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The Republican Party … and kid-fucking … go together like L&P


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Author Topic: The Republican Party … and kid-fucking … go together like L&P  (Read 164 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« on: December 10, 2017, 11:41:48 am »


from the Los Angeles Times....

In Alabama, Republicans fear a lose-lose in Roy Moore Senate race

By MARK Z. BARABAK | 3:00PM PST - Saturday, December 09, 2017

Some Republicans say that even if Roy Moore holds Alabama's Senate seat, it will be a setback for the GOP. — Photograph: Dan Anderson/TNS.
Some Republicans say that even if Roy Moore holds Alabama's Senate seat, it will be a setback for the GOP. — Photograph: Dan Anderson/TNS.

WITH more than 48 hours of campaigning still left in Alabama's scandal-shrouded U.S. Senate campaign — and the outcome far from clear — some Republicans have already conceded defeat.

From their perspective, Tuesday will yield one of two unhappy results.

Either Democrats will elect a U.S. senator from one of the most deeply conservative states in the country, slicing the GOP's slender majority to a bare 51-49.

Or the party will seat Roy Moore, an accused sexual predator with a history of outlandish statements who, if Democrats have their way, will effectively serve as running mate for every Republican seeking office in 2018.

With President Trump forcefully backing Moore, “it gives Democrats the ability to drive a narrative that starts with the president and runs through the United States Senate about what the Republican Party stands for,” said Matt David, a GOP consultant. “That's defending accused pedophiles and embracing conspiracy theories.”

Moore supporters scoff at the notion.

“They are the same Republicans that said electing Donald J. Trump would be the apocalypse,” said Andy Surabian, a strategist for a political action committee, Great America Alliance, investing heavily in Moore's success.

Still, what should have been a perfunctory campaign — Democrats have not elected a U.S. senator here since the Reagan era — has instead turned into a cliffhanger and made Alabama an unlikely battleground in the growing civil war sundering the GOP under Trump.

In the campaign's final days, the two leading candidates, Moore and Democrat Doug Jones, slashed away in a flurry of attacks that belied the season's holiday cheer.

TV ads blazed in a ceaseless negative barrage and mailboxes were crammed with mailers painting Jones, a former federal prosecutor, as a dangerous liberal and Moore, the state's ex-chief justice, as an extremist and embarrassment to Alabama.

Both sides turned to celebrity surrogates — Trump touting Moore at a rally just across the border in Florida, Jones stumping alongside African American leaders — in an effort to spur turnout just two weeks before Christmas.

Moore has long been a controversial figure. He was twice removed from the bench for defying federal court orders and has espoused a range of views — praising the slavery era, banning Muslims from Congress, suggesting the 9/11 attack was divine retribution — that place him well outside the political mainstream.

Still, he was a heavy favorite to win on Tuesday until a number of women stepped forward alleging sexual misconduct, including charges he assaulted two girls — ages 14 and 16 — when he was in his 30s. Moore, 70, has strenuously denied the allegations.

National party leaders expressed revulsion and called on Moore to quit the race. When he refused, and efforts to delay the election and find a replacement failed, they denounced his candidacy and cut off funding.

Trump, who faces his own set of sexual harassment charges, took a more measured approach. Overseas at the time, he begged off comment; upon his return he questioned the allegations, noting the considerable time that passed until they surfaced.

He then endorsed Moore, tentatively, but more recently with full-throated enthusiasm, saying his vote was needed in the Senate to pass tax legislation and tougher immigration laws among other agenda items.

“The future of this country cannot afford to lose a seat,” Trump said on Friday night at a boisterous rally in Pensacola, close enough to draw Alabama voters but physically distance the president should Moore lose. “We can't afford to have a liberal Democrat who is completely controlled by Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer,” the Democrats' congressional leaders.

Moore was notably absent from the event, which underscored the dicey politics and arm's-length nature of the president's embrace.




Others in his party remain unmoved.

Senator Cory Gardner of Colorado, the head of the GOP's Senate campaign arm, reiterated the decision to cut off Moore's funding and renounce his candidacy, telling the Weekly Standard, “Roy Moore will never have the support of the senatorial committee.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky also continues to withhold his backing and, more crucially, funding for Moore, who is being overwhelmingly outspent by Jones. McConnell vowed to open an Ethics Committee investigation the moment Moore set foot in the Capitol.

The result is a deepening chasm within the party, even as Republicans move toward two of the party's long-sought goals, a $1.5 trillion tax cut and partial repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Apart from expressing their personal disgust, some Republicans questioned whether Moore could be trusted to support the party once in office, noting the mutual contempt between the candidate and much of the GOP establishment.

“By no means is he a solid vote,” said Reed Galen, a veteran of the George W. Bush administration. “He won't owe them a thing. That might make him as dangerous as anything.”

Even more worrisome, said Galen and others, is the guilt-by-association damage they fear Moore could do to the party and its candidates, especially among women and better-educated voters, who will be key to the 2018 fight to control Congress.

They noted the stark contrast with Democrats, who ousted Representative John Conyers Jr. (Michigan) and Senator Al Franken (Minnesota) after charges of sexual misconduct.

