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“The Book”


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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« on: January 06, 2018, 11:43:07 am »


from The New York Times....

Everyone in Trumpworld Knows He's an Idiot

Michael Wolff's new book shows the cynicism of all those covering for the president.

By MICHELLE GOLBERG | Thursday, January 04, 2017

President Trump is furious about a new book set for release on Friday. — Photograph: Doug Mills/The New York Times.
President Trump is furious about a new book set for release on Friday. — Photograph: Doug Mills/The New York Times.

ONE OF the more alarming anecdotes in “Fire and Fury”, Michael Wolff's incendiary new book about Donald Trump's White House, involves the firing of James Comey, former director of the F.B.I. It’s not Trump's motives that are scary; Wolff reports that Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner were “increasingly panicked” and “frenzied” about what Comey would find if he looked into the family finances, which is incriminating but unsurprising. The terrifying part is how, in Wolff's telling, Trump sneaked around his aides, some of whom thought they'd contained him.

“For most of the day, almost no one would know that he had decided to take matters into his own hands,” Wolff writes. “In presidential annals, the firing of F.B.I. director James Comey may be the most consequential move ever made by a modern president acting entirely on his own.” Now imagine Trump taking the same approach toward ordering the bombing of North Korea.

Wolff's scabrous book comes out on Friday — the publication date was moved up amid a media furor — but I was able to get an advance copy. It's already a consequential work, having precipitated a furious rift between the president and his former chief strategist, Steve Bannon, who told Wolff that the meeting Donald Trump Jr. brokered with Russians in the hope of getting dirt on Hillary Clinton was “treasonous” and “unpatriotic”. On Thursday the president's lawyers sent a cease-and-desist letter to Wolff's publisher, Henry Holt, demanding that it stop publication, claiming, among other things, defamation and invasion of privacy. This move would be fascistic if it weren't so farcical. (While some have raised questions about Wolff's methods, Axios reports that he has many hours of interviews recorded.)

There are lots of arresting details in the book. We learn that the administration holds special animus for what it calls “D.O.J. women,” or women who work in the Justice Department. Wolff writes that after the white supremacist mayhem in Charlottesville, Virginia, Trump privately rationalized “why someone would be a member of the K.K.K.” The book recounts that after the political purge in Saudi Arabia, Trump boasted that he and Kushner engineered a coup: “We've put our man on top!”

But most of all, the book confirms what is already widely understood — not just that Trump is entirely unfit for the presidency, but that everyone around him knows it. One thread running through “Fire and Fury” is the way relatives, opportunists and officials try to manipulate and manage the president, and how they often fail. As Wolff wrote in a Hollywood Reporter essay based on the book, over the past year, the people around Trump, “all — 100 percent — came to believe he was incapable of functioning in his job.”

According to Wolff, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Reince Priebus, the former chief of staff, called Trump an “idiot”. (So did the media mogul Rupert Murdoch, owner of Fox News, though he used an obscenity first.) Trump's chief economic adviser, Gary Cohn, compares his boss's intelligence to excrement. The national security adviser, H. R. McMaster, thinks he's a “dope”. It has already been reported that Secretary of State Rex Tillerson called Trump a “moron,” which he has pointedly refused to deny.

And yet these people continue to either prop up or defend this sick travesty of a presidency. Wolff takes a few stabs at the motives of Trump insiders. Ivanka Trump apparently nurtured the ghastly dream of following her father into the presidency. Others, Wolff writes, told themselves that they could help protect America from the president they serve: The “mess that might do serious damage to the nation, and, by association, to your own brand, might be transcended if you were seen as the person, by dint of competence and professional behavior, taking control of it.”

This is a delusion as wild, in its own way, as Trump's claim that the “Access Hollywood” tape was faked. Some of the military men trying to steady American foreign policy amid Trump's whims and tantrums might be doing something quietly decent, sacrificing their reputations for the greater good. But most members of Trump's campaign and administration are simply traitors. They are willing, out of some complex mix of ambition, resentment, cynicism and rationalization, to endanger all of our lives — all of our children's lives — by refusing to tell the country what they know about the senescent fool who boasts of the size of his “nuclear button” on Twitter.

Maybe, at the moment, people in the Trump orbit feel complacent because a year has passed without any epic disaster, unless you count an estimated 1,000 or so deaths in Puerto Rico, which they probably don't. There's an old joke, recently cited by Josh Marshall of Talking Points Memo, that describes where we are right now: A guy falls from a 50-story building. As he flies by the 25th floor, someone asks how it's going. “So far, so good!” he says.

Eventually, we'll hit the ground, and assuming America survives, there should be a reckoning to dwarf the defenestration of Harvey Weinstein and his fellow ogres. Trump, Wolff's reporting shows, has no executive function, no ability to process information or weigh consequences. Expecting him to act in the country's interest is like demanding that your cat do the dishes. His enablers have no such excuse.


• Michelle Goldberg became an Op-Ed columnist for The New York Times in 2017. She is the author of three books: Kingdom Coming: The Rise of Christian Nationalism, The Means of Reproduction: Sex, Power, and the Future of the World and The Goddess Pose: The Audacious Life of Indra Devi, the Woman Who Helped Bring Yoga to the West. Her first book was a finalist for the Helen Bernstein Award for Excellence in Journalism, and her second won the Ernesta Drinker Ballard Book Prize and the J. Anthony Lukas Work-In-Progress Award. Previously she was a columnist at Slate. A frequent commentator on radio and television, Goldberg's work has appeared in The New Yorker, Newsweek, The Nation, The New Republic, The Guardian and many other publications, and she's reported from countries including India, Iraq, Egypt, Uganda, Nicaragua and Argentina. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband and children.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

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 • Right and Left React to the Clash Between Trump and Bannon

 • Read Trump's Reaction to Steve Bannon's Comments

 • Trump Breaks With Bannon, Saying He Has ‘Lost His Mind’


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/04/opinion/fire-fury-wolff-trump-book.html
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2018, 11:48:38 am »


I pre-ordered my copy from Powell's Books in Portland, Oregon (the largest bookshop in the world, occupying an entire city block) about three months ago.

