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China's 19th Communist Party Congress in Beijing…


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« on: October 21, 2017, 03:25:05 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Move over, America.
China now presents itself as the model ‘blazing a new trail’ for the world.


In keynote speech, China's president takes pains to present his nation as a model, but not as a threat.

By SIMON DENYER | 7:25PM EDT - Thursday, October 19, 2017

Chinese President Xi Jinping, bottom center, is applauded by senior members of the government after his speech at the opening session of the 19th Communist Party Congress on October 18th in Beijing. — Photograph: Kevin Frayer/Getty Images.
Chinese President Xi Jinping, bottom center, is applauded by senior members of the government after his speech at the opening session of the 19th Communist Party
Congress on October 18th in Beijing. — Photograph: Kevin Frayer/Getty Images.


BEIJING — American presidents are fond of describing their nation as a “city on a hill” — a shining example for other nations to follow. But China is now officially in the business of styling itself as another polestar for the world, with a very different political, economic and cultural model.

“The banner of socialism with Chinese characteristics is now flying high and proud for all to see,” Chinese President Xi Jinping said during a mammoth speech to the Communist Party elite on Wednesday.

“It means the path, the theory, the system, and the culture of socialism with Chinese characteristics have kept developing, blazing a new trail for other developing countries to achieve modernization,” he said in the Great Auditorium of the Great Hall of the People in Beijing.

“It offers a new option for other countries and nations who want to speed up their development while preserving their independence, and it offers Chinese wisdom and a Chinese approach to solving the problems facing mankind.”

The extent to which the Chinese model is successful or even applicable to other countries is, of course, very questionable. (Although it is also true that many people outside the United States do not see Washington's foreign policy as an unquestioned global good, or its social system as a model.)

China's economic growth has been stunning since the country's move from communism to state-directed capitalism, but per capita income is still a fraction of places such as Taiwan, Singapore or Chinese-controlled Hong Kong. China may have the world's second-largest economy in aggregate, but it ranks between 70 and 80 on a ranking of nations on a per capita basis.

Rising wealth has been accompanied by rising inequality, massive environmental pollution, rampant corruption and one of the most repressive regimes on the planet.

The country has generated cheap capital for industry by keeping real interest rates negative and preventing money from leaving the country, creating an effective tax on its citizens that would not be possible in many other nations. Yet it also has benefited from the incredible industriousness of its own people together with the huge size of its own internal market.

Chinese President Xi Jinping. — Photograph: Lintao Zhang/Getty Images.
Chinese President Xi Jinping. — Photograph: Lintao Zhang/Getty Images.

Still, China's Communist Party has seen events in the West — from the 2008 financial crisis to the election of Donald Trump, and even Brexit — as a vindication of its own political and economic system. On Tuesday, state news agency Xinhua spelled it out: Western democracy was divisive and confrontational, and beset with crises and chaos.

It is a message that resounds in other authoritarian states with big development ambitions, such as Ethiopia. There is no doubt that China's economic record does attract the envy of the people in many poorer nations, especially perhaps in Africa, where the track record of Western influence — and the brand of neoliberal economics often preached by the IMF and World Bank — has not always been rosy.

A poll by Pew Research Center spanning 37 countries showed a sharp drop in U.S. favorability ratings this year, with more people trusting Xi Jinping to do the right thing regarding world affairs than President Trump — by 28 percent to 22 percent — although a majority expressed no confidence in either man.

At the same time as it scorns the Western system, a confident China has also used its growing financial clout to extend its influence across Asia and the world — through projects such as the global development plan known as Belt and Road, and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank — and demand a greater say in global governance.

“It will be a new era,” Xi confidently declared on Wednesday, “that sees China moving closer to center stage and making greater contributions to mankind.”

In his 3˝-hour speech, Xi took an uncompromising line on what the Communist Party sees as its core interests — on the question of independence for Taiwan, for example — but he took pains to stress that China was not a threat to the rest of the world, and pursues what he called a foreign policy of peace.

“No one should expect China to swallow anything that undermines its interests,” he said. But he added: “China's development does not pose a threat to any other country. No matter what stage of development it reaches, China will never seek hegemony or engage in expansion.”