“If the Republican Party represents the anger and resentment and nationalism and nativism of Donald Trump, and now you mix in the abhorrent behavior of Roy Moore, is that the kind of people you want to be associated with?” Galen said. “Voters may not make that connection, but I assure you anyone running … will make that connection for them.”

Democrats aren't waiting. Already candidates have begun tying their GOP opponents to Moore, in House, Senate and gubernatorial races throughout the country.

“It's a big branding problem for Republicans,” said Jared Leopold, a spokesman for the Democratic Governors Association. “They've got Donald Trump's unpopular agenda, and they've got a party that seems to have lost its moral core.”

Ed Rollins, a longtime GOP consultant and Trump supporter, all but invited Democrats to keep it up.

“If that's how they want to spend their resources, we'll talk about taxes. We'll talk about other things,” Rollins said. “I've seen this many times. ‘If this one is elected, it's the end of the Republican Party’. It’s clearly not.”

Others are less sanguine, but find small solace in the promised investigation awaiting Moore if he wins on Tuesday.

Scott Jennings, a former McConnell strategist who remains close to the Senate leader, said Moore would be a “brand anvil” weighing down Republicans nationally.

“If there's going to be a silver lining in any of this,” Jennings said, “the women who won't get any sort of justice or due process in any court in Alabama will have a chance to tell their stories under oath in the U.S. Senate.”


Mark Z. Barabak reported from Birmingham, Alabama.

• Mark Z. Barabak covers state and national politics for the Los Angeles Times, based in San Francisco. A reporter for nearly 40 years, Barabak has covered campaigns and elections in 49 of the 50 states, including all or part of the last 10 presidential campaigns and dozens of mayoral, gubernatorial and U.S. Senate contests. He also reported from the White House and Capitol Hill during the George H.W. Bush and Clinton administrations.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • In Florida, Trump attacks credibility of Moore accuser as he rallies support


http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-pol-roy-moore-republicans-20171210-story.html
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« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2017, 01:05:13 pm »

Democrat Sex Scandals


https://www.ranker.com/list/democrat-sex-scandals/web-infoguy
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Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2017, 01:53:44 pm »


Ah, yes....let's talk about the Democrats.

They did the decent thing and resigned.

Whereas the Republicans refused to even admit to their sexual sicko & kid-fucking behaviour and dug their heels in.

Just goes to show that Republicans are arrogant arseholes who think they can fuck & molest anybody they wish, then brazenly carry on as though nothing happened.

And as for Trump....not only is he a sexual sicko & predator, but after initially apologising for his behaviour, he now claims the tape he apologised over is false.

Still, it says a lot about the moral inferiority of Trump's and the GOP's supporters, eh? If you support sexual sicko & kid-fucking behaviour, then you must be equally as bad.

Do the good folks of Woodville know they have somebody in their midst who makes excuses for sexual predatory and kid-fucking behaviour?
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« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2017, 09:13:58 pm »


from The Washington Post....

In Alabama, no good outcomes for the Republican Party

Trump's all in with Roy Moore, but other Republicans fear what Tuesday's results could bring.

By DAN BALZ | 11:15AM EST - Saturday, December 09, 2017

Former Alabama chief justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at a campaign rally on Tuesday in Fairhope Alabama. — Photograph: Brynn Anderson/Associated Press.
Former Alabama chief justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at a campaign rally on Tuesday in Fairhope Alabama.
 — Photograph: Brynn Anderson/Associated Press.


EVERY competitive special election draws outsized attention, but few deserve it more than Tuesday's Senate contest in Alabama. No matter the outcome, the results will reverberate loudly across the country — and nowhere more than inside the Republican Party.

The contest between Republican Roy Moore and Democrat Doug Jones is a morality play with significant political consequences. It sweeps in everything that is current — President Trump's standing, the fractured Republican Party, the Democrats' hopes for 2018, and above all, the issue of whether, at a time of changing attitudes, political allegiance outweighs credible claims of sexual misconduct.

Unlike in many such elections, the voting on Tuesday will not end the controversy. For Republicans, that's perhaps the most worrisome aspect. Tuesday's results will be picked at for meaning beyond what any single election can produce, but there will be plenty in what happens worth picking at.

For Republicans, there likely can be no truly good outcome. If Moore wins, the party will have preserved the seat but will be saddled with a new senator under a cloud of allegations, including assaulting a teenager many years ago as well as a pattern of pursuing teenagers half his age when he was in his 30s. If he wins and is sworn in, he probably will face an ethics investigation that will keep the controversy alive until his fate is resolved and perhaps much longer than that. For the Republicans, it's a hot mess.

If Moore loses, the GOP would be spared his presence in the Senate. But the result will have inflamed the anti-establishment forces led by former White House chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon, deepening antagonisms that continue to roil the party. A Jones victory also would tarnish the president, who has enthusiastically endorsed Moore and campaigned near the Alabama border on Friday night in a display of that support. Additionally, a Jones victory would put the Republican majority at greater risk in 2018.

