Xtra News Community 2
April 27, 2018, 01:44:15 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Welcome to Xtra News Community 2 — please also join our XNC2-BACKUP-GROUP.
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links BITEBACK! XNC2-BACKUP-GROUP Staff List Login Register  

The “Sexual-Offender-in-Chief” & “Liar-in-Chief”


Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: The “Sexual-Offender-in-Chief” & “Liar-in-Chief”  (Read 339 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 28673


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #25 on: March 21, 2018, 08:43:57 pm »



Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 28673


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #26 on: March 21, 2018, 10:31:32 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Playmate, porn star and reality TV contestant in court over Trump

After weeks of reports about Stormy Daniels, former playmate Karen McDougal filed
a lawsuit to break her silence on her alleged affair with Trump and a judge allowed
a defamation case bought by reality tv contestant Summer Zervos to proceed.


By BETH REINHARD, EMMA BROWN, FRANCES STEAD SELLERS and MARK BERMAN | 8:03PM EDT — Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Former “Apprentice” contestant Summer Zervos with her attorney Gloria Allred, left, outside a New York court in December. — Photograph: Kena Betancur/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Former “Apprentice” contestant Summer Zervos with her attorney Gloria Allred, left, outside a New York court in December.
 — Photograph: Kena Betancur/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


A JUDGE ruled on Tuesday that a former “Apprentice” contestant's defamation lawsuit against President Trump may proceed, potentially allowing her lawyers to begin collecting evidence to support her claim that he forcibly kissed and groped her years ago.

The decision in the case brought by Summer Zervos came on the same day a former Playboy playmate, Karen McDougal, sued the publisher of the National Enquirer for the right to break her silence about the 10-month affair she says she had with Trump more than a decade ago.

The nearly simultaneous developments added to the political and legal challenges for the president, who has faced weeks of reports about his alleged affair with another woman, porn star Stormy Daniels, and his attorney's effort to buy her silence.

All three women are now seeking to tell their stories on their own terms. McDougal is scheduled to give an interview on Thursday to CNN's Anderson Cooper, while “60 Minutes” is scheduled to air an interview with Daniels on Sunday.

As she rejected Trump's effort to block Zervos's lawsuit from proceeding, New York Supreme Court Justice Jennifer G. Schecter cited precedent from the Paula Jones case against President Bill Clinton, which led to his impeachment in 1998.

“No one is above the law,” Schecter wrote. “It is settled that the President of the United States has no immunity and is ‘subject to the laws’ for purely private acts.”

Zervos has said that Trump kissed her against her will when she visited him at Trump Tower in December 2007, after she had left his show, and that he kissed her, groped her breast and “began to press his genitals against her” when they met for dinner later that month in a bungalow at the Beverly Hills Hotel.

She first spoke publicly in October 2016 at a news conference with other women accusing Trump of misconduct. She filed the defamation suit the following January, after Trump called the women “liars” and vowed to sue them.

Zervos's attorneys have said that, in the legal process known as discovery, they would seek a deposition from Trump. It is likely, though, that Trump's attorneys will appeal Schecter's ruling, and a deposition, if there ever is one, could be months or years away.

“We are grateful for the opportunity to prove that the Defendant falsely branded Ms. Zervos a phony for telling the truth about his unwanted sexual groping,” Mariann Meier Wang, co-counsel for Zervos with Gloria Allred, wrote in an email.

Marc Kasowitz and Michael Cohen, two of Trump's personal attorneys, did not respond to requests for comment. The White House also did not respond to a request for comment.

Trump's attorneys had argued that the president cannot be sued in state court and also that his comments were political opinion and, as a result, “squarely protected by the First Amendment.” Schecter dismissed those arguments.

McDougal's lawsuit is against American Media Incorporated, the publisher of the National Enquirer, which she says paid her $150,000 in exchange for her silence.

McDougal is asking the court to declare her contract with AMI void, saying her story about the president “is core political speech entitled to the highest protection under the law.”

AMI did not respond to a request for comment.

The lawsuit, in Los Angeles Superior Court, comes two weeks after Daniels sued Trump to invalidate her own confidentiality agreement. Daniels's deal was with Cohen, who has said he “facilitated” a payment of $130,000 using his own money. Cohen has sought to keep Daniels quiet through private arbitration, alleging in a court filing that she could owe as much as $20 million for violating the agreement.

In an effort to build anticipation for the interview, her attorney, Michael Avenatti, on Tuesday released a 2011 report on the results of a polygraph test that Daniels took as part of a magazine interview about the alleged affair. The report says Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, was being “truthful” in saying she and Trump had unprotected sex.

In an interview, Avenatti said he recently paid $25,000 for video footage of the polygraph exam “in order to avoid one or more third parties from obtaining the information and destroying it or using it for nefarious means.”

He posted an image from the video on Twitter of Daniels sitting in a chair and strapped to a polygraph machine.


Stormy Daniels takes a polygraph exam in this screenshot from a 2011 video, which was obtained by her lawyer, Michael Avenatti. — Photograph: Courtesy of Michael J. Avenatti.
Stormy Daniels takes a polygraph exam in this screenshot from a
2011 video, which was obtained by her lawyer, Michael Avenatti.
 — Photograph: Courtesy of Michael J. Avenatti.


“I am not going anywhere,” Daniels wrote on Twitter on Tuesday.

McDougal's lawsuit in some respects echoes a complaint made to the Federal Election Commission by the government watchdog group Common Cause alleging that AMI coordinated with the Trump campaign when it negotiated a “catch and kill” agreement to ensure McDougal's story was quashed. The complaint says the payments were intended to influence the election and should have been reported as in-kind campaign donations.

“Her complaint today reinforces what we alleged in our complaint,” Paul S. Ryan, a Common Cause vice president, said of McDougal's lawsuit.

McDougal's 10-month relationship with Trump remained a secret until May 2016, the lawsuit says, when another Playboy playmate alluded to the affair on Twitter, prompting McDougal to explore how she might tell her story about the Republican presidential nominee.

McDougal hired Keith Davidson, a Los Angeles lawyer. Over a dinner involving “multiple bottles of wine,” the suit says, Davidson told her that AMI had put $500,000 in an escrow account and that a seven-figure publishing deal awaited her.

He later acknowledged that there had been no such escrow payment, according to the complaint. The lawsuit alleges that Davidson was working with AMI executives to fool McDougal into signing a contract that was not in her interest, falsely allowing her to believe the tabloid would publish regular fitness columns under her name. It also alleges that Cohen was briefed on the deal.

“We are confident that the so-called contract will be invalidated, and are eager for Ms. McDougal to be able to move forward with her life with the privacy she deserves,” said McDougal’s lawyer, Peter K. Stris.

In a statement on Tuesday, Davidson said he “fulfilled his obligations and zealously advocated for Ms. McDougal to accomplish her stated goals at that time.”

AMI's offer to buy her story for $150,000 was not to publish it but to bury it. By then, McDougal had “cold feet” about telling the story publicly, the lawsuit says. Davidson also told her that the deal meant she would appear on two magazine covers and she would write dozens of fitness columns for AMI's print and online magazines, the suit says.

But the agreement did not actually guarantee that AMI would publish her columns, according to the complaint.

Still, the company was swift to threaten McDougal with legal action should she speak about the agreement, the suit says, as it did after she gave an interview to the New Yorker last month. AMI's general counsel emailed McDougal's attorney to threaten her with “considerable monetary damages” if she said anything more.

“Ms. McDougal thought (naively) that such a deal could give her the best of all worlds — her private story could stay private, she could make money, and she could revitalize her career,” the suit says. “What she did not realize was that she would end up treated as a puppet by powerful men colluding to achieve their own financial and political ends.”

In a statement on Tuesday, McDougal said, “I just want the opportunity to set the record straight and move on with my life, free from this company, its executives, and its lawyers.”


