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Trump Derangement Syndrome. Treatment options.


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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #50 on: November 10, 2017, 08:04:30 pm »


from the Los Angeles Times....

Trump is about to learn that China couldn't care less about America First

“In Xi's party address, he proclaimed a ‘new era’ for China. To put it in terms
the president might better understand, it may be the era of America Second.”


By DAVID ROTHKOPF | 4:00AM PDT - Friday, November 03, 2017

American President Donald J. Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping walk together after their meetings at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Florida on April 7th, 2017. — Photograph: Alex Brandon/Associated Press.
American President Donald J. Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping walk together after their meetings at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Florida on April 7th, 2017.
 — Photograph: Alex Brandon/Associated Press.


DONALD TRUMP is reinventing the kowtow for the Twitter age. Last week, in fawning tweets, he celebrated Chinese President Xi Jinping's “extraordinary elevation” at the 19th Chinese Communist Party Congress, and in a TV interview he bragged that he and Xi had the best “president-president” relationship ever. It was over the top — especially in light of the fact that Xi is an authoritarian leader.

Clearly, Trump, a man not known for his humility, wants something. China is the most important stop on his 12-day, five nation Asia tour, which begins on Friday. In Beijing, Trump will be hoping for not only progress on North Korea and trade issues, but for a little of Xi's momentum, power and prestige to rub off on him.

At the close of the party congress last month, Xi was affirmed as a Chinese leader unequaled in stature by any since Mao Tse-tung. At the same time, at Xi's urging, the country's ruling body agreed to break with its long-standing policy of denying China's designs on a global leadership role. Instead, in a 203-minute address to the forum, Xi asserted that the People's Republic was ready to become a “mighty force” on the world stage.

Xi's ascendance and China's aggressiveness stand in stark contrast to Trump's struggles, Washington's paralysis and America's retreat from the pre-eminent international role it has played since the end of World War II.

Despite the role reversal, the Chinese will appear to stroke American egos, especially Trump's. Expect them to ply him with pomp and ceremony, setting up colorful photo ops that will play well on social media, and giving the president the quasi-royal treatment he craves. They may even offer up some business deals and the promise of unspecified cooperation with U.S. attempts to combat the nuclear threat of North Korea. But if you read deference into the show, you will be wrong.

China is still a poor country in many respects, but this year has seen it open its first overseas military base, increase its blue-water naval capability and expand Xi's trademark “One Belt, One Road” infrastructure initiative (which extends China's influence from the Pacific Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea). The People's Republic has been asserting its will on a wide range of issues, including trade and the question of who can claim the islands off its coast.

Xi and company know that Trump leads a country with greater military and economic resources than China, but they also know he has been able to get precious little accomplished as president. They understand the challenges he faces: special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation, the threat of a stock market downturn and deep divisions within the Republican Party.

The Chinese have also discovered that Trump is as inconsistent as he is susceptible to flattery. Only a few months before his valentines to Xi, he was tweeting his displeasure at China — “They do NOTHING for us with North Korea” — and attacking past U.S. presidents as “foolish” for deals they did with Beijing. Xinhua, China's national news agency, responded to the outburst by urging Trump to stop his “emotional venting”.

However grand the welcome for Trump may be, the Chinese will be serving their own goals. Behind the scenes, they will flex their muscles in tough negotiations because they can, and they now believe they should. In the end, Trump is likely to make very little in the way of meaningful gains on any major issues during his stay.

As former Under Secretary of State for Economic Affairs and veteran China expert Robert Hormats said to me, “Xi sees China as leading the next phase of globalization and of the evolution of the global economic order. [He] believes the direction should be and will be guided more by Beijing than Washington.” This, Hormats believes, will change the dynamic in the U.S.-China relationship. In Xi's party address, he proclaimed a “new era” for China. To put it in terms the president might better understand, it may be the era of America Second.

The lasting message of Trump's trip could well be the one foretold by the obsequiousness of his tweets last week. If his visit is “historic”, as he predicted on social media, it will be because it is the first in which an American president discovers he has traveled all the way to Beijing to meet with the most powerful man in the world.