Many Tibetans, who contest Beijing's right to rule the vast Himalayan plateau, might sharply contest that assertion. Several neighboring states would also have noted the way Xi listed “construction on islands and reefs in the South China Sea” as an achievement of his administration — in defiance of their claims and an international arbitration ruling that undermined China's own claims.

Democrats in Hong Kong, some of whom have recently been jailed for their role in the 2014 Umbrella Movement, will have noted Xi's assertion that the people of that territory should rule themselves — but with “patriots playing the leading role”.

The government of Taiwan also objected on Wednesday, saying it was the right of their own people to determine their own future — after Xi explicitly warned that Beijing would never allow any attempt by Taipei to declare independence.


Chinese President Xi speaks at the Communist Party Congress in Beijing. — Photograph: Kevin Frayer/Getty Images.
Chinese President Xi speaks at the Communist Party Congress in Beijing. — Photograph: Kevin Frayer/Getty Images.

Xi also said he wanted the country's military to be more modern and more powerful, and ready for conflict if needed. But the main message of the foreign policy section of his speech was one of partnership, peace and cooperation, and of greater assistance to developing countries.

China, he said, will continue to play its part in international affairs “as a major and responsible country, take an active part in reforming and developing the global governance system, and keep contributing Chinese wisdom and strength to global governance.”

But Western-style democracy? No thanks. There's no room for “erroneous” ideologies, said Xi.

“China's socialist democracy is the broadest, most genuine, and most effective democracy, to safeguard the fundamental interests of the people,” he said.

“The very purpose of developing socialist democracy is to give full expression to the will of the people, protect their rights and interests, spark their creativity, and provide systemic and institutional guarantees to ensure the people run the country,” he continued.

Yet China's apparent confidence cannot mask a deep paranoia at the root of its political system, and deep fear of ordinary Chinese people actually being allowed to express an opinion.

Dissidents were jailed or railroaded out of town ahead of the Party Congress, censorship of the Internet dramatically intensified and ordinary public gatherings canceled or postponed.


• Simon Denyer is The Washington Post's bureau chief in China. He served previously as bureau chief in India and as a Reuters bureau chief in Washington, India and Pakistan.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: A ‘new era’ of power: Xi Jinping kicks off China's 19th Communist Party Congress

 • VIDEO: Amid key party talks, China's economic growth rate slows

 • Washington Post Editorial: China's president just laid out a worrying vision for the world

 • Xi Jinping at China congress calls on party to tighten its grip on the country

 • Why the world is watching Xi Jinping and China's party congress

 • Xi Jinping's quest to revive Stalin's communist ideology

 • PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY: A look inside the Great Hall of the People during China's Communist Party Congress


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2017/10/19/move-over-america-china-now-presents-itself-as-the-model-blazing-a-new-trail-for-the-world
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« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2017, 01:33:57 pm »

Time to nuke china
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Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

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« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2017, 02:53:54 pm »


China would simply nuke America right back and on a massive, overwhelming scale.

And while they were doing that, they'd use their “proven” anti-satellite missiles to take out all of the America military satellites.

Which would completely paralyse the American military machine, because they rely on satellites for EVERYTHING these days.
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« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2017, 10:26:33 pm »


Hahaha………Donald J. Trump will be “bigly” jealous and “green with envy” over Xi Jinping's new status. Sad.



from The Washington Post....

China's leader elevated to the level of Mao in Communist pantheon

The Communist Party wrote Xi Jinping into its constitution,
making it likely he will be around for a long time to come.


By SIMON DENYER | 3:42AM EDT — Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Chinese President Xi Jinping raises his hand to show approval during the closing ceremony for the 19th Party Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, on Tuesday, October 24, 2017. — Photograph: Ng Han Guan/Associated Press.
Chinese President Xi Jinping raises his hand to show approval during the closing ceremony for the 19th Party Congress at the Great Hall of the People
in Beijing, China, on Tuesday, October 24th, 2017. — Photograph: Ng Han Guan/Associated Press.


BEIJING — China's Communist Party formally elevated President Xi Jinping to the same status as party legends Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping on Tuesday, writing his name into the party constitution and setting the nation's leader up for an extended stay in power.

