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And....this year's Nobel Peace Prize goes to....drumroll....


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Author Topic: And....this year's Nobel Peace Prize goes to....drumroll....  (Read 25 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« on: October 07, 2017, 12:03:50 am »


from The Washington Post....

International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons
awarded Nobel Peace Prize


The award comes as the threat of a nuclear conflict feels more real than in decades.

By MICHAEL BIRNBAUM | 6:31AM EDT - Friday, October 06, 2017



BRUSSELS — The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, a recognition of its efforts to avoid nuclear conflict at a time when it seems more likely than at any other period in recent memory.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee said that it was honoring the group in part because of its efforts to foster an international Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, which was approved in July by the United Nations and opened for signatures last month. The 10-year-old grass-roots civil society movement pushes for nuclear disarmament across the world.

The committee recognized the group for “its work to draw attention to the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of any use of nuclear weapons and for its groundbreaking efforts to achieve a treaty-based prohibition of such weapons,” chairwoman Berit Reiss-Andersen said as she announced the prize in Oslo.

“There is a popular belief among people all over the world that the world has become more dangerous, and that there is a tendency where we experience that the threats of nuclear conflict have come closer,” Reiss-Andersen said. The group has been successful in “engaging people in the world who are scared of the fact that they are supposed to be protected by atomic weapons,” she said.

The Geneva-based coalition, which was modeled on international efforts to ban land mines, says it has branches in more than 100 countries. In a measure of the sudden surge in interest in the group, its website was down on Friday morning following the announcement.

The award is “a message to all nuclear-armed states and all states that continue to rely on nuclear weapons for security that it is unacceptable behavior. We will not support it, we will not make excuses for it, we can't threaten to indiscriminately slaughter hundreds of thousands of civilians in the name of security. That's not how you build security,” the group's executive director Beatrice Fihn told reporters after the announcement.




A founding co-chair of the group, Rebecca Johnson, said that anti-nuclear campaigners recognize the challenge of convincing nuclear powers to agree to give up their weapons. Of the 122 countries that have signed on to the nuclear ban treaty, none possesses them.

But she said that the group believes that the treaty creates an international norm that will eventually pressure nuclear-armed countries into compliance, even if they never sign onto the agreement.

“Nuclear weapons became a tool for weak leaders to take shortcuts instead of providing their own people with safety, security and food,” Johnson said in a telephone interview. “We have to take that value away in order to pull down numbers to zero.”

She said that the nuclear tensions between Washington and North Korea were a setback to world peace.

“That has to be done with diplomacy and politics, and definitely not nuclear saber-rattling between Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un,” she said. “They are very dangerous leaders that think they are exercising nuclear deterrence but in their irrationality are actually risking nuclear war.”

The Nobel Committee said the award was not intended as a hit against any particular country or leader, but rather an effort to encourage all nations to give up their nuclear weapons in the name of a safer world.

The award came at a moment when world peace seems especially fragile. North Korea in recent months has embarked on a series of ambitious tests of nuclear weapons technology, and now appears poised to threaten the mainland United States.Trump and the North Korean government have traded an escalating series of insults and threats of war.

Meanwhile, Trump is poised next week to decertify Iran's compliance with a deal limiting its nuclear program, a step that European allies worry would derail the effort to keep Iran from building nuclear weapons. Iran has said it has no intention of acquiring nuclear arms.

Separately, the 1991 Nobel Peace Prize laureate, Burmese leader Aung San Suu Kyi, has come under fire for failing to stop or condemn the ethnic cleansing of her nation's Rohingya Muslim minority in recent months.

Last year's prize was awarded to Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos just five days after Colombian voters narrowly voted against the peace accord that was the basis for the Nobel honor. The Nobel Committee said it hoped the prize would encourage the two sides in the conflict — one of the world's longest-running — to keep pursuing peace despite the setback. Since then, the peace process has held, although the role of the Nobel remains unclear.


• Michael Birnbaum is The Washington Post's Brussels bureau chief. He previously served as the bureau chief in Moscow and in Berlin, and was an education reporter.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Nobel Peace Prize awarded to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons

 • Quiz: How much do you know about the Nobel Peace Prize?


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/international-campaign-to-abolish-nuclear-weapons-wins-nobel-peace-prize/2017/10/06/9c05dcb0-aa0b-11e7-9a98-07140d2eed02_story.html
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2017, 12:06:59 am »


An EXCELLENT CHOICE!!
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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2017, 12:22:23 pm »

When this prize is given to people for doing precisely nothing but prancing around making vacuous happy-clappy slogans (Obama) then you know it's about as valuable as a sheet of cheap toilet paper. 😁
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Donald
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« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2017, 01:59:18 pm »

Ktj...."An EXCELLENT CHOICE!!"


...ahhh....yeah..nahhhh...there's only one problem...

...it's going to be a cold day in hell when it happens....and everyone knows that🙄

...anybody who wants to put money on it...please contact me😜

...probably a wasted opportunity to give it to someone who deserves it🙄
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2017, 02:53:17 pm »


Hahaha.....I baited the hook and dangled it....and....

