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America's 2018 mid-term elections…


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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #50 on: November 07, 2018, 05:58:52 am »


from The Washington Post…

Trump won't be a loser. The worst is yet to come.

The president will do almost anything to avoid being labeled what he hates most: a loser.

By RICHARD COHEN | 5:22PM EDT — Monday, November 05, 2018

Could President Donald J. Trump potentially be America's 21st century Emperor Nero who will burn the country before relinquishing power?
Could President Donald J. Trump potentially be America's 21st century Emperor Nero who will burn the country before relinquishing power?

WHATEVER the outcome of the mid-term elections, this we already know: President Trump will do anything to win. He will exaggerate. He will lie. He will smear his opponents. He will stoke racism, white nationalism and fear of immigration, and he will do any of these things because his entire ideology comes down to this: He will not be a loser. The worst is yet to come.

America is about to enter the most dangerous period in its 242-year-old history. Soon we will know if the House of Representatives has been captured by a justifiably vengeful Democratic Party seeking to block Trump at every turn, and possibly impeach him. The president will fight back, not recognizing any distinction between his political survival and that of the nation.

Just look at what Trump has done recently in an attempt to retain GOP control of Congress: He abused his power as commander in chief by sending troops to the Mexican border. He concocted a threat to national security by falsely characterizing a march of several thousand desperate Central Americans — many of them women and children — as an “invasion” of criminals and, in the words of his sycophants at Fox News, carriers of diseases not seen since the Black Death of the Middle Ages.

Mining the same theme — anti-immigrant sentiment — the president asserted that he had the right to revoke a provision of the Constitution that grants citizenship to anyone born in the United States. This is called “birthright citizenship,” and it has been the law of the land since 1868. The 14th Amendment was intended to guarantee citizenship to former slaves — not an issue anymore, I grant you, but still the law. It cannot be revoked by executive order.

Things will only get worse with a Democratic Congress. If it blocks Trump's more egregious initiatives, and at the same time opens numerous investigations, there is no telling what Trump will do. Neither precedence nor propriety will contain him. Unless the Democrats win big, and thereby send a cautionary message to the GOP, senate Republicans — more interested in their own political survival than that of the nation — will continue to constitute the Cowards Caucus.

How will Trump react if cornered? Certainly not in a mature, statesman-like fashion. More likely, he will be on a permanent rolling boil. He will obsess about impeachment and about being defeated for a second term. He would then go down as a one-term president, becoming the one thing he cannot abide: a loser. He will do anything to avoid that outcome.

As we have learned since Trump's election, a president has vast powers, but they are not monarchical. The courts have constrained Trump. So has what he thinks of as the “deep state.” In matters of war, however, the president is supreme. Not since World War II has Congress bothered to actually declare war. Since then, it has left that up to presidential discretion.

But this president has no discretion. If he's in political trouble, he may well provoke or create or blunder into a military crisis as a way of uniting the country. Initially, this can work: George W. Bush, the most hapless of presidents, had an approval rating of 90 percent after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. (He wound up dipping to 25 percent just before leaving office.) Trump, of course, has done something similar by fixing bayonets on the Mexican border, preparing for what he called an invasion, and conflating shoeless migrants with ruthless Central American gangs.

Soon, the president will rid himself of obstinate aides who might thwart him. Gary Cohn and H.R. McMaster are already gone. Yes men are on the way. Yet, Jim Mattis remains at the Pentagon. He's a stabilizing influence, but he is not beloved by Trump, and he is not at all liked by national security adviser John Bolton and Bolton's deputy. Mattis has told friends he has no intention of leaving. But ultimately he will, and then Trump, like the brat running Saudi Arabia, will be free to do as he pleases.

An American Nero is on the throne. He would set fire to his Rome before relinquishing power. The Republican Party is inhabited by the spirit of Know-Nothingism. It has not merely lost its traditional base, it has lost its mind. A dangerous period is approaching, and only a new leader can save us. He or she is already here. Look in the mirror — and vote.