The unanimous vote to enshrine “Xi Jinping Thought on Socialism with Chinese Characteristics in a New Era” in the constitution came on the final day of the week-long 19th Party Congress, a five-yearly gathering of the party elite in the imposing and cavernous Great Hall of the People on the western side of Beijing's iconic Tiananmen Square.

The meeting effectively marks the start of Xi's second five-year-term as party general secretary, but the chances are now higher that this will not be his last.

“The amendment of the party constitution effectively confirms Xi Jinping's aspiration to be the Mao Zedong of the 21st Century — that means a top leader with no constraints on tenure or retirement age,” said Willy Wo-Lap Lam, a political expert at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

“The fact that he has become the new helmsman of the ship of state, providing guiding principles for party, state and military, provides the perfect justification for him to stay number one well beyond the normal 10 years,”

The inclusion of Xi's name in the party's document makes him only the third Chinese leader to be so honored, with his ideology joining Marxism-Leninism, Mao Zedong Thought and Deng Xiaoping Theory as a “guide to action”. It will now become compulsory learning for Chinese students from primary schools through to universities.

China's Communist Party imposed a system of collective leadership after the death of Mao, scarred by the madness, cruelty and famine the one man had imposed through the disasters of the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution.

As a result, Xi's two predecessors Jiang Zemin and Hu Jintao ruled through consensus — as the “first among equals” at the top of the ladder — and were limited to two terms in power.

Now the party is moving back in the other direction, betting on a man who aims to restore the party's central role in society and the nation's central role in global affairs.

Xi's power is not unlimited, and many of his key policy measures reflect ideas adopted by the party before he took power. Yet the past week has seen an explosion of sycophancy toward China's leader, after his mammoth three-and-a-half-hour speech kicked off proceedings last Wednesday. This is a personal style of rule, much like Vladimir Putin's in Russia.

Throughout the week, senior officials lined up, one after the other, to abase themselves, lauding Xi's profound, courageous, thrilling, insightful masterpiece of a speech, that shone “the light of Marxist Truth” and moved some of them from the bottom of their hearts.

“In retrospect it was an overwhelming assertion of authority to a degree unseen since Mao,” said Francois Godemont, director of the China-Asia program at the European Council on Foreign Relations.

Xi Jinping Thought embodies two important principles, experts say: first that the Party is in control of every aspect of life in China, from the economy to the Internet, from politics to culture and religion. The Party must be more disciplined, and more responsive to people's needs, but its leadership must not be questioned.

The second is that China is on a path to become a true global superpower — very much on its own terms.

“Under his reign, there is no more hope of convergence,” said Godemont, referring to the idea that China would become more open, more ruled by law and more democratic, as it became wealthier, that its interests and political system with ultimately converge with those of the West.

The idea of political reform in a Western sense is now firmly out of the window.

Xi's message is one of a nationalist, assertive China, one that he says will not threaten the world, but will resolutely defend its interests.

“By the middle of this century or before, China aims to close the gap economically and militarily with the United States, and become the ultimate arbiter in the Asia-Pacific region,” said Lam.

If Mao's era was one of revolution and nation-building, while Deng's was one of reform and opening that set China on the path to becoming a global economic power, Xi's era is, perhaps, one of control and nationalism.

Deng's influence on the course of Chinese history was massive but his power was wielded less explicitly, often from a position behind the scenes. As a result, his “theory on socialism with Chinese characteristics” was not formally incorporated into the party constitution until after his death.

Former leader Jiang's ideological contribution is recognized in the document as the “Theory of Three Represents”, as is Hu's “Scientific Outlook on Development”, but neither man is mentioned by name.


• Simon Denyer is The Washington Post's bureau chief in China. He served previously as bureau chief in India and as a Reuters bureau chief in Washington, India and Pakistan.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • As Xi Jinping gets a second 5-year term, Chinese wonder if he'll be another Putin


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/chinas-leader-elevated-to-the-level-of-mao-in-communist-pantheon/2017/10/24/ddd911e0-b832-11e7-9b93-b97043e57a22_story.html
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« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2017, 11:47:32 pm »


from The Washington Post....

China's Communist Party unveils new leadership,
with no clear successor to Xi Jinping


Xi broke with precedent by not including a successor in the Politburo Standing Committee.