__________________________________________________________________________

• Beth Reinhard is a reporter on the investigative team at The Washington Post. She previously worked at The Wall Street Journal, National Journal, the Miami Herald and the Palm Beach Post.

• Emma Brown is a reporter on the investigative team who joined The Washington Post in 2009. Previously, she wrote obituaries and covered local and national education.

• Frances Stead Sellers is a senior writer at The Washington Post. She covers national politics. She has served as a senior writer for the Sunday Magazine, editor of Style and deputy editor of Outlook.

• Mark Berman covers national news for The Washington Post. He also anchors Post Nation, a destination for breaking news and stories from around the country. He has been at The Post since 2007 and previously covered transportation and local news.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/defamation-case-against-trump-moves-forward-asanother-woman-seeks-to-break-silence-about-alleged-affair/2018/03/20/dc418532-2c6e-11e8-b0b0-f706877db618_story.html
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 28673


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #27 on: March 21, 2018, 10:41:11 pm »



Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 28673


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #28 on: March 22, 2018, 02:49:03 pm »


from the print edition of the Los Angeles Times....

Trump's personal scandals piling up in courts

The president's sex scandals threaten to affect the GOP's standing.

By MARK Z. BARABAK and MICHAEL FINNEGAN | Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Summer Zervos is suing in response to President Trump's denials that he tried to force himself on her. — Photograph: Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times.
Summer Zervos is suing in response to President Trump's denials that he tried to force himself on her. — Photograph: Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times.

PRESIDENT TRUMP faced new legal and political jeopardy on Tuesday as a former Playboy Playmate and alleged paramour sued to break a confidentiality agreement and a judge rejected his move to quash a lawsuit stemming from a charge of sexual assault.

The developments, coming on opposite coasts, promised months — if not years — of legal skirmishing, keeping Trump's personal conduct at the fore of this election season and complicating GOP efforts to protect their congressional majorities in November.

The White House and Republican leaders on Capitol Hill responded with silence.

Even as special counsel Robert S. Mueller III probes Russian interference in the 2016 campaign and investigates Trump's tangled financial dealings, the president is confronting salacious accusations from his days as a footloose — albeit married — reality TV star and man about Manhattan.

In three separate lawsuits, he is accused of sexually mauling a former contestant on “The Apprentice”, his show set in a corporate boardroom, and paying money to hush two alleged lovers, the former Playboy model, Karen McDougal, 46, and pornographic actress Stormy Daniels, 39.

In Los Angeles on Tuesday, McDougal filed a suit seeking to end the confidentiality agreement keeping her from speaking openly about her allegations of a 2006 affair with Trump, following a similar move earlier this month by Daniels. McDougal accused her former attorney of undermining her interests by secretly colluding with Trump's legal team and American Media Incorporated, publisher of the National Enquirer.

American Media paid McDougal $150,000 in 2016 for the rights to her story about a romance with Trump, a deal that prohibits her from sharing details elsewhere. The firm, led by a close friend of Trump, never published the story — a practice known in the tabloid industry as “catch and kill.”

“AMI lied to me, made empty promises, and repeatedly intimidated and manipulated me,” McDougal said in a statement. “I just want the opportunity to set the record straight and move on with my life, free from this company, its executives and its lawyers.”

In New York, meanwhile, a judge ruled that an Orange County woman who accused Trump of sexually assaulting her at the Beverly Hills Hotel in 2007 can proceed with a defamation lawsuit. The ruling opened the prospect of the president facing deeply personal questioning under oath.

Justice Jennifer G. Schecter of New York state court rejected a request by Trump's lawyers that she dismiss the case filed last year by Summer Zervos, 43, a former contestant on his show.

As the 2016 election neared, Zervos said Trump tried to force himself on her at a 2007 dinner in a bungalow at the Beverly Hills Hotel. He said Zervos and nine other women accusing him of sexual misconduct were lying; Zervos countered with the defamation suit seeking a retraction, an apology and unspecified damages. Her complaint said he “knowingly, intentionally and maliciously threw each and every one of these women under the bus, with conscious disregard of the impact that repeatedly calling them liars would have upon their lives and reputations.”

Seeking dismissal of the case, Trump's lawyers argued that the Constitution protects him from being sued in state court while president. They also said his comments dismissing accusations were “fiery rhetoric” and hyperbole protected by the 1st Amendment.

In denying their motion, Schecter said “no one is above the law” and cited a 1997 U.S. Supreme Court decision that allowed a sexual harassment case against President Clinton to move forward in federal court while he was in office. Schecter rejected arguments by Trump lawyers that the federal ruling did not apply to state courts.

“State courts can manage lawsuits against the president based on private unofficial conduct just as well as federal courts,” Schecter said. She also turned down Trump's request to halt proceedings until he left the White House, saying there was “absolutely no authority” for doing that.

The president's attorneys have the right to appeal the decision, first to a panel of judges in Manhattan and then to New York's highest court — a process that could drag out for years and extend well into Trump's 2020 campaign for re-election.

Attorneys for both sides declined to comment on further moves.


Karen McDougal McDOUGALis also suing to end a deal to keep her story private. — Photograph: D. Kambouris/Getty Images.
Karen McDougal McDOUGALis also suing to end a deal to keep her story private. — Photograph: D. Kambouris/Getty Images.

While Schecter's ruling stuck largely to legalities and a dry recitation of facts, McDougal's lawsuit included sordid details and allegations of a double-cross by her attorney, who she says was colluding with Trump.

McDougal says she and Trump had a 10-month relationship in 2006 and 2007, including a sexual encounter at the same Lake Tahoe golf event where Trump allegedly started an extramarital affair with Daniels. His wife, Melania, had recently given birth to their son, Barron.

McDougal, Playboy's 1998 Playmate of the Year, had something else in common with Daniels: Both employed the services of Keith Davidson, a Beverly Hills entertainment lawyer.

McDougal said Davidson “assured her that the rights to publish her story were worth millions” but was secretly advancing Trump's interests while pretending to advocate on her behalf.

McDougal, now an actress and fitness model, claimed in her suit that collusion between the publishing firm, Trump's representatives and her lawyer nullified her non-disclosure agreement with AMI, allowing her to publicly discuss the relationship.

In a written statement, a spokesman for Davidson said the attorney “fulfilled his obligations and zealously advocated for Ms. McDougal to accomplish her stated goals at that time.”

American Media issued a statement saying the firm “has a valid contract with Ms. McDougal and we look forward to reaching an amicable resolution satisfactory to her and to AMI.”


Stormy Daniels argues her non-disclosure agreement is moot. — Photograph: Ethan Miller/Getty Images.
Stormy Daniels argues her non-disclosure agreement is moot. — Photograph: Ethan Miller/Getty Images.

In a suit filed earlier this month, Daniels sought to invalidate her non-disclosure deal with Trump, saying he failed to sign the document and thus rendered it moot. Trump's lawyers, in turn, say she could owe him as much as $20 million in damages for breaking the pact.

Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, was paid $130,000 in hush money by the president's personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, and has limited her public statements about Trump to broad hints and innuendo about an alleged affair from July 2006 into 2007.

Daniels surfaced during Tuesday on Twitter with a taunting message. “Technically I didn't sleep with the POTUS 12 years ago,” she wrote. “There was no sleeping (hehe). But … People DO care that he lied about it, had me bullied, broke laws to cover it up, etc.”

Daniels ended with, “I am NOT going anywhere.” Indeed, she is scheduled to appear during Sunday on CBS' “60 Minutes” in an interview taped earlier this month.


__________________________________________________________________________

• Mark Z. Barabak Mark Z. Barabak covers state and national politics for the Los Angeles Times, based in San Francisco. A reporter for nearly 40 years, Barabak has covered campaigns and elections in 49 of the 50 states, including all or part of the last 10 presidential campaigns and dozens of mayoral, gubernatorial and U.S. Senate contests. He also reported from the White House and Capitol Hill during the George H.W. Bush and Clinton administrations.

