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As “metal bracelet day” for Donald Trump edges closer…


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Author Topic: As “metal bracelet day” for Donald Trump edges closer…  (Read 1371 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #100 on: March 04, 2018, 08:56:26 pm »


from The New York Times....

Mueller's Focus on Adviser to U.A.E. Indicates Broader Inquiry

The special counsel has asked about the role of the adviser, George Nader,
in White House policymaking, indicating that he is examining
Emirati influence on the Trump administration.


By MARK MAZZETTI, DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK and MAGGIE HABERMAN | Saturday, March 03, 2018

George Nader, an adviser to the leader of the United Arab Emirates, has been questioned in the special counsel investigation, according to people with knowledge of the discussion. — Photograph: C-Span.
George Nader, an adviser to the leader of the United Arab Emirates, has been questioned in the special counsel
investigation, according to people with knowledge of the discussion. — Photograph: C-Span.


WASHINGTON — George Nader, a Lebanese-American businessman, has hovered on the fringes of international diplomacy for three decades. He was a back-channel negotiator with Syria during the Clinton administration, reinvented himself as an adviser to the de facto ruler of the United Arab Emirates, and last year was a frequent visitor to President Trump's White House.

Mr. Nader is now a focus of the investigation by Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel. In recent weeks, Mr. Mueller's investigators have questioned Mr. Nader and have pressed witnesses for information about any possible attempts by the Emiratis to buy political influence by directing money to support Mr. Trump during the presidential campaign, according to people with knowledge of the discussions.

The investigators have also asked about Mr. Nader's role in White House policymaking, those people said, suggesting that the special counsel investigation has broadened beyond Russian election meddling to include Emirati influence on the Trump administration. The focus on Mr. Nader could also prompt an examination of how money from multiple countries has flowed through and influenced Washington during the Trump era.

How much this line of inquiry is connected to Mr. Mueller's original task of investigating contacts between Mr. Trump's campaign and Russia is unclear. The examination of the U.A.E. comes amid a flurry of recent activity by Mr. Mueller.

Last month, investigators negotiated a plea agreement with Rick Gates, Mr. Trump's deputy campaign manager, and indicted 13 Russians on charges related to a scheme to incite political discord in the United States before the 2016 election.

In one example of Mr. Nader's influential connections, which has not been previously reported, last fall he received a detailed report from a top Trump fund-raiser, Elliott Broidy, about a private meeting with the president in the Oval Office.

Mr. Broidy owns a private security company with hundreds of millions of dollars in contracts with the United Arab Emirates, and he extolled to Mr. Trump a paramilitary force that his company was developing for the country. He also lobbied the president to meet privately “in an informal setting” with the Emirates' military commander and de facto ruler, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed al-Nahyan; to back the U.A.E.'s hawkish policies in the region; and to fire Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson.

A copy of Mr. Broidy's memorandum about the meeting was provided to The New York Times by someone critical of the Emirati influence in Washington.

Mr. Trump has closely allied himself with the Emiratis, endorsing their strong support for the new heir to the throne in Saudi Arabia, as well as their confrontational approaches toward Iran and their neighbor Qatar. In the case of Qatar, which is the host to a major United States military base, Mr. Trump's endorsement of an Emirati- and Saudi-led blockade against that country has put him openly at odds with his secretary of state — as well as with years of American policy.

Mr. Nader, 58, made frequent trips to the White House during the early months of the Trump administration, meeting with Stephen K. Bannon and Jared Kushner to discuss American policy toward the Persian Gulf states in advance of Mr. Trump's trip to Saudi Arabia in May 2017, according to people familiar with the meetings. By some accounts, it was Mr. Bannon who pushed for him to gain access to White House policymakers. Others said Mr. Kushner backed him.


President Trump with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed al-Nahyan of Abu Dhabi at the White House last year. — Photograph: Al Drago/The New York Times.
President Trump with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed al-Nahyan of Abu Dhabi at the White House last year.
 — Photograph: Al Drago/The New York Times.


Reached by phone last month, Mr. Nader said he had dinner guests and would call back. He did not, and attempts to reach him over several weeks were unsuccessful. Mr. Nader's lawyer did not respond to messages seeking comment.

The White House did not respond to requests for comment. In a statement, a spokesman for Mr. Broidy said his memorandum had been stolen through sophisticated hacking.

“We have reason to believe this hack was sponsored and carried out by registered and unregistered agents of Qatar seeking to punish Mr. Broidy for his strong opposition to state-sponsored terrorism,” said the spokesman, adding that Mr. Broidy had also made the accusation in a letter to the Qatari ambassador in Washington.

Yousef al-Otaiba, the Emirati ambassador to the United States, declined to comment. Axios first reported Mr. Mueller's questioning of Mr. Nader.

Mr. Nader has long been a mysterious figure. In the 1990s, he presided over an unusual Washington magazine, Middle East Insight, which sometimes provided a platform for Arab, Israeli and Iranian officials to express their views to a Washington audience.

On the magazine's 15th anniversary, in 1996, a West Virginia congressman praised Mr. Nader on the floor of the House, calling him a “recognized expert on the region” and pointing out that the magazine had been a showcase for prominent figures such as President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt, Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel, and Yasir Arafat, the head of the Palestine Liberation Organization.

“He always struck me as a person who really thought he should be in the eye of the storm trying to make things happen,” said Frederic Hof, a former top American diplomat who knew Mr. Nader in the 1990s.

Late in that decade, Mr. Nader convinced the Clinton administration that he had valuable contacts in the Syrian government and took on a secretive role trying to broker a peace deal between Israel and Syria. Working with Ronald S. Lauder, the American cosmetics magnate and prominent donor to Jewish causes, Mr. Nader shuttled between Damascus and Jerusalem, using his contacts in both capitals to try to negotiate a truce.

“In the 1990s, George was a very effective under-the-radar operator in the peace process,” said Martin S. Indyk, a former American ambassador to Israel and a member of a team put together by President Bill Clinton to negotiate peace deals between Israel and its neighbors.

“Then, he disappeared.”


Elliott Broidy, a top Republican fund-raiser, with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel in 2008. — Photograph: David Carp/Wallenberg Committee/Associated Press.
Elliott Broidy, a top Republican fund-raiser, with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel in 2008.
 — Photograph: David Carp/Wallenberg Committee/Associated Press.


Indeed, a man with a once very public profile in Washington effectively vanished from the capital's policy scene, and his magazine ceased publication in 2002.

During the middle part of the last decade, Mr. Nader appears to have spent most of his time in the Middle East, especially in Iraq after the 2003 invasion. He developed close ties to national security officials in the Bush White House.

Erik Prince, the founder of Blackwater USA, the private security company now known as Academi, at one point hired Mr. Nader to help the company generate business deals in Iraq. In a 2010 deposition that Mr. Prince gave as part of a lawsuit against the company, Mr. Prince described Mr. Nader as a “business development consultant that we retained in Iraq” because the company was looking for contracts with the Iraqi government.

Mr. Prince said that Mr. Nader was unsuccessful in getting contracts, and that senior Blackwater officials did not work directly with him.

“George pretty much worked on his own,” he said.

At the beginning of the Obama era, Mr. Nader tried to parlay his ties to the Syrian government into access to senior members of President Barack Obama's foreign policy team, while also seeking to advance business deals with former advisers to President George W. Bush.

By the time of the 2016 election, he had become an adviser to Prince Mohammed of the U.A.E. According to people familiar with the relationship, it was around Mr. Trump's inauguration that Mr. Nader first met Mr. Broidy, the Republican fund-raiser, who is a California-based investor with a strong interest in the Middle East.

Mr. Broidy's security company, Circinus, provides services to both United States agencies and foreign governments. Run by former American military officers, Circinus promises on its website that it “can employ personnel worldwide to provide physical force protection to individuals, groups or facilities within austere, hostile environments,” as well as conducting “specialized operations, infrastructure protection and training.”

Mr. Broidy, 60, had once stumbled into legal trouble over payments to a political figure. In 2009, he agreed to plead guilty to a misdemeanor charge for providing $1 million in illegal gifts to New York State pension authorities, including trips, payouts and a secret investment in a film called “Chooch” that was produced by an official's brother. In exchange for the gifts, the state pension fund invested $250 million with an Israeli-based investment management firm that Mr. Broidy had founded. He reimbursed the pension fund for $18 million in fees.

After the inauguration, Mr. Nader became friendly with Mr. Broidy and introduced him to Prince Mohammed. Circinus then signed contracts with the United Arab Emirates worth several hundred million dollars, according to people familiar with the arrangement.


Mr. Nader played host to a talk with Mr. Netanyahu in 1996. — Photograph: C-Span.
Mr. Nader played host to a talk with Mr. Netanyahu in 1996. — Photograph: C-Span.

By October 6, Mr. Broidy had evidently become close enough to both the prince and Mr. Nader to send a detailed memorandum to an encrypted email address used by Mr. Nader recounting his advocacy on the U.A.E.'s behalf during the meeting with Mr. Trump in the Oval Office amid an afternoon of stops throughout the White House.

