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As “metal bracelet day” for Donald Trump edges closer…


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Author Topic: As “metal bracelet day” for Donald Trump edges closer…  (Read 1573 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #150 on: December 09, 2018, 11:13:24 pm »


from The Washington Post…

Mueller flashes some cards in Russia probe, but hides his hand

Flurry of court filings show that the special counsel is still waiting
to reveal his conclusions about possible conspiracy.


By DEVLIN BARRETT and MATT ZAPOTOSKY | 2:28PM EST — Saturday, December 08, 2018

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III's probe into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election has operated more like a complex financial fraud investigation than a racketeering investigation or counter-intelligence operation. — Photograph: Saul Loeb/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III's probe into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election has operated
more like a complex financial fraud investigation than a racketeering investigation or counter-intelligence operation.
 — Photograph: Saul Loeb/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


A 55-PAGE flurry of court filings shows just how deep the investigations surrounding President Trump have gone, scrutinizing secret Russian contacts, hush money meetings and a tangle of lies designed to conceal those activities.

But for all the cards special counsel Robert S. Mueller III played on Friday, it's still not clear what else he holds, or when he will put them on the table.

“The recent court filings by Mueller's team are more revealing by what they did not include than by what they did,” said Robert Mintz, a former federal prosecutor now in private practice.

On Saturday morning, Trump again seized on the lack of public conclusions about his conduct to declare his innocence.

“NO COLLUSION!” he tweeted. “Time for the Witch Hunt to END!”

Mueller's continued silence on the big question that he still must answer — whether any Trump associates conspired with the Kremlin to interfere in the 2016 election — does not mean Trump and those who were around him are in the clear.

“Like any skilled prosecutor, Mueller is playing out his hand very strategically, showing only those cards that he needs to reveal to take the investigation to the next step,” Mintz said.

While Mueller has repeatedly encountered lying witnesses — Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen, Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, Trump's former national security adviser Michael Flynn and former campaign adviser George Papadopoulos — the court cases of those defendants keep pointing to an underlying strength of the special counsel's investigation: the ability to get incriminating emails, documents and bank records.

In that sense, Mueller's probe to date has operated more like a complex financial fraud investigation than a racketeering probe or a counterintelligence operation because, even when a witness lies to him, Mueller has the receipts to win convictions.

Over three court filings submitted in two federal courts on Friday in Trump-related cases, Mueller and prosecutors in New York and Washington offered tantalizing glimpses into what they have found.

Two of the filings were made in advance of Cohen's sentencing, scheduled for Wednesday in New York. The third filing came in the case of Manafort, whom prosecutors have accused of breaking the terms of a plea deal by lying to them about key details, including his interactions with unidentified Trump administration officials as recently as this year.

In one of the filings, the Justice Department formally said Trump coordinated and directed Cohen to violate campaign finance laws. Cohen has admitted arranging hush money payments during the 2016 election for two women who had claimed to have had trysts with Trump.

The court filings describe an August 2014 meeting between Trump, Cohen and the head of a national tabloid in which they discussed buying the stories of any women who might come forward to describe sexual relationships with Trump, so the rights to those stories “could be purchased and ‘killed’.” The unidentified head of the tabloid, identified as “Chairman 1,” is David Pecker of the National Enquirer, according to people familiar with the matter, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive information.

Cohen also admitted, according to the court papers, to previously undisclosed attempts to forge a political relationship with Russia during the election — though, in those instances, the efforts do not appear to have come to fruition.

In September 2015, Cohen suggested in a radio interview that Trump might meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Though Cohen once said that suggestion was spontaneous and unplanned, he “admitted that this account was false and that he had in fact conferred with (Trump) about contacting the Russian government before reaching out to gauge Russia's interest in such a meeting,” according to one filing.