After Trump threw a tantrum and used his lawyers to try to block publication of the book, the launch date was brought foward to 5th January (U.S.A. time) and some bookstores who already were holding copies ready for the launch date started dispatching them to international customers on 4th January. I received notification from Powell's Books that my copy had already been dispatched, accompanied by a USPS tracking number. Clicking on that number showed that the book was indeed alreading being processed by USPS and updates over the past 24 hours have shown it being further processed by the international mail centre in Portland, Oregon; then being processed by the international mail centre in Los Angeles; then being dispatched by air to New Zealand. So even if Trump's lawyers did manage to achieve blocking the book (basically too late now as it is already on sale from U.S. bookshops and heaps of people have purchased it), my copy is safely out of the juristiction of U.S. federal government agencies, so I will have a copy in my possession sometime next week. Hahaha....suck eggs Trump.
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« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2018, 10:49:54 pm »

its more bullshit like every other thing that comes from the left
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Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2018, 10:34:40 am »

its more bullshit like every other thing that comes from the left


Hahaha.....please remain gullible. It gives me somebody to laugh at!!

Are you Woodville's village idiot? One really has to wonder, eh?

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« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2018, 12:42:10 pm »


i am sitting here laughing at you for being so stupid
you just dont have a clue what's going on  do you lol?



trump is about to destroy his enemies he has them all by the balls
i will sit back eat some popcorn and crack up as i watch all your stupid lefty hero's  get stomped and jailed
it will be fun to watch them go down the drain starting
with lock her up
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Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2018, 12:58:38 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Michael Wolff shows his nuclear button is ‘bigger’
and ‘more powerful’ than Trump's


“We ought to be disturbed.”

By JONATHAN CAPEHART | 9:23AM EST — Friday, January 05, 2018

President Trump listens during a meeting about immigration with Republican senators in the Roosevelt Room at the White House on January 4th. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.
President Trump listens during a meeting about immigration with Republican senators in the Roosevelt Room at the White House on January 4th.
 — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.


THE swirl of OMG surrounding Michael Wolff's new book, Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House, is unlike anything I've seen in politics. Ever. Sure, we've seen tell-all books and gasp-worthy revelations before from deep inside 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. But Wolff paints such a chaotic portrait of President Trump that we now know that the biggest nuclear button in the West Wing was the one on Wolff's tape recorder.

The New York magazine adaptation of the book, whose publication was moved up to January 5th, went online on Wednesday. And its most damning paragraph (to me, anyway) involves a brutal assessment of the president's abilities, incorporating details from former deputy chief of staff Katie Walsh.


Quote
As soon as the campaign team had stepped into the White House, Walsh saw, it had gone from managing Trump to the expectation of being managed by him. Yet the president, while proposing the most radical departure from governing and policy norms in several generations, had few specific ideas about how to turn his themes and vitriol into policy. And making suggestions to him was deeply complicated. Here, arguably, was the central issue of the Trump presidency, informing every aspect of Trumpian policy and leadership: He didn't process information in any conventional sense. He didn't read. He didn't really even skim. Some believed that for all practical purposes he was no more than semi-literate. He trusted his own expertise — no matter how paltry or irrelevant — more than anyone else's. He was often confident, but he was just as often paralyzed, less a savant than a figure of sputtering and dangerous insecurities, whose instinctive response was to lash out and behave as if his gut, however confused, was in fact in some clear and forceful way telling him what to do. It was, said Walsh, “like trying to figure out what a child wants.”

That is one of the less salacious details Wolff delivers. The knock-down-drag-out fight between Stephen K. Bannon and Ivanka Trump in the Oval Office took my breath away in its Shakespearean cruelty. But that startling “what a child wants” appraisal of the president took me back to the blistering benediction at the conclusion of an interfaith service I attended last month in San Francisco with the Faith and Politics Institute.

At the outset, Michael Pappas, executive director of the San Francisco Interfaith Council, told the gathered that their custom was free and open expression. That there were no limits on what the assembled clergy could or should say. Amos C. Brown, president of the San Francisco chapter of the NAACP and pastor of the Third Baptist Church of San Francisco since 1976, embodied that custom with every word of his sermon.


Amos C. Brown, pastor of the Third Baptist Church of San Francisco, after speaking at the Presidio Chapel on December 2nd in San Francisco. — Photograph: Jonathan Capehart/The Washington Post.
Amos C. Brown, pastor of the Third Baptist Church of San Francisco, after speaking at the Presidio Chapel on December 2nd
in San Francisco. — Photograph: Jonathan Capehart/The Washington Post.


Brown recounted the sermon he heard the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. deliver in the City by the Bay decades ago. It was a variation of what would become his famous “I Have a Dream” oration. From that day forward, Brown said, he walked in King's footsteps, followed his example of “inclusion, fairness, justice and peace.” But Brown was troubled about his country.

“I must say to you I cannot leave this podium with much hope,” he said. “I am disturbed about America. I am disturbed about my native land.” Brown turned to the words of H.L. Mencken to thunder blunt judgment upon Trump without mentioning his name. “Celebrated journalist H.L. Mencken … said, as democracy evolves and the common people get their desires, the day will come when the White House will be adorned with the presence of a moron as president.”

This was a paraphrasing of Mencken's oft-cited quote from a 1920 column, “As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.”

Invoking Trump's name only once, Brown lamented the state of the nation — its leadership and its people. “I pray as we go down from this place that you will be like me, disturbed about America,” he said in the Presidio Chapel. “We've come to a time and a point when people call right wrong and wrong right. We've come to a point when there is no integrity in the White House. Nobody seems to be very disturbed.

“We've come to the point that we have adopted the mind and the manner and the mystique of that moron that's at 1600 [Pennsylvania] Avenue now when we have refused, refused to hold Donald Trump accountable for his abusiveness, his ignorance, his disrespect for the office and, more importantly, to put this nation in harm's way with his zany behavior,” Brown continued. “So I pray, I hope and I trust that you, too, will be disturbed about America. We ought to be disturbed.”


President Trump speaks about the passage of the tax bill on the South Lawn at the White House on December 20th, 2017. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.
President Trump speaks about the passage of the tax bill on the South Lawn at the White House on December 20th, 2017.
 — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.


