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White NAZI trash in America…


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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« on: October 21, 2017, 08:57:40 pm »


from The Washington Post....

‘Kill them’: Three men charged in shooting
after Richard Spencer speech


Police said the men argued with a group of people who had been protesting the event,
shouted Nazi chants and fired into a crowd near a bus stop.


By SUSAN SVRIUGA and LORI ROZSA | 8:40PM EDT - Friday, October 20, 2017

Protesters surrounded and shouted at Tyler Eugene Tenbrink, who attended Richard Spencer's speech, as he tried to leave the University of Florida on Thursday. — Photograph: Evelyn Hockstein/The Washington Post.
Protesters surrounded and shouted at Tyler Eugene Tenbrink, who attended Richard Spencer's speech, as he tried to leave
the University of Florida on Thursday. — Photograph: Evelyn Hockstein/The Washington Post.


GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA — Three men were charged with attempted homicide after they argued with a group of people protesting a white nationalist's speech and fired a shot at them, police said Friday.

About 90 minutes after Richard Spencer's speech on Thursday at the University of Florida — which generated so much controversy that the governor declared a state of emergency days before the event — a silver Jeep pulled up to six to eight protesters near a bus stop and confronted them, according to Gainesville Police Department spokesman Sergeant Ben Tobias.

The men, whom police identified as white nationalists, threatened the group, making Nazi salutes and shouting chants about Hitler, police said.

One of the people in the group, who were in their 20s and heading home after protesting, hit the Jeep with a baton. It pulled over.

Tyler Tenbrink, 28, of Richmond, Texas, jumped out with a gun, authorities said. According to the Alachua County Sheriff's arrest report, Colton Fears, 28, and William Fears, 30, of Pasadena, Tex., encouraged Tenbrink to shoot, yelling, “I'm going to f—— kill you”, “Kill them” and “Shoot them”.

Tenbrink fired a single shot that missed the people, police said, and hit a nearby building.

“Once the altercation began, it started ramping up very quickly until the gunshot,” Tobias said.

Wesley Durrance, a 2016 graduate of UF, had just said goodbye to his friends — who were sitting at the bus stop with their signs from the protest — when he heard a loud pop. “Clearly a gunshot,” he said.

He turned around and saw chaos. “Some people were running, one of my friends was still sitting there, my friend who was shot at was standing there,” Durrance said. “Everybody was freaking out, but he was pretty calm, considering. I mean, they had just tried to kill him.”

The men then fled in the Jeep, but one of the people who had been targeted got the license plate number and reported it to police. An off-duty sheriff's deputy who had worked at the Spencer event searched for and found the Jeep.

Gainesville police confirmed on Friday that the arrests were related to the event.


Protesters walked alongside Tyler Eugene Tenbrink, who attended Richard Spencer's speech, as he left the University of Florida on Thursday. — Photograph: Evelyn Hockstein/The Washington Post.
Protesters walked alongside Tyler Eugene Tenbrink, who attended Richard Spencer's speech, as he left the University of Florida
on Thursday. — Photograph: Evelyn Hockstein/The Washington Post.


Tobias said all three admitted to having been involved in the shooting when they were stopped by police on Interstate 75 about 15 miles north of Gainesville. Tenbrink admitted he was the shooter, according to the Alachua County Sheriff's arrest report.

Spencer's speech was repeatedly disrupted by people shouting at him, but the protests outside remained largely peaceful, despite tensions between his supporters and more than 2,500 counter-protesters.

“I hesitate to make a comment on an incident that just happened,” Spencer said on Friday evening. “If it actually happened as it is described in the news, then it is an absolutely terrible incident and it can't be defended. But I think we should all remember that it is a developing story.”

He urged supporters to avoid violence.

“There are time when one can rightfully defend oneself, but these kinds of confrontations should be avoided. The eyes of the world are upon us, and we need to behave in the way that is of the highest standards,” Spencer said.

Tenbrink told The Washington Post on Thursday that he came from Houston to hear the speech. “I came here to support Spencer because after Charlottesville, the radical left threatened my family and children because I was seen and photographed in Charlottesville,” Tenbrink said, referring to the “Unite the Right” rally in August that ended in violence.

“The man's got the brass to say what nobody else will.”

Tenbrink said from inside the event venue that all he cares about are the 14 words, a reference to a white-supremacist slogan: “We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children.”

“That doesn't mean I hate all black people I see,” Tenbrink said.

