, “is by how upset liberals have already become.”

Why can't they see that's precisely what Kim Jong Un is doing to them?


__________________________________________________________________________

Jeffrey Lewis is a scholar at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • I'm an Iraq war veteran. The military doesn't want or need Trump's parade.

 • This is how nuclear war with North Korea would unfold

 • If Trump wants to use nuclear weapons, whether it's ‘legal’ won't matter

 • Why Kim Jong Un wouldn't be irrational to use a nuclear bomb first

 • How President Trump could tweet his way into nuclear war with North Korea


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/posteverything/wp/2018/02/10/to-north-korea-trumps-military-parade-will-look-like-fear-not-strength
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2018, 07:51:43 pm »


Yep.....Kim Jong-un provides the perfect template for Trump's “wankfest” military parade....



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If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 

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