__________________________________________________________________________

Richard Cohen writes a weekly political column for The Washington Post. He also contributes to the PostPartisan blog. Cohen joined The Post in 1968 as a reporter and covered night police, city hall, education, state government and national politics. As the paper's chief Maryland correspondent, he was one of two reporters who broke the story of the investigation of former Vice President Agnew. In 1976, he began writing a column that ran on the front of the Metro section. His columns have appeared on the op-ed page of The Post since 1984. He is the author, with Jules Witcover, of A Heartbeat Away: The Investigation and Resignation of Spiro T. Agnew (1974). He has received the Sigma Delta Chi and Washington-Baltimore Newspaper Guild Awards for his investigative reporting.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Trump on GOP losing the House: ‘It could happen’

 • VIDEO: What happens if Democrats win the house?


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/theres-no-telling-how-far-trump-will-go-if-democrats-take-the-house/2018/11/05/121be800-e128-11e8-8f5f-a55347f48762_story.html
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« Reply #51 on: November 07, 2018, 05:59:03 am »


from The Washington Post…

EDITORIAL: All the ugliness of the Trump campaign
is on display in Georgia


The president says Stacey Abrams is not qualified, but what he really means is she is not white.

By THE WASHINGTON POST EDITORIAL BOARD | 7:46PM EDT — Monday, November 05, 2018

Georgia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks at the Longshoremen Union Hall during a “Get Out The Vote” rally in Savannah, Georgia. — Photograph: Alyssa Pointer/Associated Press.
Georgia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks at the Longshoremen Union Hall during a “Get Out The Vote” rally
in Savannah, Georgia. — Photograph: Alyssa Pointer/Associated Press.


THE REPUBLICAN CAMPAIGN for governor in Georgia has been marked by dehumanizing immigrant phobia, invidious vote suppression, conspiratorial accusations about Democratic vote tampering, and racism. In other words, it shows in microcosm the direction President Trump would take the GOP. We hope voters, whether Republican, Democrat or independent, in Georgia or beyond, repudiate this ugliness on Tuesday.

We lack the space and time to recite every vile attack against Democratic candidate Stacey Abrams. Mr. Trump on said Sunday that she would turn Georgia “into a giant sanctuary city for criminal aliens” as Democrats moved to “impose socialism and totally erase America’s borders.” Neither Ms. Abrams nor any other notable Democrat has proposed anything like this. These are lies, far outside the bounds of normal political hyperbole.

The president also said last Thursday that Ms. Abrams “is not qualified to be the governor of Georgia.” Ms. Abrams graduated from Yale Law School and worked her way up to become minority leader of the Georgia House of Representatives, a position she held for six years. She is not only more qualified than her opponent to be governor, she is more qualified than Mr. Trump to be president. What absence of qualification could Mr. Trump possibly have been referring to, other than that she is not white?

Meanwhile, the Trump-endorsed GOP gubernatorial candidate, Brian Kemp, Georgia's current secretary of state, won his primary election by showing off his gun collection and promising to round up “criminal” immigrants in the back of his truck. This, he said, makes him “a politically incorrect conservative.” No, it makes him a demagogue eager to take advantage of voter fears and prejudices. It is more than possible — though not in Trump-world — to oppose immigration without demonizing the millions of honest, hard-working immigrants who live among us.

Over the weekend, Mr. Kemp announced that his current office, which is responsible for managing state elections, launched an investigation into the Democratic Party of Georgia for an alleged attempt to breach the state's voting systems. The secretary of state's office provided the public no evidence, while reporters obtained emails suggesting Democrats were actually involved in raising concerns about a potential cyber vulnerability. Mr. Kemp appears to be abusing his position to advance anti-Democrat conspiracy theories.

This would be in keeping with Republican strategy nationwide of using fears of voter fraud — which is imaginary — as an excuse to make voting harder. Georgia has some of the country's most restrictive voting laws. Registrations that do not exactly match other government databases are put on hold and marked for eventual purging. A missed hyphen or alternate name spelling is enough. The Associated Press found that minority voters were disproportionately affected. The state's voter-ID requirements are also severe.

Republicans could have chosen to campaign on issues: tax cuts, deregulation, the whittling away of Obamacare. Instead, they opted for fearmongering and deck-stacking. That suggests that Mr. Kemp and the other Trump lap dogs around the country have little faith in the value or popularity of the policies they would impose.