As a public figure, Moore has long been a renegade. He is a throwback to a different era and an embarrassment to many in his state. Even before the women came forward to accuse him of sexual impropriety, he was highly controversial, having twice been removed from the state Supreme Court. The first involved his resistance to an order to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the state Supreme Court building; the second was over his order to state judges not to abide by the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling that legalized same-sex marriages.

Still, Moore would be a shoo-in on Tuesday were it not for the allegations of sexual misconduct. Alabama is one of the most Republican states in the nation and is deeply polarized, red versus blue and white versus black. Trump won Alabama by 28 points in 2016. His campaign took flight in August 2015 when he staged a massive rally in Mobile. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, then an Alabama senator, was the first U.S. senator to endorse Trump.

Moore has a following that is unshakable, especially among evangelical Christians. In a recent Washington Post-Schar School poll that showed the overall race neck and neck, 78 percent of evangelical Christian voters in Alabama said they backed Moore's candidacy. Among other white Christians in the state, his support was at 41 percent.

Moore's support among Christian conservatives highlights the degree to which tribal loyalty offsets other factors in voters' political choices. The president cast the choice in starkly partisan and ideological terms when he recently gave Moore a full-throated endorsement. In a tweet last week, he said of Moore: “We need his vote on stopping crime, illegal immigration, Border Wall, Military, Pro Life, V.A., Judges 2nd Amendment and more.”

The split within the Republican coalition is highlighted by the divergent paths taken by Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Republican-Kentucky) since Moore was accused of sexual assault and impropriety.

Trump made a bad bet earlier when he was persuaded to endorse Senator Luther Strange in the GOP primary. Now he is all in with Moore. Having been accused of sexual misconduct by multiple women during his presidential campaign, Trump has chosen to embrace another Republican facing similar charges. Shortly after his endorsement, the Republican National Committee reversed course and re-entered the race on behalf of Moore after pulling out in the wake of the allegations against him.

McConnell was a more enthusiastic supporter of Strange in the primary, directing money toward the Alabamian's candidacy, but to no avail. Once the women came forward, the majority leader tried without success to force Moore to step aside. His failure once again underscored the limited power the GOP establishment has in these matters.

Unlike Trump, however, he has not moved back toward Moore in these final days. A week ago, he appeared to be softening his opposition to Moore, saying it was up to the voters in Alabama to decide whom to send to the Senate. Asked to explain that, he later told reporters, “There's been no change of heart. I had hoped he would withdraw as a candidate. That obviously is not going to happen.” He also made clear that an ethics investigation probably awaits Moore if he wins on Tuesday. Should Moore become a senator, he and McConnell will find it difficult to co-exist in the same chamber.

The National Republican Senatorial Committee and its chairman, Senator Cory Gardner of Colorado, embraced McConnell's hands-off approach. After the RNC announced its support for Republican nominee, Gardner, who like other Republicans had called on Moore to withdraw, reiterated that the NRSC would continue to stay out of the race.


Democratic Senatorial candidate Doug Jones speaks as he hosts a “Women's Wednesday” campaign event on Wednesday in Cullman, Alabama. Mr. Jones is facing off against Republican Roy Moore in next week's special election for the U.S. Senate. — Photograph: Joe Raedle/Getty Images.
Democratic Senatorial candidate Doug Jones speaks as he hosts a “Women's Wednesday” campaign event on Wednesday in
Cullman, Alabama. Mr. Jones is facing off against Republican Roy Moore in next week's special election for the U.S. Senate.
 — Photograph: Joe Raedle/Getty Images.


A Jones victory would give Democrats a boost in the battle for control of the Senate next year, though the path is narrow and starts with the necessity of holding every Democratic seat at stake next year, including the red and purple states Trump won in 2016.

If Democrats were to do that, they would still need to pick up a net of three more seats to gain the majority. While recent events have thrown into question such a pickup, they have two decent possibilities: in Arizona, where Senator Jeff Flake is stepping down; and in Nevada, where Senator Dean Heller is in trouble.

The Senate map got further scrambled in the past few days. Democrats got good news when Phil Bredesen, the former Democratic governor of Tennessee, announced that he would run for the seat of retiring Senator Bob Corker (Republican). He is one of the few Democrats who might be able to win statewide in a state that has turned increasingly red and conservative.

Meanwhile, the decision by Senator Al Franken (Democrat-Minnesota) to resign his seat in the face of allegations of sexual misconduct puts a Democrat seat in play next year that his party had not expected. Even the possibility of a Republican seat falling into Democratic hands in Alabama adds to the significance of Tuesday's outcome.

On this final weekend, the race in Alabama symbolizes a Republican Party in turmoil, with Trump and Bannon pitted against McConnell and others in the GOP establishment. Trump has continued to bend the party in his direction. A Moore victory on Tuesday would add to that record of success by the president, but at a potentially sizable cost to the Republican Party.