• David Rothkopf is a senior fellow at the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University and a visiting scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. His latest book is The Great Questions of Tomorrow.

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-rothkopf-trump-goes-to-china-20171103-story.html
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« Reply #51 on: November 10, 2017, 08:05:24 pm »


from the Los Angeles Times....

Trump's Asia trip shows U.S. at risk of being sidelined
in the region's economic future


By DON LEE | 10:10AM PST - Thursday, November 09, 2017

President Trump speaks at a business meeting on November 9th with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. — Photograph: Fred Dufour/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
President Trump speaks at a business meeting on November 9th with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People
in Beijing. — Photograph: Fred Dufour/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


FOR ALL of President Trump's efforts to build personal relations with leaders and to reassure allies during his first Asia trip, the most significant thing that has happened may have been what did not happen:

From Tokyo to Seoul to Beijing, the American president has been feted with maximum ceremonial honors — a “state visit-plus,” the Chinese called it. Asian leaders listened politely to his demands that they accept what he considers fairer trade terms and that they buy more American goods.

Nowhere in Trump's tour, however, have any of those leaders entered into serious negotiations or made significant concessions.

“Quite frankly, in the grand scheme of a $300- to $500-billion trade deficit, the things that have been achieved thus far are pretty small,” Secretary of State Rex Tillerson told reporters in Beijing on Thursday, referring to the U.S. trade deficit with China. “In terms of really getting at some of the fundamental elements behind why this imbalance exists, there's still a lot more work to do.”

Instead of offering concessions, both the United States' historical allies, Japan and South Korea, as well as China, its most serious Pacific rival, signaled that they had taken Trump at his word: His “America First” policy means the United States will become less and less a player in the fastest-growing and most dynamic region in the world.

That reality was underscored on Thursday when trade ministers from the so-called TPP-11, the signatories to the Trans-Pacific Trade agreement minus the U.S., said at a meeting in Vietnam that they had agreed on how to revise the agreement to proceed without Washington. The Obama administration's effort to push the agreement through Congress failed last year, and Trump officially withdrew U.S. agreement to the pact shortly after he took office.

“When you sit out the game, the rest of the world moves on,” said Deborah Elms, executive director of Singapore-based Asian Trade Center, a research and consulting firm. Asian nations are enthusiastically cutting trade deals with each other and with European countries, she said.

With Washington abandoning the sweeping Asia-Pacific trade deal and more generally pulling back from the multilateral economic order that it established and nurtured for decades, China is pressing to become the dominant player in the region.

Its small neighbors, among them Malaysia and Singapore, are similarly proceeding to act alone, without the United States, their long-time big brother, at their side.

Japan has moved from its traditionally passive role and has exerted greater leadership on trade. It was Tokyo, for example, that took the lead in pushing forward on the TPP without the United States.

Analysts say Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who had spent considerable political capital to have TPP approved at home, hopes the U.S. will re-enter the agreement someday.

“Everyone talks about a vacuum in leadership and everyone talks about China filling that vacuum,” said Wendy Cutler, a top Obama administration trade negotiator who worked on the TPP. “In this instance, it's Japan filling that role.”

“You have these multiple paths to establishing the rules of trade and better integration of trade within Asia, and then you have the U.S., the outlier,” said Robert Holleyman, a Washington attorney and former deputy U.S. Trade Representative.

Holleyman was in Vietnam recently for meetings ahead of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit on Friday in Da Nang, which Trump will be attending. What Holleyman said he kept hearing was a “consistent theme from other APEC economies that said, essentially, ‘Now that the U.S. has left Asia, we need to step forward and do this on our own’.”

“As an American, I hated to hear those comments. They were saying it as a matter of fact,” he said.

An economically sidelined U.S. in Asia would almost certainly weaken American companies and hurt exports, particularly of farm goods, as well as the prospects for returns on the massive investments U.S. firms have made throughout the region over the last 35 years, trade experts say. U.S. firms may face higher duties and other more onerous barriers than they would have if trade agreements that included America were in place.