By SIMON DENYER | 5:40AM EDT - Wednesday, October 25, 2017

The Communist Party of China's new Politburo Standing Committee includes (from left) Han Zheng, Wang Huning, Li Zhanshu, President Xi Jinping, Premier Li Keqiang, Wang Yang and Zhao Leji. — Photograph: Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
The Communist Party of China's new Politburo Standing Committee includes (from left) Han Zheng, Wang Huning, Li Zhanshu, President Xi Jinping,
Premier Li Keqiang, Wang Yang and Zhao Leji. — Photograph: Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


BEIJING — China's Communist Party unveiled its new leadership lineup on Wednesday, granting President Xi Jinping another five years in power as general secretary and including no obvious successor in the senior-most ranks.

Xi introduced the six other all-male members of the Politburo Standing Committee to the media, breaking with recent convention by not including a potential heir in the lineup. That appears to raise the chances that Xi could stay on in power beyond 2022.

On Tuesday, the Communist Party amended its constitution to insert Xi Jinping Thought as a guiding principle for the party, elevating Xi to the same status as its most important historical figures, Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping.

That means that Xi is likely to wield ultimate authority in the party as long as he is alive, experts say, and makes any challenge to that authority tantamount to an attack on the party itself.

On Wednesday morning, Xi led his six colleagues out onto a stage in one of the many rooms within the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. He first announced that the party's Central Committee had voted to give him five more years as General Secretary that morning — saying he sees this “not just an approval of my work but encouragement to spur me on” — before naming his colleagues in the top leadership, all men in their sixties dressed in dark suits.

Apart from Xi, the only other member of the previous Standing Committee to retain his seat was Premier Li Keqiang, with the other five all newcomers replacing retiring members. But none of the newcomers are young enough to be realistic candidates for the top job at the next Party Congress in five years' time.

Among those stepping down was a key Xi ally, the head of the powerful anti-corruption authority, Wang Qishan, who at 69 had reached the normal retirement age.

Xi, 64, and Li, 62, had both been promoted to the Standing Committee in 2007 while still in their early fifties, giving them five years' experience to draw on before they took the top two spots in the party hierarchy in 2012.

This time around, there is no such succession plan.

Guangdong party secretary Hu Chunhua, 54, and Chongqing party boss Chen Min'er, 57, had been seen as possible contenders, but neither made it to the Standing Committee, both having to be content with a place at the next level down, in the 25-member Politburo.

Another prominent figure, Sun Zhengcai, was sensationally ousted this year, accused of corruption, removed from his post and kicked out of the party.

“In a clear break with party tradition, not a single one of his potential heirs has joined the inner-most leadership circle,” said Matthias Stepan, a politics and policy expert at the Mercator Institute for China Studies (MERICS) in Berlin. “This will fuel speculation that Xi plans to remain in power beyond the next Party Congress in 2022.”


A poster with a portrait of Chinese President Xi Jinping is displayed along a street in Shanghai, China, on Tuesday. — Photograph: Aly Song/Reuters.
A poster with a portrait of Chinese President Xi Jinping is displayed along a street in Shanghai, China, on Tuesday.
 — Photograph: Aly Song/Reuters.


In the meantime, this leaves Xi more powerful than ever, having already overshadowed and undercut Li, whose role is mainly involved in the economy.

Third in seniority is Li Zhanshu, 67, who is seen as a close ally of the president, serves as his chief of staff, and is expected to be appointed to run the rubber-stamp parliament, the National People's Congress. Then comes Vice Premier Wang Yang, 62, who had a reputation for encouraging innovation and greener growth while party boss in the southern city of Guangdong.

Next is Wang Huning, also 62, director of the party's Central Policy Research Office, a former political scientist who worked on ideology for two previous presidents, has since become a close ally of Xi and is thought to have helped him develop his “Chinese Dream” slogan. Then comes Zhao Leji, 60, who takes over as head of the anti-corruption agency, the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, and finally Shanghai party boss Han Zheng, 63.

Neither Wang Yang nor Han Zheng were seen as Xi's cronies, but both will have had to work hard to prove their loyalty to the president to have risen this far. Nevertheless their appointment will help to broaden support for the leadership group within the broader party.