An ally of the White House involved in one of the initiatives discussed — a counterterrorism task force — said Mr. Broidy sent the memorandum because he had been asked by the crown prince to seek the president's views on the idea. Mr. Broidy believed that the creation of the task force would aid American security, this person said.

According to the memo, Mr. Broidy repeatedly pressed Mr. Trump to meet privately with Prince Mohammed, preferably in an informal setting outside the White House.

“I offered that M.B.Z. is available to come to the U.S. very soon and preferred a quiet meeting in New York or New Jersey,” Mr. Broidy wrote to Mr. Nader, using the crown prince's initials. “President Trump agreed that a meeting with M.B.Z. was a good idea.”

Mr. Broidy wrote that he had twice told Lieutenant General H. R. McMaster, the national security adviser, that the crown prince “preferred an informal setting to meet one on one with President Trump.” But General McMaster resisted. “LTG McMaster smiled and replied that heads of state usually meet in the White House,” as “protocol dictates.”

In his memorandum, Mr. Broidy recounted that he had told Mr. Trump that he recently returned from meeting with the crown prince about Circinus work for the U.A.E. Mr. Broidy had explained “the exciting and transformational plan being constructed by M.B.Z. to develop a counterterrorism task force,” which Mr. Broidy told the president was “inspired” by his speech at a conference in Riyadh.

Mr. Broidy was harshly critical of the crown prince’s neighbor and nemesis, Qatar. The U.A.E. has accused Qatar, an American ally, of using its satellite network Al Jazeera to promote political Islam, among other allegations.

Mr. Trump also asked about Mr. Tillerson — who had publicly criticized the isolation of Qatar — and Mr. Broidy said that the secretary of state should be fired. “Rex was performing poorly,” Mr. Broidy said, according to the memorandum.

In between the discussions of diplomacy, business and statecraft, Mr. Broidy wrote, he and the president “spoke for several minutes about politics and the fund-raising efforts for the mid-term elections as well as the state of affairs at the R.N.C.,” or the Republican National Committee.


__________________________________________________________________________

Mark Mazzetti and Maggie Haberman reported from Washington, and David D. Kirkpatrick from London. Michael S. Schmidt and Adam Goldman contributed reporting from Washington.

• Mark Mazzetti is Washington Investigations Editor, a job he assumed after covering national security from The New York Times's Washington bureau for 10 years. In 2009, he shared a Pulitzer Prize for reporting on the intensifying violence in Pakistan and Afghanistan and Washington's response. The previous year, he was a Pulitzer finalist for revelations about the C.I.A.'s detention and interrogation program.  He is the author of The Way of the Knife, a New York Times best-selling account of the secret wars waged by the C.I.A. and Pentagon since the September 11 attacks. He is a two-time recipient of the George Polk award.

• David D. Kirkpatrick is an international correspondent based in the London bureau of the New York Times. From the beginning of 2011 through the end of 2015 he was the Cairo bureau chief. He was a Washington correspondent and a national correspondent, based in New York. Before joining The N.Y. Times in 2000, Mr. Kirkpatrick served as a fact checker for the New Yorker, a reporter for The Wall Street Journal and a contributing editor for New York magazine. He is completing a book on the Arab Spring in Egypt, to be published by Viking in 2018.

• Maggie Haberman is a White House correspondent. She joined The New York Times in February 2015 as a campaign correspondent. Previously, Ms. Haberman worked as a political reporter at Politico from 2010 to 2015 and at other publications including the New York Post and New York Daily News. She was a finalist for the Mirror Awards, with Glenn Thrush, for What is Hillary Clinton Afraid of? which was published in 2014. Her hobbies include singing, and she is married with three children.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Inside a 3-Year Russian Campaign to Influence U.S. Voters

 • 13 Russians Indicted as Mueller Reveals Effort to Aid Trump Campaign

 • Former Skadden Lawyer Pleads Guilty to Lying in Russia Investigation


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/03/us/politics/george-nader-mueller-investigation-united-arab-emirates.html
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #101 on: March 16, 2018, 01:09:41 pm »

FACT you and your libtard people are insane Grin

Robert S. Mueller III found trump innocent after wasting millions of taxpayer dollars

hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaahahaha

Ooooooops....the Republicans and Trump's mob shown to be full-of-shit, yet again.....



from The New York Times....

Mueller Subpoenas Trump Organization, Demanding Documents About Russia

The court order is the first known time the special counsel has demanded that records
directly related to the president's businesses be turned over.


By MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT and MAGGIE HABERMAN | 7:38PM EDT — Thursday, March 15, 2018

It was not clear why the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, issued the subpoena instead of simply asking for the documents from the Trump company. — Photograph: Doug Mills/The New York Times.
It was not clear why the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, issued the subpoena instead of simply asking for the documents from the Trump company.
 — Photograph: Doug Mills/The New York Times.


WASHINGTON — The special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, has subpoenaed the Trump Organization in recent weeks to turn over documents, including some related to Russia, according to two people briefed on the matter. The order is the first known instance of the special counsel demanding records directly related to President Trump's businesses, bringing the investigation closer to the president.

The breadth of the subpoena was not clear, nor was it clear why Mr. Mueller issued it instead of simply asking for the documents from the company, an umbrella organization that encompasses Mr. Trump's business ventures. Mr. Mueller ordered the Trump Organization to hand over records related to Russia and other topics he is investigating, the people said.

The subpoena is the latest indication that the investigation, which Mr. Trump's lawyers once regularly assured him would be completed by now, will continue for at least several more months. Word of the subpoena came as Mr. Mueller appears to be broadening his inquiry to examine the role foreign money may have played in funding Mr. Trump's political activities. In recent weeks, Mr. Mueller's investigators have questioned witnesses, including an adviser to the United Arab Emirates, about the flow of Emirati money into the United States.

Mr. Mueller has already indicted 13 Russians and three companies accused of meddling in the 2016 presidential campaign, and on Thursday, the Trump administration included them in sanctions it leveled at Moscow as punishment for interference in the campaign and “malicious cyberattacks”.

The Trump Organization has typically complied with requests from congressional investigators for documents for their own inquiries into Russian election interference, and there was no indication the company planned to fight Mr. Mueller's order.

“Since July 2017, we have advised the public that the Trump Organization is fully cooperative with all investigations, including the special counsel, and is responding to their requests,” said Alan S. Futerfas, a lawyer representing the Trump Organization. “This is old news and our assistance and cooperation with the various investigations remains the same today.”

The White House press secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, reiterated during her daily briefing that the president was cooperating with the special counsel inquiry and referred further questions to the Trump Organization.

There are few other publicly known examples of Mr. Mueller using subpoenas. In January, he ordered the president's former chief strategist, Stephen K. Bannon, to appear before a grand jury. Mr. Mueller dropped the subpoena after Mr. Bannon agreed to be interviewed by investigators.

Mr. Mueller could run afoul of a line the president has warned him not to cross. Though it is not clear how much of the subpoena is related to Mr. Trump's business outside ties to Russia, Mr. Trump said in an interview with The New York Times in July that the special counsel would be crossing a red line if he looked into his family's finances beyond any relationship with Russia. The president declined to say how he would respond if he concluded that the special counsel had crossed that line.

Mr. Trump campaigned as a businessman whose deal-making prowess would translate directly into reforming Washington. The argument helped propel him to the White House, but the Trump Organization has been a magnet for criticism from Democrats, ethics watchdogs and some Republicans, who expressed concern that he remained vulnerable to conflicts of interest because he did not separate from the company.

Before Mr. Trump was sworn in, he pledged that he would stay uninvolved in his businesses while in office but insisted it would be too punitive for his business partners for him to divest from the company altogether.

Among the Trump Organization's holdings are golf clubs, hotels and licensing agreements for the use of the Trump name on properties and other products. While its holdings are complex, the company has always been run like a small, family-owned business; Mr. Trump brought in his three eldest children to help run the enterprise.

The Trump Organization is not publicly held, making it difficult to determine where it receives its money and invests it. The company has said that it never had real estate holdings in Russia, but witnesses recently interviewed by Mr. Mueller have been asked about a possible real estate deal in Moscow.

In 2015, a longtime business associate of Mr. Trump's, Felix Sater, emailed Mr. Trump's lawyer, Michael Cohen, at his Trump Organization account claiming he had ties to President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia and that building a Trump Tower in Moscow would help Mr. Trump's presidential campaign. Mr. Trump signed a nonbinding letter of intent for the project in 2015 and discussed it at least three times with Mr. Cohen.

A revealing comment about Russia by Eric Trump, the president's middle son, also drew scrutiny when it emerged last year. James Dodson, a longtime golf writer from North Carolina, said offhand in a radio interview that Eric Trump, who oversees the golf courses for the Trump Organization, told him in 2013 that the Trumps relied on Russian investors to back their golf clubs. Eric Trump has denied those remarks.