To be sure, many in Asia as well as America still see the U.S. as an economic superpower in the region, and they may have found some encouragement in the way Trump has toned down his trade rhetoric during his trip thus far.

Asian leaders will be closely listening to the speech Trump is scheduled to give on Friday before American business leaders accompanying him on his tour. The president is expected to use the speech to outline U.S. involvement in the Indo-Pacific region, a reference that is meant to include India, the world's largest democracy.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which has clashed with the Trump administration on the North American Free Trade Agreement, TPP and trade policy more generally, said it took heart from the fact that the president regarded Asia as important enough to make a visit lasting nearly two weeks — the longest of any American president in more than a quarter century.

But chamber officials also worry that Trump has yet to articulate a strategy for commercial engagement in the region. All that he has espoused is a consistent line that the U.S. wants fair and reciprocal trade to reduce America's large trade deficits with Asian countries and that he prefers negotiating bilateral deals rather than multilateral ones.

But no other country is lining up to sit down and bargain with the U.S. on trade.

Japan's Abe, for example, regaled Trump by taking him golfing at a swanky country club and treating him to hamburgers. He listened to Trump's expected criticisms of Japan's large trade deficit with the U.S. and his calls for Japan to make more cars in America and buy more U.S. military equipment. But Abe took no new actions.

“We had a lot of pronouncements, but there was not a move toward initiating formal bilateral trade negotiations. Prime Minister Abe again deflected, talking about a regional framework being best,” said Mireya Solis, a Japan expert and co-director of the Center for East Asia Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution.

There were a lot of symbolic gestures in China as well. President Xi welcomed Trump by shutting down the Forbidden City to give Trump a private tour and, for the first time for any American president, an official dinner inside the storied palace. As they've done in past presidential visits, the Chinese also announced billions of dollars in deals with American companies, including General Electric and Smithfield Foods, a Chinese-owned company based in Virginia.

But some of those deals were already in the pipeline, and Xi did not offer concessions on substantive issues on Trump's trade agenda, such as Chinese steel production or removal of barriers to U.S. imports to China. Tillerson, in his comments to reporters, said the “Chinese acknowledge much more has to be done.”

Xi, too, will be giving a speech in Vietnam, and could offer a stark competing vision in which the Chinese, not the Americans, will be portrayed as championing economic integration and engagement with the world, something considered unthinkable not long ago.

“I don't think the Chinese have to do very much. They're gaining strategic importance and geopolitical influence in the region by virtue of the fact that the United States is perceived, and, to some extent, is withdrawing from the region,” said Nicholas Lardy, a China economy specialist at the Peterson Institute for International Economics.

Trump, he said, “can talk about Indo-Pacific, blah, blah, blah, but we're not engaged in trade, we're not negotiating any new trade agreements with any country in the region.”

The big worry for business leaders and trade analysts here and around the world is that Trump will eventually follow through on his threats to take punitive measures against trading partners he believes have acted unfairly.

That could include imposing broad tariffs on Chinese imports, if only to inflict some pain to win concessions.

To date, however, Trump has not matched his tough language with such tough actions.

“So far, although Trump's rhetoric makes it sound like he has a different kind of trade policy, in fact he's doing pretty much what his predecessors did,” said Clyde Prestowitz, an Asian economics specialist and former top trade negotiator in the Reagan administration.

Back in the 1980s, he said, the Reagan White House pressed the Japanese to open up markets in certain sectors, and subsequent administrations have followed a similar tack in China and elsewhere in Asia.

“I think it's more of the same old stuff,” Prestowitz said. “By now, the Asians have figured it out. They've realized his bark is worse than his bite.”


• Don Lee covers the U.S. and global economy out of Washington, D.C. Since joining the Los Angeles Times in 1992, he has served as the Shanghai bureau chief and in various editing and reporting roles in California. He is a native of Seoul, Korea, and graduated from the University of Chicago.

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-trump-asia-trade-20171109-story.html
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« Reply #52 on: November 10, 2017, 08:20:57 pm »

haha

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« Reply #53 on: November 10, 2017, 09:41:05 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Why the cheery Trump trip to China may not be so successful

President Trump is expecting big things from China’s Xi Jinping, but will the Chinese president deliver?