Brown ended his remarks by citing The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, written in the 18th century by famed historian Edward Gibbon. “For Gibbon said, a long time ago, that a nation falls when she refuses to take care of her infrastructure, when leadership is immoral and when there is division in the land,” Brown noted. “We now have all three and it's time for the good folks to get up, roll up their sleeves and in a peaceful, intelligent, loving and persistent way, stand for justice.”

Brown's harsh words last month reflected the anxiety of America then. The Wolff book presents harrowing details that will deepen the concern of the American people. In a piece for the Hollywood Reporter, where he is a columnist, Wolff concludes that “100 percent” of the Trump staffers he talked to in the administration's first year, “came to believe he was incapable of functioning in his job.”

For nearly a year, we have been at the mercy of a man who uses Twitter to bully critics, exhaust the nation and freak out the world. We have seen him degrade the moral authority of the presidency and America's standing in the world. And now we know that the folks slapping smiley faces on Trump and the administration are doing so in full knowledge of the terror they are living in and inflicting on the rest of us.

We ought to be disturbed.


• Jonathan Capehart is a member of The Washington Post editorial board and writes for the PostPartisan blog.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Opinion | The president threatened nuclear war with an allusion to his sexual prowess. What?!

 • Eugene Robinson: Trump was right to hope he'd lose

 • We already know the alarming truth about Trump. Michael Wolff's book just confirms it.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan/wp/2018/01/05/michael-wolff-shows-his-nuclear-button-is-bigger-and-more-powerful-than-trumps
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« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2018, 12:58:51 pm »


from The Washington Post....

As ‘Fire and Fury’ is published, Europe openly debates: ‘Is Trump still sane?’

The allegations in the book are deepening many in Europe's grave reservations about the American leader.

By RICK NOACK | 10:32AM EST — Friday, January 05, 2018

French President Emmanuel Macron with President Donald Trump in Paris on July 14th. — Photograph: Christophe Archambault/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
French President Emmanuel Macron with President Donald Trump in Paris on July 14th. — Photograph: Christophe Archambault/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.

BERLIN — European commentary on President Trump is rarely flattering, but the cascading revelations alleged in Michael Wolff's tell-all book “Fire and Fury”, drew an especially fierce response from a horrified continent.

“Is Trump still sane?” asked the Friday lead headline on the site of Germany's most respected conservative paper, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. The piece was published under the topic “mental health”.

Meanwhile, British readers woke up to The Times of London's main front page headline that also wondered about the president's stability: “Trump's mental health questioned by top aide”.

“Donald Trump's right-hand man openly questioned his fitness to serve and predicted that he would resign to avoid being removed by his own cabinet, according to a book that the US president tried to block yesterday,” wrote the Rupert Murdoch-controlled Times of London.




For its part, France's paper of record, Le Monde, just described the book as “haunting”.

Trump has never been too popular in Western Europe, with approval ratings in many countries hovering in the single or lower double digits. But even though disagreement with Trump has almost become the norm here, some of Friday's public responses to Wolff's book still appeared unprecedented.

The Times of London and the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung are some of Europe's most renowned news outlets, and both pride themselves with having especially influential readers in business and government in their respective countries  where conservative parties are in power. More so than in the United States, European papers frequently mix traditional reporting and editorials on front pages — often helping to sway public opinion, and by extension governmental strategy, as well.

A degree of skepticism over the mental health fears prominently featured in Europe on Friday is certainly warranted, especially given that my colleagues have pointed out several possible flaws in Wolff's book and previous accusations against the author over alleged inaccuracies in his reporting. Trump himself has pushed back hard against the book, describing it as “full of lies, misrepresentations and sources that don't exist.” His legal team has also threatened libel charges against Wolff, his publisher and Trump's former chief strategist, Stephen K. Bannon, whose no-holds-barred remarks are prominently featured in the book.

But the fears remain, to the detriment of the world's perception of both Trump and the United States. Some of the United States' closest international allies, including Britain, Germany and France, are now openly debating whether the most powerful man in the world and de facto leader of NATO — an alliance on which their entire military strategies are based — can still be trusted.

“In many European capitals, the prevailing sentiment is helplessness and frustration that Trump won't engage in a rational dialogue,” argued Stephan Bierling, a professor for transatlantic relations in Germany, who said that he had long admired the United States but that his beliefs were now “shaken to the core”.

“Once a relationship is in disorder there is no easy way back. Trump has succeeded at destroying Europeans' trust in himself and the United States more broadly,” according to Bierling. The mental health concerns now raised in Wolff's book and widely debated across Europe, he said, were exacerbating European politicians' existing skepticism of Trump.

German Chancellor Merkel has mostly refrained from directly lashing out at Trump, but she said early last year that the United States was no longer a reliable partner. The White House, however, repeatedly disputed that transatlantic relations were in disarray. In May, then-White House press secretary Sean Spicer described Trump-Merkel relations as “fairly unbelievable” in a positive way. “They get along very well,” Spicer said.

Trump himself also praised French President Emmanuel Macron last September, saying that “(he's) respected by the French people, and I can tell you he is respected by the people of the United States.” At the time, Macron told reporters: “The strength that unites our relationship is that we say everything. That doesn't mean we agree on everything, but we do agree on a lot of things.”

But in Germany, Trump's unpredictable outbursts of anger have already played into the hands of those long demanding normalized relations with Russia, despite its annexation of Crimea and election meddling abroad. The chorus of voices demanding an end of sanctions against Russia are growing.

Moscow has had a strong lobby in Berlin for years and doubts over Trump's reliability could now become one of their strongest arguments. Unsubstantiated claims alone would probably not force the German government to turn its back on the United States, but the allegations made in “Fire and Fury” appear to confirm what everyone has long suspected. Already a year ago, Sigmar Gabriel, Germany's then-vice chancellor and now-foreign minister called Trump “a threat”. At the time, his remarks found little echo in the United States, even though they expressed a more widespread fear among European government representatives.