• Dan Balz is Chief Correspondent at The Washington Post. He has served as the paper's National Editor, Political Editor, White House correspondent and Southwest correspondent.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Moore says allegations of sexual misconduct are ‘dirty politics’


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/in-alabama-no-good-outcomes-for-the-republican-party/2017/12/09/7d66efc8-dc57-11e7-a841-2066faf731ef_story.html
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« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2017, 09:54:30 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Bitter Senate race tests Alabama's image
in the country — and at home


In choosing between Roy Moore and Doug Jones, many voters are torn
between their values and a desire to move beyond Alabama's history.


By ROBERT COSTA and MICHAEL SCHERER | 2:30PM EST — Saturday, December 09, 2017

Attendees listen during a campaign rally for Senate candidate Roy Moore in Henagar, Alabama, on November 27th. — Photograph: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg.
Attendees listen during a campaign rally for Senate candidate Roy Moore in Henagar, Alabama, on November 27th.
 — Photograph: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg.


BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA — For many Alabama voters, unaccustomed to a competitive election and the national attention that has come with it, the bitter showdown between Republican Roy Moore and Democrat Doug Jones has become something more personal than a race to fill an open Senate seat. It is now a referendum on the state's identity.

Supporters of Jones say with concern that a win on Tuesday by the firebrand Moore would derail the state's efforts to escape its painful history and rebrand as a forward-thinking place welcoming to Fortune 500 companies and a highly educated workforce. And they express a nagging feeling that a Moore victory would be a deflating sign that Alabama remains beholden to its past.

“You travel across the country and you say ‘Alabama’, and something goes right across people's eyes every time,” said retired actor Jonathan Fuller, a 61-year-old Democrat, as he shopped at the Piggly Wiggly supermarket in the suburbs south of Birmingham. “I don't want to apologize anymore for where I'm from because there is this pocket of stubbornness in my state.”

Supporters of Moore, meanwhile, see his candidacy as a conduit for their rejection of the national media and political elites who they believe unfairly caricature their home state as a cultural backwater. They shrug off the notion that sexual misconduct allegations against Moore — allegations that some see as a fabrication by outsiders — should make a difference.

“I don't believe a word they say about him,” J.W. Poore, a 77-year-old retired home builder and Republican, said outside a Lowe's Home Improvement store in the Birmingham area. “The Democrats have been against us all the way. They don't accept the president, they don't accept nobody.” He said people outside of Alabama “have no right to judge us.”

The vivid contrast between the two candidates — Moore, 70, with his apocalyptic warnings about Muslims and gay rights, against Jones, a low-key 63-year-old lawyer best known for prosecuting Ku Klux Klan members who planned the 1963 bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham — has put in sharp relief the idea that the results could speak volumes about Alabama to the rest of the country — and to itself.

One pivotal group on Tuesday will be voters who feel caught between these two visions and must pick a side, especially Republican-leaning voters who feel pulled between their traditional values and a desire to turn the page on the uglier parts of Alabama's past.

In the past several decades, Alabama has successfully begun to transform from a largely agricultural economy based around poultry and timber to a manufacturing and technology hub anchored in a growing federal contracting community. Much of the aerospace industry is based around Huntsville. Mercedes-Benz and a core supplier of the company recently relocated to rural Bibb County, and GE Aviation recently announced a $200 million investment to build a new ceramic matrix composites factory. The local universities have invested considerably in recent years in science and engineering programs, nurturing a booming biotechnology industry.

From the shadow of the University of Alabama's football stadium to Moore's hilly hometown of Gadsden, voters — black and white, Democrat and Republican — said they are deliberating in their communities and sometimes with themselves on the campaign and what it means for their state.

“We've got a lot of good here, a lot of people who died for equal rights. And we've got a lot of people who are stuck in 1930, and that's not going to change,” Phillip Hutchins, a 67-year-old Democrat and retired aircraft worker, said last week outside a grocery store in Titusville, a heavily black neighborhood in Birmingham.

Business-minded white Republicans — a bloc that sees itself as modern and puts an emphasis on education, commerce and tradition — have been uneasy about Moore. They have recoiled, too, at the cascade of controversies that have gripped the state this year, making the current race a culmination of various discomforts rather than a sudden drama.

Business leaders said the state's image had already taken a hit with the resignation of then-governor Robert Bentley (Republican) in April, after pleading guilty to two campaign finance misdemeanors in connection with a scandal involving secret recordings of inappropriate sexual conversations by Bentley with a woman who is not his wife.

The competition with other states for corporate investment is fierce, and state business executives have watched closely what happened in North Carolina after its ban on gender-neutral bathrooms.

“The margin of error is extremely thin,” said George Clark, president of Manufacture Alabama, an industry advocacy group. “Everybody is trying to improve their workforce. Any negative you have — it's like recruitment in football — it will be used against you.”

Jones has courted the business establishment, many of them Republicans, on both moral and economic grounds, urging them to abandon their partisan instincts to protect the state's economy and reputation.

But Jones, who supports abortion rights and whose campaign headquarters has a Planned Parenthood poster on its wall, has struggled to win over Republicans such as JoAnn Turner, a 71-year-old nurse who lives in Vestavia Hills, a mostly white Birmingham suburb.