Then, in November 2015, “Cohen received the contact information for, and spoke with, a Russian national who claimed to be a ‘trusted person’ in the Russian Federation who could offer the campaign ‘political synergy’ and ‘synergy on a government level’,” according to a filing from Mueller's office. The person repeatedly tried to set up a meeting between Trump and Putin, but Cohen “did not follow up on the invitation,” because he was working at the time on a potential real estate deal in Moscow with another intermediary with contacts in the Russian government.

Former federal prosecutor Randall D. Eliason said the filings were notable for “the increasing evidence of ties to Russia and possible coverups.” While it is impossible to say yet whether those will amount to a larger criminal conspiracy, Eliason said, they could at the very least form the basis of a politically damaging report, or produce other charges against key people in Trump's orbit for lying to investigators.

“I think it's entirely possible that Mueller ends up concluding that there were all these contacts with Russia that were some combination of unwise or naive or reckless or unpatriotic, but maybe not criminal, so that's in a report, and then the crimes are the cover ups,” Eliason said. “Then you've got political implications. Even if the stuff wasn't criminal, then presumably there are political implications for all the Russian ties. But who knows? Mueller is running such a tight ship, until something happens you don't know it's going to happen.”

Former U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade said she was struck by federal prosecutors in New York accusing Trump of directing Cohen to pay women for their silence about their alleged affairs. Cohen has admitted the payments violated campaign finance laws.

“They're not going to say that unless they believe it to be corroborated,” McQuade said. “That's only a crime if you can show that President Trump knew that was unlawful, but I don't know that it takes too many steps to get there.”

McQuade said she was also intrigued by the details Mueller revealed about Cohen's cooperation.

Mueller's memo, for example, said Cohen “described the circumstances of preparing and circulating” his false congressional testimony about a Trump Tower project in Moscow.

“With whom did he circulate it and, if it was false, was he working with others to coordinate their stories?” McQuade asked.

By leaving all these clues in public, Mueller is ensuring that everything he has found will one day be revealed by increasing the pressure on the attorney general or Congress to release details when the probe is complete, McQuade said.

“This does cause the public, I would hope, to demand to know the whole story at some point,” McQuade said.


__________________________________________________________________________

Devlin Barrett writes about national security and law enforcement for The Washington Post. He started as a copy boy at the New York Post, and since then has covered the NYPD, federal courts, and the Justice Department and its component agencies, including the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Administration, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. In 2017 he was a Pulitzer Prize co-finalist in both the Feature Writing and the International Reporting categories.

Matt Zapotosky covers the Justice Department for The Washington Post's national security team. He has previously worked covering the federal courthouse in Alexandria and local law enforcement in Prince George's County and Southern Maryland. He was educated at Ohio University, where he received a bachelor's degree in journalism.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Inside the filings: Court documents reveal new contact between Trump's inner circle and Russia

 • New Mueller filings directly implicate the president

 • Michael Cohen pleads guilty to lying to Congress


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/mueller-flashes-some-cards-in-russia-probe-but-hides-his-hand/2018/12/08/03938a34-fb01-11e8-8c9a-860ce2a8148f_story.html
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #151 on: December 09, 2018, 11:51:49 pm »


from The Washington Post…

‘Siege warfare’: Republican anxiety spikes as
Trump faces growing legal and political perils


The White House is adopting a ‘shrugged shoulders’ strategy to Mueller's Russia probe,
calculating that GOP base voters will believe whatever the president tells them to believe.


By ROBERT COSTA and PHILIP RUCKER | 4:27PM EST — Saturday, December 08, 2018

President Donald J. Trump disembarks Marine One and walks back across the South Lawn of the White House on December 7, 2018. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.
President Donald J. Trump disembarks Marine One and walks back across the South Lawn of the White House on December 7, 2018.
 — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.


A GROWING NUMBER of Republicans fear that a battery of new revelations in the far-reaching Russia investigation has dramatically heightened the legal and political danger to Donald Trump's presidency — and threatens to consume the rest of the party, as well.