__________________________________________________________________________

• Editorials represent the views of The Washington Post as an institution, as determined through debate among members of the Editorial Board. The board includes: Editorial Page Editor Fred Hiatt; Deputy Editorial Page Editor Jackson Diehl; Deputy Editorial Page Editor Ruth Marcus; Associate Editorial Page Editor Jo-Ann Armao, who specializes in education and District affairs; Jonathan Capehart, who focuses on national politics; Lee Hockstader, who writes about immigration, and political and other issues affecting Virginia and Maryland; Charles Lane, who concentrates on economic policy, trade and globalization; Stephen Stromberg, who specializes in energy, the environment, public health and other federal policy; David Hoffman, who writes about foreign affairs and press freedom; Molly Roberts, who focuses on technology and society; and editorial cartoonist Tom Toles. Op-ed editors Michael Larabee, Robert Gebelhoff and Mark Lasswell; letters editor Jamie Riley; international opinions editors Elias Lopez, Karen Attiah and Christian Caryl; international opinions writer Jason Rezaian; digital opinions editor James Downie; operations editor Becca Clemons; editor and writer Christine Emba; and digital producer and writer Mili Mitra also take part in board discussions. The board highlights issues it thinks are important and responds to news events, mindful of stands it has taken in previous editorials and principles that have animated Washington Post editorial boards over time. Articles in the news pages sometimes prompt ideas for editorials, but every editorial is based on original reporting. News reporters and editors never contribute to editorial board discussions, and editorial board members don't have any role in news coverage.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/all-the-ugliness-of-the-trump-campaign-is-on-display-in-georgia/2018/11/05/5420e71e-e141-11e8-8f5f-a55347f48762_story.html
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« Reply #52 on: November 07, 2018, 07:15:04 am »

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Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

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« Reply #53 on: November 07, 2018, 07:23:16 am »

Quote
The president says Stacey Abrams is not qualified, but what he really means is she is not white.

what he really means is she is a fat black trash ugly commie pig libtard;D
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #54 on: November 07, 2018, 10:22:05 am »

Quote
The president says Stacey Abrams is not qualified, but what he really means is she is not white.

what he really means is she is a fat black trash ugly commie pig libtard;D


Nah, what he really means in his fucked-up, mentally-retarded mind is “she's a nigger slut!”

In other words, Donald J. Trump is displaying that he is a racist arsehole who deserves to have a high-velocity bullet smash through his skull and tear his brain to pieces.
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« Reply #55 on: November 07, 2018, 10:55:29 am »


Yep, America is fucked alright (the world offers thanks Donald J. Trump for speeding up the decline of the U.S.A.)…



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« Reply #56 on: November 07, 2018, 11:05:28 am »



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« Reply #57 on: November 07, 2018, 07:04:24 pm »


The entertainment is about to begin.

Trump couldn't get legislation passed when Republicans held the majority in both Congress and the Senate.

So he definitely won't get legislation passed now the Democrats hold the majority in Congress.

They'll be able to ammend every single bill put up by Trump and remove stuff from bills they don't like.

Then it will be Trump's choice whether or not to veto his own bills and risk plunging his country into gridlock.

Trump definitely won't get the money for his wall (snďggër).

His tax returns will soon become public.

And I guess a shitload more special investigators and prosecutors will be appointed to dig into the sordid, corrupt and illegal affairs of Donald J. Trump and his criminal family.

And ... no doubt Robert S. Mueller III's investigation will be protected by Congress.

Trump's nightmare has just begun.
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« Reply #58 on: November 08, 2018, 10:19:09 am »

Quote
So he definitely won't get legislation passed now the Democrats hold the majority in Congress

I think you make a big mistake

Republicans now hold a bigger majority in the Senate

and yes there will be fun and games
I'll get the popcorn out.
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« Reply #59 on: November 08, 2018, 01:21:22 pm »


Information for stupid dim-witted Trump supporters in New Zealand...


Legislation in America needs to be passed by Congress, then approved by the Senate, then approved by the President.

So with the Democrats controlling Congress, they are the gatekeepers for ALL legislation.

If they refuse to pass it, then the Senate don't get to approve it, nor does the stupid president.

Haw haw haw ... the collapse of America.

And... Congress have the power to appoint special investigators and prosecutors and Trump cannot fire them, nor block them.

Hahahahahahahahahahahaha!!!
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« Reply #60 on: November 08, 2018, 07:13:41 pm »


from The Seattle Times…

Democratic control of House may restrain Trump's destructive actions

Democratic control of House will finally provide a check on Trump's destructive actions.