Mr. Mueller was appointed in May to investigate whether Mr. Trump's campaign colluded with the Russians to influence the 2016 election and any other matters that may arise from the inquiry.

A month later, the White House counsel, Donald F. McGahn II, threatened to quit after Mr. Trump asked him to have Mr. Mueller fired because the president believed he had conflict-of-interest issues that precluded him from running the special counsel investigation.

Mr. Mueller is also examining whether the president has tried to obstruct the investigation.

Mr. Trump's lawyers are in negotiations with Mr. Mueller's office about whether and how to allow his investigators to interview the president. Mr. Mueller's office has shared topics it wants to discuss with the president, according to two people familiar with the talks. The lawyers have advised Mr. Trump to refuse an interview, but the president has said he wants to do it, as he believes he has done nothing wrong and can easily answer investigators' questions.

At the same time, Mr. Trump is considering whether to bring on a new lawyer to help represent him in the special counsel's investigation. Last week, Mr. Trump spoke with Emmet T. Flood, a long-time Washington lawyer who represented former President Bill Clinton during the impeachment process, about coming into the White House to deal with the inquiry.


__________________________________________________________________________

Michael S. Schmidt reported from Washington, and Maggie Haberman from New York. Mike McIntire contributed reporting from New York.

• Michael S. Schmidt is an American journalist and correspondent for The New York Times in Washington, D.C. and national security contributor for MSNBC and NBC News.

• Maggie Haberman is a White House correspondent. She joined The New York Times in February 2015 as a campaign correspondent. Previously, Ms. Haberman worked as a political reporter at Politico from 2010 to 2015 and at other publications including the New York Post and New York Daily News. She was a finalist for the Mirror Awards, with Glenn Thrush, for What is Hillary Clinton Afraid of? which was published in 2014. Her hobbies include singing, and she is married with three children.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Despite Mueller's Push, House Republicans Declare No Evidence of Collusion

 • Clinton Impeachment Lawyer May Aid Trump in Mueller Response

 • Trump Asked Key Witnesses About Matters They Discussed With Special Counsel

 • Adviser to Emirates With Ties to Trump Aides Is Cooperating With Special Counsel


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/15/us/politics/trump-organization-subpoena-mueller-russia.html
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Im2Sexy4MyPants
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« Reply #102 on: March 18, 2018, 03:30:05 pm »

Time for a special counsel to investigate Robert S. Mueller and his legal team for collision with the democratic party
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #103 on: March 18, 2018, 04:08:05 pm »


Guess what, Woodville idiot?

Robert S. Mueller III has been a registered member of the Republican Party for decades and still is.

DUH!!!! Shows how much you know, eh? Basically fuck-all.

And it also proves that Robert S. Mueller is a lawman first & foremost who shows no favours to anybody, including those with the same political views as himself.

All he is interested in is getting to the bottom of criminal & treasonous behaviour and gathering evidence against wrongdoers for prosecution in a court of law.
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« Reply #104 on: March 19, 2018, 12:25:06 am »

i dont care what party he belongs to it's nothing 2 bullets won't cure

america needs to destroy the cia
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #105 on: March 19, 2018, 10:34:13 am »


So....tell me what the CIA (a spy agency dealing with stuff outside the USA) has to do with an investigation into corruption and perversion & obstruction of justice inside the USA?

Or for that matter what the CIA has to do with Robert S. Mueller III?

You are a typical Trump supporter....full-of-shit and shooting your mouth off without first engaging your brain.

Then you wonder why you get pulled up over your lack of comprehension of basic reality and hard facts.

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« Reply #106 on: March 20, 2018, 04:31:21 am »

the cia otherwise known as clowns in action
are involved in all the shit happening inside america and all around the world,
they pay their minions inside msn to spread false propaganda and lies.
the cia are involved in drug running and human trafficking to make funds that are off the books
they are totally out of control and have been for years
i remember a time when the left hated the cia

if you can't see that by now you are too stupid
and stuck inside the lefty echo chamber where they are all busy eating their own shit
they forgot to look outside the box.

but i live in hope that maybe one day you will wake up and take the red pill
i but wont hold my breath i think you are too far gone lmao Grin
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #107 on: March 20, 2018, 10:37:49 am »


So.....what I can pick up from that stupid diatribe is that you are one of those silly, gullible idiots who gets sucked in by every nutty conspiracy theory oozing out of the stupid American right.

Are other folks in Woodville as gullible and dumb as you? Or are you Woodville's village idiot?
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« Reply #108 on: March 20, 2018, 02:30:13 pm »


from the print edition of the Los Angeles Times....

Trump lashes out at Russia inquiry

As tensions rise over McCabe's dismissal, some Republicans urge president not to move to fire Mueller.

By LAURA KING | Monday, March 19, 2018

The firing of FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe could lead opposing political camps to dig in. — Photograph: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.
The firing of FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe could lead opposing political camps to dig in. — Photograph: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

WASHINGTON — President Trump stepped up his attacks against Robert S. Mueller III on Sunday even as some Republican allies cautioned the president against any move to fire the special counsel, who is carrying out a broad investigation arising from Russian interference in the U.S. presidential election.

Tensions over the Mueller inquiry gained intensity from the firing late on Friday night of Andrew McCabe, the former deputy director of the FBI. Attorney General Jeff Sessions fired McCabe just hours before he would have qualified for the full government pension given to law enforcement officers.

Trump, who had targeted McCabe, publicly cheered his removal.

McCabe is expected to be a significant witness in the Mueller investigation. News reports said that he kept notes about his encounters with Trump as well as memos about his conversations with fired FBI Director James B. Comey. Mueller's investigators have asked questions of witnesses that suggest they are looking at whether Trump's firing of Comey was part of an effort to obstruct justice.

According to Justice Department officials, internal FBI overseers recommended that McCabe be fired over a matter unrelated to the Mueller inquiry — his handling of information about the FBI's investigation of allegations against Hillary Clinton.

But Sessions' decision to dismiss him, and the speed with which that happened, quickly became a talking point for both critics and defenders of the president in the context of the Russia investigation, which for months has cast a cloud over Trump's presidency.

The president, who spent a sunny Sunday at his golf property in Virginia, began the day with a series of caustic early-morning tweets aimed at McCabe, Comey and Mueller.

One expressed doubts concerning whether McCabe had indeed documented details about their conversations. Trump tweeted that McCabe “never took notes when he was with me” and added that the memos were probably written at a later date “to help his own agenda.”

“Can we call them Fake Memos?” the president asked rhetorically.

When dealing with a sensitive legal matter, law enforcement personnel often document encounters in as much detail as they can recall, immediately after the fact, in what are known as contemporaneous memos.

Another presidential tweet accused Comey of lying to congressional investigators months ago, and yet another suggested that the investigative team of Mueller, a lifelong Republican, was tainted by political partisanship.

That tweet marked the second day in a row in which Trump had publicly mentioned the special counsel by name, despite urgings from his legal team to refrain from doing so.

Speculation that the president might be preparing to move against Mueller took on new energy during Saturday, when one of his lawyers, John Dowd, suggested that the McCabe affair should serve as a prelude to a forced end to the special counsel's investigation.

Late on Sunday, another of Trump's lawyers, Ty Cobb, sent a statement to several news organizations insisting that the president was not planning to fire Mueller.

“In response to media speculation and related questions being posed to the administration, the White House yet again confirms that the President is not considering or discussing the firing of the Special Counsel, Robert Mueller,” said Cobb, who has repeatedly appeared to be the member of Trump's legal team most intent on avoiding a confrontation with Mueller's office.

Dowd's earlier words drew a blunt warning on Sunday from Senator Lindsey Graham (Republican-South Carolina), who has said consistently that any attempt by the White House to halt Mueller's work would be disastrous for Trump.

“If he tried to do that, it would be the beginning of the end of his presidency,” said Graham, who sits on the Senate Judiciary Committee. “We are a rule-of-law nation.”

Interviewed on CNN's “State of the Union”, Graham said that Mueller could only be dismissed for cause. “I see no cause,” the senator said. “I think he's doing a good job.”

“There are many Republicans who share my view,” he pointedly added.

Another South Carolina Republican, Representative Trey Gowdy, took aim at Dowd, who had expressed hope on Saturday that the “brilliant and courageous example” set by the firing of McCabe would “bring an end to the alleged Russia collusion investigation.”

Dowd's comments made it appear that Trump had something to hide, Gowdy said on “Fox News Sunday”.

“The president's attorney frankly does him a disservice when he says that, and when he frames the investigation that way,” said Gowdy, who chairs the House Oversight Committee and is not running for re-election.

“If you have an innocent client, Mr. Dowd, act like it.”

But Gowdy said if Trump did move against Mueller, “I'm not sure the House can do a lot.”

One of the few Republicans who has spoken out strongly against Trump's behavior on a wider range of issues predicted that the president would see a groundswell of opposition to any attempt to end the special counsel's investigation.

“I don't know what the designs are on Mueller, but it seems to be building toward that,” Senator Jeff Flake of Arizona said on “State of the Union”.

