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EXCELLENT NEWS: Turkey bombs the crap out of America's proxy army in Syria


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Author Topic: EXCELLENT NEWS: Turkey bombs the crap out of America's proxy army in Syria  (Read 96 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« on: January 21, 2018, 04:35:08 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Turkey launches airstrikes in Syria against U.S.-backed Kurdish fighters

The Trump administration had urged Ankara not to pursue the attack on the enclave of Afrin,
arguing that it could distract from the ongoing battle against Islamic State militants.


By KAREEM FAHIM and LOUISA LOVELUCK | 4:37PM EST - Saturday, January 20, 2018

Smoke billows on the Syrian side of the Syria-Turkey border at Hassa on January 20th, 2017, as Turkish fighter jets hit Syrian Kurdish positions. — Photograph: Bulent Kilic/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Smoke billows on the Syrian side of the Syria-Turkey border at Hassa on January 20th, 2017, as Turkish fighter jets hit Syrian Kurdish positions.
 — Photograph: Bulent Kilic/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


ISTANBUL — With airstrikes and artillery fire, Turkey on Saturday defied U.S. appeals and opened a long-anticipated offensive on Afrin, an enclave in Syria for Kurdish militias backed by the United States.

Turkish officials have framed the offensive as part of a wider battle against Kurdish separatists, known as the Kurdistan Workers' Party, in Turkey's southwest. Turkey also fears any gains in strength by the Syrian Kurds, whose territory runs along some of Turkey's southern border.

But the United States has opted to back the Syrian Kurds as proxy fighters against the Islamic State and as a buffer to keep the militants from trying to reclaim territory.

The military action immediately raised concerns that it could spark conflicts among the assortment of foreign military powers present, in proximity, across northern Syria. They include Turkey, Russia and the United States. All have the Islamic State as a common foe, but, individually, they back different factions among the various armed groups in Syria.

The latest flash point also highlighted the shifting disputes and conflicting agendas that have complicated any efforts toward ending nearly seven years of conflict in Syria. The Turkish military action came amid intensifying violence in the northern Syrian province of Idlib, where Syrian government forces are on the offensive against al-Qaeda-aligned rebels in the east of the province.

Recent statements by U.S. military officials about plans to train border security forces that would protect a Kurdish enclave in Syria also provoked Turkey's ire.

“We are taking these steps to ensure our own national security,” President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said in comments carried by the semi-official Anadolu agency.

Yet Turkish incursions could carry risks. The government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad had warned that it was prepared to fire on Turkish warplanes in the event of an attack on Afrin.

A Syrian government offensive is causing one of the worst surges in population displacement since Syria's civil war began. More than 212,000 people have fled fighting around Idlib in the past month, many of them sleeping in the open as temperatures plunge and rain drenches makeshift campsites, according to the United Nations.

On Saturday, hours after the announcement of the airstrikes, Turkey said it had struck more than 100 positions belonging to Kurdish fighters. The number of casualties was not immediately clear. The airstrikes followed days of intense Turkish artillery fire on Kurdish positions, according to residents in Afrin.

In a statement, the U.S.-backed Kurdish force, known as the Syrian Democratic Forces, warned that the Turkish offensive “threatens to breathe new life into Daesh,” using an Arabic acronym for the Islamic State militant group.

The Trump administration, in urging NATO-ally Turkey not to attack, had made a similar argument, saying it would distract from the ongoing battles against Islamic State militants in their remaining strongholds in Syria. There are roughly 2,000 U.S. troops in northern Syria.

Russia, which backs Assad's government, said it was watching developments “with concern” and called on the warring sides to “exercise mutual restraint.” Russia's Defense Ministry said that an unspecified number of Russian troops had been moved out of the Afrin area and redeployed.

Much about the Turkish offensive, which the government dubbed “Operation Olive Branch”, remained unclear on Saturday, including whether it would be accompanied by a substantial push by Turkish ground forces and allied rebel factions.