President Trump added to the tumult on Saturday by announcing the abrupt exit of his chief of staff, John F. Kelly, whom he sees as lacking the political judgment and finesse to steer the White House through the treacherous months to come.

Trump remains headstrong in his belief that he can outsmart adversaries and weather any threats, according to advisers. In the Russia probe, he continues to roar denials, dubiously proclaiming that the latest allegations of wrong-doing by his former associates “totally clear” him.

But anxiety is spiking among Republican allies, who complain that Trump and the White House have no real plan for dealing with the Russia crisis while confronting a host of other troubles at home and abroad.

Facing the dawn of his third year in office and his bid for re-election, Trump is stepping into a political hailstorm. Democrats are preparing to seize control of the House in January with subpoena power to investigate corruption. Global markets are reeling from his trade war. The United States is isolated from its traditional partners. The investigation by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III into Russian interference is intensifying. And court filings on Friday in a separate federal case implicated Trump in a felony.

The White House is adopting what one official termed a “shrugged shoulders” strategy for the Mueller findings, calculating that most GOP base voters will believe whatever the president tells them to believe.

But some allies fret that the president's coalition could crack apart under the growing pressure. Stephen K. Bannon, the former Trump strategist who helped him navigate the most arduous phase of his 2016 campaign, predicted 2019 would be a year of “siege warfare” and cast the president's inner circle as naively optimistic and unsophisticated.

“The Democrats are going to weaponize the Mueller report and the president needs a team that can go to the mattresses,” Bannon said. “The president can't trust the GOP to be there when it counts…. They don't feel any sense of duty or responsibility to stand with Trump.”

This portrait of the Trump White House at a precarious juncture is based on interviews with 14 administration officials, presidential confidants and allies, some of whom spoke on the condition of anonymity to candidly discuss private exchanges.

Rather than building a war room to manage the intersecting crises as past administrations have done, the Trump White House is understaffed, stuck in a bunker mentality and largely resigned to a plan to wing it. Political and communications operatives are mostly taking their cues from the president and letting him drive the message with his spontaneous broadsides.

“A war room? You serious?” one former White House official said when asked about internal preparations. “They've never had one, will never have one. They don't know how to do one.”

Trump's decision to change his chief of staff, however, appears to be a recognition that he needs a strong political team in place for the remainder of his first term. The leading candidate for the job is Nick Ayers, Vice President Pence's chief of staff and an experienced campaign operative known for his political acumen and deep network in the party.

Throughout the 18-month special counsel investigation, Trump has single-handedly spun his own deceptive reality, seeking to sully the reputations of Mueller's operation and federal law enforcement in an attempt to pre-emptively discredit their eventual conclusions.

The president has been telling friends that he believes the special counsel is flailing and has found nothing meaningful. “It's all games and trying to connect dots that don't really make sense,” one friend said in describing Trump's view of Mueller's progress. “Trump is angry, but he's not really worried.”


President Donald J. Trump attends a Hanukkah reception in the East Room of the White House on December 6, 2018. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.
President Donald J. Trump attends a Hanukkah reception in the East Room of the White House on December 6, 2018.
 — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.


But Mueller's latest court filings offer new evidence of Russian efforts to forge a political alliance with Trump before he became president and detail the extent to which his former aides are cooperating with prosecutors.

Some GOP senators were particularly shaken by this week's revelation that former national security adviser Michael Flynn had met with Mueller's team 19 separate times — a distressing signal to them that the probe may be more serious than they had been led to assume, according to senior Republican officials.

Even in the friendliest quarters, there are fresh hints of trouble. Fox News Channel host Tucker Carlson, a reliable prime-time booster of the president, faulted Trump in an interview this week for failing to keep his main campaign promises, understand the legislative process and learn how to govern effectively.

For now, Republicans on Capitol Hill are still inclined to stand by Trump and give the president the benefit of the doubt. But one pro-Trump senator said privately that a breaking point would be if Mueller documents conspiracy with Russians.