By EMILY RAUHALA and SIMON DENYER | 10:44AM EST - Thursday, November 09, 2017

From left, Chinese President Xi Jinping, Chinese first lady Peng Liyuan, President Trump and first lady Melania Trump visit the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. — Photograph: Andy Wong/Associated Press.
From left, Chinese President Xi Jinping, Chinese first lady Peng Liyuan, President Trump and first lady Melania Trump visit the Great Hall of the People in Beijing.
 — Photograph: Andy Wong/Associated Press.


BEIJING — When President Trump landed in Beijing on Wednesday, he was whisked through quiet streets to the Forbidden City, where he got a history lesson from President Xi Jinping and caught an opera at the Pavilion of Pleasant Sounds.

It was an apt opener. After twice tweeting out his gratitude, Trump on Thursday met Xi at the tightly guarded Great Hall of the People, where, surrounded by corporate chief executives, he oversaw the signing of $250 billion in trade deals and continued to praise his authoritarian host.

The two-day trip was orchestrated to project the image of remote and absolute power that Xi enjoys and Trump admires. There were no protests, no questions from the press, no ordinary people — nothing but pleasantries and soothing tones.

Trump brought up North Korea but said Xi could solve it. He raised the trade deficit but said it was not China's fault. He said the Chinese people are very proud of Xi.

After all the sweet talk, the United States is expecting a lot in return from Beijing — but Xi, in the ascendant, may not budge. That could lead to disappointment in the United States and friction down the road in the relationship.

While both sides were pleased to see a high-stakes visit end without incident, there are questions about what was gained and what, perhaps, was lost.

“Talk about embracing the Leninist political system,” said Evan S. Medeiros, who heads the Eurasia Group's coverage of the Asia-Pacific region and was the National Security Council's Asia director in the Obama administration. “In Trump's effort to ingratiate himself with Xi, is he inadvertently ceding American primacy to China?”

The United States, Medeiros argued, is the anchor power in Asia because of the rules, institutions and values it represents. “Trump fundamentally calls that into question when he's praising the Chinese political system — and not getting much in exchange.”

Xi, said analysts, may have calculated that the really tough negotiations with the United States, on a range of issues, still lie ahead — and that China can play a strong hand. Until then, he can sit tight.

“My expectation is that not much will come from China,” said Max Baucus, until the beginning of this year the U.S. ambassador to China. “And that is going to put Trump in a bit of a box.”

William Zarit, chairman of the American Chamber of Commerce in China, applauded the trade deals but also wondered what comes next, whether the Trump administration would be able to use the momentum to tackle tougher issues in the U.S.-China economic relationship, such as market access for U.S. firms in China.

“The question remains: What is being done about these structural issues?” he asked. “We hope to see proactive measures by the Chinese to address the imbalances in the relationship, as pressure is building in the U.S. to take reactive reciprocal actions.”

As a candidate, Trump often lashed out at Beijing, blaming the Chinese economy for a host of U.S. ills.

But when Trump hosted Xi at the president's Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida, his tone changed.

In an apparent effort to secure Xi's help on North Korea, Trump has curtailed his criticism and shifted his focus to areas where he thinks he can win.

The focus on signing deals in front of the cameras — as opposed to, say, hammering out solutions to long-standing economic issues — makes some sense, experts said.

Trump lacks diplomatic experience and has been slow to make appointments to several key Asia roles.

“We haven't yet had the bandwidth in the U.S. administration or the time to have detailed conversations with the Chinese side on market access and other systemic issues,” said Timothy P. Stratford, managing partner of Covington and Burling's Beijing office and a former assistant U.S. trade representative.

“Unless you've had time to discuss these very difficult and complicated issues in some detail, you can't expect the two presidents to announce anything that is concrete and detailed and meaningful,” he said. “I fully expect these very tough discussions to begin in the next few months.”

Chen Dingding, a professor at Guangzhou's Jinan University, said the visit was a starting point — a first offer on the way to the next deal.