• Michael Finnegan Michael Finnegan is a Los Angeles Times politics writer. Since joining the L.A. Times in 2000, he has covered elections for mayor, governor and president, most recently the Donald Trump campaign. In 2011, Finnegan and fellow Los Angeles Times reporter Gale Holland won the Worth Bingham Prize for Investigative Journalism for articles on rampant waste in the $6-billion rebuilding of Los Angeles community colleges. A Los Angeles native, Finnegan started newspaper work at the Hudson Dispatch in New Jersey. For seven years, he covered city and state politics at the New York Daily News. He plays piano on the side.

http://enewspaper.latimes.com/infinity/article_share.aspx?guid=c8f736b8-d25e-4190-8df0-f5812684dc4b
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 28673


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #29 on: March 22, 2018, 09:57:11 pm »



Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7326



WWW
« Reply #30 on: March 24, 2018, 04:51:05 pm »



trumps had more bitches than you had wanks
but that's only if these attention seeking whores are not paid to tell bullshit
Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 28673


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #31 on: March 26, 2018, 11:28:38 pm »


from The New York Times....

Stormy Daniels Tells ‘60 Minutes’ Fear Kept Her Silent on Trump

The pornographic film actress, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, told “60 Minutes” that a man
had threatened her after she sold her claims of an affair with Donald Trump to a magazine in 2011.


By JIM RUTENBERG | 3:07AM EDT — Monday, March 26, 2018

Stormy Daniels said that a man threatened her after she agreed to a tell a magazine about an affair with Donald J. Trump. She said the man told her: “Leave Trump alone. Forget the story.” — Photograph: CBS News/Associated Press.
Stormy Daniels said that a man threatened her after she agreed to a tell a magazine about an affair with Donald J. Trump.
She said the man told her: “Leave Trump alone. Forget the story.” — Photograph: CBS News/Associated Press.


THE pornographic film star Stephanie Clifford told “60 Minutes” that she struck a $130,000 deal for her silence about an alleged affair with Donald J. Trump in the final days of the 2016 campaign because she was worried about her safety and that of her young daughter.

That concern, she told “60 Minutes” in an interview broadcast on Sunday night, was based on a threat she received in 2011 from a man who approached her in Las Vegas. She said the threat came after she sold her story about Mr. Trump for $15,000 to Bauer Publishing, which finally published the interview in its magazine InTouch early this year. Bauer had initially decided not to run it after Mr. Trump's personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, threatened to sue.

“I was in a parking lot going to a fitness class with my infant daughter,” she told the “60 Minutes” correspondent and CNN host Anderson Cooper. “And a guy walked up on me and said to me, ‘Leave Trump alone. Forget the story’. And he leaned round and looked at my daughter and said, ‘That's a beautiful little girl, it would be a shame if something happened to her mom’.”

Ms. Clifford said she did not go to the police after the threat, but when, years later, a lawyer came to her with an offer brokered by Mr. Cohen in the final days of the presidential campaign, she took it because “I was concerned for my family and their safety.”

Ms. Clifford's interview — which made for the most anticipated episode of “60 Minutes” in recent memory — was something of a national event, one marked by viewing parties and “Dark and Stormy” cocktail specials at bars, a nod to her professional name, Stormy Daniels.

And it was a quintessential moment of the Trump presidency — a tabloid-ready scandal and must-see television — that carried potential legal implications for Mr. Trump and his longtime lawyer and personal fixer, Michael Cohen. Until Sunday's broadcast, Ms. Clifford had kept her public appearances to the strip club circuit — what she called her “Make America Horny Again” tour. But, in speaking with Mr. Cooper, she chose business-like attire that was in keeping with the seriousness of the legal case she is making, that she had been silenced in a cover-up effort to protect the presidential prospects of Mr. Trump.

Ms. Clifford is one of two women who have recently filed suit seeking to get out of agreements they said they entered during the last stretch of the 2016 campaign to give up the rights to their stories about what they have said were affairs with Mr. Trump. The other woman, a former Playmate named Karen McDougal, sold her rights to the company that owns The National Enquirer — which never published it — and spoke to Mr. Cooper on CNN on Thursday. Representatives for Mr. Trump have denied that he had an affair with either woman.

Both cases present potentially consequential legal challenges for Mr. Trump, forming the basis of complaints that have been filed with the Federal Election Commission and the Justice Department saying that the payments constituted illegal campaign contributions.

Ms. Clifford's appearance on “60 Minutes” showed that the effort to keep her story from public view had failed spectacularly — just as statements from Mr. Cohen that he would seek millions of dollars in damages from her for violating a hush agreement had not kept her from appearing on what is often the highest-rated program in television news.

Shortly after “60 Minutes” aired, a lawyer for Mr. Cohen, Brent H. Blakely, sent a cease-and-desist letter to Ms. Clifford's new lawyer, Michael Avenatti. It accused him and Ms. Clifford of defaming Mr. Cohen in relation to the threat she says she received and demanding a public apology.

“Mr. Cohen had absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with any such person or incident, and does not even believe that any such person exists, or that such incident ever occurred,” Mr. Blakely wrote. “You and your client's false statements about Mr. Cohen accuse him of criminal conduct and constitute, among other things, libel per se and intentional infliction of emotional distress.”

During the interview Mr. Cooper asked Ms. Clifford why she was taking the legally risky route of sitting for a nationally televised interview. “I was perfectly fine saying nothing at all, but I'm not O.K. with being made out to be a liar,” she said.

Ms. Clifford had first threatened to speak out in February, after, she said, Mr. Cohen broke his part of the previously secret 2016 agreement by telling The New York Times that he had paid the $130,000 from his own pocket. He has denied Mr. Trump had an affair with Ms. Clifford.

The White House was quiet ahead of the airing of Ms. Clifford's interview, though an ally of Mr. Trump's, the Newsmax founder and editor in chief, Christopher Ruddy, told ABC News earlier on Sunday that Mr. Trump considered her story “a political hoax”. Mr. Trump spent the evening before the interview dining at his club in Palm Beach, Mar-a-Lago, with Mr. Cohen.

Ms. Clifford said during the interview that while she had seen Mr. Trump more than once, she had had sex with him a single time, unprotected. That happened shortly after they met at a celebrity golf tournament in Lake Tahoe in 2006. (Ms. McDougal has also said that she, too, was intimate with Mr. Trump during that event.) Mr. Trump was 60 at the time; Ms. Clifford was 27.

Ms. Clifford said that Mr. Trump had invited her to his hotel suite for dinner, and that their banter began with him showing her a magazine cover featuring his photograph. “I was like, ‘Someone should take that magazine and spank you with it’.” she said. “So he turned around and pulled his pants down a little — you know, had underwear on and stuff, and I just gave him a couple swats.”

It was done in a joking manner, she said, and the flirtation — which included Mr. Trump comparing Ms. Clifford to his daughter — led to intercourse, though, she said, she had not been particularly attracted to Mr. Trump and had not wanted to have sex with him. (She said she nonetheless went along of her own accord.)

“He said that it was great,” she said, and told her he had had “a great evening, and it was nothing like he expected, that I really surprised him, that a lot of people must underestimate me — that he hoped that I would be willing to see him again, and that we would discuss the things we had talked about earlier in the evening.”

Mr. Trump, she said, had raised the possibility that he get her onto his reality show, “Celebrity Apprentice”, but it would not come to be.

She said that he had invited her to his Beverly Hills Hotel bungalow in 2007 to fill her in on that promise. The entertainment for the night, she said, was a “Shark Week” documentary. Mr. Trump, she said, wanted to have sex but this time she did not go along with it, and when he did not have an answer for her about being on the show, she left. She said he told her over the phone a month later that he would not be able to get her onto the program and that was effectively the end of it.