“Then they've lost me,” said the senator, noting that several Republican lawmakers have been willing to publicly break with Trump when they believe it is in their interests — as many did over Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's role in the brutal killing of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Senator Richard Blumenthal (Democrat-Connecticut), an outspoken Trump critic and a frequent subject of his ire, said, “The president's situation is fraught with mounting peril, and that's apparent to everyone who's paying any attention, which is all of my Republican colleagues.”

Another possible breaking point could come if Trump pardons his former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, who has elicited the president's sympathy as he sits in solitary confinement in a Virginia prison following the collapse of his plea agreement with Mueller's team, White House aides and Republican lawmakers said. Trump advisers said they understand that a pardon of Manafort could be difficult to defend and could prompt rebukes from Republican allies.

The special counsel on Friday accused Manafort of telling “multiple discernible lies” during interviews with prosecutors. Manafort was convicted of tax and bank fraud and has pleaded guilty to additional charges, including conspiring to defraud the United States by hiding years of income and failing to disclose lobbying work for a pro-Russian political party and politician in Ukraine.

Trump's legal team, meanwhile, is bracing not only for new Mueller developments but also for an onslaught of congressional requests. New White House counsel Pat Cipollone and his associate, Emmet T. Flood, are the leaders inside, although both have taken pains to stay out of the spotlight.

Cipollone has been scouring the résumés of congressional Republican staffers with experience handling investigations and trying to recruit them to the White House, officials said. Meanwhile, Flood, who advised former president Bill Clinton during his impeachment, has been prepping for months to forcefully exert executive privilege once House Democrats assume the majority.

Yet hiring remains difficult as potential staffers worry about whether they will need to hire a personal lawyer if they join and express uncertainty about the constant turmoil within the White House hierarchy, as illustrated by Kelly's announced departure on Saturday.

Bannon said he and others were urging contacts in the White House to enlist David N. Bossie, Trump's former deputy campaign manager and a former congressional investigator who was known for his hard-edge tactics.

Trump's lead outside attorney, Rudolph W. Giuliani, said he and his team are busy writing a defiant “counter report” to Mueller, which the president boasted this week was 87 pages long. Giuliani described the effort as a collaboration in which he, Jay Sekulow, Jane Raskin and other lawyers draft different sections and then trade them among the group, debating how to frame various passages on the president's conduct and Russian interference.

“We're writing out a lot and will pick and choose what to include. We're trying to think through every possibility,” Giuliani said. “I'm sure we'll take the lead in defending [Trump] publicly, if he needs defense, like we always do.”


Representatives Mark Meadows (Republican-North Carolina), left, and Devin Nunes (Republican-California) speak outside a reception at the British ambassador's residence in Washington on May 19, 2018. — Photograph: Erin Schaff/for The Washington Post.
Representativess Mark Meadows (Republican-North Carolina), left, and Devin Nunes (Republican-California) speak outside a reception
at the British ambassador's residence in Washington on May 19, 2018. — Photograph: Erin Schaff/for The Washington Post.


Some of Trump's allies have been encouraging him to bolster his legal team. One confidant recalled telling the president, “You need to get you an army of lawyers who know what the hell they're doing.”

So far, Trump's public relations strategy mostly has been to attack Mueller, as opposed to countering the facts of his investigation. But Lanny Davis, a former Clinton lawyer, said that approach has limits.

“No matter what your client says, if you're not ready with factual messages to rebut charges, you'll fail,” said Davis, who now advises former Trump attorney Michael Cohen, who faces possible prison time for crimes including lying to Congress about his Russia contacts. “Even if you think the Trump strategy of attacking the messenger can continue to work, it will not work once the Mueller report is done.”

Former House speaker Newt Gingrich said Clinton's experience in 1998, when the embattled president questioned the special prosecutor and warned of GOP overreach, is instructive for Trump and Republicans, showing them how to be both combative and confident amid chaos.

