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Donald J. Trump is such a stupid dickhead…


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Author Topic: Donald J. Trump is such a stupid dickhead…  (Read 32 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« on: September 01, 2017, 01:58:15 am »


from the Los Angeles Times....

Trump's words reveal his favorite subject is himself

By DAVID HORSEY | 5:00AM PDT - Thursday, August 31, 2017



DONALD TRUMP clearly knows how to communicate with his ardent followers, but in every other way, he is a weirdly awkward speaker.

His speech at the Boy Scout Jamboree was a political rant infused with towel-snapping locker room banter that got him in hot water with Scout leaders and parents. After the chaos that accompanied the neo-Nazi rally in Charlottesville, his twice-emphasized comment that “many sides” were responsible for the violence earned him widespread criticism from even his fellow Republicans. Then, in a Trump Tower news conference that was supposed to be about infrastructure, he stepped all over his policy message by delivering an angry defense of his Charlottesville faux pas.

On Tuesday, the president visited hurricane-ravaged Texas and everyone waited to see if his big mouth would get him into trouble again.

In comments during a meeting with Texas Governor Greg Abbott and other officials, he sounded a bit like a master of ceremonies thanking the organizing committee of a banquet. Other presidents might have mentioned some of the victims of the storm, but not Trump. He just promised, in his competitive way, that the disaster response would be “better than ever before. We want to be looked at in five years, in 10 years from now, as this is the way to do it.”

And then, when he strolled outside to face a group of citizens, he could not resist slipping into his core brain frequency where all that matters are large crowds and high ratings.

“What a crowd, what a turnout,” Trump declared. The derision online quickly ensued.

Trump's obsession with crowd size and his signature use of superlatives, such as “historic”, “epic”, “tremendous”, “the biggest ever”, draw a lot of flak from his critics — so much so that they risk crossing the line into overkill. Picking on the president for his every gaffe reinforces his supporters' contention that “elites” in the mainstream media and the liberal punditocracy are unable to judge Trump without reflexive bias. How many times have we heard Trump supporters say they like him because he says what's on their minds? That being the case, picking on Trump for his use of language is a direct insult to all those who are perfectly pleased with the way he talks.

Still, it is hard to stifle the fascination and frequent shock that Trump's artless and undisciplined use of language instills because, after all, he is president of the United States. His words have consequences.

Trump's tiny vocabulary reveals an uncomplicated intellect. For him, things are good, bad or “sad” (one of his favorite words). If you are not on his side, you are an enemy to be belittled in terminology fit for a junior high playground. If you are with him, you are the best, most capable and accomplished person ever, until you fail him in any tiny way. Then you are a loser.

Trump may have an empathetic impulse buried inside him somewhere, but, if so, he hides it well. His Texas visit was comparatively free of tone-deaf rhetoric, but he said nothing inspirational. Barack Obama was eloquent in times of national suffering. Bill Clinton expressed a true human touch in similar times. And Ronald Reagan had a way with words that tugged at heartstrings and put a lump in the throat of every patriot. Trump does not have that skill or inclination.

When on script, Trump's voice is bland and passionless. When he is talking off-the-cuff, he cannot resist slipping into self-congratulation, braggadocio, insults or threats. Presidents do not all have to be articulate speakers. Dwight Eisenhower was hardly a great orator and George W. Bush sometimes had trouble finding his way to the end of a sentence. But, whatever their verbal skills, Bush and Eisenhower and other presidents found their individual ways to project a sense of engagement in endeavors greater than themselves.

With Trump, though, his words, however well or poorly delivered, always get back to one subject: Donald Trump.


http://www.latimes.com/opinion/topoftheticket/la-na-tt-trump-words-20170831-story.html
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« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2017, 06:53:42 am »

OK we get you don't like Trump. Why do you keep spamming this silly shit? Are you OK?
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2017, 03:31:58 am »


from The Washington Post....

During a summer of crisis, Trump chafes against criticism and new controls

Behind the scenes, president fumes about media and Congress, while friends fret about his dark moods.

By PHILIP RUCKER and ASHLEY PARKER | 6:31PM EDT - Thursday, August 31, 2017

President Trump greets border patrol agents as he tours the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol facility in Yuma, Arizona, on August 22nd. — Photograph: Joshua Roberts/Reuters.
President Trump greets border patrol agents as he tours the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol facility in Yuma, Arizona, on August 22nd.
 — Photograph: Joshua Roberts/Reuters.


PRESIDENT TRUMP spent the final days of August dutifully performing his job. He tended to the massive recovery from Hurricane Harvey. He hit the road to sell his tax-cut plan. And he convened policy meetings on the federal budget and the North Korean nuclear threat.