But when her story threatened to surface again in 2016, Ms. Clifford said, her lawyer, Keith Davidson, called her. “I think I have the best deal for you,” she said Mr. Davidson told her, presenting Mr. Cohen's offer. (Mr. Davidson had also represented Ms. McDougal.)

When Mr. Cooper said some viewers would be skeptical that Ms. Clifford had made her decision because of a threat made years earlier, she said she “didn't even negotiate” and “just quickly said ‘yes’, to this very, you know, strict contract, and what most people will agree with me, extremely low number.” Ms. Clifford also said that she had “turned down a large pay-day multiple times.”

Ms. Clifford said that she can remember the man's face to this day and would recognize him immediately. Mr. Avenatti said earlier this month that she had been threatened, although he did not provide any details. At the time, the White House press secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, said, “Obviously we take the safety and security of any person seriously, certainly would condemn anyone threatening any individual”.

When the story about the payoff first broke earlier this year, Ms. Clifford had signed a statement emphatically denying that an affair had taken place. She told Mr. Cooper that she had been told that if she failed to sign it, “they can make your life hell in many different ways.” That sentiment, she indicated, was based on the terms of the agreement, not on any new threat of physical violence, though, she said, she felt both “intimidated” and “bullied.”

Lawyers for Mr. Cohen have said that Ms. Clifford faces $20 million in penalties for violating an agreement to remain quiet and that the agreement was still binding.

Ms. Clifford's suit hinges on Mr. Avenatti's argument that the agreement is invalid because Mr. Trump had not signed it. Mr. Cohen signed the agreement, representing the Delaware shell company Essential Consultants, through which he paid Ms. Clifford.

Mr. Cohen has denied any involvement by the Trump Organization or the Trump campaign. But Mr. Avenatti, through his various media appearances, has been trying to build a case that Mr. Cohen was acting in his capacity as a lawyer at the Trump Organization when he worked on the agreement. He presented new evidence on “60 Minutes”: a FedEx envelope showing that Mr. Davidson had sent the contract to Mr. Cohen at his office at the Trump Organization, and addressed a cover letter to him in his official Trump Organization capacity.

Mr. Cooper pressed Ms. Clifford on whether she was not coming forward to cash in on her affair now that Mr. Trump had become president. She did not apologize for the extra money she says she is already making as a dancer because of the surrounding publicity, but noted that she was also opening herself up to real financial risk.

Asked what she would tell the president if he was watching, she said, “He knows I'm telling the truth.”


__________________________________________________________________________

• Jim Rutenberg is a freelance media columnist and former political correspondent for The New York Times, for which he has written over 2,300 articles.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Stormy Daniels: Timeline of a Trump Scandal

 • Stormy Daniels, Porn Star Suing Trump, Is Known for Her Ambition: ‘She's the Boss

 • Ex-Playboy Model Karen McDougal Sues to Speak on Alleged Trump Affair

 • Stormy Daniels Lawsuit Opens Door to Further Trouble for Trump


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/25/business/stormy-daniels-donald-trump.html
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7326



WWW
« Reply #32 on: March 27, 2018, 03:28:51 am »


that's the funnest bullshit story i have ever heard

sucking up to anderson cooper thought for a min she was going to offer to suck anderson
stormy is a great BJ expert cum dumpster but she's ugly

and she is so drugged
my guess is she needs money for her habit
did you see her giant pupils
Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 28673


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #33 on: March 28, 2018, 12:39:15 am »


from The Washington Post....

Trump Can't Stop Tweeting, but Goes Silent on Stormy Daniels

After sixty-one weeks in the White House, President Trump
has found someone he won't attack on Twitter: Stormy Daniels.


By MICHAEL D. SHEAR and MAGGIE HABERMAN | 8:02AM EDT — Monday, March 26, 2018

President Donald J. Trump returned to Washington D.C. on Sunday after spending the weekend in Florida. — Photograph: Tom Brenner/The New York Times.
President Donald J. Trump returned to Washington D.C. on Sunday after spending the weekend in Florida. — Photograph: Tom Brenner/The New York Times.

WASHINGTON — After 61 weeks in the White House, President Trump has found two people he won't attack on Twitter: Stormy Daniels and Karen McDougal.

The verbose commander in chief has posted more than 2,900 times on Twitter since taking office, using the term “FAKE NEWS” to describe everything from the Russia inquiry and allegations of chaos in the White House to harassment accusations, the size of his inaugural crowds and heated arguments with world leaders.

But he has been uncharacteristically silent in recent days — to the relief of his advisers — as a pornographic film star and a Playboy model described intimate details of sexual encounters with Mr. Trump. Stephanie Clifford, known in pornographic films as Stormy Daniels, said during Sunday night on CBS's “60 Minutes” that she once spanked the president with a copy of Forbes magazine bearing his face on the cover.

The fact that the president has not given oxygen to the headlines, however, does not mean that he is content.

Inside the White House, Mr. Trump is eager to defend himself against allegations that he insists are false, those close to him say. And he is growing increasingly frustrated with breathless, wall-to-wall news media coverage of the salacious details from the two women.

On Monday, Ms. Clifford's lawyer added new charges to the suit she filed: that the president's lawyer defamed Ms. Clifford in denying her claims; that he and Mr. Trump pursued the deal to specifically help Mr. Trump's election prospects; and that he then structured the agreement to shield from public view what was, effectively, an illegal $130,000 campaign gift.

In discussions with allies and some aides, Mr. Trump has privately railed against Ms. Clifford, and insisted that she is not telling the truth. He has reminded advisers that he joined an effort to enforce financial penalties against Ms. Clifford, whose TV interview on Sunday night was hyped throughout the weekend on the cable news channels that Mr. Trump watches obsessively.

But there has been no debate among Mr. Trump's advisers about the best course for him: just keep quiet about a story that would only be fueled by a presidential tweet or a comment about the women shouted above the roar of Marine One.

Keeping a lid on Mr. Trump is never easy, especially when he is eager to hit back at his adversaries.

In the days after an “Access Hollywood” video exposed his own lewd comments about women during the final month of the campaign, Mr. Trump responded by showing up at his debate with Hillary Clinton with three women who had accused Bill Clinton of sexual improprieties.

As a candidate, and as president, Mr. Trump has eagerly attacked just about all of his enemies and accusers, often with colorful nicknames like “Little Rocket Man” for the North Korean leader, “Crazy Joe Biden” or “Sloppy Steve” Bannon.

But for now, it appears that the president is listening to — and accepting — his advisers' warnings on the dangers of speaking out about the women, much the way he followed the advice of his lawyers for a year not to attack Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel in the Russia inquiry.

Recently, he has ditched that advice, attacking Mr. Mueller and his team directly on Twitter. That leaves only his alleged mistresses and President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia as people who are immune to Mr. Trump's Twitter trash-talk.

Raj Shah, a deputy White House press secretary, declined to say “what the president may or may not have seen” on television on Sunday night, though he said that Mr. Trump denies the allegations that Ms. Clifford made in the CBS interview.

“I'll just say that he's consistently denied these allegations,” Mr. Shah said. “The president doesn't believe that any of the claims that Ms. Daniels made last night in the interview are accurate.”

Mr. Trump dined at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida on Saturday evening with Michael D. Cohen, his lawyer and longtime aide who is at the center of the Clifford scandal, according to three people familiar with the get-together. The president scheduled the meeting himself, surprising his aides with it a short time before Mr. Cohen arrived, people familiar with the meeting said.

Melania Trump, too, has been silent about the allegations. Asked to react to the interviews, Stephanie Grisham, Mrs. Trump's spokeswoman, said: “She's focusing on being a mother, she's quite enjoying her spring break and she's focused on future projects.”