“You can't have that many smart lawyers, with the full power of the government, and not have something bad come out,” Gingrich said of the special counsel's team. “Mueller has to find something, like Trump jaywalked 11 times. The media will go crazy for three days, screaming, ‘Oh, my God! Oh, my God!’”

But, Gingrich said, “This isn't a crisis moment for Trump or the party. Remember, we thought we had Clinton on the ropes, but Clinton kept smiling and his popularity went up.”

The White House is looking to its hard-right supporters on Capitol Hill to serve as its political flank, in particular House Republicans such as Mark Meadows (North Carolina), Jim Jordan (Ohio), and Devin Nunes (California), who are frequent guests on Fox News Channel. In January, Jordan and Nunes will be the top-ranking Republicans on the House Oversight Committee and the House Select Committee on Intelligence, respectively, positioning them as public faces of the Trump defense and antagonists of the Justice Department's leadership.

Republicans close to incoming House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (California) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Kentucky) said there is an implicit understanding that Jordan, Meadows and others in their orbit will be most vocal, but many rank-and-file Republicans, looking to hold on to their seats, will attempt to avoid becoming swept up in the standoff over the probe, as they have for over a year.

“Among most House Republicans, the feeling is, ‘We're ready for this to be over with. We're not nervous, but we're having Mueller fatigue’,” Meadows said.

But Democrats say they are determined not to let the investigation end prematurely. Representative Eric Swalwell (California), who sits on the intelligence committee as well as the House Judiciary Committee, said, “Our job is to protect the investigation from the president — whether it's firing Mueller, intimidating witnesses or obstructing the investigation.”

Trump critics, like retiring Senator Jeff Flake (Republican-Arizona) — who has sponsored legislation that would protect Mueller but has been largely ignored by his colleagues — warned that the drumbeat of Trump loyalists in Congress, along with the president's relentless clashes with Mueller, have lulled Republicans into a dangerous place.

“It's like the party is a frog slowly boiling in water, being conditioned to not be worried, to not think too hard about what's happening around them,” Flake said. “They feel at a loss about what to do because it's the president's party, without any doubt. So, there's a lot of whistling by the graveyard these days.”

Giuliani dismissed Flake's criticism in much the same way he and the president have taken on Mueller — with a barbed character attack rather than a measured rebuttal.

“He's a bitter, bitter man,” Giuliani said of Flake. “It's sick. Nobody likes him and they would like him gone.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Robert Costa is a national political reporter for The Washington Post. He covers the White House, Congress, and campaigns. He joined The Post in January 2014. He is also the moderator of PBS's “Washington Week” and a political analyst for NBC News and MSNBC.

Philip Rucker is the White House Bureau Chief for The Washington Post. He previously has covered Congress, the Obama White House, and the 2012 and 2016 presidential campaigns. Rucker also is a Political Analyst for NBC News and MSNBC. He joined The Post in 2005 as a local news reporter.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/siege-warfare-republican-anxiety-spikes-as-trump-faces-growing-legal-and-political-perils/2018/12/08/679b785a-fa59-11e8-863c-9e2f864d47e7_story.html
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Im2Sexy4MyPants
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« Reply #152 on: December 10, 2018, 05:39:41 am »

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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #153 on: December 10, 2018, 08:25:44 am »


The Mueller investigation is an on-going juggernaut which is going to eventually BURY Donald J. Trump in evidence and TRUTH as opposed to Trump's lies.

Bring it on.
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« Reply #154 on: December 10, 2018, 08:56:08 pm »

you and all your lefty fools are fucked in the head and totally mentally retarded

your world is a delusion everything you say is backward's

children have more clues than you

"IDIOT"

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« Reply #155 on: December 10, 2018, 09:00:06 pm »


The Mueller investigation is an on-going juggernaut which is going to eventually BURY Donald J. Trump in evidence and TRUTH as opposed to Trump's lies.