He said he would expect “considerable pushback in the next couple of days, urging the president not to go there.”

Flake has announced plans to retire from the Senate and is exploring the possibility of challenging Trump for the Republican nomination in 2020.

Democrats have long been harshly critical of Trump's stance toward the Mueller investigation. They also insist that large numbers of Republican officials are privately horrified by the president's behavior.

“I hear so many Republican senators grumble about his ethics, about his name-calling,” Ohio Democratic Senator Sherrod Brown said on NBC's “Meet the Press”.

“I think at some point Republican enablers in the House and Senate are going to say publicly what they've been saying privately,” he added. “And that's when things change and we see a president back off this kind of name-calling, not telling the truth, sending out these tweets, all that.”

Senator Marco Rubio (Republican-Florida), also on “Meet the Press”, expressed misgivings about the circumstances of McCabe's firing, hours before his birthday would have made him eligible for the full pension.

“I don't like the way it happened,” Rubio said. “He [McCabe] should have been allowed to finish through the weekend.”

Although officials say the FBI's Office of Professional Responsibility laid out a case for firing McCabe in a not-yet-released internal report, Rubio said the president “obviously … doesn't like McCabe, and he's made that pretty clear now for over a year.”

Oklahoma Republican James Lankford, who sits on the Senate Intelligence Committee, said on ABC's “This Week” that the investigation ought to run its course.

“I don't see the president firing him,” he said of Mueller.

The issue of whether McCabe will be stripped of his retirement benefits was still unclear on Sunday.

Trump appeared to demand months ago that the former deputy director be fired in time to prevent him from collecting a pension earned over two decades of FBI service.

Some experts on federal employment suggested, however, that any loss of retirement income could be prevented if a member of Congress hired McCabe, thus keeping him on the federal payroll for at least a few more days. Several lawmakers quickly offered to do so, sometimes accompanying their overtures with sardonic commentary on Twitter.

One of them, Representative Mark Pocan (Democrat-Wisconsin), tweeted, “Andrew call me. I could use a good two-day report on the biggest crime families in Washington, D.C.”

Another Twitter message came from Representative Luis V. Gutierrez, a bitter opponent of Trump's immigration policies, saying it was important to “stand up to bullies.”

“If you need a federal job, call me on Monday,” the Illinois Democrat said in a tweet directed at McCabe. “I am serious.”


__________________________________________________________________________

• Laura King has been a Washington, D.C.-based global affairs correspondent for the Los Angeles Times since 2016. She was most recently the L.A. Times bureau chief in Cairo, and served previously as bureau chief in Kabul and Jerusalem. Before joining the Los Angeles Times, she was a correspondent for the Associated Press in Washington, Tokyo, Jerusalem and London, covering conflicts in the Balkans and the Mideast. King is a graduate of UC Davis and holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Oregon. She was a 1997 Nieman Fellow at Harvard and a fellow at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at Oxford University in 2013. In 2016, King was a co-recipient of an Overseas Press Club award for coverage of the Syrian refugee crisis.

http://enewspaper.latimes.com/infinity/article_share.aspx?guid=ee510acd-9ee9-4b16-b0d2-1a7fb1efb68f
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« Reply #109 on: March 20, 2018, 03:16:38 pm »


from The New York Times....

Trump Hires Lawyer Who Has Pushed Theory
That Justice Departmen Framed the President


The lawyer, Joseph E. diGenova, will serve as an aggressive player
on the president's legal team.


By MAGGIE HABERMAN and MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT | 2:32AM EDT — Monday, March 19, 2018

Joseph E. diGenova during a television interview in March 2016. — Photograph: C-Span.
Joseph E. diGenova during a television interview in March 2016. — Photograph: C-Span.

MANCHESTER, NEW HAMPSHIRE — President Trump hired the longtime Washington lawyer Joseph E. diGenova on Monday, adding an aggressive voice to his legal team who has pushed the theory on television that the F.B.I. and Justice Department framed Mr. Trump.

Mr. diGenova, a former United States attorney, is not expected to take a lead role. But he will serve as an outspoken player for the president as Mr. Trump has increased his attacks on the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III. Mr. Trump broke over the weekend from the longstanding advice of some of his lawyers that he refrain from directly criticizing Mr. Mueller, a sign of his growing unease with the investigation.

“Former U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia Joe DiGenova will be joining our legal team later this week,” said Jay Sekulow, one of the president's personal lawyers. “I have worked with Joe for many years and have full confidence that he will be a great asset in our representation of the President.”

Mr. diGenova has endorsed the notion that a secretive group of F.B.I. agents concocted the Russia investigation as a way to keep Mr. Trump from becoming president. “There was a brazen plot to illegally exonerate Hillary Clinton and, if she didn't win the election, to then frame Donald Trump with a falsely created crime,” he said on Fox News in January. He added, “Make no mistake about it: A group of F.B.I. and D.O.J. people were trying to frame Donald Trump of a falsely created crime.”

Mr. Trump's legal team has been in tumult in recent weeks. On Saturday, Mr. Trump's personal lawyer, John Dowd, called on the Justice Department to end the special counsel investigation. Mr. Dowd said at the time that he was speaking for the president but later backtracked. According to two people briefed on the matter, he was in fact acting at the president's urging to call for an end to the inquiry.

Earlier this month, Mr. Trump did not tell his lawyers that he was in discussions with another Washington lawyer, Emmet T. Flood, about representing him. Mr. Flood represented former President Bill Clinton during his impeachment proceedings.

Mr. diGenova did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Mr. diGenova is law partners with his wife, Victoria Toensing. Ms. Toensing has also represented Sam Clovis, the former Trump campaign co-chairman, and Erik Prince, the founder of the security contractor Blackwater and an informal adviser to Mr. Trump. Mr. Prince attended a meeting in January 2017 with a Russian investor in the Seychelles that the special counsel is investigating.

Ms. Toensing also represents Mark Corallo, the former spokesman for the Trump legal team who has accused one of the president's advisers of potentially planning to obstruct justice with a statement related to a 2016 meeting between Donald Trump Jr. and a Russian lawyer who supposedly had damaging information Hillary Clinton.

Mr. diGenova has worked in Washington legal circles for decades. He is a former Republican-appointed United States attorney for the District of Columbia. And he has served as an independent counsel in government waste, fraud and abuse investigations, notably a three-year criminal inquiry into whether officials in the George H.W. Bush administration broke any laws in their search for damaging information about then-presidential candidate Bill Clinton.

In 1995, Mr. diGenova declared the investigation he led was “unnecessary.” And, he said, “a Kafkaesque journey for a group of innocent Americans comes to an end.”

Mr. diGenova was one of several former independent counsels who, in the late 1990s, argued that the role of the independent counsel — as defined in the aftermath of the Watergate scandal — ought to be narrowed.

Drawing on his own experience, Mr. diGenova said in 1998 that the law, the Ethics in Government Act of 1978, should not be renewed. He argued that once the independent counsel law was invoked, the prosecutors were forced into bringing “an unnatural degree of targeted attention” to the case. In 1999, the United States Congress let the independent counsel portions of the law expire.


__________________________________________________________________________

Maggie Haberman reported from Manchester, New Hampshire, and Michael S. Schmidt from Washington. Matt Apuzzo and Eileen Sullivan contributed reporting from Washington.

• Maggie Haberman is a White House correspondent. She joined The New York Times in February 2015 as a campaign correspondent. Previously, Ms. Haberman worked as a political reporter at Politico from 2010 to 2015 and at other publications including the New York Post and New York Daily News. She was a finalist for the Mirror Awards, with Glenn Thrush, for What is Hillary Clinton Afraid of? which was published in 2014. Her hobbies include singing, and she is married with three children.

• Michael S. Schmidt is an American journalist and correspondent for The New York Times in Washington, D.C. and national security contributor for MSNBC and NBC News.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Newly Emboldened, Trump Says What He Really Feels

 • Trump and the Truth: A President Tests His Own Credibility


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/19/us/politics/joseph-digenova-trump-lawyer.html
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« Reply #110 on: March 20, 2018, 03:17:25 pm »


For a so-called “innocent man”, Donald J. Trump sure seems to be desperately trying to hide something.

If he really is innocent, don't you think it would be best to sit back and allow Mueller to dig out the truth?

Of course, if one is guilty of a shitload of crimes, I guess that could explain the desperation to pervert the course of justice……

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« Reply #111 on: March 20, 2018, 03:27:55 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Trump's lawyers have turned over documents to Mueller
with hopes of limiting interview scope


The sharing of materials is part of an effort by the president's legal team
to curtail his exposure to the special counsel.


By CAROL D. LEONNIG | 5:13PM EDT — Monday, March 19, 2018

President Trump's legal team is seeking ways to curtail an interview with the special counsel. — Photograph: Mandel Ngan/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
President Trump's legal team is seeking ways to curtail an interview with the special counsel. — Photograph: Mandel Ngan/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.