Behind the scenes during a summer of crisis, however, Trump appears to pine for the days when the Oval Office was a bustling hub of visitors and gossip, over which he presided as impresario. He fumes that he does not get the credit he thinks he deserves from the media or the allegiance from fellow Republican leaders he says he is owed. He boasts about his presidency in superlatives, but confidants privately fret about his suddenly dark moods.

And some of Trump's friends fear that the short-tempered president is on an inevitable collision course with White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly.

Trump chafes at some of the retired Marine Corps general's moves to restrict access to him since he took the job almost a month ago, said several people close to the president. They run counter to Trump's love of spontaneity and brashness, prompting some Trump loyalists to derisively dub Kelly “the church lady” because they consider him strict and morally superior.

“He's having a very hard time,” one friend who spoke with Trump this week said of the president. “He doesn't like the way the media's handling him. He doesn't like how Kelly's handling him. He's turning on people that are very close to him.”

Aides say Trump admires Kelly's credentials, respects his leadership and management skills, and praises him often, both in private meetings and at public events. In a tax policy speech on Wednesday in Missouri, Trump singled out Kelly's work to decrease the number of illegal border crossings when he was secretary of homeland security.

Meanwhile, people close to the president said he is simmering with displeasure over what he considers personal disloyalty from National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn, who criticized Trump's responses to a deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville on August 12th. He also has grown increasingly frustrated with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who has clashed with the president on issues including Afghanistan troop levels, the blockade on Qatar and Cuba policy.

This portrait of Trump as he enters what could be his most consequential month in office is based on interviews with 15 senior White House officials, outside advisers and friends of the president, many of whom spoke on the condition of anonymity to be candid.

In September, Trump will face deadlines to raise the federal debt ceiling and pass a spending bill possibly tied to his campaign promise to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border; make his first big push for tax cuts; and oversee a potentially historic disaster recovery in Texas and Louisiana.

If Trump's 75-minute rally performance on August 22nd in Phoenix served as a public testimonial to his rage over the media and Congress, he is agitating privately about other concerns, as well.

Trump lashed out at George Gigicos, one of his original campaign staff members, for what the president considered unflattering television camera angles at the Phoenix rally, which Bloomberg News first reported. The president also was distressed by a New York Times report that was posted a few hours before the event documenting the turmoil between him and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Republican-Kentucky).

Trump was especially angered by something he learned at his stop earlier in the day, a border visit in Yuma, Arizona, several of his associates said.

A group of Border Patrol agents who had endorsed him and become campaign-trail buddies initially were blocked by the Trump administration from attending. Although the agents eventually were allowed into the event, the president made his displeasure about their treatment known to Kelly, said people who were briefed about the incident. Two of those people said Trump raised his voice with his chief of staff, whom he faulted for trying to restrict outside friends from having direct access to him.

That evening in Phoenix, Trump attempted to call Kelly onto the stage. “Where's John?” he asked. “Where is he? Where's General Kelly? Get him out here. He's great. He's doing a great job.”

Kelly did not join his boss in front of the crowd.

“It is not unusual for staffers to hear him bluster about things,” said Barry Bennett, a former campaign adviser. “That doesn't mean it's real. There were people on the campaign staff that he said to fire a dozen times, but he never did it. It was just bark. And some people don't know the difference between the bark and the bite.”

Kelly took the job with the express goal of implementing strict order in a West Wing that had become rife with turmoil, infighting and damaging leaks to the media.

Friends used to be able to call the White House and be patched directly through to Trump; now those calls are routed through Kelly and do not always make it to the president. Friends used to drop by the West Wing when they had time to kill, wandering to the Oval Office to say hello; now they must have an official appointment — and a clear reason — to visit.

The changes are largely welcomed by senior administration officials, who say the president's time is too valuable to be wasted on chitchat and hangers-on.

But Trump sometimes defies — and even resents — the new structure. He has been especially sensitive to the way Kelly's rigid structure is portrayed in the media and strives to disabuse people of the notion that he is being managed. The president continues to call business friends and outside advisers, including former chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon, from his personal phone when Kelly is not around, said people with knowledge of the calls.

“Donald Trump resists being handled,” said Roger Stone, a former Trump adviser and longtime confidant. “Nobody tells him who to see, who to listen to, what to read, what he can say.” Stone added, “General Kelly is trying to treat the president like a mushroom. Keeping him in the dark and feeding him shit is not going to work. Donald Trump is a free spirit.”

Kelly has told colleagues that he has no intention of controlling what Trump says or tweets. Although he has tried to manage the information the president receives, Kelly recognizes that there are limits to what he can do, according to White House officials.

“The president can turn on the television, the president can call people, and the president can read the newspaper,” said a Republican close to the White House who added that the onus is on Trump, not his staff, to control his impulses.