Bring it on.


Where is truth?

there is more proof the Democrats are criminals than anything they imagine they have on trump

wake up you deadbeat retarded clown
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« Reply #156 on: December 13, 2018, 06:01:11 pm »

I think Trump has a nasty surprise for the Dems bet he's saving it for a king hit
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« Reply #157 on: December 13, 2018, 09:27:15 pm »


Michael Cohen has just been sentenced to jail for illegally covering up stuff for Trump and he has been singing like a bird to the feds about Trump to get a lesser sentence.

Donald J. Trump's mate, publisher David J. Pecker, has also been singing like a bird to the feds about Trump and has got immunity from prosecution in return.

Trump is like a scared rabbit who KNOWS the feds are coming for him and that the moment the 46th president is sworn in, the feds will arrest Trump and lead him away from the podium in handcuffs in front of the crowd which has gathered to see the inauguration of the next president.

And now Nancy Polosi has publicly stood up to Trump in front of live television cameras and not only refused to budge an inch, but she has called him out for the LIAR he is.

The walls are closing in on Donald J. Trump, whether he likes it or not. The rope is running out and eventually it will go tight, but in the meantime, Trump is going to see his sons and his beloved daughter locked up for criminal corruption as a warning of what is waiting for him.

Good fucking job, too.
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« Reply #158 on: December 14, 2018, 04:55:06 pm »

your dreaming again Brucey

Quote
Michael Cohen has just been sentenced to jail for illegally covering up stuff for Trump

No, he was jailed for being shady with taxis and tax evasion and would say anything to get a lighter sentence

it will take a lot more than the left with their fake news and name and shame tactics to bring Trump down

There is no proof of Russian collusion except by Hillary, the FBI, M16 agent Steel, Muller colluded with Hillary by delivering samples of uranium  to Russia as part of the corrupt uranium one deal part of the pay for play lol

All the idiots against trump are going to go down

If you want to know who's scared they all are shitting their pants
they are  trying to buy time and distract the stupid lefty moonbats from discovering they are the real criminals

Hillary is being investigated right now
I expect she will soon face a special counsel and end up in jail with Obama
none of them are safe

There are no secrets anymore

Mike Flynn will be pardoned and may end up being trumps new head of staff

I guess that's why they call the prez the most powerful man in the world  Grin
« Last Edit: December 14, 2018, 05:02:43 pm by Im2Sexy4MyPants » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #159 on: December 16, 2018, 10:36:07 am »


Keep up with the news, dumbfuck.

Michael Cohen was originally charged with tax evasion and that taxi stuff.

But then, a week ago, he appeared in court and pleaded GUILTY to a whole lot of additional charges, INCLUDING covering up illegal stuff for Trump and committing serious breaches of the electoral act on behalf of and on the orders of Trump. And he had secretly taped those conversations where Trump ordered him to carry out illegal stuff on his behalf and the feds now have those audio tapes with Trump's own voice on them ordering Cohen to do illegal stuff on Trump's behalf.

I guess in backwards, hicksville Woodville, you must get the latest news a few weeks after everybody else, eh?
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« Reply #160 on: December 16, 2018, 10:32:29 pm »


from The Washington Post…

Our long national nightmare is just beginning

As more of the truth comes to light, Trump's legitimacy is melting away.

By MAX BOOT | 10:35AM EST — Monday, December 10, 2018

President Donald J. Trump speaks to reporters during a press conference in the East Room of the White House on November 7. — Photograph: Calla Kessler/The Washington Post.
President Donald J. Trump speaks to reporters during a press conference in the East Room of the White House on November 7.
 — Photograph: Calla Kessler/The Washington Post.