....I hooked two big fish (stupid ones at that), both of whom bit like big dogs!!










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aDjUsToR
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« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2017, 03:45:59 pm »

KTJ I think if pop into Pak N Save and purchase some weetbix you may find yourself a noble peace prize in there.
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2017, 02:34:13 pm »


from the Los Angeles Times....

They didn't win Nobel but advanced cause of peace

An independent group's shortlist notes some other worthy candidates.

By ANN M. SIMMONS | 4:00AM PDT - Saturday, October 07, 2017

Iran's Mohammad Javad Zarif, left, and EU official Federica Mogherini, right, with IAEA's Yukiya Amano. — Photograph: Christian Bruna/European Pressphoto Agency.
Iran's Mohammad Javad Zarif, left, and EU official Federica Mogherini, right, with IAEA's Yukiya Amano.
 — Photograph: Christian Bruna/European Pressphoto Agency.


THE International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons won this year's Nobel Peace Prize. But there were many other worthy candidates: 215 individuals and 103 organizations.

The Nobel Peace Prize Committee keeps the names of the nominees secret for 50 years. But each year, their identities inspire a guessing game.

Since 2002, directors of the independent Peace Research Institute Oslo, which studies peace and conflict, have put out their own personal shortlists.

Here is the shortlist of the current director, Henrik Urdal:


Mohammad Javad Zarif and Federica Mogherini

Zarif, Iran's foreign minister, and Mogherini, high representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, were paramount in organizing the negotiations for the 2015 nuclear deal between Iran and the United States, Britain, France, Germany, China and Russia. Officially known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, the deal is considered to be “a landmark agreement resolving a 12 year long international conundrum,” the institute said.

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi

As the world struggles with a humanitarian crisis that has seen more than 65 million people displaced from their homes and some 22 million people become refugees, “the Office of the UNHCR has shown its capacity and integrity in standing up for refugees' rights and needs time and time again,” the institute said. “Refugees need a voice in the world,” and Grandi and his organization have been “working tirelessly to mend the consequences of war in major conflict theaters like Syria, Afghanistan and South Sudan,” the organization said.

Cumhuriyet and Can Dundar

Can Dundar, the former editor of the decades-old Turkish newspaper Cumhuriyet, has endured Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's crackdown on the freedom of the press. After he was found guilty of disclosing state secrets and aiding terrorist groups, Dundar decided to forsake his homeland and move to Germany. In September, at least 17 members of the newspaper's staff were prosecuted after being accused of involvement in terrorism. Cumhuriyet has won accolades for “its impartial reporting and fearlessness in criticizing the authorities,” the institute said. The Nobel Peace Prize, it said, “would be a welcome boost for press freedom and civil society in a country where such liberties are becoming rarer and rarer.”

Economic Community of West African States

ECOWAS was lauded by a previous director of the institute for its “success in combining diplomatic efforts with the prospective use of armed force.” This year, it helped ensure political transition in Gambia, where the electoral defeat of autocratic President Yahya Jammeh sparked unrest. In power for more than two decades, Jammeh initially refused to leave office after losing to Adama Barrow. ECOWAS stepped in. The 15-member organization “exemplifies how increased political and economic interaction contributes to ensuring long term regional stability,” the institute wrote.

Syria Civil Defense and Raed Saleh

Commonly known as the “White Helmets,” the Syria Civil Defense is a group of volunteer first responders that works in rebel-held territories of Syria digging survivors out of the rubble of bombed-out buildings at great risk to their own safety.

The group and its leader, Raed Saleh, “could be an ideal Nobel candidate for their work saving lives, ameliorating human suffering, and maintaining a ray of hope in the Syrian civil war, now in its sixth year,” the institute said. A Nobel prize would “draw attention to the remarkable — yet rarely celebrated — resilient forces of societies hit by armed conflict.”


Members of the Syria Civil Defense, known as the “White Helmets”, help a victim in Dara, Syria. — Photograph: Mohamad Abazeed/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Members of the Syria Civil Defense, known as the “White Helmets”, help a victim in Dara, Syria.
 — Photograph: Mohamad Abazeed/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


• Ann M. Simmons is a global development writer/editor on the foreign desk of the Los Angeles Times, where she covers global sustainability issues. In her most recent role she served as a video and multimedia journalist. She has worked as a metro reporter and national and foreign correspondent. She has been based in Russia, Kenya and South Africa and has reported from Iraq and several other countries across the globe. A Brit, Simmons holds a double honors bachelor's degree in Russian and Norwegian from the University of Anglia in Norwich, England, and a master's degree from Columbia University's Graduate School Journalism. She was a Nieman fellow at Harvard in 2003.

http://enewspaper.latimes.com/infinity/article_popover_share.aspx?guid=43987ad4-29ef-41c4-bb6a-5d95672ddb46&subject=They didn't win Nobel but advanced cause of peace
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