Macron, who has established a more extensive working relationship with Trump than the Germans were able to, also voiced an unusually stern warning this week, arguing that Trump's policies could result in a war. Referring to Trump's Iran approach, he said: “The official line pursued by the United States, Israel and Saudi Arabia, who are our allies in many ways, is almost one that would lead us to war.” His remarks came before excerpts from “Fire and Fury” emerged.

In Britain, a country that usually prides itself for having a special relationship with the United States, enthusiasm for that deep interlinking has weakened remarkably over the last year, as well. A scheduled Trump state visit to Britain was delayed and might never happen. And Prime Minister Theresa May publicly rebuked Trump after he retweeted videos shared by a far-right group in the country.

“This isn't a crisis Europeans will simply sit out,” said Bierling, the German transatlantic relations professor.

“Even once Trump is gone, the damage to the transatlantic alliance is almost irreversible now. There is no easy way back,” he said.


• Rick Noack is a foreign affairs reporter for The Washington Post based in Berlin. Previously, he worked for The Post from Washington, D.C. as an Arthur F. Burns Fellow and from London.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • In D.C., people lined up at midnight for Wolff's Trump exposé

 • VIDEO: A list of striking quotes from the new book on Trump

 • VIDEO: France's Macron criticizes Trump's Jerusalem decision

 • Following Trump's trip, Merkel says Europe can't rely on ‘others’. She means the U.S.

 • Most Europeans predict a rocky future for the U.S. and Europe, a new study says


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2018/01/05/as-fire-and-fury-is-published-europe-openly-debates-is-trump-still-sane
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« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2018, 12:59:47 pm »


from the Los Angeles Times....

Should you read the book ‘Fire and Fury’ about Donald Trump?

By CAROLYN KELLOGG | 11:40AM PST — Friday, January 05 2017

President Donald J. Trump in the Oval Office after signing the tax bill on December 22nd, 2017. — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.
President Donald J. Trump in the Oval Office after signing the tax bill on December 22nd, 2017. — Photograph: Evan Vucci/Associated Press.

THE book “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House” by Michael Wolff is the biggest literary sensation in a long time, making headlines since it was leaked earlier this week. President Trump's lawyers tried to block its publication; in response, publisher Henry Holt decided to publish “Fire and Fury” four days early. It officially hit shelves today.

There are many questions about the book, not the least of which is how much is verifiably true. But it seems to me the simplest question is: Should I read it?

Below, I try to guide you to the answer, after spending a few short hours with the ebook.


Do you follow Donald Trump on Twitter?

If you have been reading Donald Trump's tweets, you know that he is inclined to make loaded pronouncements with questionable grammar. So it will come as no surprise that, as Wolff describes it, Trump sees policy briefs as homework to be avoided, and that his White House agenda is driven more by personality than consideration of the issues — and you'll probably be fascinated. Whether you follow Trump on Twitter out of devotion or outrage, the answer is simple: Yes, read it.

Do you like “Empire”, “Dallas” or “All My Children”?

There is definitely a soap-opera element to “Fire and Fury”. Wolff lays out the conflicts between Steve Bannon, Jared Kushner and Reince Priebus as each tries to be the power behind the Trump White House. Admittedly, this is Beltway drama, so there are no great songs or evil twins, but there is manipulation and betrayal. This would be the case for any White House but more so in this one — portrayed as being unmoored from ideology and policy and driven by the whims of its malleable leader. Does that sound fun to you? Then yes, read it.

Does this passage make your blood pressure rise dangerously?

“Nearly all meetings in the Oval with the president were invariably surrounded and interrupted by a long list of retainers — indeed, everybody strove to be in every meeting. Furtive people skulked around without clear purpose: Bannon invariably found some reason to study papers in the corner and then to have a last word; Priebus kept his eye on Bannon; Kushner kept constant tabs on the whereabouts of the others. Trump liked to keep Hicks, Conway, and, often, his old Apprentice sidekick Omarosa Manigault — now with a confounding White House title — in constant hovering presence. As always, Trump wanted an eager audience, encouraging as many people as possible to make as many attempts as possible to be as close to him as possible.”

If that upsets you — if, say, you have an abiding sense that running the country is a serious business that should be undertaken with humility and duty — then this book will not be good for your health. No, don't read it.


Did you vote for Hillary Clinton?

If you voted for Hillary Clinton, chances are this book will reinforce what you concluded about Donald Trump during the campaign. It intimates that he wasn't prepared for the White House, portraying key staffers, family and even himself as not expecting to win. Once the presidency was his, chaos ensued. Some Clinton fans will take a painful pleasure in seeing just how right they were; others will not be able to bear it. Should you read it? Maybe yes, maybe no.

Are you Gretchen Carlson?

In the opening pages, Wolff recounts a private dinner that took place during the transition at which Roger Ailes and Steve Bannon share thoughts about Trump. Wolff describes Ailes as being dismissed from Fox News after being “accused of sexual harassment … in a move engineered by the liberal sons” of Rupert Murdoch and that Trump “hardly three months later, accused of vastly more louche and abusive behavior, was elected president.” The contrast, especially to the women who accused Ailes of sexual harassment, may seem inaccurate and flip. Do not read.

Do you adore “Real Housewives” or “The Bachelor”?

Who can't resist a good drunken argument, burst of tears or table flip? Wolff, after a long stint at Vanity Fair where he was known for spilling secrets many in New York media preferred to keep quiet, would seem to be the right guy to get and share the juiciest stories of the Trump White House. Sadly, though, the book is not as gossipy as you might hope. I read most of the chapter on Jared and Ivanka (titled “Jarvanka”) and while we briefly eavesdrop on Ivanka at a breakfast meeting at the Four Seasons, the book is lacking nasty moments (except in the words of one aide talking about another) and doesn't have as the outrageous drama of reality TV. Do not read.

Did you vote for Donald Trump?

If you voted for Donald Trump, this book will probably entertain you. It's not surprising, after all, that the man who came from outside Washington D.C. refuses to do things the way Washington typically does. The infighting between his chief aides is also nothing new — it's just shown in close-up. Trump is not portrayed flatteringly, but Wolff isn't attempting to criticize his modes of management and governance — just to share them. If you voted for Trump, yes, read it.

Do you like reading?