“I've been in Alabama for 42 years, and I'm so tired of the publicity being so bad. It's not who we are, and it's embarrassing,” Turner said, referencing the allegations against Moore and the racial tensions associated with the state. “The people of today, the generation of today, has put what has happened behind us. You look at this neighborhood, it's kind, good Christian people.”

“All that said,” Turner added, “I can't vote for Roy Moore, and I can't vote for Doug Jones. I have spent my life helping to deliver babies. I'll have to do a write-in, because at the end of the day, this is about my conscience.”

Turner plans to write in Senator Luther Strange (Republican-Alabama), who was appointed to the seat earlier in the year following Jeff Sessions's confirmation as attorney general. Moore beat Strange, an ally of President Trump with a moderate temperament, in a September primary runoff.

Billie Hopper, a soft-spoken 73-year-old Republican from Fultondale, said she stands by Moore and will support him because she does not trust the reporting about his alleged sexual advances toward teenage girls when he was in his 30s. She called him crucial to the causes of putting another conservative justice on the Supreme Court and assisting Trump with his legislative agenda.

“He has stood up for things that I believe in, Christian values,” Hopper said, adding that she is dismayed by coverage of Alabama and television ads that she says portrays the state as “backwoodsy … white supremacists, haters, things like that. I don't hate anyone. I love them all.”

While Trump has endorsed Moore, as has former White House chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon, Strange and veteran Senator Richard C. Shelby (Republican-Alabama) have remained wary of the former judge who was twice removed from the state Supreme Court — and have called the allegations against him credible and disturbing.

Shelby has opted to cast a write-in vote, telling The Washington Post that he is anxious about how a Moore victory would affect the corporate world's impressions of Alabama. “Image, reputation. Is this a good place to live, or is it so controversial that we wouldn't go there?” Shelby said. “You know, these companies are looking to invest. They are looking for a good place to live, a good place to do business, a good education system, opportunities, transportation. And we have come a long way; we've got to keep going…. We can't live in the past.”


People wait for the arrival of Doug Jones, Roy Moore's Democratic rival, at an event on Thursday in Cullman, Alabama. — Photograph: Joe Raedle/Getty Images.
People wait for the arrival of Doug Jones, Roy Moore's Democratic rival, at an event on Thursday in Cullman, Alabama.
 — Photograph: Joe Raedle/Getty Images.


Other Alabama Republicans do not share the senators' apprehension about Moore. Governor Kay Ivey (Republican), who is running in a crowded race for governor next year, has said she would vote for him.

Black Democrats, on whom the Jones campaign is counting to turn out on Tuesday in strong numbers, said they believe Jones has a shot at winning but do not expect his victory, should he win, to change the state's culture entirely.

“Right, wrong or indifferent, that's who we are,” Ron Pace, an Army veteran and Democrat, said over breakfast at Fife's Restaurant in downtown Birmingham, when asked about Moore. “Five more years from now, there's going to be another Roy Moore, and they'll vote in the interests of that Christian coalition.”

A Washington Post-Schar School poll released on December 2nd showed Jones and Moore in a dead heat among likely voters, while a RealClearPolitics polling average shows Moore slightly ahead. The Post-Schar School survey illustrated the ways the race is dividing the state, with Moore supported by more than 6 in 10 whites — including a clear majority of white women.

Dana Billingsley, a Republican real estate broker sitting with friends at a Starbucks on a weekday in suburban Vestavia Hills, is more open to voting for Jones and said she has taken to Facebook to vent about “Roy Moore being on Jimmy Kimmel” and Sessions being parodied on NBC's “Saturday Night Live”.

“I like Donald Trump since he loves real estate and isn't afraid of getting a divorce,” Billingsley said with a laugh. “But I actually haven't liked Roy Moore since before the allegations. I mean, this is 2017. Come on. The world has changed.” She said she hasn't followed Jones but knows enough: “What he did on the 16th Street bombing was right.”

Outside of Birmingham and in rural towns to the east — home to massive evangelical churches and family-owned barbecue restaurants that puff black smoke out of chimneys — Moore's support is heartier, particularly in his home town of Gadsden on the Coosa River.

“I know Roy Moore personally. He's an easygoing guy, and I don't believe he did what he's accused of,” said Michael Newsome, a burly 22-year-old Gadsden-area welder. “I've done work at his house, and we all know him as a gentle guy who's religious. Honestly, in good faith, I truly believe him.”

Ava Lyles, a 71-year-old grandmother who leans Republican, echoed him as she picked up Christmas gifts at the Gadsden Mall — the same mall Moore frequented when he was a young district attorney and where several of his accusers say he engaged them.

“I'm for Moore,” Lyles said. “Whatever happened in the past is now in the past, and God forgives us all.” She dismissed the suggestion that the race has stirred debates about the state's character.

“Oh, please. Haven't we always been bad, like cousins marrying cousins? That's not true, but people say what they want to say. Always have judged us,” Lyles said.

Otis Dupree, a 53-year-old retired chicken-plant worker who works part time at the Burger King in Gadsden, said he is “disgusted” with the city's embrace of Moore.