It is not clear whether Mr. Trump watched a similar tell-all interview on CNN on Thursday evening, when Karen McDougal, a former Playboy model, alleged a 10-month romantic affair with Mr. Trump in which they repeatedly had sex.


Stormy Daniels said Sunday night on CBS's “60 Minutes” that she once spanked the president with a copy of Forbes magazine bearing his face on the cover. — Photograph: Joe Raedle/Getty Images.
Stormy Daniels said Sunday night on CBS's “60 Minutes” that she once spanked the president with a copy
of Forbes magazine bearing his face on the cover. — Photograph: Joe Raedle/Getty Images.


Sunday's interview with Ms. Clifford contained few surprises but some humiliating details, such as Ms. Clifford saying she was not attracted to Mr. Trump, and her recollection of spanking him. Virility and strength are key traits that the president likes to project, and he once gloated about a New York Post headline quoting a friend of his second wife, Marla Maples, who recalled Ms. Maples saying that Mr. Trump was the “Best Sex I've Ever Had.”

In the interview, Ms. Clifford said that she had flirted with Mr. Trump in 2006 at a celebrity golf tournament in Lake Tahoe. She said Mr. Trump had compared her favorably to his daughter during the flirtation, and that she had intercourse with Mr. Trump.

She also alleged that an unknown person whom she believed to be connected to Mr. Trump and Mr. Cohen threatened her in a parking lot in 2011, telling her, “leave Trump alone. Forget the story.” Then looking at her infant daughter, he added, “That's a beautiful little girl. It would be a shame if something happened to her mom.”

Asked by Anderson Cooper whether she had anything to say to Mr. Trump, if he was watching on Sunday night, Ms. Clifford said, “He knows I'm telling the truth.”

Even that has not prompted Mr. Trump to directly address the central allegations from Ms. Clifford and Ms. McDougal — that the president cheated on his wife shortly after Mrs. Trump gave birth to their son.

Mr. Trump did type out a vague “Fake News” tweet on Monday morning, although it is unclear to what he was referring.

Beyond the details of the alleged encounters, Mr. Trump's advisers have been urging the president to keep quiet about the legal wrangling concerning Ms. Clifford and Ms. McDougal.

Ms. McDougal, who accepted $150,000 from the parent company of the National Enquirer to keep quiet about her alleged affair with Mr. Trump, is suing the company to be released from the contract. Mr. Cohen has acknowledged paying Ms. Clifford $130,000 in the days before the 2016 election to keep quiet about her allegations.

Mr. Shah said at the White House on Monday that “I can say categorically that, obviously, the White House didn't engage in any wrong-doing.”

Asked about why Mr. Trump's lawyer would pay Ms. Clifford $130,000 if her allegations were false, Mr. Shah said that “false charges are settled out of court all the time.” He referred further questions about the case to Mr. Cohen.

The lawyer for Ms. Clifford has aggressively argued that his client is not bound by the non-disclosure agreement that she signed, in part because Mr. Trump himself never signed the document. Michael Avenatti, the lawyer, has repeatedly used Trump-like insinuations to suggest that Ms. Clifford has digital evidence of the intercourse.

“We have a litany of more evidence in this case, and it's going to be disclosed, and it's going to be laid bare for the American public,” Mr. Avenatti said in an interview on Monday morning on ABC's “Good Morning America”.

Last week, Mr. Avenatti tweeted a picture of a CD or DVD with the suggestive caption: “If a picture is worth a thousand words, how many words is this worth??? #60minutes #pleasedenyit #basta”.

Even that has not prompted a presidential retort — yet.


__________________________________________________________________________

Jim Rutenberg contributed reporting from New York.

• Michael D. Shear is a White House correspondent in the Washington bureau of The New York Times, where he covers President Trump, with a focus on domestic policy, the regulatory state and life at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. A veteran political correspondent, he covered Barack Obama's presidency, including the 2012 re-election campaign. Before coming to The N.Y. Times in 2010, he spent 18 years at The Washington Post, writing about local communities, school districts, state politics, the 2008 presidential campaign and the White House. A member of the Pulitzer Prize-winning team that covered the Virginia Tech shootings in 2007, Mr. Shear is a 1990 graduate of Claremont McKenna College and has a masters in public policy from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He lives in Virginia with his wife and two teenage children.

• Maggie Haberman is a White House correspondent. She joined The New York Times in February 2015 as a campaign correspondent. Previously, Ms. Haberman worked as a political reporter at Politico from 2010 to 2015 and at other publications including the New York Post and New York Daily News. She was a finalist for the Mirror Awards, with Glenn Thrush, for What is Hillary Clinton Afraid of? which was published in 2014. Her hobbies include singing, and she is married with three children.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • How Stormy Daniels Out-Trumped Trump

 • Stormy Daniels Tells ‘60 Minutes’ That Fear of Trump Kept Her Silent

 • Stormy Daniels, Porn Star Suing Trump, Is Known for Her Ambition: ‘She's the Boss’


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/26/us/politics/trump-silent-stormy-daniels.html
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 28673


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #34 on: March 28, 2018, 12:48:24 am »


from the Los Angeles Times....

Trump team and Stormy Daniels each accuse the other of lying
as clash over alleged affair escalates


By MICHAEL FINNEGAN | 8:55PM PDT — Monday, March 26, 2018

Porn star actress, Stormy Daniels in 2007. — Photograph: Matt Sayles/Associated Press.
Porn star, actress Stormy Daniels in 2007. — Photograph: Matt Sayles/Associated Press.

THE CLASH between Stormy Daniels and President Trump intensified on Monday in the aftermath of the porn star's “60 Minutes” interview, with each side claiming the other is lying about an alleged sexual encounter in Lake Tahoe.

The spectacle of an adult entertainer recalling the time she spanked a future president with a magazine featuring his face on the cover was a major draw for CBS on Sunday night; more than 21 million viewers tuned in.

Tawdry details aside, the legal stakes — and political trouble for Trump — mounted on Monday as Daniels filed a defamation claim against the president's personal lawyer, Michael Cohen.

Cohen in effect called Daniels a liar last month in a public statement challenging her comments about having sex with Trump, her complaint said.

He “made the statement knowing it was false or had serious doubts about the truth,” Daniels charged in papers filed in Los Angeles federal court.

The complaint, expanding on a lawsuit she filed against Trump on March 6, accused Cohen of breaking federal law when he set up a shell corporation to pay her $130,000 in hush money 11 days before the November 2016 presidential election.

Former Playboy model Karen McDougal, who was also paid during the campaign to stay quiet about an alleged 10-month romance with Trump, has filed a similar lawsuit. Both suits say the payments were meant to influence the election by keeping Trump's extramarital affairs from voters and thus were illegal campaign donations.

Cohen, who had dinner with Trump over the weekend at the president's Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida, did not respond to emails seeking comment. He has denied the payments to the women had anything to do with Trump's run for president.

Trump maintained his uncharacteristic silence about Daniels on Monday, letting White House Deputy Press Secretary Raj Shah speak for him. Shah declined to say whether the president watched her on “60 Minutes”, but attacked Daniels' credibility on his behalf.

“The president doesn't believe that any of the claims that Ms. Daniels made last night in the interview are accurate,” Shah said.

Daniels, he said, had no corroboration for her charge that a man threatened her with physical harm if she were to go public with her story about Trump.

Daniels, 39, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, told CBS that the man confronted her and her infant daughter in a Las Vegas parking lot in 2011 after Cohen learned she had told a magazine reporter about having sex with Trump.

The man warned Daniels not to talk about her relationship with Trump. He glanced at her baby and said, “It'd be a shame if something happened to her mom,” according to Daniels.

Cohen's lawyer demanded a retraction and apology from Daniels, saying she'd suggested on “60 Minutes” that Cohen was behind that threat.