“And homosexuals, if they want to be homosexual, keep it to yourself. Nobody wants to see that s—,” he said.

The Gainesville Sun reported that William Fears had told the paper on Thursday that he believed James Fields, the man accused of driving his car into a crowd of people protesting the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, killing one woman and injuring others, wasn't unjustified.


Richard Spencer spoke on Thursday at the University of Florida. — Photograph: Evelyn Hockstein/The Washington Post.
Richard Spencer spoke on Thursday at the University of Florida. — Photograph: Evelyn Hockstein/The Washington Post.

William Fears told The Washington Post in August that he came to Charlottesville equipped for violence — and found it. He threw and took punches.

“It was like a war … it was an eerie feeling,” Fears said after he had gone home to Texas and his job as a construction worker. “Things are life and death now, and if you're involved in this movement, you have to be willing to die for it now …”

“If I'm killed, that's fine,” he said. “Maybe I'll be a martyr or something, or remembered.”

At least two of the three who were arrested in Gainesville have demonstrated connections to extremist groups, police said.

All three men have attended white supremacist events, according to the Anti-Defamation League, and all three were at the torchlight march and the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville.

Spencer's speech was his first on a university campus since he led a torchlight march through the University of Virginia in August, with followers chanting, “You will not replace us” and “Jews will not replace us”. That was the beginning of a weekend of clashes between white nationalists and white supremacists on one side and counter-protesters on the other that turned fatal in Charlottesville the next day.

After that violence, University of Florida officials denied Spencer's request to speak on campus — as did several other public universities — “amid serious concerns for safety”.

Spencer, who leads the National Policy Institute, was not invited by the university or a student group. UF leaders have repeatedly rejected his message as hateful. But under threat of a lawsuit, university officials acknowledged Spencer's First Amendment right to speak at a campus venue they rent out, and began planning extensive security.

Governor Rick Scott (Republican) declared a state of emergency in the days before the speech. More than 1,000 law-enforcement officers converged on campus, and the public university expects its total costs for security measures to exceed $600,000.

Tyler Tenbrink, Colton Fears and William Fears were charged with attempted homicide and were in the Alachua County Jail on Friday. Tenbrink faces additional charges for possession of a firearm by a felon.


Tyler Tenbrink. — Photograph: Alachua County Jail. Colton Fears. — Photograph: Alachua County Jail. . — Photograph: Alachua County Jail.
Tyler Tenbrink, left; Colton Fears, center; and William Fears, right. — Photographs: Alachua County Jail.

Joe Heim, Jennifer Jenkins, and Terrence McCoy contributed to this report.

• Susan Svrluga is a reporter for The Washington Post, covering higher education for the Grade Point blog.

• Lori Rozsa is a freelance reporter and frequent contributor to The Washington Post.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: 'Not in our town!' Protesters march against Richard Spencer at University of Florida.

 • ‘Go home, Spencer!’ White nationalist's speech disrupted by protesters.

 • ‘We will keep coming back’: Richard Spencer leads another torchlight march in Charlottesville

 • The road to hate: For six young men of the alt-right, Charlottesville is just the beginning

 • PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY: Photos from the scene as protesters counter Richard Spencer's speech at the University of Florida


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/grade-point/wp/2017/10/20/kill-them-three-men-charged-in-shooting-after-richard-spencer-speech
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2017, 02:00:34 pm »

Hmm. Uneducated white trash sound a lot like uneducated black trash. Would there possibly be a common thread between these groups of messed up people?
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Im2Sexy4MyPants
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« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2017, 03:37:14 pm »

There's total arseholes in every race

we have our own one here @KTJ Grin
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Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
aDjUsToR
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« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2017, 08:22:52 pm »

Haha. Best not to feed the troll (might stop the spamming... Maybe???)
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2017, 10:19:00 pm »



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« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2017, 06:48:48 am »

In KTJ-land(and indeed the wider lefty fantasy-land "community "), racism only exists or ever existed courtesy of white colonialism. It's called selective /obsessive outrage. One of the mental afflictions the loony left suffer from.
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« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2017, 12:55:59 pm »

In KTJ-land(and indeed the wider lefty fantasy-land "community "), racism only exists or ever existed courtesy of white colonialism. It's called selective /obsessive outrage. One of the mental afflictions the loony left suffer from.

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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2017, 06:21:53 pm »


from The New York Times....