PRESIDENT TRUMP's attorneys have provided the special counsel's office with written descriptions that chronicle key moments under investigation in hopes of curtailing the scope of a presidential interview, according to two people familiar with the situation.

Trump's legal team recently shared the documents in an effort to limit any session between the president and special counsel Robert S. Mueller III to a few select topics, the people said. The lawyers are worried that Trump, who has a penchant for making erroneous claims, would be vulnerable in an hours-long interview.

The decision to share materials with Mueller's team is part of an effort by Trump's lawyers to minimize his exposure to the special counsel, whom the president recently attacked in a series of tweets.

Trump has told aides he is “champing at the bit” to sit for an interview, according to one person. But his lawyers, who are carefully negotiating the terms of a sit-down, recognize the extraordinarily high stakes.

As part of his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, Mueller is probing whether Trump's campaign coordinated with Russia and whether the president obstructed justice by trying to block the investigation. In particular, his team is focused on Trump's firing of his national security adviser and the FBI director, according to people familiar with the inquiry.

The president has denied any wrongdoing, calling the investigation a “witch hunt.”

Behind the scenes, his lawyers are moving into what one adviser called “crunchtime” — reviewing the likely questions Mueller's team will have for the president.

In preparation, Trump on Monday brought on another lawyer, hiring former U.S. attorney Joseph diGenova to join his personal legal team.

John Dowd, an attorney for the president, declined to comment on any records provided to the special counsel.

“We have very constructive, productive communications with the special counsel and his colleagues,” he said in an interview on Friday.

“We're blessed to have them,” Dowd said of the conversations with Mueller's team. “I think it's helpful to them and of course I think it's very helpful to us.”

Peter Carr, spokesman for the special counsel's office, declined to comment.

The written materials provided to Mueller's office include summaries of internal White House memos and contemporaneous correspondence about events Mueller is investigating, including the ousters of national security adviser Michael Flynn and FBI Director James B. Comey. The documents describe the White House players involved and the president's actions.

Special counsel investigators have told Trump's lawyers that their main questions about the president fall into two simple categories, the two people said: “What did he do?” and “What was he thinking when he did it?”

Trump's lawyers expect Mueller's team to ask whether Trump knew about Flynn's communications with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak during the presidential transition, for example, and what instructions, if any, the president gave Flynn about the contact, according to two advisers.

Trump said in February that he fired Flynn because he had misled Vice President Pence about his contact with Kislyak. He said he fired Comey because he had mishandled an investigation of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

The records do not include Trump's personal version of events but provide a narrative of the White House view, the people said. Trump's lawyers hope the evidence eliminates the need to ask the president about some episodes.

DiGenova, whose addition to Trump’s legal team was first reported by The New York Times, declined to comment on the role he will play.

Now the head of a law firm with his wife, Victoria Toensing, diGenova served as an independent counsel who investigated whether former president George H.W. Bush's staff looked at former president Bill Clinton's passport files during the 1992 presidential campaign.

His hiring, pushed by Trump attorney Jay Sekulow, was delayed briefly to ensure that diGenova's work for the president would not conflict with his firm's other clients. Toensing represents Mark Corallo, a former spokesman for Trump's legal team.

“Former US Attorney for the District of Columbia Joe diGenova will be joining our legal team later this week,” Sekulow said in a statement.” I have worked with Joe for many years and have full confidence that he will be a great asset in our representation of the President.”

DiGenova and Trump share the view that a faction inside the FBI sought to frame Trump. In February, diGenova criticized FBI Director Christopher A. Wray and Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein for trying to withhold the names of FBI officials from a controversial GOP House committee memo that called out their roles in seeking a surveillance warrant of a former Trump campaign aide.

In 1997, DiGenova wrote a column in The Wall Street Journal arguing that the Constitution allows for the indictment of a sitting president.

The legal question has never been tested in court. Many scholars have argued the Constitution prohibits criminally charging a president, leaving impeachment as the only avenue to hold a president accountable for legal violations until he or she leaves office. Trump's own legal team has made that argument. Many experts believe a controlling Justice Department opinion prohibits Mueller, technically a Justice employee, from charging a sitting president.

But diGenova argued there is no clear statute or constitutional provision that would prevent the indictment of the president.

“The nation, in fact, could conceivably benefit from the indictment of a president,” he wrote in the column, which was published while Clinton was under investigation by an independent counsel. “It would teach the valuable civics lesson that no one is above the law.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Rosalind S. Helderman and Matt Zapotosky contributed to this report.

• Carol Leonnig is an investigative reporter at The Washington Post, where she has worked since 2000. She won the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for her work on security failures and misconduct inside the Secret Service.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Trump takes aim at Mueller. Lawmakers were steadfast in response.

 • Trump rails against Mueller investigation, dismisses McCabe's notes as ‘Fake Memos’

 • After McCabe firing, Trump attacks FBI, and his lawyer says Russia probe must end


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/trumps-lawyers-have-turned-over-documents-to-mueller-with-hopes-of-limiting-interview-scope/2018/03/19/9174cd54-2b9f-11e8-b0b0-f706877db618_story.html
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« Reply #112 on: March 20, 2018, 03:35:15 pm »


Definitely worth clicking on....



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« Reply #113 on: March 20, 2018, 04:28:32 pm »

you're sniffing your own farts again i see
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Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
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« Reply #114 on: March 20, 2018, 05:40:21 pm »


from The New York Times....

‘You Will Not Destroy America’: A Trump Battle Is No Longer One-Sided

The president and former law enforcement and intelligence officials are trading Twitter insults,
turning a conflict that would have once stayed private into a public brawl.


By KATIE ROGERS | 8:15PM EDT — Monday, March 19, 2018

President Trump and former law enforcement and intelligence officials traded insults over the weekend. — Photograph: Tom Brenner/The New York Times.
President Trump and former law enforcement and intelligence officials traded insults over the weekend. — Photograph: Tom Brenner/The New York Times.

WASHINGTON — Usually, top intelligence and law enforcement officials withdraw to lives of tight-lipped relative anonymity after their careers end. (Suffice it to say, they are not exactly known for viral Twitter battles.)

But as President Trump has voiced his grievances against the F.B.I. with a series of insult-laden tweets, his targets have responded nearly in kind, turning a conflict that would in the past have stayed behind closed doors into a brawl for all to see.

Throughout the weekend, the president attacked “lying James Comey,” the F.B.I. director he fired last year.

He also celebrated the dismissal of Mr. Comey's onetime deputy, Andrew G. McCabe, calling it on Friday “a great day for Democracy.”

Mr. Comey struck back on the president's preferred digital soapbox. “Mr. President, the American people will hear my story very soon,” he wrote on Twitter on Saturday, in what was most likely a reference to his coming book. “And they can judge for themselves who is honorable and who is not.”

Mr. McCabe, through his lawyer, tweeted a similar message, though with a biting flourish. “We will not be responding to each childish, defamatory, disgusting & false tweet by the President,” said the lawyer, Michael R. Bromwich. “The whole truth will come out in due course.”

Other former officials who have been the subject of the president's taunts have also had choice words for him on Twitter. John O. Brennan, a former C.I.A. director who now refers to himself as “a nonpartisan American who is very concerned about our collective future,” attacked the president's character on Saturday.

“When the full extent of your venality, moral turpitude, and political corruption becomes known, you will take your rightful place as a disgraced demagogue in the dustbin of history,” wrote Mr. Brennan, whom Mr. Trump once called “one of the biggest liars and leakers in Washington”. “You may scapegoat Andy McCabe, but you will not destroy America … America will triumph over you.”

Throughout history, presidents have found themselves in private conflict with members of law enforcement and intelligence agencies.

Bill Clinton clashed with Louis J. Freeh, who oversaw the F.B.I. during the Lewinsky scandal. Richard M. Nixon fired the independent special prosecutor in the “Saturday Night Massacre,” and his attorney general and deputy attorney general resigned in protest.

But those tense interactions, experts say, seem almost quaint compared to the public mudslinging unfolding now.

“We've never had anybody so blatantly go after a president before,” Gary J. Schmitt, a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute who was once an intelligence adviser to President Ronald Reagan, said in an interview. “It's also unprecedented to have a president so overtly going after various intelligence officials.”

He added, “It's a race to the bottom.”

The president, who has no qualms about publicly attacking individuals as well as institutions, has grown only more frustrated as the investigation into his campaign's ties to Russia continues well beyond the timeline given to him by his lawyers. On Saturday, one of them, John Dowd, said that he thought the investigation was baseless and should end.

The president followed up with a pair of Twitter posts singling out the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, for the first time.

“Why does the Mueller team have 13 hardened Democrats, some big Crooked Hillary supporters, and Zero Republicans? Another Dem recently added…does anyone think this is fair? And yet, there is NO COLLUSION!” Mr. Trump wrote.

The White House did not respond to questions about the former officials' criticism of the president, but Mr. Trump's outrage spoke for itself. He kept lobbing tweet-size insults until Sunday morning, when he left the White House for a round of golf.