Although Daniels did not accuse Cohen of arranging the threat, her lawyer, Michael Avenatti, said on television networks on Monday that it had to have been Cohen or someone else involved with Trump.

In a letter to Avenatti, Cohen's lawyer, Brent H. Blakely, said statements blaming Cohen for the threat were false and defamatory.

“In truth, Mr. Cohen had absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with any such person or incident, and does not even believe that any such person exists, or that such incident ever occurred,” Blakely wrote.

Blakely called on Daniels and Avenatti to make clear through the media “that you have no facts or evidence whatsoever to support your allegations that my client had anything whatsoever to do with this alleged thug.”

Avenatti responded by taunting Cohen.

“Will this guy ever come clean with the American people or is he more interested in trying to role play Ray Donovan (badly),” Avenatti told the Los Angeles Times in a text message, referring to the television show about a shady fixer.


President Donald J. Trump's lawyer, Michael Cohen, is being sued for defamation by Stormy Daniels. — Photograph: Mark Wilson/Getty Images.
President Donald J. Trump's lawyer, Michael Cohen, is being sued for defamation by Stormy Daniels. — Photograph: Mark Wilson/Getty Images.

Daniels' lawsuit seeks to void the October 2016 confidentiality agreement that bars her from talking about the alleged affair. The pact requires Daniels to pay Trump $1 million each time she violates the terms.

Lawyers for Trump say she had already done so at least 20 times even before the “60 Minutes” interview. She could be liable for more than $20 million in damages, they say.

Trump's legal team has requested a court order forcing Daniels to settle the dispute in private arbitration, as required by the confidentiality agreement.

In her updated legal complaint, Daniels argues that requirement was specifically designed “to prevent public disclosure of an illegal campaign contribution.” It also suppresses speech on a matter of enormous public concern about a presidential candidate, her legal papers say.

At the White House, Shah declined to comment on allegations that Cohen broke federal law when he arranged payment of the hush money.

“The campaign or Mr. Cohen can address anything with respect to their actions,” Shah said.

More broadly, Shah said, Trump “strongly, clearly and has consistently denied these underlying claims, and the only person who's been inconsistent is the one making the claims.”

Trump actually has never spoken publicly about Daniels, leaving the task to Cohen and White House press aides.

As for the rationale for the $130,000 payment, Shah said: “False charges are settled out of court all the time. You have to ask Michael Cohen about the specifics.”

Trump is also facing legal trouble in New York, where former “Apprentice” contestant Summer Zervos is suing him for defamation.

A few weeks before the presidential election, Zervos accused him of trying to force himself on her in his bungalow at the Beverly Hills Hotel in 2007. He called her a liar, prompting her lawsuit.

With the surge of news on the sex scandals, a spokeswoman for First Lady Melania Trump urged the media to stop mentioning the couple's son, Barron.

At the time of Trump's alleged extramarital affairs in 2006, Barron, who turned 12 last week, was a baby.

The first lady remained at Mar-a-Lago when the president returned to the White House on Sunday night after a weekend getaway at the estate in Palm Beach, Florida.

Cohen has a history of using aggressive tactics on Trump's behalf.

NBC anchor Megyn Kelly, who sparred with Trump when he was running for president, posted a sample on Sunday night on Twitter: Cohen's 2015 threats against Tim Mak, then a reporter at the Daily Beast.

Mak asked Cohen about a deposition by Ivana Trump in which the president's first wife alleged that Trump raped her in 1989.

“I will make sure that you and I meet one day while we're in the courthouse. And I will take you for every penny you still don't have,” Cohen responded, according to the Daily Beast.

With a burst of profanity, Cohen warned Mak to tread lightly, because he was going to do something disgusting to the reporter.

“You write a story that has Mr. Trump's name in it, with the word ‘rape’, and I'm going to mess your life up … for as long as you're on this frickin' planet,” Cohen told Mak, adding, “you're going to have judgments against you, so much money, you'll never know how to get out from underneath it.”

When Ivana Trump's statement about rape became public after the couple's 1991 divorce, she said the incident had made her feel “violated,” but did not want her accusation interpreted “in a literal or criminal sense.”

Avenatti also sought to draw attention to Cohen's threats against the Daily Beast. “This is a man who has a history of thuggish behavior, using intimidation tactics, and trying to step on little people,” Avenatti said on “CBS This Morning”. “And as it relates to my client, it's going to come to an end, and we're going to show the American people exactly who Michael Cohen is.”


__________________________________________________________________________

• Michael Finnegan is a Los Angeles Times politics writer. Since joining the L.A. Times in 2000, he has covered elections for mayor, governor and president, most recently the Donald Trump campaign. In 2011, Finnegan and fellow Los Angeles Times reporter Gale Holland won the Worth Bingham Prize for Investigative Journalism for articles on rampant waste in the $6-billion rebuilding of Los Angeles community colleges. A Los Angeles native, Finnegan started newspaper work at the Hudson Dispatch in New Jersey. For seven years, he covered city and state politics at the New York Daily News. He plays piano on the side.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • DOWNLOAD VIDEO: Stormy Daniels sues Trump lawyer for defamation and alleges illegal cover-up of hush money

 • Trump denies Daniels' story after ‘60 Minutes’ interview he ‘may or may not’ have seen, aide says

 • Stormy Daniels brings ‘60 Minutes’ its biggest TV audience since 2008


 • Stormy Daniels says she was threatened with physical harm if she talked about her affair with Donald Trump

http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-pol-stormy-trump-cohen-20180326-story.html
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Im2Sexy4MyPants
Absolutely Fabulously Incredibly Shit-Hot Member
*
Posts: 7326



WWW
« Reply #35 on: March 28, 2018, 10:52:39 am »

funny shit Grin

Report Spam   Logged

Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 28673


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #36 on: April 06, 2018, 10:00:15 pm »


from The New York Times....

Trump Denies Knowing of Any Hush Money Paid to Porn Actress

In his first public remarks on the matter, President Trump told reporters that he knew nothing about
the $130,000 paid to Stormy Daniels, remarks that could complicate his legal battle against her.


By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS | Thursday, April 05, 2018

President Trump denied knowledge of a $130,000 payment to Stephanie Clifford, a pornographic film actress known as Stormy Daniels. It was the first time he commented publicly on the scandal. — Photograph: Doug Mills/The New York Times.
President Trump denied knowledge of a $130,000 payment to Stephanie Clifford, a pornographic film actress known as Stormy Daniels.
It was the first time he commented publicly on the scandal. — Photograph: Doug Mills/The New York Times.


WASHINGTON — President Trump denied on Thursday knowing of a $130,000 payment his lawyer made to a pornographic film actress who claims to have had a sexual encounter with him, an assertion that threatened to complicate his legal battle against her.

Mr. Trump made his first public remarks about the matter aboard Air Force One as he returned to Washington from White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia, where he had held a round table on tax cuts. Asked by a reporter if he knew about the payment to the actress, Stormy Daniels, whose given name is Stephanie Clifford, he said, “No.”

Asked why Michael D. Cohen, his personal lawyer, had made the payment, Mr. Trump said: “You'll have to ask Michael Cohen. Michael is my attorney, and you'll have to ask Michael Cohen.”

The president said he did not know where the money had come from, and ignored a question about whether he ever set up a fund Mr. Cohen could draw from.

Ms. Clifford has said that she was paid $130,000 before the 2016 election to buy her silence. She is now suing Mr. Trump to abrogate a non-disclosure agreement that was supposed to prevent her from discussing the relationship. She claims the agreement is null and void because Mr. Trump never signed it.

The president's comments on Thursday could create a predicament for him and his legal team. Ms. Clifford's case is based on the notion that the confidentiality agreement is invalid because Mr. Trump was not a party to it. By saying he was not aware of the agreement, Mr. Trump appeared to confirm that argument, which would mean neither party is legally bound by it, thus potentially paving the way for Ms. Clifford to break her silence without consequences.