A Voice of Hate in America's Heartland

By RICHARD FAUSSET | Saturday, November 25, 2017

Tony Hovater at his home in New Carlisle, Ohio. — Photograph: George Etheredge/The New York Times.
Tony Hovater at his home in New Carlisle, Ohio. — Photograph: George Etheredge/The New York Times.

HUBER HEIGHTS, OHIO — Tony and Maria Hovater were married this fall. They registered at Target. On their list was a muffin pan, a four-drawer dresser and a pineapple slicer.

Ms. Hovater, 25, was worried about Antifa bashing up the ceremony. Weddings are hard enough to plan for when your fiancé is not an avowed white nationalist.

But Mr. Hovater, in the days leading up to the wedding, was somewhat less anxious. There are times when it can feel toxic to openly identify as a far-right extremist in the Ohio of 2017. But not always. He said the election of President Trump helped open a space for people like him, demonstrating that it is not the end of the world to be attacked as the bigot he surely is: “You can just say, ‘Yeah, so?’ And move on.”

It was a weeknight at Applebee's in Huber Heights, a suburb of Dayton, a few weeks before the wedding. The couple, who live in nearby New Carlisle, were shoulder to shoulder at a table, young and in love. He was in a plain T-shirt, she in a sleeveless jean jacket. She ordered the boneless wings. Her parents had met him, she said, and approved of the match. The wedding would be small. Some of her best friends were going to be there. “A lot of girls are not really into politics,” she said.

In Ohio, amid the row crops and rolling hills, the Olive Gardens and Steak 'n Shakes, Mr. Hovater's presence can make hardly a ripple. He is the Nazi sympathizer next door, polite and low-key at a time the old boundaries of accepted political activity can seem alarmingly in flux. Most Americans would be disgusted and baffled by his casually approving remarks about Hitler, disdain for democracy and belief that the races are better off separate. But his tattoos are innocuous pop-culture references: a slice of cherry pie adorns one arm, a homage to the TV show “Twin Peaks”. He says he prefers to spread the gospel of white nationalism with satire. He is a big “Seinfeld” fan.

“I guess it seems weird when talking about these type of things,” he says. “You know, I'm coming at it in a mid-90s, Jewish, New York, observational-humor way.”

Mr. Hovater, 29, is a welder by trade. He is not a star among the resurgent radical American right so much as a committed foot soldier — an organizer, an occasional podcast guest on a website called Radio Aryan, and a self-described “social media villain,” although, in person, his Midwestern manners would please anyone's mother. In 2015, he helped start the Traditionalist Worker Party, one of the extreme right-wing groups that marched in Charlottesville, Virginia, in August, and again at a “White Lives Matter” rally last month in Tennessee. The group's stated mission is to “fight for the interests of White Americans.”

Its leaders claim to oppose racism, though the Anti-Defamation League says the group “has participated in white supremacist events all over the country.” On its website, a swastika armband goes for $20.

If the Charlottesville rally came as a shock, with hundreds of white Americans marching in support of ideologies many have long considered too vile, dangerous or stupid to enter the political mainstream, it obscured the fact that some in the small, loosely defined alt-right movement are hoping to make those ideas seem less than shocking for the “normies,” or normal people, that its sympathizers have tended to mock online.

And to go from mocking to wooing, the movement will be looking to make use of people like the Hovaters and their trappings of normie life — their fondness for National Public Radio, their four cats, their bridal registry.

“We need to have more families. We need to be able to just be normal,” said Matthew Heimbach, the leader of the Traditionalist Worker Party, in a podcast conversation with Mr. Hovater. Why, he asked self-mockingly, were so many followers “abnormal”?

Mr. Hovater replied: “I mean honestly, it takes people with, like, sort of an odd view of life, at first, to come this way. Because most people are pacified really easy, you know. Like, here's some money, here's a nice TV, go watch your sports, you know?”

He added: “The fact that we're seeing more and more normal people come is because things have gotten so bad. And if they keep getting worse, we'll keep getting more, just, normal people.”


A bookshelf at Mr. Hovater's house. — Photograph: George Etheredge/The New York Times.
A bookshelf at Mr. Hovater's house. — Photograph: George Etheredge/The New York Times.

Flattening the Edges

Mr. Hovater's face is narrow and punctuated with sharply peaked eyebrows, like a pair of air quotes, and he tends to deliver his favorite adjective, “edgy,” with a flat affect and maximum sarcastic intent. It is a sort of implicit running assertion that the edges of acceptable American political discourse — edges set by previous generations, like the one that fought the Nazis — are laughable.