“The challenge is that no one knows what they intend to do,” said Aaron Stein, a resident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council's Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East.

“Afrin will be hostile to a Turkish-backed force patrolling from permanent garrisons. The YPG in the area can retreat to the mountains for protection,” he said, referring to the Syrian Kurdish militia that controls Afrin.

The offensive probably was prompted in part by Turkish concerns that Russia and the United States planned to broker a reconciliation between Syria's government and the Syrian Kurdish forces. “This is anathema to Turkey for obvious reasons,” Stein said. “So they are making a statement.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Louisa Loveluck reported from London. Suzan Haidamous in Beirut, Heba Habib in Stockholm and Anton Troianovski in Moscow contributed to this report.

• Kareem Fahim is a Middle East correspondent for The Washington Post. He previously spent 11 years at The New York Times, covering the Arab world as a Cairo-based correspondent, among other assignments. Kareem also worked as a reporter at The Village Voice.

• Louisa Loveluck is a reporter in The Washington Post's Beirut bureau, focusing on Syria.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • U.S. gives mixed signals on Kurdish force as Turkey escalates pressure


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_east/turkey-launches-airstrikes-in-northern-syria-to-start-offensive-on-us-backed-kurdish-fighters/2018/01/20/614d5528-fdec-11e7-a46b-a3614530bd87_story.html
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2018, 04:41:56 pm »


Donald J. Trump will not be able to focus his short-attention-span mind on this, because he is too pre-occupied with being pissed-off that he has had to miss his “one year anniversary” bash at Mar-a-Lago because of the Federal Government fiscal shutdown, something he will be seething with rage about, as evidenced by his Twitterstorm of hatred towards the Democrats who he blames for creating the situation which has kept him in Washington D.C., instead of basking in praise from his sycophant supporters down in Florida.
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Im2Sexy4MyPants
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« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2018, 06:51:21 am »

Obama's proxy army was ISIS which trump deleted

if you like death and destruction so much why don't you go and kill some kurds
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Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

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And the many things that will personally effect you.
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2018, 11:30:05 am »


ISIS was a result of George W Bush warmongering in Iraq.

That war caused the destabilisation of Syria, which resulted in ISIS.

Fortunately, the glorious Soviet Union Russia and Iran's Republican Guard with help from Hezbollah have pushed back against ISIS and made them largely impotent.

Meanwhile, the idiot Donald J. Trump is trying to stir up trouble all around the world again, which will result in may more ISIS-like organisations evolving.

Of course, the idiot Donald J. Trump was a gutless cunt when his country needed him during the Vietnam War and he showed his cowardly, yellow-belly streak in hiding from doing his duty for his country.
 
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Im2Sexy4MyPants
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« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2018, 08:32:02 am »

Obama, Hillary,Saudi Arabia with help from the Un-American leftist globalist clowns in the CIA have been arming ISIS for the last 8 years

Trump & Russia destroyed them because they both hate those murdering vile muslim nutter terrorist

next time they stick their ugly heads up they will die
« Last Edit: January 26, 2018, 08:39:56 am by Im2Sexy4MyPants » Report Spam   Logged

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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2018, 09:00:55 pm »


from The Washington Post....

New American strategy for Syria could be
doomed as allies of U.S. fight each other


The Turkish assault on a Kurdish enclave in Syria has exposed
the limitations of the Trump administration's new Syria strategy.


By LOUISA LOVELUCK, LIZ SLY and KAREEM FAHIM | 8:31AM EST — Saturday, January 27, 2018

Turkish-backed Syrian rebels are seen through the window of a Turkish armored vehicle on January 26th in Azaz, Syria. The Turkish military on January 20th launched its second major incursion into Syrian territory during the seven-year civil war. — Photograph: Ozan Kose/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Turkish-backed Syrian rebels are seen through the window of a Turkish armored vehicle on January 26th in Azaz, Syria.
The Turkish military on January 20th launched its second major incursion into Syrian territory during
the seven-year civil war. — Photograph: Ozan Kose/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


LONDON — Turkey's assault against Kurdish militants in Syria has exposed the limitations of the Trump administration's new Syria policy, calling into question the feasibility of Washington's plans to maintain a military presence in that country without becoming embroiled in a wider conflict.