National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn stands at the North Portico of the White House before President Trump travels to Iowa on June 21st. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.
National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn stands at the North Portico of the White House before President Trump
travels to Iowa on June 21st. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.


Trump has jettisoned some of the more controversial figures in his administration this summer. For instance, the firing of Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci after just 10 days earned the flamboyant aide the moniker “suicide bomber” in the West Wing for having taken down with him Chief of Staff Reince Priebus and press secretary Sean Spicer. Trump also parted ways with Bannon, who often channeled the president's nationalist instincts.

More changes may be afoot under Kelly, who is continuing his personnel review and is said to be targeting aides without clear portfolios of responsibility.

On Tillerson, Trump has come to see his top diplomat's approach to world affairs as “totally establishment,” in the words of one Trump associate. Several people close to Trump said they would be surprised if Tillerson stays in his post past his one-year mark in January. They hinted that his departure may come far sooner, with one describing it as “imminent.”

And some who have recently seen Tillerson say the former Exxon Mobil chief executive — unaccustomed to taking orders from a superior, let alone one as capricious as Trump — also seems to be ready to end his State Department tenure. He has grumbled privately to Kelly about Trump's recent controversies, said two people familiar with their relationship.

Others, however, caution that Tillerson remains fully enmeshed in the administration. After having lunch with the president on Monday, Tillerson sat in the front row of Trump's joint news conference with the president of Finland and was a key member of Cabinet discussions focused on handling Hurricane Harvey.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters Wednesday that Trump “absolutely” has confidence in Tillerson.

Tillerson made headlines over the weekend when he was asked on “Fox News Sunday”, in the context of Charlottesville, whether Trump speaks for American values. “The president speaks for himself,” Tillerson told anchor Chris Wallace.

Many Trump insiders were aghast at the diplomat's apparent denunciation of the president, but several senior White House officials said Trump's frustration with Tillerson has been about specific policies. The Fox interview did not bother Trump, one official said, even though the president was upset about Cohn's scolding of him to the Financial Times.

Trump was especially upset that Cohn went public with his complaints about the president's handling of Charlottesville, even after Trump listened to Cohn vent during a private meeting on August 18th in Bedminster, New Jersey.

The president has been quietly fuming about Cohn for the past week but has resisted dismissing him in part because he has been the face, along with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, of the administration's tax-cut strategy.

Still, Trump has other ways to slight Cohn. The economic adviser traveled with Trump on Wednesday to Springfield, Missoouri, for his speech about tax reform, yet when the president ticked through “the many distinguished guests” in attendance, he did not mention Cohn. Afterward, Ivanka Trump, the president's daughter, tweeted a call for tax reform with a picture of Trump backstage flanked by her and Mnuchin. Notably absent was Cohn, the plan's co-architect.

Asked about the perceived insults, Sanders told reporters aboard Air Force One on the flight home to Washington that it was “pretty standard tactics” for Trump not to call out staff members in his remarks.

Pressed on the state of Trump and Cohn's relationship, Sanders said only that both men are committed to tax reform.

“Well, look,” she said, “Gary is here. The president is here.”


Robert Costa, Anne Gearan and Carol D. Leonnig contributed to this report.

• Philip Rucker is the White House Bureau Chief for The Washington Post. He previously has covered Congress, the Obama White House, and the 2012 and 2016 presidential campaigns. He joined The Post in 2005 as a local news reporter.

• Ashley Parker is a White House reporter for The Washington Post. She joined The Post in 2017, after 11 years at The New York Times, where she covered the 2012 and 2016 presidential campaigns and Congress, among other things.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: How John Kelly is trying to bring discipline into the White House

 • The bad news about ‘this Russia thing’ keeps pouring in for Trump

 • Public rifts between Trump and some senior officials widen in the wake of Charlottesville

 • As Trump ranted and rambled in Phoenix, his crowd slowly thinned

 • Trump enlists Kelly to enforce order, but can the ‘zoo’ be tamed?


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/during-a-summer-of-crisis-trump-chafes-against-criticism-and-new-controls/2017/08/31/8fb32d72-8d97-11e7-91d5-ab4e4bb76a3a_story.html
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2017, 02:10:02 pm »


from The Los Angeles Times....

Trump's narcissism has taken over America

“Who cares what's good or bad for Trump? What matters is
whether his decisions are good or bad for the rest of us.”


By ANN FRIEDMAN | 4:00AM PDT - Friday, September 29, 2017

President Donald Trump walks from Marine One across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington on September 27th. — Photograph: Carolyn Kaster/Associated Press.
President Donald Trump walks from Marine One across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington on September 27th.
 — Photograph: Carolyn Kaster/Associated Press.