“I don't want you to think I'm some ‘edgy’ Republican,” he says, while flatly denouncing the concept of democracy.

“I don't even think those things should be ‘edgy’,” he says, while defending his assertion that Jews run the worlds of finance and the media, and “appear to be working more in line with their own interests than everybody else's.”

His political evolution — from vaguely leftist rock musician to ardent libertarian to fascist activist — was largely fueled by the kinds of frustrations that would not seem exotic to most American conservatives. He believes the federal government is too big, the news media is biased, and that affirmative action programs for minorities are fundamentally unfair.

Ask him how he moved so far right, and he declares that public discourse has become “so toxic that there's no way to effectively lobby for interests that involve white people.” He name-drops Murray Rothbard and Hans-Hermann Hoppe, architects of “anarcho-capitalism,” with its idea that free markets serve as better societal regulators than the state. And he refers to the 2013 science-fiction movie “Pacific Rim”, in which society is attacked by massive monsters that emerge from beneath the Pacific Ocean.

“So the people, they don't ask the monsters to stop,” he says. “They build a giant robot to try to stop them. And that's essentially what fascism is. It's like our version of centrally coming together to try to stop another already centralized force.”

Mr. Hovater grew up on integrated Army bases and attended a mostly white Ohio high school. He did not want for anything. He experienced no scarring racial episodes. His parents, he says, were the kinds of people who “always assume things aren't going well. But they don't necessarily know why.”

He is adamant that the races are probably better off separated, but he insists he is not racist. He is a white nationalist, he says, not a white supremacist. There were mixed-race couples at the wedding. Mr. Hovater said he was fine with it.

“That's their thing, man,” he said.

Online it is uglier. On Facebook, Mr. Hovater posted a picture purporting to show what life would have looked like if Germany had won World War II: a streetscape full of happy white people, a bustling American-style diner and swastikas everywhere.




“What part is supposed to look unappealing?” he wrote.

In an essay lamenting libertarianism's leftward drift, he wrote: “At this rate I'm sure the presidential candidate they'll put up in a few cycles will be an overweight, black, crippled dyke with dyslexia.”

After he attended the Charlottesville rally, in which a white nationalist plowed his car into a group of left-wing protesters, killing one of them, Mr. Hovater wrote that he was proud of the comrades who joined him there: “We made history. Hail victory.”

In German, “Hail victory” is “Sieg heil.”


Mr. Hovater and others in the loosely defined alt-right movement are hoping to make their ideas less than shocking, even normal. — Photograph: George Etheredge/The New York Times.
Mr. Hovater and others in the loosely defined alt-right movement are hoping to make their ideas less than shocking, even normal.
 — Photograph: George Etheredge/The New York Times.


A Growing Movement

Before white nationalism, his world was heavy metal. He played drums in two bands, and his embrace of fascism, on the surface, shares some traits with the hipster's cooler-than-thou quest for the most extreme of musical subgenres. Online, he and his allies can also give the impression that their movement is one big laugh — an enormous trolling event put on by self-mocking, politically incorrect kids playing around on the ash heap of history.

On the party's website, the swastika armband is formally listed as a “NSDAP LARP Armband.” NSDAP was the abbreviation for Hitler's Nazi Party. LARP stands for “Live-Action Role Playing,” a term originally meant to describe fantasy fans who dress up as wizards and warlocks.

But the movement is no joke. The party, Mr. Hovater said, is now approaching 1,000 people. He said that it has held food and school-supply drives in Appalachia. “These are people that the establishment doesn't care about,” he said.

Marilyn Mayo, a senior research fellow at the Anti-Defamation League's Center on Extremism, estimated that the Traditionalist Worker Party had a few hundred members at most, while Americans who identify as “alt-right” could number in the tens of thousands.

“It is small in the grand scheme of things, but it's one of the segments of the white supremacist movement that's grown over the last two years,” she said.

It was midday at a Panera Bread, and Mr. Hovater was describing his political awakening over a turkey sandwich. He mentioned books by Charles Murray and Pat Buchanan. He talked about his presence on 4chan, the online message board and alt-right breeding ground (“That's where the scary memes come from,” he deadpanned). He spoke dispassionately about the injustice of affirmative action, about the “malice directed toward white people” in popular media, about how the cartoon comedy “King of the Hill” was the last TV show to portray “a straight white male patriarch” in a positive light.