Perhaps I'm reading between the lines, but at some points Wolff appears to be exasperated with Trump's resistance to reading. Writing, after all, is Wolff's livelihood, so why shouldn't he be slightly annoyed that the president decided to add more TV screens to his White House bedroom rather than, say, settle down to read a briefing folder or even a good book once in a while? “Trump didn't read. He didn't really even skim. If it was print, it might as well not exist. Some believed that for all practical purposes he was no more than semiliterate,” Wolff writes. If you like reading, you can enjoy the process of reading this book, but the subject may get under your skin. But heck, you're a reader. So yes, read it.

• Carolyn Kellogg was named book editor of the Los Angeles Times in 2016. She joined the L.A. Times in 2010 as a staff writer in books with an emphasis on digital projects. Her work was recognized with the paper's editorial award. For six years, she served on the board of directors of the National Book Critics Circle. Prior to coming to the L.A. Times, she served as editor of LAist.com, web editor of Marketplace and as the web editor of the California Community Foundation. In her spare time, she ran a podcast interviewing authors called Pinky's Paperhaus. She has an MFA in creative writing from the University of Pittsburgh and a bachelor's degree from the University of Southern California.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

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 • The juiciest lines from Michael Wolff's upcoming Trump book ‘Fire and Fury

 • Explosive ‘Fire and Fury’ book about the Trump White House goes on sale early

 • Controversial new book on Trump White House prompts president to blast Steve Bannon


http://www.latimes.com/books/jacketcopy/la-et-jc-fire-and-fury-20180105-story.html
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« Reply #8 on: January 07, 2018, 01:03:20 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Forget Harry Potter. In D.C., people lined up at midnight
for Michael Wolff's Trump exposé.


“This is a D.C. moment, and I wanted to be a part of it.” This was the scene at Kramerbooks.

By BEN TERRIS and MONICA HESSE | 4:30PM EST — Friday, January 05, 2018

Customers line up at Kramerbooks late Thursday for the midnight sale of Michael Wolff's Trump White House book, “Fire and Fury”. Journalists also turned out in large numbers. — Photograph: Ben Terris/The Washington Post.
Customers line up at Kramerbooks late Thursday for the midnight sale of Michael Wolff's Trump White House book, “Fire and Fury”.
Journalists also turned out in large numbers. — Photograph: Ben Terris/The Washington Post.


THE WIND CHILL hit minus-3 degrees the night Fire and Fury came to town.

But neither polar vortex nor “bomb cyclone” nor gloom of night could keep Washington's political gossipmongers from lining up at Kramerbooks on Thursday night for the midnight sale of Michael Wolff's newly published romp through the Donald Trump White House.

“This is a D.C. moment, and I wanted to be a part of it,” said Steve Dingledine, a fifth-grade teacher from the District who showed up shortly after 11 p.m. and held the pole position in a line that snaked through the Dupont Circle bookstore/cafe. And it was definitely a D.C. moment: Dingledine found himself flanked by a cluster of cameras — the BBC, Fox News, someone conducting interviews in Turkish, and emissaries of various local TV channels. Reporters from BuzzFeed, HuffPost, the Weekly Standard and Vice News hovered nearby.

Dingledine was not fazed. This was not his first D.C. moment.

“Mark Halperin came to my classroom last year to film his show, ‘The Circus’,” he said, laying down his money before tucking his purchase under his arm and exiting into the cold night air.

For days the capital had been captivated by deconstructed versions of Wolff's book: excerpts in New York magazine and British GQ; an essay by the author in the Hollywood Reporter; and the juiciest tidbits (Bannon said what about Don Jr.??) published in The Guardian after its reporters stumbled across a stray early copy in a New England bookstore. High-level White House staffers called around town to find out if they had been mentioned. When Kramerbooks announced it would start selling copies of Wolff's book at midnight — nine hours before the text would be available to download via Kindle — the legendary bookstore started trending on Twitter.

Hours after the first book excerpts appeared online, the book was ranked No.1 in sales on Amazon.com. And even during a week that Trump threatened to jail a former Clinton aide and press a button that would annihilate North Korea, Thursday's White House press briefing was dominated by questions about the book.

A great debate waged over whether “Fire and Fury” was more damning or damnable: Were the anecdotes all accurate? Is it true that President Trump can barely read? Do his staffers really think he's basically an overgrown child? Does it matter if the book turns out just to be mostly true? Does anything matter?

Not up for debate: This has become the biggest must-read Washington book in a generation. The president saw to that when he threatened to sue the author and publisher, which only encouraged them to push up the publication date by four days, from Tuesday of next week to Friday. He had earlier boosted its profile when he sent a cease-and-desist letter to his former chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon, a major source for the book. And he pushed it over the top just hours before the book hit the shelves by tweeting: “I authorized Zero access to White House (actually turned him down many times) for author of phony book! I never spoke to him for book. Full of lies, misrepresentations and sources that don't exist. Look at this guy's past and watch what happens to him and Sloppy Steve!”

It could go down as the greatest unintentional marketing campaign in history.


Steve Dingledine, in the white turtleneck, claimed a spot at the front of the Kramerbooks line. — Photograph: Ben Terris/The Washington Post.
Steve Dingledine, in the white turtleneck, claimed a spot at the front of the Kramerbooks line. — Photograph: Ben Terris/The Washington Post.

Cameramen scrambled to find the best angle to capture the slowly-building crowd. — Photograph: Ben Terris/The Washington Post.
Cameramen scrambled to find the best angle to capture the slowly-building crowd. — Photograph: Ben Terris/The Washington Post.

By Friday morning, the city was in full “Fury” mode. Politics & Prose ran out of its 84 copies within 15 minutes of opening, an anticipatory line having formed outside of the Connectict Avenue location. “Some folks came in and wanted six books apiece,” reports owner Bradley Graham. The store limited everyone to two, promptly placed a refill order, and for the rest of the afternoon, the phone was “constantly ringing” with would-be customers.

“It's not as if we haven't had to deal with best-selling books before,” Graham says. But the fervor over this one took him aback.