IN AUGUST, In August, after President Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to breaking federal campaign finance laws at the behest of his client, I wrote that Trump had become an illegitimate president. Now, it seems, the president's own Justice Department agrees. Read the sentencing memorandum filed in Cohen's case on Friday by the U.S. attorney's office for the Southern District of New York:

Quote
Cohen's commission of two campaign finance crimes on the eve of the 2016 election for President of the United States struck a blow to one of the core goals of the federal campaign finance laws: transparency. While many Americans who desired a particular outcome to the election knocked on doors, toiled at phone banks, or found any number of other legal ways to make their voices heard, Cohen sought to influence the election from the shadows. He did so by orchestrating secret and illegal payments to silence two women who otherwise would have made public their alleged extramarital affairs with Individual-1. In the process, Cohen deceived the voting public by hiding alleged facts that he believed would have had a substantial effect on the election.

Keep in mind that these are the words of career prosecutors whose integrity remains unimpeachable for the simple reason that “Individual 1” hasn't bothered to impeach them. He has been so busy smearing special counsel Robert S. Mueller III and his gang of “Angry Democrats” that he hasn't had any vitriol left over for the prosecutors who have now all but charged the president with two felonies.

If Trump weren't president, he probably would have been indicted by now. The only thing standing in the way are memoranda produced by the Nixon and Clinton Justice Departments arguing that a president can't be prosecuted while in office — but then what else would you expect Nixon and Clinton appointees to say? It's a safe bet that Trump's own Justice Department would take the same view, but that only delays Trump's day of reckoning. Representative Adam B. Schiff (Democrat-California), the incoming chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, suggests that Trump could face indictment the minute he leaves office — and former prosecutor Andrew McCarthy, normally a Trump defender, agrees.

And, of course, the illegal payment of hush money to the president's playmates is only one tiny molecule of the titanic iceberg now bearing down on the SS Trump. In spite of the president's desperate caterwauling that there is “NO COLLUSION” and “No Smocking Gun”, the evidence that the Trump campaign engaged in a conspiracy with Russian agents to influence the outcome of the 2016 presidential election continues to grow. On Friday, Mueller revealed yet another Trump-Russia contact, bringing to at least 14 the number of Trump associates known to have interacted with Russians during the campaign. Trump and his gang never once notified the FBI about any of these conversations. Instead, they lied repeatedly and shamelessly to cover up their acts, leaving the president vulnerable to Russian blackmail.

Some of these lies are so significant that, if revealed, they easily could have swung the election. Imagine if voters had known that Trump was pursuing a development deal in Moscow even as he was locking up the Republican nomination — and modifying the Republican platform in a pro-Russian direction. Imagine if voters had known that the Trump campaign's high command had met with Russian emissaries promising dirt on Hillary Clinton just before the Russians started leaking stolen Clinton campaign documents. Imagine if voters had known that Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort was in business with an individual linked to Russian intelligence. Imagine if voters had known that Trump consigliere Roger Stone knew in advance about the impending Russian release, via WikiLeaks, of documents stolen from Clinton's campaign chairman.

Granted, as Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook noted in a Washington Post op-ed, the general pattern of Russian interference was known in 2016. But events were shrouded in the fog of politics. The media were citing cybersecurity firms to report on Russian hacking, but Trump and his minions were denying and lying. On July 27, 2016, for example, Trump said, “I have nothing to do with Russia,” and called any suggestion otherwise “ridiculous” and a “conspiracy theory.” Thus Trump created just enough uncertainty to eke out a narrow electoral college win. There were voters credulous enough to believe the hacking could have been the work of a 400-pound coach potato. Such beliefs are no longer tenable — and are no longer held outside of a small coterie of brainwashed cultists.

What we are left with is a president who defrauded the American people to win office — and who is now protected by the immunity that his office confers. He is protected, too, by his dwindling band of followers in Congress who argue that Manafort should be pardoned for his financial crimes (Representative Matt Gaetz) and that Trump should not be prosecuted for merely breaking campaign finance laws (Senator Rand Paul). Rather than calling out the president for obstruction of justice, some lawmakers (I'm looking at you, Representative Devin Nunes) assist him in that obstruction.