“The status quo of co-existence between Xi allies and various factions at the top level will remain in place,” said Zhang Lifan, a party historian. “However, we can see that the factions are weakening and there aren't any powerful figures from any of them.”

“Xi has assumed absolute authority,” he added.

Experts said the concentration of power poses a risk for China, making it harder for the Communist Party to change course when necessary, but also raising the possibility of a power vacuum should Xi suddenly become ill or die.

Zhao Leji's role running the anti-corruption agency puts him at the center of efforts to maintain discipline and loyalty with the party. The youngest member of the Standing Committee, he could be a man to watch, with the potential to play an important role beyond 2022, said Stepan at MERICS.

But party convention suggests that anyone aged 68 or above at the five-yearly Congress should retire, meaning that none of the current Standing Committee are young enough to be candidates for two terms as general secretary and president in 2022.

Xi ended the event by thanking the media for covering the Party Congress, saying China didn't need “lavish praise from others,” but welcomed objective reporting and constructive suggestions.

Then he concluded with two lines from an ancient poem about a plum blossom in an ink painting, which “doesn't need people to praise its nice color, but only wants to fill the universe with its light fragrance.”

Yet in the hours that followed the event, CNN, BBC, and CNBC faced intermittent blackouts in China when discussing the new leadership lineup.

Censorship has been significantly stepped up in China since Xi took power.


Amber Ziye Wang contributed to this report.

• Simon Denyer is The Washington Post's bureau chief in China. He served previously as bureau chief in India and as a Reuters bureau chief in Washington, India and Pakistan.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: What we learned from the 19th Chinese Communist Party Congress


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/chinas-communist-party-unveils-new-leadership-with-no-obvious-successor-to-xi-jinping/2017/10/25/efe67876-b8fc-11e7-9b93-b97043e57a22_story.html
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« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2017, 02:01:27 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Xi Jinping's brave new world

The Chinese president is now so powerful that his advisers no longer dare offer candid advice.
That's dangerous for China.


By STEVE TSANG | 1:03PM EDT - Thursday, October 26, 2017

Chinese President Xi Jinping introduces the Chinese Communist Party's new Politburo Standing Committee, the nation's top decision-making body. Beijing, October 25th, 2017. — Photograph: Wang Zhaowang Zhao/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Chinese President Xi Jinping introduces the Chinese Communist Party's new Politburo Standing Committee, the nation's top decision-making body.
Beijing, October 25th, 2017. — Photograph: Wang Zhaowang Zhao/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


LONDON — As the Chinese Communist Party concluded its 19th National Congress, President Xi Jinping ushered in a new era in the People's Republic of China. This is more than rhetoric.

The previous two eras in contemporary China were characterized by Mao Zedong's totalitarianism and then by Deng Xiaoping's “reform and opening”. In this new era, the Chinese Communist Party is confident of its own socialist developmental model. It no longer looks outside its borders for inspiration, and it emphatically rejects any democratic or Western model. Xi has closed the book on Deng's strategy of “hide your capacities, bide your time”. Instead, he now feels China should openly assert itself. It is the era of putting China first and making China great again.

What was most striking about this national congress was Xi's display of confidence. He was confident of his grip on the party machinery and on China's future. Resistance within the establishment has not dissipated, but Xi was not forced to make major concessions. He must be pleased with how the congress went.

Xi got the seven-man Politburo Standing Committee that he wanted. Membership of this inner sanctum of power is normally a closely guarded secret until the end of the congress, as who does or does not get elevated can be the subject of last-minute deal-making. Not this time. The final list was leaked days before the formal announcement. This could not have happened without Xi's approval. The list suggests that despite toying earlier with the idea of promoting his protégé Chen Min'er to the committee and raising the prospect that Chen may be his successor, Xi preferred to eliminate speculation on succession.

With no potential successor on the committee, Xi is signaling that he will not relinquish power at the next congress in 2022. He has left open the possibility for him to stay in charge, altering the party's practice since the Deng era of institutionalizing leadership succession ahead of time.