“What's the alternative? No trade deals? Often you can't get your best deal — you can get your second best, get your third and move from there.”

Both the Chinese and U.S. sides, of course, are casting Thursday's agreements as first rate. At a briefing after the meeting, Commerce Minister Zhong Shan said the deals were “a miracle”.

China's Communist Party-controlled press seems pleased, for now, with Trump's visit, for what he said and didn't say.

The Global Times, a newspaper known for its nationalist rhetoric, ran an editorial on Thursday headlined, “What do most Chinese people like about Trump?”

The piece noted Trump's “frank” character and “pragmatic” approach to U.S.-China ties, mentioning specifically that he does not bring up human rights.

One of the main reasons China likes Trump is that Trump likes Xi, the paper argued. “He respects our head of state and has repeatedly praised President Xi Jinping in public.”

The paper noted in particular that Trump had been quick to call Xi after the recent 19th Party Congress. “This is respect for the Chinese system.”

The question is what happens if the friendly rhetoric changes — if Trump, for whatever reason, stops being so positive about Xi. With the mood in the United States turning increasingly skeptical about China and the benefits of the bilateral relationship, that has to be a real possibility, experts said.

“President Xi and the Chinese leadership will think that they have done an awful lot to give President Trump face: They've done a ‘state visit plus’, they've rolled the red carpet out with all the pomp and ceremony, they did all these business deals, and they come away thinking the relationship is on a solid footing,” said Paul Haenle, director of the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center in Beijing.

“But President Trump may go home to a domestic political environment where people are disappointed he hasn't achieved more progress on trade and economics and North Korea,” he said, “and you may see a shift towards a much harder line.”


Amber Ziye Wang and Yang Liu in Beijing contributed to this report.

• Emily Rauhala is a China Correspondent for The Washington Post. She was previously a Beijing-based correspondent for TIME, and an editor at the magazine's Hong Kong office.

• Simon Denyer is The Washington Post's bureau chief in China. He served previously as bureau chief in India and as a Reuters bureau chief in Washington, India and Pakistan.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: China rolls out red carpet to welcome Trump

 • VIDEO: Trump: ‘The entire civilized world must unite to confront the North Korean menace’

 • Trump's granddaughter gets praise and sympathy for singing for Chinese president

 • China's panda-shaped solar plant is part of a bigger challenge facing Trump

 • Taiwan worries about becoming a ‘bargaining chip’


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/trump-thinks-his-china-trip-went-great-that-could-be-a-problem/2017/11/09/2aff59ea-c53d-11e7-a441-3a768c8586f1_story.html
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« Reply #54 on: November 10, 2017, 09:44:58 pm »


President Xi Jinping would have found Trump an easy idiot to amuse. He no doubt pandered to Trump's vanity by giving him plenty of pomp & ceremony (simple things amuse simple minds), while taking advantage of Trump's stupidity and short-attention span. It will probably take Trump a few months to realise he was played like a fiddle by the Chinese president. The twitter storm when Trump eventually wakes up will be highly amusing and entertaining.

Meanwhile, the Chinese are stepping right into the vacuum opened up by the idiot Trump's incompetency and narcissism.
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« Reply #55 on: November 10, 2017, 09:50:10 pm »

you're a wanktard with a trump derangement sickness get some help  Cheesy
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« Reply #56 on: November 10, 2017, 09:56:08 pm »


This is what I posted to reader comments about a story regarding Trump's visit to China which was published by The Washington Post earlier today…


So as expected, President Xi stroked Trump's huge ego by giving him some pomp & ceremony; and chucking the idiot a few toys; but in reality will give him nothing except for a few platitudes and ambiguous promises. I wonder how long before the Orange Goblin manages to work it out that he has been played by somebody who is waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay more intelligent than him? Talk about ENTERTAINMENT PLUS!!!


…my comment has attracted a shitload of “likes” from intelligent Americans.
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« Reply #57 on: November 10, 2017, 10:00:25 pm »


from the Los Angeles Times....