The Turkish offensive targeting Afrin, a Kurdish enclave just over Turkey's border, was launched days after Secretary of State Rex Tillerson unveiled a strategy that committed the United States to an apparently open-ended troop presence in the Kurdish areas of northeastern Syria.

This strategy aims to prevent Islamic State militants from returning to areas recently conquered from them, U.S. officials say. But Tillerson articulated a number of other goals for the new policy, including rolling back Iranian influence, defeating al-Qaeda and securing a peaceful settlement of the Syrian conflict that excludes President Bashar al-Assad.

Washington's focus on providing military support to Syrian Kurds battling the Islamic State, however, has always been rife with contradictions, experts say. These are now coming to the fore as longtime U.S. ally and fellow NATO member Turkey takes on the United States' biggest Syrian ally in the fight against the Islamic State.

“This highlights the fundamental difficulty of a U.S. strategy that requires maintaining active alliances with two forces which are at war with each other,” said Noah Bonsey, a Syria analyst at the International Crisis Group who is on a visit to the Kurdish areas of northeastern Syria. “There has never been an easy answer to that, and there isn't going to be one.”




Since the assault began a week ago, Washington has scrambled to strike a balance between its warring friends, acknowledging the validity of Turkey's security concerns while urging Ankara to restrict the scope of the offensive to the border region of Afrin and to limit casualties.

Turkey has been waging a decades-old war at home against Kurdish insurgents of the Kurdistan Workers' Party, or PKK, which is allied to the U.S.-backed group controlling territory along the Turkish border in northern Syria. The PKK is designated a terrorist group by Washington and Ankara.

The U.S. military has meanwhile made clear it will not go to the aid of the Kurds in Afrin because it does not regard them as allies on par with the Kurds farther east who were trained and armed to fight the Islamic State. The Kurds in Afrin were not involved in fighting the Islamic State and have not received American assistance, U.S. officials say.

But with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan intensifying his threats to extend the Turkish offensive to the areas farther east, where the U.S. military maintains troops, a larger conflict looms.

On Saturday, he issued an ultimatum to U.S. troops to withdraw from Manbij, which has been controlled by the U.S.-backed, Kurdish-led alliance since it was captured from the Islamic State in 2016. Manbij in turn borders a part of northern Syria controlled by other Syrian rebels backed by Turkey. U.S. troops have been conducting patrols in the area for nearly a year to keep their hostile allies apart.

A Turkish attack on Manbij would present the United States with a major dilemma, said Gonul Tol, director of the Center for Turkish Studies at the Middle East Institute in Washington.

If the Trump administration intends to remain in northern Syria, “they need the Kurds,” she said. “On the other hand, Turkey is a NATO ally. They might be forced to pick a side.”

In the past, U.S. officials have privately dismissed Erdogan's frequent threats to attack Manbij as rhetoric intended primarily for domestic consumption in Turkey. But domestic politics means such an attack could become inevitable, Tol said.

“Erdogan talked about this so much, it's going to be difficult for him to walk it back,” she said. Erdogan's primary focus has been a presidential election in Turkey scheduled for next year, and the intensifying confrontation with Washington works in his favor politically at home, she said.


A Turkish-backed Syrian rebel fighter stops an armed man Friday near the Syrian town of Azaz. — Photograph: Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
A Turkish-backed Syrian rebel fighter stops an armed man Friday near the Syrian town of Azaz.
 — Photograph: Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


Meanwhile, other regional players in Syria are hardly more enthusiastic than Turkey about the prospect of a long-term U.S. troop presence in Syria or about the existence of the Kurdish autonomous zone the troops appear to be cementing. Russia has given the nod to the Turkish offensive, which is unfolding in an area demarcated as under Russia's overall influence, U.S. officials say.