By DAVID HORSEY | 3:48PM PDT — Wednesday, November 07, 2018



THE VOTERS have given control of the U.S. House of Representatives to the Democrats and, after two years of romping unchecked through American politics like a big, impulsive, destructive puppy, Donald Trump may finally be leashed — at least some of the time. House investigative committees run by Democrats will dig deeply into the dark corners of the Trump administration and it will not make the president happy. Already, Trump is warning there will be hell to pay if Democrats come after him. It's going to be a nasty two years until the next election.

__________________________________________________________________________

• See more of David Horsey's cartoons at The Seattle Times HERE.

https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/democratic-control-of-house-may-restrain-trumps-destructive-actions
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« Reply #61 on: November 10, 2018, 08:45:26 pm »

Quote
So he definitely won't get legislation passed now the Democrats hold the majority in Congress

I think you make a big mistake

Republicans now hold a bigger majority in the Senate

and yes there will be fun and games
I'll get the popcorn out.


Yeah, you just keep believing that.

It'll be hilarious when Congress refuses to give Trump any money for his wall and in fact refuses to pass any Trump legislation and pass it onto the Senate for their approval.

I guess the Republican-controlled Senate are going to spend the next two years twiddling their thumbs doing bugger-all as no significant legislation comes their way for approval. And no doubt the bills which authorise government spending will be full of Democrat ammendments which will force the Republican Senators to either swallow dead rats in order to keep financing Trump's government, or else they'll choose to shut the government down, then cop the backlash from the voters in two years time.

And as for that wall ... I guess Trump could always get down on his knees and BEG Mexico to pay for his wall, eh?

Faaaaaarking hilarious, eh?









from The Washington Post…

For Democrats, a mid-term election that keeps on giving

After a spotty beginning on Tuesday, days of additional returns
give the party its biggest House gains in 44 years.


By DAN BALZ and MICHAEL SCHERER | 7:49PM EDT — Friday, November 09, 2018

Supporters of Wisconsin Democratic gubernatorial candidate Tony Evers celebrate as he takes the stage on Tuesday during a post-election party in Madison, Wisconsin. Evers defeated incumbent Republican Scott Walker. — Photograph: John Hart/Associated Press.
Supporters of Wisconsin Democratic gubernatorial candidate Tony Evers celebrate as he takes the stage on Tuesday during
a post-election party in Madison, Wisconsin. Evers defeated incumbent Republican Scott Walker.
 — Photograph: John Hart/Associated Press.


IN THE early hours of election night on Tuesday, a consensus began to take hold that the vaunted Democratic blue wave that had been talked about all year was failing to materialize. Now, with a handful of races still to be called, it's clear that an anti-President Trump force hit the country with considerable, if uneven, strength.

Democrats appear poised to pick up between 35 and 40 seats in the House, once the last races are tallied, according to strategists in both parties. That would represent the biggest Democratic gain in the House since the post-Watergate election of 1974, when the party picked up 49 seats three months after Richard M. Nixon resigned the presidency.

Republicans will gain seats in the Senate, but with races in Florida and Arizona still to be called, their pre-election majority of 51 seats will end up as low as 52 or as high as 54. Meanwhile, Democrats gained seven governorships, recouping in part losses sustained in 2010 and 2014, and picked up hundreds of state legislative seats, where they had suffered a virtual wipeout in the previous two mid-term elections.

The Democrats' gains this week are still far short of what Republicans accomplished in their historic victories of 1994 and 2010. But they would eclipse the number of seats Democrats gained in 2006, the last time the party recaptured control of the House, as well as the 26-seat gain in 1982, when the national unemployment rate was at 10 percent. This year, the election took place with the unemployment rate at just 3.7 percent.

Day by day, the outlook for Democrats in the House has improved. At the offices of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, already high spirits have been rising all week as more races fell into the party's column. One joke that has been making the rounds there goes like this: “This is actually turning out to be more of a Hanukkah than a Christmas election,” meaning day after day of gifts, rather than just one.

This was always an election that would test the strength of the economy, which favored the president's party, versus the president's low approval ratings, which, along with the record of past mid-term elections, pointed to Democratic gains. In the end, history and presidential approval combined to give Democrats control of the House by what appears to be a comfortable margin.