Ms. Clifford's pugnacious lawyer, Michael J. Avenatti, quickly issued a statement to respond to Mr. Trump's claim. He said that the president's professed ignorance of the payment would improve his client's case, suggesting that he would use legal discovery to expose the back and forth around the payment.

“Our case just got that much better,” Mr. Avenatti said in the statement. “We very much look forward to testing the truthfulness of Mr. Trump's feigned lack of knowledge concerning the $130,000 as he stated on Air Force One.”

“As history teaches us, it is one thing to deceive the press and quite another to do so under oath,” he added.

Later, Mr. Avenatti appeared to exult on Twitter about what he suggested were undisciplined comments by Mr. Trump that would give Ms. Clifford the upper hand in the legal dispute.

“Good (actually GREAT) things come to those who wait!!!” Mr. Avenatti wrote. “The strength of our case just went up exponentially. You can't have an agreement when one party claims to know nothing about it. #nodiscipline.”

Mr. Cohen did not respond on Thursday to requests for comment. Charles Harder, a lawyer representing Mr. Trump in his legal wrangling with Ms. Clifford, also did not respond to requests for comment on the president's remarks and how they could affect his case.

Mr. Trump and a company affiliated with him filed papers in court on Monday seeking to force Ms. Clifford to raise her disputes through private arbitration, not lawsuits.

Arbitration would shield the case from public view, sparing Mr. Trump the public spectacle that would attend a lawsuit with a discovery process and a trial. Mr. Avenatti said at the time that he would vigorously oppose the effort to resolve the case privately. In fact, on Thursday night, he said that Mr. Trump's remarks had made him more determined than ever to try to depose the president.

“If the president didn't know anything about the payment, then he obviously didn't know anything about the agreement, in which case you can't have an agreement,” Mr. Avenatti said in an interview on MSNBC. “And then there is no such thing as an NDA,” he added, referring to a non-disclosure agreement.

“Now if, on the other hand, what he said on Air Force One is not accurate — and I, for one, have serious questions as to its veracity or accuracy — they've got a whole host of problems,” Mr. Avenatti said.

The president and his lawyers have been working to prevent Ms. Clifford, who sat for a lengthy interview that aired on “60 Minutes” last month, from making further public statements.

In February, she said that she believed that Mr. Cohen had violated the agreement and that she, as a result, was no longer bound by it. Mr. Cohen secretly obtained a restraining order late that month to prevent her from speaking.

Then last month, Mr. Trump's legal team filed a motion asking to move the case from state court to federal court, which may have been an effort to increase the likelihood that it would be resolved in arbitration.


__________________________________________________________________________

Jim Rutenberg contributed reporting from Los Angeles.

• Julie Hirschfeld Davis is a White House correspondent at The New York Times. She has covered politics from Washington for 19 years, writing on Congress, three presidential campaigns and three presidents. She joined The Times in 2014 after stints at Bloomberg News, the Associated Press, The Baltimore Sun and Congressional Quarterly. Julie is the 2009 winner of the Everett McKinley Dirksen Award for Distinguished Reporting of Congress for her coverage of the federal response to the 2008 financial meltdown. She grew up in New York City and attended Yale University.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Trump Speaks About Stormy Daniels Scandal

 • Stormy Daniels Case Should Be Resolved Privately, Trump's Lawyers Say

 • How Stormy Daniels Out-Trumped Trump

 • Stormy Daniels Tells ‘60 Minutes’ That Fear of Trump Kept Her Silent


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/05/us/politics/trump-stormy-daniels-hush-money.html
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 
Kiwithrottlejockey
Admin Staff
XNC2 GOD
*
Posts: 28673


Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #37 on: April 10, 2018, 11:50:30 pm »


from the Los Angeles Times....

Trump meets his match: Stormy Daniels' combative lawyer Michael Avenatti

By MICHAEL FINNEGAN and MAURA DOLAN | 4:00AM PDT — Saturday, April 07, 2018

Michael Avenatti is interviewed on Thursday by Kristen Scholer on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. — Photograph: Richard Drew/Associated Press.
Michael Avenatti is interviewed on Thursday by Kristen Scholer on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. — Photograph: Richard Drew/Associated Press.

MICHAEL AVENATTI, the newly famous lawyer for porn star Stormy Daniels, has more than a few things in common with President Trump.

He's brash. He's media savvy. He enjoys the high life. He revels in antagonizing opponents.

In short, Trump may have met his match in this Newport Beach lawyer whose client, now America's best-known stripper, is suing the president to break free of a deal that bars her from discussing what she says was a one-night stand with Trump in 2006.

With a swagger worthy of the young Trump who barged his way into New York's tabloids decades ago, Avenatti has spent weeks shuttling among Manhattan TV studios to taunt the president and his fixer Michael Cohen.

His pugnacious edge makes Avenatti a natural on cable news.

“Wait a minute, I'm not done, I'm not done, I'm not done,” he snapped at Cohen spokesman David Schwartz on CNN.

His casual allusions to impeachment — “To address the rumor: We DO NOT have a ‘Monica Lewinsky type’ dress,” he announced on Twitter — underscore the lawsuit's high stakes for Trump.

More than anyone, Avenatti has shaped the scandal's narrative and kept it in the news. He has out-foxed the Trump forces over and over, most strikingly by getting Daniels on “60 Minutes”.

Avenatti — whose professional history, like Trump's, is messy — had already appeared twice himself on “60 Minutes”, both times playing the broadcast's stock part of dogged consumer lawyer nailing big companies for wrong-doing.

“Among trial lawyers, Avenatti is regarded as extraordinarily tenacious and aggressive,” said Brian Kabateck, the incoming president of the Los Angeles Bar Association.

“He may be the perfect foil for Trump,” he said, “because he understands Trump and is in Trump's head.”

Louise Sunshine, a former New York lobbyist who worked closely with Trump early in his career, agreed that Avenatti was a vexing adversary.

“I think he's sort of got Donald figured out,” she said.


Anderson Cooper interviews Stormy Daniels for “60 Minutes”. — Photograph: CBS News.
Anderson Cooper interviews Stormy Daniels for “60 Minutes”. — Photograph: CBS News.

BORN IN Sacramento, Avenatti, 47, grew up mainly in Chesterfield, Mo., a St. Louis suburb where he developed a love for sports cars and the Cardinals.

He studied political science at the University of Pennsylvania and earned a law degree as a night student at George Washington University, working on opposition research for both Democratic and Republican campaigns along the way.

In 2000, he moved to Los Angeles to practice law, spending three years at O'Melveny & Myers, then switching to a smaller firm.

He gravitated toward celebrity cases, working for the Eagles' Don Henley and Glenn Frey when fellow band member Don Felder sued them, claiming he was cheated out of album and concert earnings. Avenatti also handled lawsuits against heiress Paris Hilton and actor Jim Carrey.

In 2007, Avenatti and two partners started a Newport Beach plaintiffs' firm, Eagan, O'Malley & Avenatti.

He soon took on Service Corporation International, a cemetery company accused of desecrating graves in the San Fernando Valley. He won an $80-million settlement, along with his first star turn on “60 Minutes”, the CBS News flagship.

His biggest victory, now on appeal, was a $454-million jury verdict last year against surgical gown manufacturers Halyard Health and Kimberly-Clark. The gowns were supposed to protect doctors and nurses from blood-borne viruses such as Ebola and HIV, but sometimes leaked.

Avenatti was featured in the opening tease for a “60 Minutes” segment on the case. An executive at one of the gown makers, he said, “forgot the 11th commandment.”

“Which is?” Anderson Cooper asked.

“Do not lie to ‘60 Minutes’,” Avenatti replied, his close-up yielding to the ticking stopwatch.