While Xi establishes firm control over the committee, he has not felt the need to fill it with his protégés only. Wang Yang, who has a strong Youth League background, and Han Zheng, who is from Shanghai, are indications that even those who have not previously worked closely with Xi can be promoted to the inner sanctum of power. Wang and Han, who cannot fail to be aware of the reasons for their elevation, will no doubt closely follow Xi's policy line. And having arranged for Premier Li Keqiang to be publicly humiliated by allowing rumors that he would be removed to circulate for some time, the decision to retain him will not change the reality that it is Xi alone who dominates the committee.

Xi's notable successes include getting “Xi Jinping Thought” written into the constitution, albeit not in his preferred format. The inclusion of the phrase “Xi Jinping Thought on Socialism with Chinese Characteristics for a New Era” is almost certainly the result of a compromise. This seems the sole major success achieved by party leaders who are resistant to Xi. The amendment to the constitution suggests that Xi now enjoys a position below that of Mao Zedong but above that of Deng Xiaoping. To achieve parity with Mao, Xi needed to have “Xi Jinping Thought” — without the long tag — written into the constitution.

Nonetheless, with his name enshrined in the constitution while he is still in power, Xi has ensured that anyone who opposes him will henceforth be deemed an enemy of the party. At the same time, although he has made himself more powerful than Deng, sustaining that power will require him to tighten control over the party. As paramount leader, Xi is feared rather than loved or admired, though he enjoys wide support outside the party. The further implication is that the anti-corruption drive will continue.

The confidence Xi demonstrated reached breathtaking proportion when he outlined his vision for China. He declared that in 30 years' time, China's dramatically enhanced comprehensive national strength will transform it into a modern, advanced and beautiful country. In other words, the world's leading power, second to none.

This is a grand vision whose fulfilment implicitly requires China to repeat the sustained growth of the last 30 years. China's achievement of about 10 percent annual GDP growth for three decades already constitutes an unparalleled achievement in human history. Fulfilment of Xi's ambitious aspirations will require China to maintain a compound rate of GDP growth of 6-7 percent per year for a further three decades. If it is to succeed, China will have to bypass the “Minsky Moment” — a sudden fall in asset prices following a long phase of optimism and growth — as well as resolve the rapidly increasing debt burden, overcome the middle-income trap, address the consequences of an emerging demographic deficit (captured in a contracting workforce alongside accelerated population aging), and accommodate slowing global economic growth.

Xi seems to believe these challenges can be overcome by reinvigorating the Leninist nature and effectiveness of the party. For Xi, doing so will enable the party to exercise leadership and control throughout the country and face up to all challenges. For Xi, there is no inherent contradiction between economic globalization and tightening party control. His approach seeks to open the door for market forces to play a decisive role, but requires that market forces work with the party in pursuit of this goal.

Xi's ambition and confidence are awe-inspiring. Has he put China on a solid footing to achieve the goals he has set?

To begin to answer this question, it is necessary to recognize that Xi is now so powerful that even his own advisers no longer dare to offer candid advice for fear of causing Xi to think that he is being contradicted. The breathtaking vision of his opening speech at the congress was unnecessary and its lack of realism might expose him to ridicule.

Furthermore, it rang alarm bells in the region and among the great powers. The fact that top advisers who understand foreign policy, economics, demographics and history did not or could not persuade Xi to moderate his ambitions for the next 30 years is worrying. If Xi's advisers do not dare to contradict him, the risk that Chinese policies will be grounded in inappropriate assumptions or calculations will increase, carrying a danger that misguided policies will be introduced and forcefully backed by the full might of the party and military.


Steve Tsang is the director of the China Institute at SOAS University of London.

• This was produced by The WorldPost, a partnership of the Berggruen Institute and The Washington Post.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Western media is still wrong. China will continue to rise. Xi is ushering in a new era of Chinese socialism, despite what The Economist says.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/theworldpost/wp/2017/10/26/xi-jinpings-brave-new-world
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« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2017, 02:10:21 pm »

No longer a communist party. Now simply a dictatorship. As you were.
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« Reply #7 on: October 27, 2017, 04:44:09 pm »


Yep....Donald J. Trump will be absolutely GREEN WITH ENVY.
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« Reply #8 on: October 27, 2017, 05:15:54 pm »

https://therevolutionaryact.com/treating-trump-derangement-syndrome-part-1/
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