The Democratic wave hit hardest in suburban districts, many of them traditional Republican territory, where college-educated voters — particularly women — dissatisfied with the president backed Democratic challengers. Ronald Brownstein of The Atlantic and CNN, who has closely tracked these changes over many elections, noted in a post-election article that, before the election, two-thirds of Republicans represented congressional districts where the percentage of the population with college degrees was below the national average. After the election, he estimated, more than three-quarters of GOP House members now will represent such districts.

Democrats flipped about two-thirds of the competitive districts won by both Hillary Clinton in 2016 and Barack Obama in 2012 or by Clinton in 2016 and Mitt Romney in 2012. They also picked up one-third of districts won by Trump in 2016 and Obama in 2012. In districts where both Trump and Romney had won in the previous two elections, Democrats gained about a quarter of the competitive seats.

Also striking in House races was the number of narrow victory margins — on both sides. About 20 Democrats won or are leading in races where the margin is fewer than five percentage points, while about two dozen Republicans who won or are leading are in races with similarly small margins.

That indicates that the outcome in 2018 could have been substantially better for Democrats or significantly worse, had the political winds been blowing differently. It also foreshadows another fiercely contested election for the House in 2020.

The final outcome in the Senate races this year will also have a bearing on 2020. The difference between a majority of 54 seats or 52 seats would have a sizable impact on the odds of Democrats being able to win control two years from now.

Republicans expect to defend 22 seats up for election, compared with only 12 seats held by Democrats. These include the Colorado seat of Senator Cory Gardner (Republican), the Maine seat of Senator Susan Collins (Republican) and the Arizona seat now held by Senator Jon Kyl (Republican). Senate Republicans Joni Ernst of Iowa and Thom Tillis of North Carolina are likely to face competitive races. Democrat Doug Jones of Alabama, who won a special election last year, also will face a serious challenge to hold his seat.

Beyond the tally of victories and defeats, the 2018 election was notable for the ways in which it deepened many of the divisions and shifts in allegiance that are changing the political landscape across the country. That carries implications for politics in 2020 and beyond.

Democratic strategists have been cheered by exit polls that show the underlying national demographic trends that drove their gains, particularly in the border states of California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas.

Voters under the age of 29 voted for Democrats over Republicans by 67 percent to 32 percent, a margin which beats the previous record in the 2008 presidential election. Latino voters matched their national 11 percent vote share from the higher-turnout 2016 election, with Democrats winning 69 percent of the Latino vote nationwide, slightly more than the 66 percent share when Trump was elected. Asian voters, who make up about 3 percent of the voting population, sided with Democrats by a margin of 77 percent to 23 percent.

“The emerging electorate, the one which will dominate U.S. politics for the next generation or two, supported Democrats in record numbers,” said Simon Rosenberg, a Democratic strategist. “Democrats not only won the 2018 election handily, but won it in a way which should worry Republicans about 2020.”

Said Republican pollster Whit Ayres: “To me, the big story is that the 2018 mid-term election reinforced and accelerated the patterns we saw in 2016. You had smaller, overwhelmingly white, rural counties become more deeply entrenched in the Republican Party, and suburban counties, particularly those with high proportions of well-educated voters, going exactly the opposite direction.”

New returns have been raising Republican concerns in western states. Chuck Coughlin, a Republican adviser to former Arizona governor Jan Brewer (Republican), said it was clear that Trump's approach to immigration in the final weeks of the campaign did not have the nuance required for a state like Arizona, where immigrants play a central role in the economy.

“One thing is for certain, that the caravan rhetoric doesn't resonate in this state as well as it resonates in the Midwest,” Coughlin said. “We have done a lot of research, and we have consistently shown that border security is a big issue, but the immigration reform side of that question is integral to the future of the state.”

Republicans in the state, however, have been hemmed in by Trump's support among Republican primary voters, which forced Representative Martha McSally, the Republican nominee for Senate, to tack to the right, particularly on immigration. “She didn't ever modulate,” said Coughlin. “She didn't create any separation.” Representative Kyrsten Sinema, the Democratic Senate nominee, now has a narrow lead in that race.

In neighboring Colorado, Democrats won every state-wide race, picked up a House seat, took control of the state Senate, and swept most down-ballot races as well. “We are not Ohio, Michigan or the Midwest. The college-educated suburban voter — they don't like Trump because of his behavior,” said Dick Wadhams, the former chairman of the state GOP.