He declared the widely accepted estimate that six million Jews died in the Holocaust “overblown.” He said that while the Nazi leader Heinrich Himmler wanted to exterminate groups like Slavs and homosexuals, Hitler “was a lot more kind of chill on those subjects.”

“I think he was a guy who really believed in his cause,” he said of Hitler. “He really believed he was fighting for his people and doing what he thought was right.”

He said he wanted to see the United States become “an actually fair, meritocratic society.” Absent that, he would settle for a white ethno-state “where things are fair, because there's no competing demographics for government power or for resources.”

His fascist ideal, he said, would resemble the early days in the United States, when power was reserved for landowners “and, you know, normies didn't really have a whole hell of a lot to say.”

His faith in mainstream solutions slipped as he toured the country with one of the metal bands. “I got to see people who were genuinely hurting,” he said. “We played coast to coast, but specifically places in Appalachia, and a lot of the Eastern Seaboard had really been hurt.”


“I don't want you to think I'm some ‘edgy’ Republican,” Mr. Hovater said, while flatly denouncing the concept of democracy. — Photograph: George Etheredge/The New York Times.
“I don't want you to think I'm some ‘edgy’ Republican,” Mr. Hovater said, while flatly denouncing the concept of democracy.
 — Photograph: George Etheredge/The New York Times.


Friendships Made and Lost

In 2012, Mr. Hovater was incensed by the media coverage of the Trayvon Martin shooting, believing the story had been distorted to make a villain of George Zimmerman, the white man who shot the black teenager. By that time, he and Ms. Hovater had been dating for a year or two. She was a small-town girl who had fallen away from the Catholic Church (“It was just really boring”), and once considered herself liberal.

But in the aftermath of the shooting, Ms. Hovater found herself on social media “questioning the official story,” taking Mr. Zimmerman's side and finding herself blocked by some of her friends. Today, she says, she and Mr. Hovater are “pretty lined up” politically.

As they let their views be known, friends left and friends stayed.

“His views are horrible and repugnant and hate-filled,” said Ethan Reynolds, a Republican and city councilman in New Carlisle, Ohio, who said he had befriended Mr. Hovater without knowing his extremism. “He was an acquaintance I regret knowing.”

Jake Nolan, a guitarist in one of the bands Mr. Hovater played in, stuck with him. “There are people who literally go around Sieg Heiling,” he said. “Then you have the people who just want the right to be proud of their heritage” — people, he said, who are standing up against “what appears to be an increasingly anti-white America.”

Mr. Hovater befriended Mr. Heimbach in February 2015 at the Conservative Political Action Conference. Mr. Heimbach, who two years earlier had founded a White Student Union at Towson University in Maryland, was holding a protest outside the proceedings and praising Vladimir Putin. The pair founded the Traditionalist Worker Party in the spring.

Soon Mr. Hovater was telling people that he would be running for a council seat in his hometown, New Carlisle, population 5,600. The announcement caught the attention of the Southern Poverty Law Center and the heavy metal press. But he never filed papers.

On a recent weekday evening, Mr. Hovater was at home, sautéing minced garlic with chili flakes and waiting for his pasta to boil. The cats were wandering in and out of their tidy little rental house. Books about Mussolini and Hitler shared shelf space with a stack of Nintendo Wii games. A day earlier, a next-door neighbor, whom Mr. Hovater doesn't know very well, had hung a Confederate flag in front of his house.

“This is kind of brackish territory here,” Mr. Hovater said. “A lot of people consider Cincinnati the most northern Southern city.”

The pasta was ready. Ms. Hovater talked about how frightening it was this summer to watch from home as the Charlottesville rally spun out of control. Mr. Hovater said he was glad the movement had grown.

They spoke about their future — about moving to a bigger place, about their honeymoon, about having kids.


Tony Hovater (Facebook)

• A version of this article appears in print on November 26th, 2017, on Page A16 of the New York edition with the headline: “In America's Heartland, the Voice of Hate Next Door”.