Call the Barnes & Noble in Potomac Yard, and a clerk will sorrowfully report that their stash of “Fire and Fury” hasn't arrived yet — a delayed shipment, and no, you aren't the first person to ask. Call the one in Bethesda, and get a recorded message: “If you are calling to inquire after the title ‘Fire and Fury’ by Michael Wolff, we regret to inform you that our location does not currently have the book in stock. Nor are we planning to carry it at any time before we close our doors permanently.”

The wonks who had managed to acquire the book began to flaunt it, in some sort of primal, peacocking nerd ritual. “Follow our White House reporter for live copy edits of ‘Fire and Fury’,” tweeted the Weekly Standard, as the reporter in question began to populate his feed with photographs of book pages and his own notes: “I think Wolff means belied, not belayed, here.”

Live copy edits.

This is why they hate us.

The city kept talking.

“We usually buy copies of books about our targets,” Adrienne Watson, a spokeswoman for the Democratic National Committee, responded primly when asked whether the DNC planned to get a copy of the book. “Especially when there are direct quotes from their own staff trashing them.”

“No, I'm a little busy doing my job,” Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said in a press briefing on Friday when asked if he planned to read it. But — but — the index says he was mentioned 13 times! “If it's a book with my name in it, an aide puts double-stickies over it,” Mattis said, “So I don't read about myself.”


A book-buyer holds his new copy of “Fire and Fury” after exiting a Washington bookstore on Friday. — Photograph: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
A book-buyer holds his new copy of “Fire and Fury” after exiting a Washington bookstore on Friday.
 — Photograph: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


Author Michael Wolff on the set of http://NBC's “Today” show, where he was interviewed on Friday morning. — Photograph: Brendan Mcdermid/Reuters.
Author Michael Wolff on the set of NBC's “Today” show, where he was interviewed on Friday morning.
 — Photograph: Brendan Mcdermid/Reuters.


The night before at Kramerbooks, the journalists had come first, of course — looking for a scene but finding only one another and posting up at the bar in wait.

Maeve McGale, a 19-year-old bookstore employee with fading purple hair, swept the floors wondering if anyone would even show on such a frigid night. (Hasn't anyone ever heard of a Kindle?)

“People have been calling about it all day,” she said. “So we've been taking bets in the store about who will actually be here.”

But first came Dingledine. Then a woman named Moira who works in the legal support field, followed by a historian from the University of California at Riverside, who said this president is “off the rails” (historically speaking, of course).

By 11:40 p.m., there were dozens of people in line.

“It's like Harry Potter for adults,” someone said.

“Is it, though?” a woman asked. “I feel like that's giving Michael Wolff too much credit.”

“I have a half-drunk beer and some half-eaten nachos at my table,” a man shouted, seemingly to no one in particular. “But I don't want to lose my spot. I'm here for the party.”

The store had 75 copies to sell. It took 15 minutes for them to sell out.

“We'll have more soon,” a clerk told a gaggle of disappointed would-be shoppers. “Plenty more.”


• Ben Terris is a writer in The Washington Post's Style section with a focus on national politics.

• Monica Hesse is a staff writer for The Washingto Post's Style section, and author of American Fire.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Michael Wolff's ‘Today’ show interview, annotated

 • VIDEO: A list of striking quotes from the new book on Trump

 • Michael Wolff tells a juicy tale in his new Trump book. But should we believe it?

 • New Trump book: Bannon’s ‘treasonous’ claim, Ivanka's presidential ambitions and Melania's first-lady concerns


https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/forget-harry-potter-in-dc-people-lined-up-at-midnight-for-michael-wolffs-trump-expose/2018/01/05/b38a8968-f226-11e7-b3bf-ab90a706e175_story.html
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« Reply #9 on: January 07, 2018, 01:24:15 pm »




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« Reply #10 on: January 07, 2018, 02:17:14 pm »


Is that all you can post?

You're shooting blanks.

If you wish to be taken seriously, post PROOF that the book is bullshit, not mere delusional inuendo.
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« Reply #11 on: January 07, 2018, 02:29:48 pm »

as long as you are having fun in your cut and paste libtard echo chamber

waste of time for me to cast pearls before swine
 it's not worth the effort
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« Reply #12 on: January 07, 2018, 02:43:11 pm »


In other words, you're ALL HOT AIR, because you cannot post verifiable facts refuting the contents of the book.

You really ARE Woodville's village idiot!!
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« Reply #13 on: January 08, 2018, 08:31:42 pm »

oh no an awful lefty turd is calling me bad names
is he not a motherfucker?
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« Reply #14 on: January 08, 2018, 09:15:47 pm »


ROFLMAO....Donald Trump's dummy spitting & chucking his toys out of the cot has provided so much free publicity for “The Book” that the seventh printing has now been ordered; and within 24 hours of going on sale, it became Amazon's biggest selling book of all time, even out selling copies of the bible through Amazon.

HILARIOUS!!





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« Reply #15 on: January 08, 2018, 10:08:34 pm »


from the print edition of the Los Angeles Times....

Why believe Michael Wolff?

Because, for now, this stuff is too good not to.

By VIRGINIA HEFFERNAN | Sunday, January 07, 2018

Illustration by Zina Saunders for the Los Angeles Times.
Illustration by Zina Saunders for the Los Angeles Times.

IT TAKES A THIEF to catch a thief, and Michael Wolff, with his new book, “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House”, is the ideal hustler to capture President Trump, whom Wolff describes as having a “twinkle in his eye, larceny in his soul.” Wolff, if memory serves, is similar, minus the twinkle. Gimlet eyes don't twinkle.

Say what you will about Wolff: Unless the book is wholesale invention, something in his I'm-with-the-band swagger in the West Wing attracted awesomely sordid material from Trump's scurvy syndicate. In John Sterling at Macmillan, the book has a masterful editor, and three fact-checkers reviewed it. So I'm betting “Fire and Fury” will withstand whatever charges of journalistic impropriety come at it.

And you're a better woman than I am if you can look away.

Take Stephen K. Bannon's unpulled punch in calling Donald Trump Jr. “treasonous” for meeting with Russians in June 2016. Centrist and liberal media spent a year walking a prudent, scholarly line pontificating about the crimes Trump and his clan may or may not have committed. And suddenly everyone's favorite warlock of the far-right comes right out with it: treason.