In Nevada, Democrats picked up a Senate seat and the governorship and held on to two competitive House districts, in a sign of a continued shift left in what has been a closely contested state in most recent elections.

Democrats fell short in two other evolving Sun Belt states. In Texas, Democratic Representative Beto O'Rouke lost the Senate race to incumbent Senator Ted Cruz but managed to win 48 percent of the vote. Meanwhile, Democrats picked up two suburban congressional districts.

In Georgia, Democrat Stacey Abrams trails Republican Brian Kemp in the gubernatorial race, but the changing dynamics of voting patterns there worry some Republicans for future elections.

“When you have someone like Stacey Abrams carrying a major Atlanta suburban county like Gwinnett, like Hillary Clinton did, then the formula for Republican victories in Georgia has been completely upended,” Ayres said.

Other results point in a different direction, however, which offers some encouragement to Republicans beyond adding to their narrow Senate majority.

Ohio appears to be moving steadily away from the Democrats, largely because of cultural issues. Since 1994, Republicans have won nearly nine of every 10 statewide contests. The GOP's victory in the open gubernatorial race on Tuesday was the latest blow for the Democrats, though Democratic Senator Sherrod Brown held his seat.

Democrats also failed to pick up the governorship in Iowa, though they gained two House seats. They struggled to make inroads in House races in Republican strongholds such as Kentucky, North Carolina and Nebraska.

Florida remains a top concern heading into the 2020 elections, when the state will probably play a crucial role in any path for Trump to win a second term. Contrary to the Latino vote elsewhere in the country, the Cuban, Puerto Rican and Central American populations in the Sunshine State split more evenly, as Governor Rick Scott (Republican) mounted an aggressive outreach effort.

“The Democrats underestimated just how much Hispanic support Republicans were able to capitalize on in Florida,” said Fernand Amandi, a Democratic pollster in Miami. “It's about the margins.”

Of the 15 percent of voters in the state who were Latino, Scott was able to win 45 percent, according to exit polls, including a slight majority of Latino men. The Republican gubernatorial candidate, former congressman Ron DeSantis, was able to win 44 percent of Latino voters.


__________________________________________________________________________

Dan Balz is chief correspondent at The Washington Post. He joined The Post in 1978 and has been involved in political coverage as a reporter or editor throughout his career. Before coming to The Washington Post, he worked at National Journal magazine as a reporter and an editor and at the Philadelphia Inquirer. At The Post, he has reported on 10 presidential campaigns. The first political convention he covered was the Democratic Convention in Chicago in 1968. He is the author of several books, including two bestsellers. He was born in Freeport, Illinoid, and served in the U.S.Army. He is a regular panelist on PBS's “Washington Week” and is a frequent guest on the Sunday morning talk shows and other public affairs programs.

Michael Scherer is a national political reporter at The Washington Post. He was previously the Washington bureau chief for TIME magazine, where he also served as the White House correspondent. Before joining TIME, he was the Washington correspondent for Salon.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Uncalled Senate, House and Governor's races to watch

 • Prospect of another Florida recount sparks a partisan showdown


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/for-democrats-a-midterm-election-that-keeps-on-giving/2018/11/09/b4075ef2-e456-11e8-ab2c-b31dcd53ca6b_story.html
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« Reply #62 on: November 11, 2018, 11:29:15 am »


from The Seattle Times…

Rural areas resist election's big blue wave

Rural areas resisted the election's big blue wave.

By DAVID HORSEY | 1:25PM PDT — Friday, November 09, 2018



THE 2018 election's blue wave was large, but it failed to flood rural America. In Washington state, that reality was especially pronounced. While the vote on Tuesday may have done in the last few Republican state legislators in King County while giving the 8th Congressional District to a Democrat for the first time ever, Eastern Washington got even redder with some very damaged GOP legislative candidates winning landslides against Democratic opponents.

Nationally, Democrats seized the House of Representatives by toppling a long list of Republicans representing suburban districts, but the GOP majority in the Senate increased as Democratic incumbents in rural states were turned out of office. Donald Trump has wanted a wall and he got a big red one in rural areas — the only thing protecting him from drowning in the blue wave.