• Richard Fausset is a correspondent to The New York Times based in Atlanta, Georgia. He mainly writes about the American South, focusing on politics, culture, race, poverty and criminal justice. He covered the Charleston, South Carolina, church massacre in 2015, and wrote extensively about working-class voters in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election. From 2012 to 2014, he was a foreign correspondent with the Los Angeles Times, based in Mexico City, where he wrote about the ravages of drug cartels on the Mexican countryside and the capture, in 2014, of Joaquín Guzmán Loera, the Mexican drug lord known as El Chapo. Mr. Fausset also spent six years covering the American South for that paper, producing a series of articles on changing demographics in the region entitled “The New Latino South”. From 1999 to 2006, he was a reporter on the Los Angeles Times Metro desk. He served as editor of Flagpole, the alternative weekly in Athens, Georgia, from 1997 to 1999. Mr. Fausset grew up in New Orleans. He has a degree in English from the University of Texas at Austin and a degree in journalism from the University of Missouri.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • I Interviewed a White Nationalist and Fascist. What Was I Left With?

 • Readers Accuse Us of Normalizing a Nazi Sympathizer; We Respond


https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/25/us/ohio-hovater-white-nationalist.html
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« Reply #8 on: November 30, 2017, 11:00:30 pm »


Hahaha.....good job it is turning to shit for this piece of Trump-supporting Nazi filth....



from The Washington Post....

Nazi sympathizer profiled by The New York Times
says he lost his job and — soon — his home


Tony Hovater said he, his wife and his brother-in-law were all
fired from their jobs following swift backlash over the story.


By KRISTINE PHILLIPS | 5:09PM EST — Wednesday, November 29, 2017

White nationalist demonstrators walk into the entrance of Lee Park surrounded by counter demonstrators on August 12th, 2017 in Charlottesville. — Photograph: Steve Helber/Associated Press.
White nationalist demonstrators walk into the entrance of Lee Park surrounded by counter demonstrators on August 12th, 2017 in Charlottesville.
 — Photograph: Steve Helber/Associated Press.


TONY HOVATER, the white nationalist and Nazi sympathizer featured in a controversial New York Times story this weekend, said he lost his job and would soon lose his home following a swift backlash over the article.

Hovater, a 29-year-old Ohio resident, told The Washington Post on Wednesday that he has been fired from his job and that he and his wife, Maria, are in the process of moving out of their home in New Carlisle, Ohio for financial and safety reasons. They could no longer afford to pay the rent, he said, and somebody had published their home address online.

“It's not for the best to stay in a place that is now public information,” he said, adding later: “We live alone. No one else is there to watch the house while I'm away.”

The lengthy New York Times profile that was published on Saturday portrayed the daily and seemingly normal life of Hovater, whom writer Richard Fausset described as the “Nazi sympathizer next door” and a “committed foot soldier” of the far-right movement. The story also described Hovater as a “Seinfeld” fan whose “Midwestern manners would please anyone's mother.”

Hovater said that he, his wife and his brother-in-law were fired on Monday. All three worked at 571 Grill & Draft House, a restaurant in New Carlisle.

Hovater said the restaurant, where he worked as a kitchen manager for about a year and a half, received harassing calls Monday morning demanding that he be fired. One of the owners later became concerned about employees' safety and told him to leave, he said. His wife and brother-in-law were fired shortly after.

Hovater said that before the owners fired his brother-in-law, they asked him if he has the same beliefs as Hovater.

A marketing firm that represents 571 Grill said on Wednesday that the restaurant is preparing to release a statement.

Hovater, who also contracts as a welder, said he wasn't surprised at his former employer's decision to fire him, though he thought it was “a little hasty.”

“Businesses will do what they have to do to protect their businesses,” he said.

After Hovater was fired, his supporters launched a crowdfunding campaign through a website called Goyfundme.com to raise money for him and his wife.

“Tony was fired from his job for his political beliefs. His wife and family all fired all at once to avoid the political pressure,” Matt Parrott, who runs the site, said, adding that the “nationalist community” has rallied behind the Hovaters.




The campaign has raised more than $6,000 as of Wednesday afternoon.

According to the website, The New York Times article “resulted in a smear campaign” against Hovater and his wife. It claimed that “communists, antifa, and general basement-dwelling ne'er-do-wells set to work immediately, identifying their place of employment and harassing their management into terminating them.”

Goyfundme.com, which relies on bitcoin and credit and debit card payments, is an alternative crowdfunding site created earlier this year after mainstream fundraising sites like GoFundMe and PayPal removed campaigns and accounts associated with far-right ideologies. Parrott condemned “active censorship” and what he sees as the lack of net neutrality among the sites.