In one, he took aim at news that Mr. McCabe, who was one of the first officials at the F.B.I. to look into possible Russian ties to the Trump team, had kept contemporaneous memos about his interactions with the president. (Mr. Comey also kept memos.)

“Spent very little time with Andrew McCabe, but he never took notes when he was with me,” Mr. Trump wrote. “I don't believe he made memos except to help his own agenda, probably at a later date. Same with lying James Comey. Can we call them Fake Memos?”

Jeremy Bash, who served as chief of staff to Leon E. Panetta in his roles as C.I.A. director and defense secretary during the Obama administration, said in an interview that current and former officials were alarmed to see a president so intent on eroding the public's trust in the F.B.I. They are keenly aware, Mr. Bash said, that Mr. Trump's insults have a way of making it to TV, and vice versa.

“It seems to be a very short distance between the president's Twitter device and the megaphone of Fox News and other allies on Capitol Hill,” Mr. Bash said. “I think most professionals I speak with think he will ultimately fail, but they worry we are a few Fox News segments away from more and more people in that conspiracy theory echo chamber.”

Some experts question the decision of Mr. Comey and others to publicly hit back at the president. Mike German, a former F.B.I. agent who is now at the Brennan Center, a public policy and law institute, said the public exchanges were further proof of an eroding of trust between the head of the executive branch and its traditionally apolitical civil servants.

He said the former officials' willingness to speak out against the president could spell problems for Mr. Mueller.

“I would imagine from Bob Mueller's point of view having potential witnesses tweeting back and forth with the president is the last thing you want,” Mr. German said. “The credibility of everyone involved is being torn to tatters in broad daylight.”

Vicki Divoll, a former general counsel for the Senate Intelligence Committee and a former assistant general counsel for the C.I.A., said remarks by former officials like Mr. Comey and Mr. Brennan reflected a larger frustration that others, including Republican members of Congress, were not speaking out against transgressions that would have felled other politicians.

“Comey and Brennan are perfect examples who do not seek the limelight,” Ms. Divoll said, “who do not do anything but speak publicly and privately in very measured ways. But the gloves are off. That's not happening anymore.”


__________________________________________________________________________

• Katie Rogers is a White House correspondent for The New York Times. She started at The N.Y. Times in 2014 and has since focused on features and breaking news. She has covered Washington in the Trump era, pop culture, sexual harassment in Congress, New York Fashion Week, socialites, sexism at the Olympics and the occasional Santa. She is a native Hoosier and a graduate of Loyola University Chicago.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Trump Assails Mueller, Drawing Rebukes From Republicans

 • How Top Republicans Reacted, or Didn't, to Trump's Tweets on Mueller


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/19/us/politics/trump-tweets-comey-mccabe.html
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« Reply #115 on: March 20, 2018, 08:15:00 pm »



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« Reply #116 on: March 20, 2018, 08:16:10 pm »


from The New York Times....

Trump Considers Reshuffling Legal Team
as He Takes On Mueller More Aggressively


President Trump has discussed firing one lawyer, and another has considered quitting.
A third, who has pushed theories on television that the F.B.I. framed the president, was hired.


By MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT and MAGGIE HABERMAN | 8:57PM EDT — Monday, March 19, 2018

President Trump's shift in tone appears to be a product of his concern that the investigation into possible ties between his associates and Russia's election interference is bearing down on him more directly. — Photograph: Tom Brenner/The New York Times.
President Trump's shift in tone appears to be a product of his concern that the investigation into possible ties between his associates
and Russia's election interference is bearing down on him more directly. — Photograph: Tom Brenner/The New York Times.


WASHINGTON — President Trump's legal team was poised for a shake-up on Monday, according to two people briefed on the matter, as he openly discussed firing one of his lawyers, another considered resigning and a third — who pushed theories on television that Mr. Trump was framed by the F.B.I. — joined the roster.

Mr. Trump has weighed aloud in recent days to close associates whether to dismiss his lawyer Ty Cobb, who had pushed most strongly a strategy of cooperating fully with the special counsel investigation. The president reassured Mr. Cobb that he had no plans to fire him, according to a person who spoke with the president late Monday, in part to prevent a narrative that his team was in disarray after The New York Times began making inquiries.

Mr. Trump's lead lawyer, John Dowd, has contemplated leaving his post because he has concluded that he has no control over the behavior of the president, the two people briefed on the matter said. Ignoring his lawyers' advice, Mr. Trump has reverted to a more aggressive strategy of publicly assailing the inquiry that he initially adopted in the weeks immediately after the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, was appointed. Now the president has begun attacking Mr. Mueller himself.

The shift in tone appears to be a product of the president's concern that the investigation into possible ties between his associates and Russia's election interference is bearing down on him more directly. And the legal team's collapse comes as his lawyers are confronting one of their most critical tasks: advising the president on whether to agree to sit for an interview with the special counsel’s office.

Mr. Dowd said he had no plans to leave the team. “I'm sitting here working on the president's case right now,” he said in a telephone interview on Monday night. Mr. Cobb has told people that the president has recently implored him to stay.

In another sign of the president's more aggressive posture, on Monday he hired Joseph E. diGenova, a longtime Washington lawyer who has appeared regularly on Fox News in recent months to claim that the F.B.I. and the Justice Department had manufactured evidence against Mr. Trump to aid Hillary Clinton.

“There was a brazen plot to illegally exonerate Hillary Clinton and, if she didn't win the election, to then frame Donald Trump with a falsely created crime,” he said on Fox News in January. He added, “Make no mistake about it: A group of F.B.I. and D.O.J. people were trying to frame Donald Trump of a falsely created crime.”

Little evidence has emerged to support that theory.

Mr. Trump is also discussing adding other lawyers to the team, according to one person with knowledge of the matter.

The tumult marked the greatest instability on the team since Mr. Trump pushed aside his personal lawyer, Marc E. Kasowitz, last summer, and was passed over by many of Washington's top lawyers before he settled on his current crop of attorneys.

“It's never a good idea to see legal teams change dramatically and for competent lawyers to be replaced by others,” said Roger Cossack, a longtime legal analyst. “It shows that there is chaos and that whoever the client is — in this case the president — is unhappy and is searching for the magic bullet. And it's never a great strategy to search for the magic bullet. The president clearly wants it to end and wants to put an end to it.”

Mr. Cobb, Mr. Dowd and another lawyer, Jay Sekulow, took over last summer from Mr. Kasowitz, a feisty New Yorker who had represented Mr. Trump in high-profile lawsuits and urged an aggressive posture toward Mr. Mueller, who was appointed last May.

Mr. Trump insisted to his lawyers that he did nothing wrong and they pushed for cooperation with the special counsel, arguing it was his best way to have his name cleared. Working inside the White House, Mr. Cobb oversaw the production of thousands of pages of documents and emails that were turned over to Mr. Mueller's office and said that the president should not assert executive privilege over the records to keep from slowing the process. The lawyers told the president they hoped to get Mr. Mueller to acknowledge by the end of the year that Mr. Trump was not a target of the investigation.

Mr. Mueller's investigation is continuing.

As it goes forward, Mr. Trump has questioned his lawyers' approach and clashed with them about whether to be interviewed by Mr. Mueller. The president believes he is his best spokesman and can explain to Mr. Mueller that he did nothing wrong. The lawyers see little upside.


John Dowd, the president's lead lawyer, said he had no plans to leave the legal team. — Photograph: Brendan Mcdermid/Reuters.
John Dowd, the president's lead lawyer, said he had no plans to leave the legal team. — Photograph: Brendan Mcdermid/Reuters.

Mr. Dowd and Mr. Sekulow became concerned about their standing with the president in the past two weeks after they learned Mr. Trump had met with another veteran lawyer, Emmet Flood, who represented President Bill Clinton during impeachment proceedings, about joining the team.

Both publicly and privately, Mr. Trump tried to reassure his lawyers that they had not fallen out of favor with him. “I am VERY happy with my lawyers, John Dowd, Ty Cobb and Jay Sekulow,” Mr. Trump said on Twitter, assailing a New York Times article about his discussions with Mr. Flood. “They are doing a great job.”

Mr. Dowd, in turn, called on the Justice Department over the weekend to end the special counsel investigation. Mr. Dowd said at first that he was speaking for the president, but later backtracked. But according to two people briefed on the matter, he was in fact acting at the president's urging.

Mr. Dowd's statement set off a stream of negative coverage of Mr. Trump on cable television, to which he is closely attuned. His lawyers were criticized for being undisciplined, and Mr. Dowd's remarks prompted concern that the president was going to order that Mr. Mueller be fired. Mr. Cobb tried to douse that speculation on Sunday, saying that the president was not considering dismissing the special counsel.

The president's newest lawyer, Mr. diGenova, has worked in Washington legal circles for decades, including as a United States attorney for the District of Columbia appointed by President Ronald Reagan. He has served as an independent counsel in government waste, fraud and abuse investigations, notably a three-year criminal inquiry into whether officials in the George Bush administration broke any laws in their search for damaging information about Bill Clinton, then a presidential candidate.