__________________________________________________________________________

• See more of David Horsey's cartoons at The Seattle Times HERE.

https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/rural-areas-resist-elections-big-blue-wave
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« Reply #63 on: November 11, 2018, 11:29:28 am »


from The Seattle Times…

High noon for Washington state and NRA's legal gunslingers

NRA's legal gunslingers will be coming after state's tough new firearms law.

By DAVID HORSEY | 1:46PM PDT — Friday, November 09, 2018



WASHINGTON voters just approved tough new gun regulations, passing I-1639 by a margin of more than 60%. The National Rifle Association invested comparatively little in the campaign to fight the initiative, but gun rights advocates have promised the NRA and other pro-gun groups will be sending in expensive lawyers in an effort to upend the will of the people.

Since they can no longer convince the public that unfettered access to firearms is a good idea, the gun lobby will hope they can find sympathetic judges who will overturn the will of Washingtonians.


__________________________________________________________________________

• See more of David Horsey's cartoons at The Seattle Times HERE.

https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/high-noon-for-washington-state-and-nras-legal-gunslingers
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« Reply #64 on: November 11, 2018, 12:32:18 pm »


What a brilliant article. It sums up perfectly the differences between the stupid, uneducated idiots who believe the god delusion inside their minds is a real god and who therefore support Trump and the GOP; compared to intelligent, educated people who can see right through Trump's (and the GOP's) bullshit.



from The Seattle Times…

Hey GOP: You're dead around here.
Time to dump Trump, and look to the ‘Nones’


You've heard of the gender gap in politics. And the education gap.
But a new survey of more than 4,000 Washingtonians who voted
on Tuesday finds the widest of all is the religion gap — and helps
explain why the Republican party has ceased to exist in King County.


By DANNY WESTNEAT | 7:00PM PDT — Friday, November 09, 2018

Washington voters increasingly do not view themselves as religious. — Photograph: Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times.
Washington voters increasingly do not view themselves as religious. — Photograph: Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times.

NOW THAT more votes have been counted, it has become clear that the Republican Party was completely wiped out of existence in King County this past week.

This has been building for years. But Tuesday's election made it complete. The blue wave turned out to be big but a slow roller, and now the Grand Old Party has been washed entirely out of the state's most populous and fastest-growing county.

The questions now are: Why? What happened to them? And can they ever make it back?

I won't dwell much on the most immediate cause, because it ought to be obvious to all. The cancer at the top metastasized down rapidly to kill the party almost completely in the nation’s suburbs.

Since Donald Trump rode down that golden escalator, the GOP in King County has lost four state Senate seats, five state House seats and now a congressional seat, the 8th, that just a few years ago was seen as a safe Republican district.

There's not a GOP elected official left in any King County district. The only Republicans left who live in the county are three state legislators way down in the southeast corner, around Enumclaw and Auburn. But most of that district, the 31st, is in Pierce County.

There also are three Republicans left on the King County Council, though that entire body was reclassified as “non-partisan” a few years back (if it hadn't been, those three could easily be gone now as well). The sole countywide elected Republican, Prosecutor Dan Satterberg, forecast all this carnage and announced earlier this year he was switching to the Democrats.

An “exit poll” of Washington state on Tuesday — actually a phone and online survey of 4,368 residents by the University of Chicago, Assoicated Press and Fox News — shows that Trump is poison to Republicans here. His approval rating statewide is 25 points underwater. So one can only imagine how abysmal it is in the suburbs.

Why local Republicans don't speak out against Trump is a mystery. He cut an ad in the final weeks of the campaign that was so racist the networks pulled it, including Fox. But I didn't hear a peep of critique from local Republicans.

Of course Trump won't be around forever (praying on that one, and I'm an atheist). But the exit poll, which is a more deliberative survey of more voters than the old-style exit polls, offers a host of other insights into who we are as voters — and why the GOP is kaput.

There's been coverage of both the gender gap and education gap — and both definitely are widening here. State female voters favored Democrats by 20 points more than male voters did. While the “college, non-college” gap was plus 22 points for the Democrats.

But there's another gap that’s having an even more profound effect on local elections: the “religion gap”. The exit survey shows that the core base of the GOP — white evangelical or born-again Christians — now make up only 18 percent of the Washington electorate. While the rarely talked-about “Nones” — those who don't identify with any religious tradition — have soared to twice that, 35 percent of all voters in the state.