“Turkey and Russia struck an agreement to allow the Turkish offensive to take place,” a senior U.S. administration official said at a briefing for journalists last week in Washington. The Russians essentially “greenlighted” the operation, said the official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss the sensitive subject.

The bigger problem, said Faysal Itani, a resident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council, is the U.S. presence in Syria is so small and the hostility to the U.S. troops so widespread that it is hard to see how they can influence events. The United States maintains 2,000 troops in an area the size of Indiana, alongside the Kurdish-Arab alliance known as the Syrian Democratic Forces. The dominant group in the alliance is the Kurdish People's Protection Units, or YPG, which has close ties to the PKK.

Syria and Iran also are unhappy about American plans to remain in Syria, and the Turkish offensive appears only to have brought Turkey, Russia, Iran and Syria closer together, analysts say.

“Keeping 2,000 troops on the desert margins of Syria in alliance with a group the entire region hates is not really leverage,” Itani said. “It does, however, get others to unite against us. The Turkish incursion into Afrin shows just how few friends we have in Syria.”

Turkey's wrath was initially sparked by reports from northeastern Syria that the United States was training a 30,000-member force to patrol the borders of the autonomous Kurdish enclave that has emerged from Syria's seven-year-old war. U.S. officials have since backtracked, saying they never intended the force to be deployed along the border with Turkey but to guard against infiltration by the Islamic State from Iraq and other parts of Syria.

Turkish anger with U.S. policy is not new; it dates to the Obama administration's decision to arm the Syrian Kurds to fight the Islamic State in 2015, said Robert Ford, a former U.S. ambassador to Syria who is now a senior fellow at the Middle East Institute and teaches at Yale University.

“Back in 2011, Turkish officials stressed to me that their nightmare scenario was a break-away Syrian Kurdish region in northeast Syria. The Turks' nightmare has arrived, with huge, conscious help from the Americans,” Ford wrote in an email. “Whatever the name of the security force the Americans are helping construct in eastern Syria, the Turks will view it as helping anchor that Syrian Kurdish breakaway region, and there will be conflict.”

The United States has viewed Syria through the narrow prism of defeating the Islamic State since 2014, and with the extremists on the brink of defeat, Washington finds itself with no alternative vision, said Sam Heller, a fellow at the Century Foundation, in comments made from Beirut.

“What the Turks are doing here is keying into the illogic of the American campaign” against the Islamic State, he said.

U.S. officials dispute widespread characterizations of their plans for a continuing troop presence in Syria as indefinite, pointing out that their strategy articulates clear goals.

But those are ambitious and almost certainly elusive objectives that are unlikely to be realized anytime soon, Itani said. “The goals are too ambitious for what we're willing to do, regardless of whether Turkey controls Afrin,” he said. “On top of that, every major actor in Syria is now working against us in one way or another.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Liz Sly reported from Beirut and Kareem Fahim from Istanbul. Missy Ryan and Greg Jaffe in Washington and Zakaria Zakaria in Istanbul contributed to this report.

• Louisa Loveluck is a reporter in The Washington Post's Beirut bureau, focusing on Syria.

• Liz Sly is The Washington Post's Beirut bureau chief, covering Lebanon, Syria and the wider region. She has spent more than 17 years covering the Middle East, including the first and second Iraq wars. Other postings include Washington, Africa, China, Afghanistan and Italy.

• Kareem Fahim is a Middle East correspondent for The Washington Post. He previously spent 11 years at The New York Times, covering the Arab world as a Cairo-based correspondent, among other assignments. Kareem also worked as a reporter at The Village Voice.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • In call, Trump issues stern warning to Turkey over Syria operation

 • Turkey says its troops have entered Syria in fight against Kurdish militias


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/new-us-strategy-for-syria-could-be-doomed-as-american-allies-fight-each-other/2018/01/26/dc3c007c-005d-11e8-86b9-8908743c79dd_story.html
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