Wolff's bomb cyclone of a book officially hit stores on Friday. It stormed up Amazon's bestseller list pre-publication, however, after various passages leaked to the Guardian and New York magazine rushed out an exclusive excerpt. Copies of the book then circulated, sub rosa, as the Steele dossier once did, which heightened my excitement when I scored one on Thursday morning. To each his own, but I flipped first to the section explaining Trump's belief that President Obama “wiretapped” him.

This delusion was, Wolff argues, an offshoot of Trump's martyr complex. Wolff makes the point that Trump's plan all along was to lose the election. Defeat would let Trump build a long-running reality franchise with a protagonist who was not a king but a living saint, shot through with arrows for the nation's sins of — what? Political correctness? The Satans in the tale would be, of course, Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama.

Self-pity is a drug, and Trump, even from the Oval Office, couldn't get clean. “The system was rigged,” Wolff writes. “The bureaucratic swamp, the intelligence agencies, the unfair courts, the lying media.” (Because many of Wolff's interviews are with press amateurs who speak on background, on deep background, off and on the record, or without any ground rules, Wolff often narrates in free indirect discourse, a literary trick that allows third-person narration to slip in and out of a range of consciousnesses.)

In Wolff's telling, Jared Kushner is also to blame for the wiretapping obsession. He passed on a galling tidbit from none other than former British Prime Minister Tony Blair: the speculation that the British may have kept the Trump campaign under surveillance, at the attenuated suggestion of President Obama. Wolff then gives some creepy, maybe exaggerated backstory: Blair was a “patron” of Kushner, having met him through Rupert Murdoch. Blair, Wolff writes, was eager to partner with the president's son-in-law to further Blair's financial interests in the Middle East, which he framed as dovetailing nicely with Kusher's religio-politico-economic ones in the region.

After the CIA had soundly refuted Blair's baseless conjecture, Trump's self-pity was further aggravated by a Fox News report that amped up the rumor again. Thus at dawn on March 3rd, Trump repeated the nutty legend: “How low has President Obama gone to tap my phones…. This is Nixon/Watergate. Bad (or sick) guy!”

Trump's tweet, which pulled all kinds of intelligence alarms, was, therefore, the product of a bunch of incompetent and venal Iagos and one big chump. As we've come to expect.


Illustration by Zina Saunders for the Los Angeles Times.
Illustration by Zina Saunders for the Los Angeles Times.

Fire & Fury” also chronicles the furious firing of FBI Director James B. Comey. According to Wolff, it wasn't only Comey's incipient Russia investigation that drove Trump to ditch him. Charles Kushner, Jared's ex-con father, had a role, too: He was terrified of the Justice Department as leaks from it had wrecked the Kushners' Hail Mary deal with the Chinese to bail out the family's drowning real estate empire. At the same time, Wolff writes, Trump's "billionaires' Cabinet" — people like Carl Icahn — knew the Justice Department well, having tangled with it a time or two. “They were always up on DOJ gossip," Wolff writes. Former national security advisor Michael "Flynn was going to throw him in the soup. [Former campaign Chairman Paul] Manafort was going to roll. And it wasn't just Russia. It was Atlantic City. And Mar-a-Lago. And Trump SoHo.” Comey was fired, then, because of all the stones he might turn over.

The various excerpts have already led to vehement pushback by Trump World characters. (Thomas J. Barrack Jr., a longtime friend of Trump, and Katie Walsh, a former White House aide, denied having made the negative comments about the president that Wolff attributed to them.) Trump even charged Bannon with mental illness on Wednesday for selling him out to Wolff. “Steve Bannon has nothing to do with me or my Presidency,” the president wrote on White House letterhead. Rage spurred him to eloquence: “When he was fired, he not only lost his job, he lost his mind.” Lovely zeugma, Mr. President.

With this statement, Trump seems to have hit his prose stride, and I hope we'll hear more from him in this dead-to-me genre.

Among journalists, “Fire and Fury” has hydrated a handful of freeze-dried complaints about Wolff, a tireless panelist, devotee of the rich and snide opiner on media who is never not described as a “gadfly.” In a more serious key, Wolff has been faulted for making stuff up. Writing in the New Republic, Michelle Cottle argued in 2004 that “the scenes in his columns aren't recreated so much as created — springing from Wolff's imagination.” He has also been accused of flacking for Murdoch, although the Murdoch connection seems to have served him well in reporting “Fire and Fury”. A lion in winter, Murdoch is evidently bored by Trump's idolatry of him, and now hardly conceals his contempt for his acolyte. My favorite line in the New York magazine excerpt is his. Here's hoping it works without the obscenity: “‘What an idiot’, said Murdoch, shrugging, as he got off the phone.”

It's clear that Wolff uses all manner of sleight of hand — tricks common to a more reckless period in 20th century magazine journalism — to generate operatic effects in “Fire and Fury”. The dialogue, for example, is suspiciously Netflix-ready, although Wolff claims to have reported all from what he told New York was his “semi-permanent seat on a couch in the West Wing.” He conducted about 200 interviews with capricious flakes, and Wolff also has some skeletons in his sourcing closet that someone's bound to drag out.

But who cares, really? Wolff's dislikable. He plays by his own rules. Big surprise. No one likable or rule-bound would have been able to abide this unsavory crew — Murdoch, Bannon, Roger Ailes, or, for God's sake, Trump — long enough to squeeze this much big, fat, soapy story out of them.

Wolff's ace has always been his excitement about cartoonish power dynamics among insufferable old men. In the past, this excitement has been decidedly uninfectious. But this time Wolff's subjects are not boresville “moguls” with interchangeable faces and net worths but the president of the United States and his psycho crew. And, because the world finds itself at their mercy, we'd do well to hear their fetid locker room talk interpreted by a writer who can stomach it.