Hovater and Parrott are both co-founders of the Traditionalist Worker Party, one of the extreme right-wing groups that rallied in August in Charlottesville, where a car allegedly driven by a Nazi sympathizer plowed into a group of counterprotesters, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer.

The aftermath of the Charlottesville rally was the genesis of The Times profile story on Hovater, national editor Marc Lacey said in a column responding to widespread criticisms of the story. Many have accused The Times of normalizing a man who unabashedly supports Adolf Hitler.

“We described Mr. Hovater as a bigot, a Nazi sympathizer who posted images on Facebook of a Nazi-like America full of happy white people and swastikas everywhere,” Lacey wrote.

Later, he added that The Times regrets the story offended so many.

“We recognize that people can disagree on how best to tell a disagreeable story,” Lacey wrote. “What we think is indisputable, though, is the need to shed more light, not less, on the most extreme corners of American life and the people who inhabit them. That's what the story, however imperfectly, tried to do.”




Fausset, the writer, also responded.

He wrote that he and his editors had hoped to understand why someone like Hovater, who's “intelligent, socially adroit and raised middle class amid the relatively well-integrated environments of United States military bases,” drifted toward an extreme political ideology. Fausset acknowledged that his story, after multiple revisions and despite hours of conversation with Hovater, never really answered that question.

“Mr. Hovater was exceedingly candid to me — often shockingly so — but it seems as though his worldview was largely formed by the same recombinant stuff that influences our mainstream politics…. But even if I had called Mr. Hovater yet again — even if we had discussed Blavatsky at length, the way we did his ideas about the Federal Reserve Bank — I'm not sure it would have answered the question.”

Hovater said he thought Fausset would “editorialize” the story, but he said the article “was immensely fair.”

“A lot of people were confused with what he was trying to do with that story. He's not trying to set out and spook people,” Hovater said. “He wrote the article, he wrote the story that was given, and it was an accurate portrayal of me.”

Hovater said he and his wife are now staying with a friend. He also said he still expects some income from his contractual job as a welder.


• Kristine Phillips is a general assignment reporter for The Washington Post.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Erik Wmple: New York Times faces backlash over half-baked profile of white nationalist

 • Recounting a day of rage, hate, violence and death

 • How Charlottesville lost control amid deadly protest

 • The man who organized the Charlottesville rally is in hiding — and too toxic for the alt-right

 • The white flight of Derek Black


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2017/11/29/nazi-sympathizer-profiled-by-the-new-york-times-says-he-lost-his-job-and-soon-his-home
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« Reply #9 on: December 01, 2017, 07:13:23 am »


Faaaaaarking hillarious that the white-trash Nazi scum lost his job, eh?   Grin
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« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2017, 11:27:46 am »

Per capita, I'd say there are more genuine racists in NZ (many of them brown). Maybe get your own back yard in order???
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« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2017, 02:09:58 pm »

all the anti white bullshit is getting old
there are black trash and white trash lots of people are cunts

98% of the major inventions and advancements in this world were done by white people

The left are the real nazis this smear campaign against the guy was the same as the nazis did against the jews

the owner of the washington post is a nazi skinhead
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« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2017, 03:35:37 pm »


The owner of The Washington Post is a very successful businessman who has never had his business go bankrupt, like the failure Trump has multiple times.
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« Reply #13 on: December 01, 2017, 07:30:37 pm »

hes just a greedy commie scum with a sick agenda i see his workers were going on strike half of them are living in their cars he's such a greedy pig

most of the elite are being exposed as pedo's thanks to trump

« Last Edit: December 01, 2017, 07:36:41 pm by Im2Sexy4MyPants » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #14 on: December 02, 2017, 09:07:13 am »


Hahaha....the only country Trump is making great again is China.

The Chinese know how to play Trump like a fiddle by pandering to his love of shallow stuff such as pomp & ceremony.

Trump is like the dog you throw a bone to and that occupies their time while you burgle the house they are supposed to be guarding.

Hilarious, watching Trump facilitate the change of world superpower top-dog from America to China because of his shallow stupidity.

And all those dumb white-trash Nazis who worship Trump too.....it's like having a daily comedy show to laugh at.
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« Reply #15 on: December 02, 2017, 01:20:40 pm »


According To The Nutty Left Wing ReTards Oh No White People Are Bad hahahahaha
Stupid Commie Scumbags Can Go Fuck Yourselves

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