“The way I see it is white folks stick with him; that's pretty much what's going on,” Dupree said. “People in Alabama are going along with it — and it's messed up.”

More than 100 miles southwest on the state's flagship campus — the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa — hundreds of students in athletic clothing and T-shirts stream out of dorm buildings and sorority mansions across the street from the school's beloved Bryant-Denny Stadium.

As with the men and women in Vestavia Hills, many of them are financially stable and white — and Republican in a cultural sense as much as ideologically. They see themselves as Alabama's future and are eager to define it.

Roy Moore isn't part of that plan, according to Ella Jernigan, a 19-year-old Republican student who's studying marketing.

“My family had been friends with Luther Strange for years,” Jernigan said on her way to a meeting. “I thought that was where we were as a state. I can't stand us getting pinned now as rednecks or uneducated.”

She added, “Every time you think we're going forward, something like Roy Moore sets us back.”

Tim Booth, a 52-year-old construction worker on campus, however, had no such angst over Moore. Chewing tobacco and wearing a camouflage hunting cap, Booth said Tuesday's vote was more of a rebuff to the state's critics than a reckoning for its residents.

“People can see us the way they want to,” Booth said. “It's like the way we look at California: They should be their own little country.”


• Robert Costa is a national political reporter at The Washington Post.

• Michael Scherer is a national political reporter at The Washington Post. Michael previously reported for TIME since December 2007 and became their Washington Bureau Chief in 1913. He moved to The Post in August 2017.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Trump's Pensacola rally, in three minutes

 • Doug Jones makes final appeal in Alabama with black voters in Selma


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/bitter-senate-race-tests-alabamas-image-in-the-country--and-at-home/2017/12/09/314a63de-db7d-11e7-b1a8-62589434a581_story.html
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« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2017, 10:03:07 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Trump supporters were reminded that Ivanka once
denounced Roy Moore: ‘A special place in hell’


“I've yet to see a valid explanation and I have no reason to doubt the victims'
accounts,” Ivanka Trump told the Associated Press about Roy Moore


By KRISTINE PHILLIPS | 5:57PM EST — Saturday, December 09, 2017

Ivanka Trump, daughter of President Trump, during the Global Entrepreneurship Summit in Hyderabad, India, on November 29th. — Photograph: Cathal McNaughton/Reuters.
Ivanka Trump, daughter of President Trump, during the Global Entrepreneurship Summit in Hyderabad, India, on November 29th.
 — Photograph: Cathal McNaughton/Reuters.


A DIGITAL BILLBOARD was roaming around Pensacola, Florida, as President Trump held a rally there and urged residents in nearby Alabama to vote for embattled Republican candidate Roy Moore in the Senate race.

The billboard, displayed on the side of a moving truck on Friday, reminded people of what Ivanka Trump, the president's daughter and a White House adviser, had previously said about Moore amid accusations of sexual misconduct involving teenage girls.

“There's a special place in hell for people who prey on children. I've yet to see a valid explanation and I have no reason to doubt the victims' accounts,” Ivanka Trump told the Associated Press last month.

The billboard appears to be the work of the liberal group American Bridge, which featured the comments in big, bold letters next to Ivanka Trump's image. The group seemed to double down on the trolling by blasting the comments over a loud speaker outside the rally.




Ivanka Trump's words contradicted her father's unwavering support of Moore. The president defended Moore last month, saying the former Alabama chief justice “totally denies” the allegations against him and telling reporters at the White House that “you have to listen to him, also.”

At his rally on Friday, just four days before the Alabama special election, Trump's endorsement of Moore was even more unequivocal.

“We want people that are going to protect your gun rights, great trade deals instead of the horrible deals. And we want jobs, jobs, jobs. So get out and vote for Roy Moore. Do it. Do it. Do it,” he told supporters.

Trump also singled out one of Moore's accusers, Beverly Young Nelson, who had admitted earlier on Friday that she added notes — a location, a date and the initials “D.A.” — to what she said was Moore's inscription to her in her yearbook. Nelson said she stands by her claim that Moore sexually assaulted her when she was a 16-year-old waitress in Gadsden, Alabama.

“So did you see what happened today?” Trump asked supporters. “You know the yearbook? Did you see that? There was a little mistake made. She started writing things in the yearbook. Oh, what are we going to do?”

Trump also mentioned Nelson's attorney, Gloria Allred: “Anytime you see her, you know something's going wrong.”

The Washington Post first reported on the decades-old allegations against Moore in early November. Five women have told The Post that Moore pursued them when they were teenagers and he was an assistant district attorney in his 30s. Nelson, who came forward with her attorney, was not among those women.

Moore, who has denied engaging in sexual misconduct, had told Fox News's Sean Hannity that he may have dated teenage girls when he was in his 30s, though he said he could not recall.

Ivanka Trump's condemnation of Moore isn't the only time the first daughter broke with her father on divisive issues.

While her father shied away from immediately condemning white supremacists and neo-Nazis after deadly violence erupted in Charlottesville last summer, Ivanka Trump didn't.