All it takes is 34 votes in the Senate and Trump can serve out his term even as his administration is consumed by the biggest political scandal in American history. Our long national nightmare is just beginning.


__________________________________________________________________________

Max Boot is a historian, best-selling author and foreign-policy analyst who has been called one of the “world's leading authorities on armed conflict” by the International Institute for Strategic Studies. He is the Jeane J. Kirkpatrick senior fellow for national security studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, a columnist for The Washington Post and a global affairs analyst for CNN. Boot's latest book — The Corrosion of Conservatism: Why I Left the Right — was released in October 2018 by Norton/Liveright. His previous book, The Road Not Taken: Edward Lansdale and the American Tragedy in Vietnam, came out in January 2018 and became a New York Times bestseller. It was named an Amazon Best Book of the Month and praised as an “epic and elegant biography” by The Wall Street Journal, “judicious and absorbing” by The New York Times and “a superb scholarly achievement” by Foreign Policy. Boot is also the author of three previous books that were all widely acclaimed: The New York Times bestseller Invisible Armies: An Epic History of Guerrilla Warfare from Ancient Times to the Present (W.W. Norton & Co./Liveright, 2013), which The Wall Street Journal said “is destined to be the classic account of what may be the oldest as well as the hardest form of war”; War Made New: Technology, Warfare, and the Course of History, 1500 to Today (Gotham Books, 2006), which was hailed as a “magisterial survey of technology and war” by The New York Times; and “[/i]The Savage Wars of Peace: Small Wars and the Rise of American Power[/i]” (Basic Books, 2002), which won the 2003 General Wallace M. Greene Jr. Award from the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation as the best non-fiction book pertaining to Marine Corps history and has been placed on Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy professional reading lists. Boot has served as an adviser to U.S. commanders in Iraq and Afghanistan. He was a senior foreign policy adviser to John McCain's presidential campaign in 2007-08, Mitt Romney's campaign in 2011-12 and Senator Marco Rubio's campaign in 2015-16. Boot is a frequent public speaker and guest on radio and television news programs. He has lectured on behalf of the State Department and at many military institutions, including the Army, Navy and Air War Colleges, the Australian Defense College, the John F. Kennedy Special Warfare School, West Point and the Naval Academy. In 2004, Boot was named by the World Affairs Councils of America as one of “the 500 most influential people in the United States in the field of foreign policy.” In 2007, he won the Eric Breindel Award for Excellence in Opinion Journalism, given annually to a writer who exhibits “love of country and its democratic institutions” and “bears witness to the evils of totalitarianism.” In 2018, he was named one of America's “Great Immigrants” by the Carnegie Corporation. Before joining the Council in 2002, Boot spent eight years as a writer and editor at The Wall Street Journal, the last five as op-ed editor. From 1992 to 1994 he was an editor and writer at the Christian Science Monitor. In more recent years, Boot has been a columnist for Foreign Policy, a contributing editor to the Los Angeles Times, a member of the USA Today board of contributors, and a regular contributor to many other publications, including The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. He serves on the boards of Intelligence Squared U.S. and the Renew Democracy Initiative. Max Boot holds a BA in history from University of California at Berkeley; and a MA in history from Yale University.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • David Von Drehle: All the Trumpians' lies have one thing in common

 • Robby Mook: The sad truth about Russian election interference

 • Dana Milbank: The utterly lawless ‘Individual-1’

 • Max Boot: George H.W. Bush, the anti-Trump


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2018/12/10/our-long-national-nightmare-is-just-beginning
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« Reply #161 on: December 17, 2018, 07:37:08 am »


Another stupid Washington post mind control attempt
they are so loose with their questionable facts
Washington post are so left they are stuck right up Karl Marx arse

while spewing alt left propaganda their main problem is
they are the mouthpiece
for the richest white man in the world
a man who steals from the poor and gives to himself
hahaha, what a guy Grin
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Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP

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