Mr. diGenova is law partners with his wife, Victoria Toensing. She has also represented Sam Clovis, the former Trump campaign co-chairman, and Erik Prince, the founder of the security contractor Blackwater and an informal adviser to Mr. Trump. Mr. Prince also attended a meeting in January 2017 with a Russian investor in the Seychelles that the special counsel is investigating.

Ms. Toensing also represents Mark Corallo, the former spokesman for the Trump legal team who has accused one of the president's advisers of potentially planning to obstruct justice with a statement related to a 2016 meeting between Donald Trump Jr. and a Russian lawyer who promised damaging information about Mrs. Clinton.

Mr. diGenova was one of several former independent counsels who, in the late 1990s, argued that the role be narrowed. In 1999, Congress let the portions of the law allowing for an independent counsel expire.


__________________________________________________________________________

Michael S. Schmidt reported from Washington, and Maggie Haberman from Manchester, New Hampshire. Matt Apuzzo and Eileen Sullivan contributed reporting from Washington.

• Michael S. Schmidt is an American journalist and correspondent for The New York Times in Washington, D.C. and national security contributor for MSNBC and NBC News.

• Maggie Haberman is a White House correspondent. She joined The New York Times in February 2015 as a campaign correspondent. Previously, Ms. Haberman worked as a political reporter at Politico from 2010 to 2015 and at other publications including the New York Post and New York Daily News. She was a finalist for the Mirror Awards, with Glenn Thrush, for What is Hillary Clinton Afraid of? which was published in 2014. Her hobbies include singing, and she is married with three children.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Andrew McCabe's Firing: Here's What We Know


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/19/us/politics/trump-lawyers-mueller-russia-investigation.html
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« Reply #117 on: March 20, 2018, 09:20:36 pm »

trump does need to be more aggressive he as been under attack for nearly a year and a half by people trying to get rid of him
he needs to get on with the program and fuck them all up
thats why hes getting rid of the obama stay behinds
remember being the president gives him all the intel and he knows all those rat bastards dirty secrets
he's going to smash them
i think he should sack jeff sessions and put Joseph E. diGenova in his job

Joseph E. diGenova understands the swamp very well
he has experienced it from the inside and has the balls to kick their arses
a good move by trump

america's government is totally corrupt it has been for the last 80 years and needs a good clean out and a shake up.
obama promised change but changed nothing
next good job for trump would be to destroy the federal reserve banking system they are the international deep state bloodsuckers
who made all their money from death and destruction
they are the slave masters...
« Last Edit: March 20, 2018, 09:39:31 pm by Im2Sexy4MyPants » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #118 on: March 21, 2018, 03:18:01 am »


Donald Trump isn't even fit enough to lick the shit from Barak Obama's arsehole, 'cause he is so crooked he would corrupt the shit.
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« Reply #119 on: March 21, 2018, 06:38:58 pm »


Donald J. Trump being interviewed/questioned by Robert S. Mueller III....



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« Reply #120 on: March 26, 2018, 09:07:06 pm »


from The New York Times....

At a Crucial Juncture, Trump's Legal Defense
Is Largely a One-Man Operation


President Trump is struggling to find any top lawyers willing to represent him
as he faces a critical decision: whether to give the special counsel an interview.


By MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT and MAGGIE HABERMAN | 9:01PM EDT — Sunday, March 25, 2018

Jay Sekulow is the only personal lawyer for President Trump who is working full time on the special counsel's investigation as Mr. Trump faces a significant decision: whether to sit for an interview. — Photograph: Steve Helber/Associated Press.
Jay Sekulow is the only personal lawyer for President Trump who is working full time on the special counsel's investigation as Mr. Trump faces
a significant decision: whether to sit for an interview. — Photograph: Steve Helber/Associated Press.


AS President Trump heads into one of the most critical phases of the special counsel's investigation, his personal legal team has shrunk to essentially just one member, and he is struggling to find any top lawyers willing to represent him.

Working for a president is usually seen as a dream job. But leading white-collar lawyers in Washington and New York have repeatedly spurned overtures to take over the defense of Mr. Trump, a mercurial client who often ignores his advisers' guidance. In some cases, lawyers' firms have blocked any talks, fearing a backlash that would hurt business.

The president lost two lawyers in just the past four days, including one who had been on board for less than a week.

Joseph diGenova, a long-time Washington lawyer who has pushed theories on Fox News that the F.B.I. made up evidence against Mr. Trump, left the team on Sunday. He had been hired last Monday, three days before the head of the president's personal legal team, John Dowd, quit after determining that the president was not listening to his advice. Mr. Trump had also considered hiring Mr. diGenova's wife, Victoria Toensing, but she will also not join the team.

That leaves the president with just one personal lawyer who is working full time on the special counsel's investigation as Mr. Trump is facing one of the most significant decisions related to it: whether to sit for an interview.

That lawyer, Jay Sekulow, is a conservative commentator who made his name on religious freedom cases. Mr. Sekulow is in talks with other lawyers about joining the team, although it is not clear how far those discussions have progressed.

Hours before the announcement of Mr. diGenova's departure, which Mr. Sekulow said was related to a conflict of interest, the president took to Twitter to reject any suggestion that lawyers do not want to work for him.

“Many lawyers and top law firms want to represent me in the Russia case … don't believe the Fake News narrative that it is hard to find a lawyer who wants to take this on,” he wrote. “Fame & fortune will NEVER be turned down by a lawyer, though some are conflicted.”

Adding new lawyers, he said, would be costly because they would take months “to get up to speed (if for no other reason than they can bill more).”

“I am very happy with my existing team,” he added.

This month, the president met with the veteran lawyer Emmet Flood about the possibility of joining the legal team. But Mr. Trump was put off by the fact that Mr. Flood, a Republican, had represented Bill Clinton during his impeachment process, and Mr. Flood has made clear that he will not represent the president if Marc E. Kasowitz, his brash long-time personal lawyer, has any role in the effort.

Mr. Trump also tried to recruit Theodore B. Olson, a well-known Republican lawyer, but Mr. Olson has said he would not be representing the president.

The first phase of legal work for Mr. Trump in the inquiry by the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, was led by a White House lawyer, Ty Cobb. That work, which in part involved the production of documents and the arrangement of interviews with White House officials, has been largely completed.

The second phase, which is now focused on the question of a presidential interview with Mr. Mueller, had been led by Mr. Dowd. One reason Mr. Dowd quit was that, against his advice, Mr. Trump was insistent that he wanted to answer questions under oath from Mr. Mueller, believing that it would help clear him.

Mr. Dowd had concluded that there was no upside and that the president, who often does not tell the truth, could increase his legal exposure if his answers were not accurate.


John Dowd quit as the head of the president's personal legal team last week after determining that Mr. Trump was not listening to his advice. — Photograph: Brendan Mcdermid/Reuters.
John Dowd quit as the head of the president's personal legal team last week after determining that Mr. Trump was not listening to his advice.
 — Photograph: Brendan Mcdermid/Reuters.


Roger Cossack, a seasoned legal analyst, said the key to successfully defending a high-profile client under immense scrutiny was to have a cohesive legal team with a consistent strategy.

“In these types of cases, you need highly competent lawyers and a client who will listen and follow their advice,” Mr. Cossack said. “If you don't have both, you have what we're seeing here: chaos and disaster.”

“You have a client who clearly thinks he has a better idea of how things should work than the lawyers who, from time to time, have told him things he doesn't want to hear,” he added. “He is looking for the guy who can say, ‘I know how to handle Mueller, I know you think he is bad, and we'll take care of it’. Problem is you can't find that lawyer because no one will be able to do that.”

People close to the president say the upheaval in the legal team was inevitable. When Mr. Kasowitz took the lead after Mr. Mueller was appointed in May, he wanted to follow a model used by Mr. Clinton, with a separate team of lawyers and communications professionals handling issues related to the inquiry, so that the White House staff could keep its distance.

But Mr. Trump, who trusts few people and considers himself his best lawyer, spokesman and strategist, never wanted that type of system. As a result, his legal and public relations strategies have been out of sync, with the president at times publicly contradicting his lawyers, and the White House often finding itself flat-footed in the face of new disclosures about the Russia investigation.

The president's decision has also exposed many of his aides, leaving them deeply enmeshed in an inquiry that is likely to cost them tens of thousands of dollars in legal fees.

But while Mr. Trump has struggled to find lawyers, his family and his close associates are being represented by some of the country's top legal talent.

His son-in-law, Jared Kushner, has hired Abbe Lowell, a long-time Washington lawyer who recently got the Justice Department to drop corruption charges against Senator Robert Menendez, Democrat of New Jersey, after a lengthy court fight.

Three prominent current and former White House officials — the former chief strategist, Stephen K. Bannon; the former chief of staff, Reince Priebus; and the White House counsel, Donald F. McGahn — are being represented by William A. Burck, who turned down the chance to represent the president. Mr. Burck, a former federal prosecutor, represented FIFA in its legal problems in the United States and has worked for high-profile witnesses in federal investigations, including Maureen McDonnell, the wife of a former Virginia governor.