“He's a dangerous lawyer,” said Brian Panish, an attorney who used to work with Avenatti, “because he is so sharp, quick and fearless.”

Avenatti can be difficult with allies.

After a few years of booming business, he told the partners in his firm that he was leaving unless they agreed to give him a bigger share of the profits, John C. O'Malley alleged in a 2011 lawsuit.

Dumbfounded by what he called “brazen tactics,” O'Malley protested, but Avenatti drove him out of the practice, he said in court documents. A judge confirmed an arbitration award of $2.7 million against Avenatti and the firm.

Avenatti, who declined to be interviewed and requested all questions in writing, said by email that the case was resolved to the satisfaction of all involved. “Anybody can say anything in a lawsuit,” he wrote.

With his reliance on contingency cases, Avenatti lives on a boom-or-bust pay cycle.

He and his wife sold their ocean-front bluff-top house in Laguna Beach for $12.6 million in 2015. Since then he has rented high-end homes in Newport Beach and Los Angeles.

In recently filed court papers in their divorce case, his wife detailed extravagant holidays in France, Italy, Spain, Mexico and Japan. Avenatti collects artwork and watches, travels by private jet and leases a Ferrari Spider, his wife claimed in the documents.

A part-time race-car driver, Avenatti has competed in the 24 Hours of Le Mans circuit.


Michael Avenatti. — Photograph: Hoch Zwei/Corbis/Getty Images.
Michael Avenatti. — Photograph: Hoch Zwei/Corbis/Getty Images.

“Once you've driven 190 miles per hour in the pouring rain, in the middle of the night, down the Mulsanne Straight with prototype cars whizzing by you at 240-plus miles per hour … compared to that, what I'm doing right now is a warm-up lap,” he told Sports Illustrated after the Daniels case vaulted him to fame.

His Porsche race car and white uniform both advertise Tully's Coffee, the Seattle chain that he bought in 2013 for $9 million in a partnership with “Grey's Anatomy” star Patrick Dempsey, a fellow racer.

Avenatti's sideline as coffee entrepreneur turned into a morass of legal and financial trouble. Dempsey sued and withdrew from the deal, saying Avenatti had borrowed $2 million against Tully's assets without telling him. They resolved the dispute out of court.

Keurig Green Mountain, which owns the Tully's brand, claims the chain has missed royalty payments and has moved to revoke its license to use the name. Tully's denied wrongdoing in its court response.

Multiple landlords have sued for back rent or eviction of Tully's stores.


A race car driven by Michael Avenatti. — Photograph: Hoch Zwei/Corbis/Getty Images.
A race car driven by Michael Avenatti. — Photograph: Hoch Zwei/Corbis/Getty Images.

After a gradual shutdown of Tully's outlets, the remaining stores closed a month ago when they nearly ran out of coffee, according to the Seattle Times, but a company spokeswoman said it was simply launching a “rebranding process.”

David Nold, an attorney for one of the landlords, compared Avenatti to Trump. “They sure seem to have a very similar business style,” he said. “Unpaid bills. Taxes owed. Bombastic to a fault when it comes to the facts.”

Avenatti called Nold “an embarrassment to the legal profession.”

“Any claim that problems arose as a result of anything I did or did not do personally is ridiculous and baseless,” he wrote.

He said he divested his interest in Tully's long ago and now serves solely as outside counsel.

In bankruptcy and civil court papers, however, Avenatti claimed a substantial ownership stake in the coffee chain as recently as April 2017, and in July 2017 identified himself as chairman, general counsel and a board of managers member at Global Baristas US, the company that runs Tully's.


A Tully's Coffee in Tacoma, Washington, in March. — Photograph: Ted S. Warren/Associated Press.
A Tully's Coffee in Tacoma, Washington, in March. — Photograph: Ted S. Warren/Associated Press.

At both Tully's and the Eagan Avenatti law firm, unpaid taxes have been a problem for Avenatti.

The Internal Revenue Service put a $5-million lien on Global Baristas US last June, initially naming Avenatti as the person responsible for payment.

The company withheld payroll taxes from employees, but did not transmit the money to the IRS, the government said. The state of Washington has filed more than $800,000 in similar liens against the company.

When Eagan Avenatti emerged last month from an involuntary Chapter 11 bankruptcy triggered by an unpaid vendor, Avenatti personally agreed to pay the IRS $2.4 million in back taxes, penalties and interest, bankruptcy court records show.

Nearly $1.3 million of that was for payroll taxes that the firm withheld from employees, but failed to turn over to the government.

Avenatti, who was responsible for holding the money in trust for the IRS, has repaid $1.5 million so far, said Thom Mrozek, a spokesman for the U.S. attorney in Los Angeles.

Avenatti attributed the unpaid taxes at Eagan Avenatti and the coffee company to “payroll companies that failed to do their job.”

He called the Los Angeles Times' reporting inaccurate, but said he did not have the time or energy to address further questions about his dealings with the IRS and Tully's.

The IRS also has put a $904,000 lien on all of Avenatti's personal property, due to unpaid 2009 and 2010 income taxes, Orange County records show. Avenatti said it “was placed in error,” no taxes are due and the issue was resolved many months ago. The lien remains open, according to the Orange County clerk-recorder's office.

Avenatti said his taxes and personal life were irrelevant to his role in the Daniels case.

As he tries to resolve his financial troubles, his law practice is getting enormous publicity from the sex scandal. Savannah Guthrie, Wolf Blitzer and Megyn Kelly have each grilled him on television. To buttress his case, for the public if not for the court, he rations out scoops to TV networks.

Avenatti has been especially pointed in attacking Cohen, the long-time Trump personal attorney who set up the shell corporation that paid Daniels $130,000 in hush money just before the 2016 presidential election.

On CNN, he ridiculed Cohen for saying he paid off a woman who never had sex with Trump.

“I would encourage every American tomorrow morning to call … Mr. Cohen, claim you had an affair with the president. They will promptly send you a check for $130,000, no questions asked,” Avenatti said sarcastically.

On Twitter, he rips both Cohen and Schwartz, Cohen's lawyer, punctuating tweets with his customary basta, Italian for enough.

“Where have the two legal geniuses of our time, Michael Cohen and David Schwartz, gone?” he tweeted on Thursday. “Forced to sit down by Mr. Trump after repeatedly making a disaster of their case on national television and being mocked by every real lawyer in America? #didtheygotolawschool #basta.”

Trump responds to Avenatti's provocations mostly with silence, leaving it to his spokesmen and lawyers to fight back.

Schwartz dismissed Avenatti's case as “completely wrong on the merits.”

“But,” Schwartz conceded, “he's an excellent performer.”


• To read this article in Spanish, CLICK HERE.

__________________________________________________________________________

• Michael Finnegan is a Los Angeles Times politics writer. Since joining the L.A. Times in 2000, he has covered elections for mayor, governor and president, most recently the Donald Trump campaign. In 2011, Finnegan and fellow Los Angeles Times reporter Gale Holland won the Worth Bingham Prize for Investigative Journalism for articles on rampant waste in the $6-billion rebuilding of Los Angeles community colleges. A Los Angeles native, Finnegan started newspaper work at the Hudson Dispatch in New Jersey. For seven years, he covered city and state politics at the New York Daily News. He plays piano on the side.

• Maura Dolan is the California-based legal affairs writer for the Los Angeles Times. She covers the California Supreme Court and the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. A California native, she graduated from UC Berkeley and has worked in Washington and Los Angeles for the L.A. Times. She is now based in San Francisco.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Stormy weather, or how a meeting at a golf resort blew up into a Trump scandal


http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-pol-avenatti-stormy-trump-20180407-story.html
Report Spam   Logged

If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 

Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Open XNC2 Smileys
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum

Buy traffic for your forum/website
traffic-masters
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.172 seconds with 11 queries.