In Trump, China sees a straight shooter, a successful
businessman — and a symptom of American decline


By MATT DeBUTTS | 6:15PM PST - Thursday, November 09, 2017

Beijing-based caricature artist Zheng Shenghui shows off his wares. — Photograph: Matt DeButts/Los Angeles Times.
Beijing-based caricature artist Zheng Shenghui shows off his wares. — Photograph: Matt DeButts/Los Angeles Times.

FOR YEARS, Zheng Shenghui sold grinning caricatures of President Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping from his small booth in Beijing's Happy Valley Amusement Park. These days, his drawings aren't so cheerful. After Obama left office in January, an angry, grimacing President Trump replaced him.

“I drew a frown because he's upset,” said Zheng, 35. “Trump wants it be the 1970s again, when America was No.1. But things change. He needs to understand the world keeps turning.”

Trump spent two nights in Beijing this week on the third leg of a five-country Asia tour before departing for Vietnam on Friday. Chinese state media called it a “state visit-plus,” underscoring the lavishness of his welcome. He met with Xi, received a military honor, toured the Forbidden City and enjoyed an opulent state dinner.

For his part, Trump, who during his campaign vilified China as an “economic enemy,” was a relatively polite guest. “Who can blame a country for being able to take advantage of another country for the benefit of its citizens?” he told a crowd of Chinese and American business executives, as Xi looked on. He called his relationship with Xi “a great one.”

But there have been many reasons for ordinary Chinese to look beyond the frowning caricatures of the American president.

Many in the country's elite see Trump's “America First” isolationism as an opportunity for China to rise on the global stage.

And for ordinary Chinese, too, Trump can be an appealing figure. While opinions are dizzyingly diverse — in a country of 1.4 billion people, it is difficult to generalize — Trump seems to elicit a surprising level of goodwill when his name comes up.

In a country that venerates business acumen, many admire his financial success. Still others take their cues from Chinese internet forums, where Trump is praised for his honesty. To them, “America First” is just a frank, honest assessment of the U.S. presidency's age-old priorities.

“People always preferred Trump over Hillary Clinton,” says Manya Koetse, editor-in-chief of What's-on-Weibo, a website reporting social trends in China, though she notes neither was perceived as an ideal candidate. “They thought Hillary was hypocritical. They like the businessman in Trump and his pragmatic side.”

Unlike other U.S. presidents, Trump isn't prone to lecturing China on human rights. When Liu Xiaobo, China's imprisoned Nobel Peace Prize winner, died in July, the White House released a statement saying Trump was “deeply saddened” to hear of Liu's death, but it held back from direct condemnation.

Trump, with his background in real estate, his successful reality TV show, and his how-to business books, also fulfills many Chinese stereotypes of a powerful leader. Chinese politicians often project an air of no-nonsense governance, prioritizing economic growth over humanitarian concerns. Xi has made the “great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation” a key goal of his leadership.

Trump fits well into that mold.

“About 15 years ago, I purchased ‘The Apprentice’ box set,” said Li Guang, 35, a former software engineer, referring to Trump's former TV show. “What stuck with me was the line, ‘You’re fired’. It was the spitting image of the overbearing CEO-type. Now at 70 years plus, he hasn't lost a step. I admire the strong leadership.

“Trump is completely different from slippery career politicians,” he added. “He tells it straight, just like me.”

Li, like many Chinese, especially those who talk about politics on the internet, admire Trump's professed disregard for political correctness. Internet users have even spawned a new term, baizuo, or “white left,” to criticize Western-style progressives. While the definition varies, it often refers to Western-educated people who adopt feel-good positions to satisfy a feeling of moral superiority. It is a damning term, implying that someone has been brainwashed by politicians. Many internet users apply it to describe Western elites. They support Trump for what they see as standing up to them.

“Free trade, immigration, refugees, these are things that baizuo support,” said Luo Xing, 23, a recent college graduate in Beijing. After reading social media posts that praised Trump for his positions on these issues, Luo decided she liked Trump. But after studying abroad in England, she changed her mind.