“There should be no place in society for racism, white supremacy and neo-Nazis. We must all come together as Americans — and be one country UNITED,” she tweeted.

The first daughter's stance on Syrian refugees also contradicts her father's policy. She told NBC News in April that “a global humanitarian crisis is happening,” and opening the country's borders to Syrian refugees “has to be part of the discussion.”

The latest version of the president's travel ban bars people from Syria, Libya, Iran, Yemen, Chad, Somalia, North Korea and Venezuela from entering the country.

Although she has departed from her father on some issues, Ivanka Trump has been accused of being complicit in her father's policy agenda. After her comments on Moore, The Post's Jennifer Rubin pointed out that many others, her father included, have been accused of sexual misconduct.


Michael Scherer and Amber Phillips contributed to this report.

• Kristine Phillips is a general assignment reporter for The Washington Post.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: “Travesty, pure allegation, disturbing’: Alabamians react to Roy Moore allegations

 • It's official: President Trump just campaigned for Roy Moore

 • Woman says Roy Moore initiated sexual encounter when she was 14, he was 32


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/politics/wp/2017/12/09/trump-supporters-were-reminded-that-ivanka-once-denounced-roy-moore-a-special-place-in-hell
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« Reply #6 on: December 23, 2017, 02:53:31 pm »


from the Los Angeles Times....

Roy Moore still won't concede the Alabama Senate race.
And those write-in votes? Mickey Mouse got a few.


By KURTIS LEE | 1:50PM PST — Friday, December 22, 2017

Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at the end of an election-night watch party on December 12th in Montgomery, Alabama. — Photograph: Mike Stewart/Associated Press.
Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at the end of an election-night watch party on December 12th in Montgomery, Alabama.
 — Photograph: Mike Stewart/Associated Press.


IT'S BEEN 10 days and Republican Roy Moore has yet to concede in Alabama's special Senate race, even as election officials move toward certifying Democrat Doug Jones' victory in the days ahead.

As vote tallies from 100% of the state's precincts show Alabamians have clearly selected Jones, Moore has offered no indication that he plans to concede the race.

On Friday, all of Alabama's 67 counties were required to officially file their election results to the secretary of state's office. In a statement, Secretary of State John H. Merrill said his office plans to officially certify the election on December 28th.

Also on Friday, some of the names left on thousands of write-in ballots began to emerge. Some names are surprising. Who knew SpongeBob SquarePants had a constituency?

Moore's campaign did not respond immediately to a request for comment about any plans to concede.

Since the December 12th special election, Moore, a former chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court who faced a barrage of sexual misconduct allegations during the campaign, has remained defiant.

In a short video thanking his supporters, Moore declared that “immorality sweeps our land,” and railed against abortion and same-sex marriage and said, “Abortion, sodomy and materialism have taken the place of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”

“We are indeed in a struggle to preserve our republic, our civilization, and our religion and to set free a suffering humanity. And the battle rages on,” he said in the four-minute video posted to YouTube. “Today, we no longer recognize the universal truth that God is the author of our life and liberty.”

Jones, a former U.S. attorney, said it's time for the state to come together. He's the first Democrat elected to the Senate from Alabama in a quarter-century.

“I say it's time to move on. Alabama has spoken,” Jones said in an interview on CNN this week, adding that “now it's time to heal.”

In the special contest to fill the seat vacated by Jeff Sessions, who is now U.S. attorney general, Jones bested Moore by about 20,700 votes.


Phil Robertson, of the television reality show “Duck Dynasty”, received write-in votes in the Alabama Senate contest. — Photograph: Stephanie Cornfield/Los Angeles Times.
Phil Robertson, of the television reality show “Duck Dynasty”, received write-in votes in the Alabama Senate contest.
 — Photograph: Stephanie Cornfield/Los Angeles Times.


Nearly 22,800 Alabamians choose neither candidate and wrote in their choice, which, in turn, hurt Moore's candidacy.

Republican Richard Shelby, Alabama's senior senator, did not endorse Moore and announced that he cast a write-in ballot for a “distinguished” candidate. He didn't explicitly tell voters to cast write-ins, but his ballot offered Republicans a way to vote without supporting the Democrat.

Nick Saban, the University of Alabama head football coach, received 264 write-in votes, according to a report from AL.com.

In several counties, Mickey Mouse and SpongeBob SquarePants appeared on ballots. Phil Robertson, star of the television series “Duck Dynasty”, received votes in at least 10 counties. Another popular choice was simply the word “anybody”.

But the candidates to receive the most write-ins were mostly seasoned politicians and public figures.

Senator Luther Strange, who lost to Moore in the Republican primary, netted 5,822 write-in votes, according to AL.com. Lee Busby, a retired Marine who launched his write-in campaign as Moore's sexual misconduct allegations emerged, raked in nearly 3,600 votes.

Sessions, who before leaving his seat served in the Senate for two decades, received 267 write-in votes.