The turmoil in Mr. Trump's legal team started within weeks of the appointment of Mr. Mueller. Mr. Kasowitz pushed for an adversarial approach to the special counsel, which the president was poised to follow. But Mr. Kasowitz clashed with Mr. Kushner, and he was soon pushed aside after a series of mis-steps and embarrassing incidents.

The president then hired Mr. Cobb, a veteran Washington lawyer, to lead efforts within the White House, as well as Mr. Dowd, who was put in charge of his personal legal team. They advocated a strategy of cooperation, telling the president that the sooner he gave Mr. Mueller's office what it wanted, the sooner his name would be cleared.

While Mr. Cobb had told the president that the investigation would be over by now, it seems to be accelerating. Mr. Mueller is still looking into a wide range of matters related to Mr. Trump's corporate activities, his 2016 campaign, his associates and his time in office.

Mr. Trump, hoping to bolster his team, met with Mr. diGenova and Ms. Toensing in recent days but, according to two people told of details about the meeting, did not believe he had personal chemistry with them.

There were also significant conflict-of-interest issues, but Mr. Trump could have waived them if he wanted. Ms. Toensing is representing Mark Corallo, who was the spokesman for Mr. Trump's legal team in 2017 before they parted ways. Mr. Corallo has told investigators that he was concerned that a close aide to Mr. Trump, Hope Hicks, may have been planning to obstruct justice during the drafting of a statement about a meeting between a Russian lawyer and Donald Trump Jr. during the campaign.

Ms. Hicks's lawyer has strongly denied that suggestion, and White House aides said Mr. Corallo's assertion had come up in discussions with the president as he weighed whether to go ahead with Mr. diGenova and Ms. Toensing.

Mr. diGenova had been expected to serve as an outspoken voice for the president as Mr. Trump has increased his attacks on Mr. Mueller. Mr. diGenova has endorsed the notion that a secretive group of F.B.I. agents concocted the Russia investigation as a way to keep Mr. Trump from becoming president, a theory with little supporting evidence.

“There was a brazen plot to illegally exonerate Hillary Clinton and, if she didn't win the election, to then frame Donald Trump with a falsely created crime,” he had told Fox News in January.


__________________________________________________________________________

• Michael S. Schmidt is an American journalist and correspondent for The New York Times in Washington, D.C. and national security contributor for MSNBC and NBC News.

• Maggie Haberman is a White House correspondent. She joined The New York Times in February 2015 as a campaign correspondent. Previously, Ms. Haberman worked as a political reporter at Politico from 2010 to 2015 and at other publications including the New York Post and New York Daily News. She was a finalist for the Mirror Awards, with Glenn Thrush, for What is Hillary Clinton Afraid of? which was published in 2014. Her hobbies include singing, and she is married with three children.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Trump Won't Hire 2 Lawyers Whose Appointments Were Announced Days Ago


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/25/us/politics/trump-lawyers-digenova.html
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« Reply #121 on: March 27, 2018, 01:13:21 pm »


hey rabid lefty twat=ktj

obama is unfit to lick the crumbs from a dogs arsehole
his germs would make the dog sick as you well know
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« Reply #122 on: March 27, 2018, 01:51:08 pm »


Trump cannot find any new lawyers to represent him since two of his lawyers told him to “get fucked” because he wouldn't listen to them and kept shooting his mouth off, putting himself in further legal jeopardy because he is basically stupid. Other lawyers don't want to get involved with such a mentally-retarded boofhead so are refusing to work for him.

Hahaha.....that will make it easier for the women who are suing Trump and also for Robert S. Mueller III.

Metal Bracelet day is edging ever closer thanks to Trump's inherent stupidity.
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« Reply #123 on: March 27, 2018, 10:46:19 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Somebody get this man a lawyer

President Trump keeps searching for the right legal representation.
He'll need it against Mueller.


By RICHARD COHEN | 7:21PM EDT — Monday, March 26, 2018

President Donald J. Trump at the White House. — Photograph: Manuel Balce Ceneta/Associated Press.
President Donald J. Trump at the White House. — Photograph: Manuel Balce Ceneta/Associated Press.

I HAVE TWO WORDS for President Trump: David Barrett. He was appointed an independent counsel to investigate payments made by Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Henry Cisneros to a former mistress. That was in 1995. Barrett finished up only 11 years later, by which time almost no one could remember what the investigation was about or, even, who Cisneros was. A special counsel, like the shark in “Jaws”, or the Pinkerton agents in “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid”, just keeps on coming.

The president does not seem to realize that. He is consistent in always loving the face in the mirror, but on other matters, he is mercurial and chaotic. Just last week his lead lawyer, John Dowd, resigned, purportedly because Trump will not take his advice. Trump wants to sit down with special counsel Robert S. Mueller III and work his charm on the man. Dowd, being an experienced criminal lawyer, looked upon such a meeting with appropriate apprehension — the president, after all, having possibly last told the truth when he stated his name at his inauguration. After that, the record is spotty.

Dowd was just the latest of several lawyers who have bailed on Trump. His long-time lawyer, Marc Kasowitz, was early on board and early to abandon ship — though he might yet come back. He, too, favored an aggressive strategy that, to Dowd and others, was sheer foolishness. At the moment, Trump's team is led by Jay Sekulow, who has argued many times before the Supreme Court but has never tried a criminal case in his life. As is typical for a Trump aide, he has often appeared on Fox News. This, though, is not the same as courtroom experience.

Last week, Trump came up with two new names. He announced that Joseph E. diGenova, another Fox fixture, would join his legal team. DiGenova practices with his wife, Victoria Toensing, in a boutique firm, but one of their clients gave them a conflict and they had to withdraw as Trump's counsel. T'was a pity. They would have been good fun. They are both enamored of conspiracy theories, some of them having to do with the consummate evil of Hillary Clinton and the murders of Americans that she supposedly arranged or permitted — or something! — at Benghazi in Libya.

More recently, diGenova discovered a government conspiracy to do in Trump. “There was a brazen plot to illegally exonerate Hillary Clinton and, if she didn't win the election, to then frame Donald Trump with a falsely created crime,” he said on Fox News. (Where else?) And who was doing all this? The FBI, of course.

The Trump brand of chaos is extreme, acute and should worry us all. It evinces a presidency that cannot function. Here, after all, is a president who could stand in considerable legal jeopardy. Yet Trump sort of wings it. He must feel he is up against some widow who won't make way for his Atlantic City casino, or some woman who mistakes a spot of sex with Trump for a pay-day. According to USA Today, Trump has been involved in 4,095 lawsuits. Most of the time, he goes on the offensive and counter-sues. He learned contempt for the law from a master, Roy Cohn, who was eventually disbarred.

This time, though, Trump has met his match. Mueller is seen always in the same film clip, leaving a government building. He shuns the spotlight. He never smiles. He is a central-casting evocation of the old WASP establishment figure — St. Paul's School, Princeton, University of Virginia Law School and combat in Vietnam as a Marine. He thought his country was owed his service. He was a citizen. He had certain obligations. In combat, he was brave, winning a Bronze Star. Trump, in contrast, ducked the draft five times, the last for a bone spur in one foot or the other. (He has said he can't remember.)

This is a fight between the old America, upright and conscientious, and the new America of easy lies, shirking of duty and alleged extra-marital cuddles with porn actresses. It's as if the America of Norman Rockwell's illustrations ripped itself off the cover of the old Saturday Evening Post and is coming right at Trump, pitchfork in hand. Trump, a brat in bespoke suits, is in more trouble than he imagines. Now both time and money will work against him: The special counsel never runs out of either. Ask Henry Cisneros.


__________________________________________________________________________

• Richard Cohen writes a weekly political column for The Washington Post. He also contributes to the PostPartisan blog. Cohen joined The Post in 1968 as a reporter and covered night police, city hall, education, state government and national politics. As the paper's chief Maryland correspondent, he was one of two reporters who broke the story of the investigation of former Vice President Agnew. In 1976, he began writing a column that ran on the front of the Metro section. His columns have appeared on the op-ed page of The Post since 1984. He is the author, with Jules Witcover, of A Heartbeat Away: The Investigation and Resignation of Spiro T. Agnew (1974). He has received the Sigma Delta Chi and Washington-Baltimore Newspaper Guild Awards for his investigative reporting.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: Trump attorney John Dowd resigns

 • Michael Gerson: The strange, unexpected public contribution of Stormy Daniels

 • Karen Tumulty: When Trump goes low, go low

 • Jennifer Rubin: Dowd is out, so what is next for Trump's legal team?

 • Paul Waldman: Trump's lawyer just quit. Here's what it means for the Mueller investigation.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/find-this-man-a-lawyer/2018/03/26/9127a548-312a-11e8-8abc-22a366b72f2d_story.html
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« Reply #124 on: March 28, 2018, 08:56:40 am »


heard there's a HRC video of her getting it on with an underaged girl
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