“He's anti-feminist, anti-globalization. He discriminates against minority groups,” Luo said. Then she laughed. “Now I dislike him for some of the same reasons baizuo don't like him.”

Trump also finds common ground with many here in his support for restricting immigration from Muslim countries. Islamophobia is rising in China, fueled by news of terrorist attacks and unrest among China's predominantly Muslim Uighur minority. In recent months, the country has been racked by controversies surrounding the designation of a halal-only food delivery truck, as well as a video of a girl reciting the Koran in school.

“Many people online applauded Brexit, applauded the rise of the right in Europe,” said Koetse, referring to Britain's vote to leave the European Union. “You have strong anti-Islamic sentiment. Anyone who goes against the left and political correctness is applauded on Chinese social media.”

Trump has also drawn his share of critics. As in the U.S., he is a frequent target of ridicule. One Chinese transliteration of his name, chuanpu, is the same as the Chinese word for Sichuanese Mandarin, a famously colorful dialect of Chinese.

“Many think he's some sort of joke,” said Koetse.

It's not hard to find young people who disapprove of Trump.

“He's an opportunist,” said Gigi Zheng, 20, a university student in Beijing who compared him to former President Reagan, noting that Reagan used the phrase “Make American great again” long before Trump popularized it.

“He copied Reagan's slogan to cater to the white working class whose interests had been overlooked before. But what did they gain from his policies?” Gigi said.

“He doesn't care about people,” said Lu Dandan, a 27-year-old in Beijing. “I used to think America was a forgiving place. Now I'm not so sure.”

Criticism of Trump may be offset by the widespread popularity of his daughter Ivanka. Many Chinese admire her beauty, business success and apparent affinity for China. While President Trump did not send a personal message to the Chinese community for Chinese New Year, breaking with tradition, Ivanka celebrated the holiday at the Chinese Embassy in Washington. Her daughter Arabella, who is studying Chinese, sang a song in Mandarin.

Chinese audiences may also be insulated from Trump's most controversial behavior. The 2005 “Access Hollywood” tape that became public during last year's campaign, for example — in which Trump boasted about predatory sexual assault — was not widely covered in Chinese media. In January, Chinese government censorship guidelines, leaked online, instructed Chinese media outlets to handle Trump carefully. “Unauthorized criticism of Trump's words or actions is not allowed.”

Still, videos filter through.

After Trump's visit to Japan on Monday, a video circulated on Chinese social media of a joint press conference between Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. Trump noted that Japan's economy was smaller than that of the U.S., then said, “We're going to try and keep it that way.”

Chinese internet users reacted with disbelief, and even a hint of admiration for his directness. Hen chuanpu, said one. “That's so Trump.”


Staff writer Jonathan Kaiman and special correspondent Gaochao Zhang in the Los Angeles Times' Beijing bureau contributed to this report.

• Matt DeButts is a frelance journalist based in Beijing and who is a special correspondent to the Los Angeles Times.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Trump, in Beijing, shifts blame for trade imbalance from China to his predecessors

 • Trump visits Vietnam after helping to reopen old war wounds at home


http://www.latimes.com/world/asia/la-fg-china-trump-public-opinion-20171109-story.html
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« Reply #58 on: November 11, 2017, 09:53:16 pm »


Yep....the rest of the world doesn't need America and their idiot president Donald J. Trump.

The rest of the world is showing that they are prepared to chuck a few toys to Trump to amuse his simple, short-attention-span mind, while they carry on making deals as usual and ignoring the United States of America and their clown emperor with no clothes. Hilarious, really!!




from The Washington Post....

Trump says U.S. won't be ‘taken advantage of anymore’.
Hours later, Pacific Rim nations reach deal on trade without America.


The agreement represents a rebuke of the president,
coming near the end of his 12-day swing through Asia.


By ASHLEY PARKER | 10:36PM EST - Friday, November 10, 2017

President Trump arrives to speak at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation leaders' summit in Danang, Vietnam, on Friday. — Photograph: Associated Press.
President Trump arrives to speak at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation leaders' summit in Danang, Vietnam, on Friday. — Photograph: Associated Press.