__________________________________________________________________________

• Virginia Heffernan writes about politics and culture for Opinion at the Los Angeles Times.

http://enewspaper.latimes.com/infinity/article_popover_share.aspx?guid=3c73ac35-e49e-4529-8dee-092c8787fcf0
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« Reply #16 on: January 08, 2018, 11:03:32 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Fire and Fury’ proves an often-forgotten rule:
Don't assume ‘we're off the record’


Talking candidly to a reporter is harmless, right? Michael Wolff's West Wing
tell-all suggests that you shouldn't stake your future on it.


By MARGARET SULLIVAN | 4:00PM EST — Sunday, January 07, 2018

Michael Wolff “said whatever was necessary to get the story”. — Photograph: Brendan McDermid/Reuters.
Michael Wolff “said whatever was necessary to get the story”. — Photograph: Brendan McDermid/Reuters.

MICHAEL WOLFF says he didn't exactly trick President Trump while he was researching his scathing overnight bestseller, “Fire and Fury”.

“Whether he realized it was an interview or not, I don't know, but it certainly was not off the record,” Wolff said Friday on NBC's “Today” show, describing his conversation with Trump, who claims he gave the infamous author “zero access.”

As to whether he misled anyone about what he was doing hanging around the West Wing, Wolff's words may go down in journalism history: “I said whatever was necessary to get the story.”

Wolff, of course, has a reputation for “busting embargoes and burning sources by putting off-the-record comments on the record,” as one assessment put it.

Even so, even people who should know better about spilling their guts to a reporter often don't.

Last year, the president’s newly named communications director Anthony Scaramucci apparently thought he was off the record when he profanely trashed his White House colleagues to journalist Ryan Lizza, then of the New Yorker. Lizza wrote it up, and Scaramucci flamed out.

Last August, White House chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon was ousted shortly after the American Prospect's Robert Kuttner quoted him blasting the Trump administration's economic and foreign policy. Kuttner later said he was stunned that Bannon (who later claimed the interview was not the cause of his departure) never bothered to make the conversation off the record.

And a few years ago, Wolff himself neglected to mention to Ben Smith that a dinner he had invited the BuzzFeed editor in chief to was off the record. Smith wrote a story that embarrassed Uber executives, and Wolff in turn wrote a column that chided Smith, but also blamed himself for not being explicit about the ground rules.

Some people never allow for the possibility of such mishaps.

“My personal practice is to speak on the record or keep my mouth shut,” said Jonathan Landman, editor in charge of opinion columns at Bloomberg View and a former high-ranking New York Times editor.

Landman claims no moral superiority. He knows that there are plenty of valid justifications for people speaking off the record or on background, the latter meaning that information can be used but without the source's name. (Wolff wrote that he used “deep background,” which allows the use of information, as if it came from an omniscient observer, not attributed to anyone.)

“For me,” Landman told me by email, “the reasons have much more to do with self-discipline than high principle.”

Janet Malcolm, in The Journalist and the Murderer, caustically observed that reporters don't make dependable friends. In her case study of journalistic ethics, she explored the interactions between author Joe McGinniss and the subject of his true-crime classic, Fatal Vision, convicted murderer Dr. Jeffrey MacDonald, who felt betrayed by reporting which he mistakenly thought would exonerate him.

“Something seems to happen to people when they meet a journalist, and what happens is exactly the opposite of what one would expect,” Malcolm wrote. “One would think that extreme wariness and caution would be the order of the day, but in fact childish trust and impetuosity are far more common.”

Of course, when journalists do become their sources' friends, other problems may arise.

And ethical journalists honor their commitments to their sources — to the point of being willing to go to jail to protect confidentiality. But that assumes a true agreement has been reached.

Jim VandeHei and Mike Allen, on the news website Axios, called Wolff's “liberties with off-the-record comments … ethically unacceptable to nearly all reporters.” But, they granted, they do “have the effect of exposing Washington's insider jokes and secret languages, which normal Americans find perplexing and detestable.”

VandeHei and Allen then slyly confirmed some of Wolff's reporting: “In the past year, we have had many of the same conversations with the same sources Wolff used. We won't betray them, or put on the record what was off.” Still, they wrote, certain lines in Wolff's book rang unambiguously true; they provided a list.

So, if “off the record” really means that what a reporter is seeing and hearing can't be used in any form, ever, that's a high bar. But it's when the agreement is implied, not nailed down, that most screw-ups (and sometimes the juiciest stories) result.

The late Michael Hastings decided not to observe implicit rules when he described how Army General Stanley A. McChrystal and his staff mocked top civilian officials, including Vice President Joe Biden. After Hastings's Rolling Stone report was published in 2010, President Barack Obama fired his top U.S. military commander in Afghanistan.

Hastings later bashed other military reporters for ceding their ability to tell the unvarnished truth by trading it for access. “They go on these trips with McChrystal and they get to see all this cool stuff,” he told the Guardian, “and they completely drink the Kool-Aid.”

Now along comes Wolff, whose abundant faults don't include drinking the Kool-Aid.

“One of the things that's unnerving about Michael is he's loyal only to the story,” the former Hollywood Reporter editor Janice Min said in a New York Times interview.

He said and did “whatever was necessary,” as Wolff put it.

The lesson is there for the taking but certain to be ignored again and again: Let the speaker beware.


• Margaret Sullivan is The Washington Post's media columnist. Previously, she was The New York Times public editor, and the chief editor of The Buffalo News, her hometown paper.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Sunday wrap: ‘I've wasted enough of my viewers' time’

 • The dam of denial has broken


https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/fire-and-fury-proves-an-often-forgotten-rule-dont-assume-were-off-the-record/2018/01/07/59a363dc-f237-11e7-b390-a36dc3fa2842_story.html
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« Reply #17 on: January 09, 2018, 06:53:18 am »

dems cry wolf
people getting sick of hearing this bullshit?
more fake news from the retard propaganda factory=Trumps baaaaaaaaaad


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« Reply #18 on: January 09, 2018, 08:13:36 am »


You can keep screeching all you like.

The truth will ooze out eventually.

Then YOU (and all the other stupid mental retards who got sucked in by Trump's bullshit) will look like the biggest dorks in the world, 'cause you ARE the biggest dorks in the world.
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« Reply #19 on: January 10, 2018, 05:31:18 pm »

i am happy with my big dork glad its not tiny like yours
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