I'm a None, so I've deputized myself to speak for them. Nones may believe in God, or not. But they're fed up with the influence of institutionalized religion, especially as it seeps into what is supposed to be a secular government. As an outgrowth of that, the Nones don't trust government to police personal morality, are highly suspicious of any God talk by politicians or Supreme Court nominees, are strongly pro-science, and tend to be overwhelmingly socially liberal even as some may be fiscally conservative.

Here's the clincher: The Nones voted Democratic by an enormous 51-point margin in Washington state on Tuesday. White evangelicals voted plus 51 for Republicans. But the math for the GOP doesn't pencil — not only are there now twice as many Nones, it's also by far the fastest-growing religious group in the state, up 84 percent in 10 years, based on exit polls from 2008.

It may not be long before you can call us Nones the “Amoral Majority”. “Enormous but invisible” is how The Washington Post put it about Nones on the national scene, where they now make up 21 percent of the electorate.

Whatever you call them, in state-wide elections or in the Seattle suburbs, either appeal to the Nones or forget it.

This doesn't mean candidates have to be progressive liberals, the exit poll showed. Two examples: Statewide voters said by 30 points, 64 to 34 percent, that there's “too much pressure to be politically correct.” Voters also said they're against a state income tax by a whopping 60 points, 79 to 19 percent. There's room for smart fiscal moderates who don't thump the Bible. But it may take years to repair the wreckage from Trump.

This is a generational realignment of who we are and our politics. As a result, the prescription for bringing the GOP back from the dead around here is daunting: Dump Trump. And dump God from politics.

Admittedly not so easy, either one. So I recommend getting started right away.


__________________________________________________________________________

Danny Westneat is a Seattle Times columnist.

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/hey-gop-youre-dead-around-here-time-to-dump-trump-and-look-to-the-nones
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« Reply #65 on: November 13, 2018, 03:23:46 am »

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Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
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« Reply #66 on: November 13, 2018, 10:38:04 am »


Yeah, we KNOW you're one of those stupid fucked-in-the-head conspiracy theorists.

It's obviously you're gullible enough to believe Alex Jones' insane bullshit.

Therefore, it stands to reason that you're dumb enough to be a Trump supporter.

And ......... you live in Woodville!! 
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« Reply #67 on: November 15, 2018, 10:33:16 am »

really
you're part of a communist braindead zombie conspiracy

trump is smart while you are dumb  Grin
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Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

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And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #68 on: November 15, 2018, 04:32:05 pm »

Quote
So he definitely won't get legislation passed now the Democrats hold the majority in Congress

I think you make a big mistake

Republicans now hold a bigger majority in the Senate

and yes there will be fun and games
I'll get the popcorn out.


Yes, we get it. Trump WON the mid-term elections.

Oh well, you can relax now ... your hero WON.

Faaaaaarking funny, eh?

It'll be even funnier when America's main parliament (Congress) refuses to pass any laws Trump wishes them to pass. Refuses to finance his big wall (why should they when Trump said Mexico is going to pay for it?). Uses their powers to publicly release Trump's tax returns. Appoints a shitload of special investigators and prosecutors to dig into every aspect of Trump and his criminal family.

But at least Trump WON, eh?

(and the simpleton idiot from Woodville, NZ believed Trump won too)






 
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« Reply #69 on: Yesterday at 03:01:07 pm »


from The Seattle Times…

GOP out of fashion in King County

Trump's dead weight sinks GOP in King County.

By DAVID HORSEY | 10:24AM PDT — Thursday, November 15, 2018



ELEPHANTS have long been endangered in Africa; now, in the wake of the 2018 mid-term election, the party that has long used the elephant as a mascot appears equally in peril in King County. Not that long ago, Bellevue and the Eastside suburbs were a bastion of GOP power in the state. Now, there is not a single Republican left holding a partisan office that is fully inside the county boundaries.

The most dramatic shift is in the 8th Congressional District where Kim Schrier is the first Democrat ever to win that congressional seat. The voters who swung this election are the college-educated females who have increased in numbers in the suburbs — women who generally loathe Donald Trump. As long as Republicans keep embracing their unpopular and divisive leader, they may face extinction, not just in King County, but in suburban districts across the country.


__________________________________________________________________________

• See more of David Horsey's cartoons at The Seattle Times HERE.

https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/gop-out-of-fashion-in-king-county
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