DANANG, VIETNAM — President Trump delivered a fiery speech on trade here on Friday, declaring that he would not allow the United States to be “taken advantage of anymore” and planned to place “America first”.

And then, less than 24 hours later, 11 Pacific Rim countries collectively shrugged and moved on without the U.S.

On Saturday, the countries announced they had reached a deal to move ahead with the Trans-Pacific Partnership free-trade pact that Trump threw into question when he withdrew from it earlier this year.

The agreement represents something of a rebuke of Trump, coming near the end of his five-country, 12-day swing through Asia, and reflects the willingness of other nations to proceed without the buy-in of the United States.

A statement early on Saturday trumpeted a breakthrough on the “core elements” of the trade agreement. “Ministers are pleased to announce that they have agreed on the core elements of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership,” it read.

The deal was originally expected to be announced on Friday — the same day Trump addressed business leaders at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit here, in a speech heavy on tough talk and protectionist rhetoric — but was delayed after Canada raised concerns.

The decision to move ahead with the TPP agreement, minus the United States, reflects how Trump's decision to withdraw from the deal created a vacuum other nations are now moving to fill, with or without the president.

In his speech on Friday, Trump struck an aggressive note, saying he believed the United States had for too long been the victim of poor trade deals.

“We are not going to let the United States be taken advantage of anymore,” he said. “I am always going to put America first, the same way that I expect all of you in this room to put your countries first.”

Instead, he said the U.S. was still a willing trade partner, but only for deals based on “mutual respect and mutual benefit.”

“I will make bilateral trade agreements with any Indo-Pacific nation that wants to be our partner and that will abide by the principles of fair and reciprocal trade,” he said.  “What we will no longer do is enter into large agreements that tie our hands, surrender our sovereignty, and make meaningful enforcement practically impossible.”

A senior administration official, asked if the new trade announcement foreshadowed the United States being left behind in the region, rejected the notion, pointing out that “the president is here visiting and is part of the dialogue, and has already spent a significant portion of time talking to his allies and like-minded partners in Japan and South Korea.”

“We'll continue that conversation with many parties here,” the official said. “So we absolutely are engaged on the economic side, and we'll continue to be so.”


• Ashley Parker is a White House reporter for The Washington Post. She joined The Post in 2017, after 11 years at The New York Times, where she covered the 2012 and 2016 presidential campaigns and Congress, among other things.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-politics/wp/2017/11/10/trump-says-u-s-wont-be-taken-advantage-of-anymore-and-hours-later-pacific-rim-nations-reach-deal-on-trade-without-u-s-buy-in
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« Reply #59 on: November 12, 2017, 02:27:43 am »

 sucker news
another nothing burger

antitrust should break up the amazon monopoly and probably will
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« Reply #60 on: November 12, 2017, 11:57:29 am »


I could post a similar story by a different reporter published by the Los Angeles Times.

Ditto the Chicago Tribune.

Ditto The Boston Globe.

Ditto The Seattle Times.

Ditto The New York Times.

Ditto heaps of other mainstream (as opposed to the conspiracy theory bullshit such as Breithart, InfoWars.com, etc., run by stupid RETARDS) American newspapers.
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« Reply #61 on: November 12, 2017, 12:57:43 pm »

Yep all loony left rags staffed by people with degrees in lesbian dance theory and the like 😀
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« Reply #62 on: November 12, 2017, 02:17:52 pm »


I love it when America under Trump gets left out of trade deals.

Perhaps China should step right into the vacuum created by America's withdrawal from many things?

They're the new rising world superpower anyway, so they may as well claim the top-dog prize even sooner, eh?

The “Thucydides Trap” is edging ever closer, it's just that at the moment America's dumb president with the short-attention-span is too full of himself after being played by the Chinese to realise his country is rapidly becoming irrelevant on the world state. It's going to be hilarious when the idiot wakes up.
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« Reply #63 on: November 16, 2017, 08:11:35 pm »

So, how many new spam threads on Trump or America this week? 😁
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« Reply #64 on: Yesterday at 03:08:56 am »

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Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP

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