• Kurtis Lee is a national reporter for the Los Angeles Times. Prior to joining the L.A. Times in August 2014, Lee worked for three years at the Denver Post and covered state and national politics. He's also reported from the scenes of destructive wildfires and mass shootings and was a member of the L.A. Post staff that won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news coverage of the Aurora theater shooting. He's a Colorado native and a graduate of Temple University.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • White House hints that it's time for Moore to concede

 • Roy Moore accusers feel vindicated by his Senate defeat


http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-alabama-senate-race-20171222-story.html
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« Reply #7 on: December 24, 2017, 08:54:30 am »

I think you might want to get that missing sandwich seen to by a shrink. You do realise you live in NZ right?
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« Reply #8 on: December 24, 2017, 11:39:27 am »


Donald Trump backed a kid-fucking loser in Alabama.

But then again, Donald Trump is a sexual sicko, so I guess it's no surprise he backs a sexual sicko.

Birds of a feather and all that.

No wonder America is now the laughing stock of the entire world.

No doubt, it's all to China's benefit as they step up to take over the world leadership role.
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« Reply #9 on: March 03, 2018, 11:41:51 pm »


Hahaha....don't you just love KARMA?



from The Washington Post....

Roy Moore issues grievance-laden plea for money:
My resources have been depleted


Moore is hoping to raise $250,000 to defend himself in a defamation suit
brought by woman who says he touched her sexually when she was 14.


By ELI ROSENBERG | 5:01PM EST — Friday, March 02, 2018

Former Senate candidate Roy Moore (Republican) in December 2017 after his loss to Doug Jones (Democrat) in the special U.S. Senate race in Alabama. — Photograph: Mike Stewart/Associated Press.
Former Senate candidate Roy Moore (Republican) in December 2017 after his loss to Doug Jones (Democrat) in the special U.S. Senate race in Alabama.
 — Photograph: Mike Stewart/Associated Press.


EMBATTLED former Senate candidate Roy Moore is making a public plea for help to pay the legal fees he faces defending himself from a lawsuit brought by an Alabama woman who says he touched her sexually when she was 14 years old.

In a statement posted on his Senate campaign's Facebook page, the Republican former judge made the ask in a grievance-filled note, saying that he faced a “vicious attack from lawyers in Washington D.C. and San Francisco who have hired one of the biggest firms in Birmingham Alabama to bring another legal action against me.”

“My resources have been depleted and I have struggled to make ends meet,” Moore wrote, saying that his legal fees could exceed $100,000. “I have had to establish a legal defense fund, anything you give will be appreciated.”

Leigh Corfman filed a defamation lawsuit against Moore in January, part of an emerging legal strategy of litigating sexual misconduct claims through civil lawsuits when the statute of limitations has expired for criminal charges.

In November, Corfman told The Washington Post that Moore took her to his house, undressed her and touched her sexually when he was a 32-year-old district attorney in 1979, and she was 14. The accusations shook up the Senate race in the deep-red state, and helped catapult it to wide national attention. Moore denied the accusations, maintaining that he was the victim of a conspiracy by liberal groups, mainstream media organizations and others. Corfman claims some of the statements he made defamed her.

These statements include calling Corfman's accusations “politically motivated”, “completely false” and “malicious”. He also told Fox News host Sean Hannity that he had never met Corfman.

Corfman is not seeking financial compensation in the case beyond its legal costs, her lawyer has said. Instead, she is asking for a judgment, an apology from Moore and a ban to ensure he doesn't publicly attack her again.

Moore, who refused to concede his loss to his Democratic opponent Doug Jones, continued his campaign argument on Thursday.

“The liberal media, in association with some who want to destroy our Country,” he wrote, “… are doing everything they can to stop me.

“Gays, lesbians, and transgenders have joined forces with those who believe in abortion, sodomy, and destruction of all that we hold dear. Unless we stand together we will lose our Country,” he continued.

He said that “Christians can no longer afford to remain silent in these ‘perilous’ times,” taking aim at “covetous”, “unthankful”, “unholy” and “incontinent” “lovers of pleasure”.

“When I stood to bring these values and truths to Washington D. C. I was forced to fight the Washington establishment, the Republican Party, the Democrat Party, the ultra-liberal media and people such as George Soros, Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, and many others who fear the truth,” he wrote.

“Please help me fight this battle for the heart and soul of this Nation. Your financial contribution to my legal defense fund is crucial.”

A website he had set up to fundraise said he had secured about $32,000 of a $250,000 goal. Emails sent to supporters show he has been soliciting donations since at least January.

A list included on the donation site, presumably meant to include organizations he was fighting against, included Soros, the frequent target of conservative conspiracy theories; lawyer Gloria Allred, who represents a woman who accused Moore of groping her when she was 16 years old; the Senate Leadership Fund, a super PAC aligned with Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Republican-Kentucky); and The Washington Post.


__________________________________________________________________________

Beth Reinhard contributed to this story.

• Eli Rosenberg is a reporter on The Washington Post's General Assignment team.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • ‘How is my daughter a pervert?’: Alabama dad's plain-spoken rebuke of Roy Moore strikes a nerve


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/politics/wp/2018/03/02/roy-moore-issues-grievance-laden-plea-for-money-my-resources-have-been-depleted
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