IN the Greek mythological version of this presidency, our self-obsessed leader would already be dead of starvation, having been transfixed and immobilized by his reflection. But America has not let Donald Trump spiral into narcissistic irrelevance. The opposite has happened: We've all become as obsessed with Trump as he is with himself. It's the country that's transfixed and immobilized.

Of course party operatives have always worried about how the president is perceived by the public. But there was once a time when the rest of us evaluated executive decisions based on what effect they would have on the world, not just on the approval rating of the person occupying the White House.

We now filter much of our experience through whether Trump's actions are “good or bad” for Trump. The NFL protests—good or bad for Trump? Nuclear threats against North Korea — good or bad for Trump? The latest attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act —good or bad for Trump? The solar eclipse—good or bad for Trump? (Astrologers, for what it's worth, said “bad”.)

Sure, we might also read about the political aims of the kneeling NFL players, watch a video about terrified South Koreans prepping for disaster, or let our minds wander to the people who rely on health insurance exchanges. We understand, on some level, that there are lives at stake.

Yet our bad habit is as steady as Narcissus' reflection in the water: Each news story and its subsequent social-media commentary comes back to its potential effect on Trump.

This is true even when the people involved say their actions are not about Trump. NFL player Colin Kaepernick first decided to sit during the national anthem last year, before the election. “I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color,” he said at the time. Most of the pro football players who chose to take a knee in recent weeks have made it clear that they, too, kneel in opposition to the killing of black Americans by police and as a call for racial justice.

Their protest is about so much more than Trump. Yet some could only interpret it as an attempt to annoy the president. “Trump wants you to kneel — because it divides the nation, with him and the flag on the same side. Don't give him the attention he wants,” tweeted Republican Senator Ben Sasse of Nebraska, managing the impressive feat of both ignoring the players' stated goals and directing even more attention to Trump in fewer than 140 characters.

Trump was also the center of attention in Alabama, where he appeared at a rally on behalf of Senator Luther Strange, the struggling incumbent Republican candidate in a special-election runoff. (Strange lost his bid on Tuesday.) Trump set the tone that the race was really all about him: “I'm taking a big risk because if Luther does not make it, they are going to go after me,” he told the crowd, in a speech that was mostly a drawn-out defense of his own behavior since January.

And at a separate rally on behalf of Roy Moore, who challenged Strange for the seat, Trump's former chief strategist Steve Bannon agreed that this Alabama special election was, in fact, a referendum on the president. “We did not come here to defy Donald Trump, we came here to praise and honor him,” he said.

Bannon knows as well as anyone that the president views every single event as either a threat to defy him or an opportunity to earn him praise and honor.

So do we.

We're all taking our cues from the president. The Washington Post reported, “After being praised for his response to hurricanes Harvey and Irma, which struck Texas and Florida the hardest, Trump has received lower marks for his response to Maria.” When Republicans' latest attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act failed, commentator Bill Maher noted that “This looks bad for Trump.”

It's as if we've collectively failed to accept that Trump has been sworn into office, and that his actions now have direct consequences for Americans and indeed the planet. The real-time scorekeeping feels like a holdover from the debates and polls and primaries of the 2016 campaign, when everything was still in the realm of the hypothetical. The president is in perpetual campaign mode, continuing to send fundraising emails and hold rallies as if the election never happened.

That doesn't mean the rest of us should join him. Who cares what's good or bad for Trump? What matters is whether his decisions are good or bad for the rest of us.


Ann Friedman is a contributing writer to Opinion at the Los Angeles Times. She lives in Los Angeles.

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-friedman-trump-narcissism-20170929-story.html
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Donald
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« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2017, 02:36:04 pm »

Ktj....."Trump's narcissism has taken over America"


Haha....yeah....and in some houses around Musturtun😜
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2017, 02:52:52 pm »


Tell me....where, or what is Musturtun?

From the context you use when you post, it would indicate Musturtun is a place, yet I cannot locate any place called Musturtun in New Zealand (I've got sophisticated mapping software covering ALL of NZ in multiple scales and formats); and Google is unable to locate any place called Musturtun anywhere in the world.

So what, or where is Musturtun?

Is it a word you simply made up?
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Donald
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« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2017, 03:47:47 pm »

..yeah...I'm guessing that it is such a small and insignificant village where only the scum of society reside ...that google would not include it on the map😕
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2017, 03:52:12 pm »


So in other words, you simply made it up.

Was it a delusion which appeared in your fucked-up mind?

Did you think you were seeing god when you first saw the name Musturtun?

Should you be certified and banged up in a rubber room due to those delusions?
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Donald
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« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2017, 05:16:07 pm »

I just know it's somewhere near whyrarappa🙄
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