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Kim Jong-un celebrates American Independence Day in style…


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Author Topic: Kim Jong-un celebrates American Independence Day in style…  (Read 259 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« on: July 04, 2017, 05:34:10 pm »


from The Washington Post....

North Korea tests another missile, spurring angry retort from Trump

The missile reportedly flew toward waters off the Korean Peninsula.

By EMILY RAUHALA | 10:49PM EDT - Monday, July 03, 2017



BEIJING — North Korea has test-fired another ballistic missile, defying international pressure and earning a swift and angry rebuke from President Trump.

The launch was made on Tuesday morning from a site in North Korea's North Phyongan province, according to U.S. Pacific Command. The missile was tracked for 37 minutes and landed in the Sea of Japan, it said.

The test comes after a string of recent tests, including a salvo of missiles last month and three tests in May alone. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has now launched more missiles in one year than his father launched during 17 years in power.

The rate and variety of tests has alarmed experts, who see the launches as part of an effort to develop an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of reaching the United States.

Trump has made tackling the issue a priority, focusing his efforts on getting China to pressure the Kim regime and cut off its nuclear weapons program.


Army soldiers walk by a TV news program showing a file image of a missile being test-launched by North Korea at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea on Tuesday, July 4th, 2017. North Korea on Tuesday launched yet another ballistic missile in the direction of Japan, South Korean officials said, part of a string of recent test-firings as the North works to build a nuclear-tipped missile that could reach the United States. The signs read “The presidential Blue House was briefed immediately after the North Korean missile was fired”. — Photograph: Ahn Young-joon/Associated Press.
Army soldiers walk by a TV news program showing a file image of a missile being test-launched by North Korea at the Seoul
Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea on Tuesday, July 4th, 2017. North Korea on Tuesday launched yet another ballistic
missile in the direction of Japan, South Korean officials said, part of a string of recent test-firings as the North works to
build a nuclear-tipped missile that could reach the United States. The signs read “The presidential Blue House was
briefed immediately after the North Korean missile was fired”. — Photograph: Ahn Young-joon/Associated Press.


As news of Tuesday's test emerged, Trump weighed in on Twitter, calling out Kim and appearing to call on China to do more to pressure him.

“North Korea has just launched another missile,” Trump wrote. “Does this guy have anything better to do with his life?”

“Hard to believe that South Korea and Japan will put up with this much longer,” he continued. “Perhaps China will put a heavy move on North Korea and end this nonsense once and for all.”

In recent weeks, there have been signs that the U.S. president is frustrated with China's progress. On June 21st, he tweeted that, while he appreciated Beijing’s efforts, “it has not worked out.”

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe appeared to share his frustration. In remarks to the the press on Tuesday, Abe vowed to work closely with the United States and South Korea, but called on China and Russia to do more.

“North Korea forcibly launched a ballistic missile again. This ignores repeated warnings by the international community. This launch clearly shows its threat has increased,” he said, according to NHK, a Japanese broadcaster.

“I'd like to strongly urge international society's co-operation on the North Korea issue and urge China's Chairman Xi Jinping and Russia's President Putin to take more constructive measures.”


• Emily Rauhala is a China Correspondent for The Washington Post. She was previously a Beijing-based correspondent for TIME, and an editor at the magazine's Hong Kong office.

__________________________________________________________________________

More on this topic:

 • US tracks North Korea missile for 37 minutes

 • VIDEO: Trump calls for more action against North Korea

 • North Korea and trade on agenda for US-South Korea talks


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/defying-international-pressure-north-korea-tests-another-missile/2017/07/03/d814d880-fb23-401e-aef1-e78068077a7f_story.html
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2017, 10:33:15 pm »


An updated story....



from The Washington Post....

North Korea claims successful intercontinental ballistic missile test,
defying international condemnation


If the missile's capabilities are confirmed, this would mark a major development.
As early details of the launch emerged, President Trump weighed in on Twitter
to acknowledge the test and call out Kim Jong Un. He also appeared to urge
China to do more to pressure North Korea's leader.


By EMILY RAUHALA | 3:29AM EDT - Tuesday, July 04, 2017

A pedestrian walks past a screen in Tokyo on July 4th, 2017 broadcasting file news footage of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un, after a ballistic missile was launched by North Korea earlier in the day. — Photograph: Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
A pedestrian walks past a screen in Tokyo on July 4th, 2017 broadcasting file news footage of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un,
after a ballistic missile was launched by North Korea earlier in the day. — Photograph: Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


BEIJING — North Korea test-fired a ballistic missile on Tuesday, defying international condemnation and earning a swift and angry rebuke from President Trump.

In a special television announcement, North Korean state media claimed the country had successfully tested an intercontinental ballistic missile, which, if confirmed, would be a major development.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in had said earlier that it may indeed be an ICBM. U.S. Pacific Command's first statement on the launch called it a land-based intermediate range missile.

Either way, the test has renewed questions about how close Kim Jong Un's regime is to developing a missile capable of hitting the United States.

It also appears to have put North Korea at the top of Trump's agenda as he heads into Group of 20 meetings in Germany this week, raising the stakes as he prepares to meet foreign leaders, including Chinese President Xi Jinping.

As news of the July 4th test emerged, Trump took to Twitter, calling out Kim and appearing to urge China to do more to pressure him. “North Korea has just launched another missile. Does this guy have anything better to do with his life?” Trump wrote.

“Hard to believe that South Korea and Japan will put up with this much longer,” he continued. “Perhaps China will put a heavy move on North Korea and end this nonsense once and for all.”

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe appeared to share Trump's frustration, if not his tone. In remarks to the press to the press on Tuesday, Abe vowed to work closely with the United States and South Korea, but called on China and Russia to do more.

“I'd like to strongly urge international society's co-operation on the North Korea issue and urge China's chairman, Xi Jinping, and Russia's President Putin to take more constructive measures.”

Beijing has yet to issue a formal response.

Experts are still looking for clues about the missile and what they might mean, both in terms of North Korea's capability and the international community's response.

U.S. and South Korean officials say the launch was made from a site in North Korea's Phyongan province. The missile flew more than 500 miles before landing in waters off the Japanese coast.

Melissa Hanham of the James Martin Center for Non-proliferation Studies in California said experts are waiting for more detailed information about the missile's trajectory, as well as pictures of the weapon, to identify and categorize it, but that early signs suggested it may be a significant development.

“This is definitely a serious missile,” she said. “We just don't know if it’s the same serious missile we've seen, or if it went further.”

The test comes after a string of recent tests, including a salvo of missiles last month and three tests in May alone. Kim has now launched more missiles in one year than his father did in 17 years in power.

The rate and variety of tests has alarmed experts, who see the launches as part of an effort to develop a nuclear-tipped weapon capable of reaching the west coast of the United States. The missiles are already capable of hitting much of East Asia.

Tuesday's test will put fresh pressure on the Trump administration to address North Korea. Since taking office, Trump has made North Korea's weapons program a priority, focusing his efforts — and tweets — on getting North Korea to back down.

At the heart of Trump's strategy is getting China, North Korea's neighbor and patron, to pressure the Kim regime. In recent weeks, there have been signs that is frustrated with the progress. On June 21st, Trump tweeted that, although he appreciated Beijing's efforts, “it has not worked out.”


• Emily Rauhala is a China Correspondent for The Washington Post. She was previously a Beijing-based correspondent for TIME, and an editor at the magazine's Hong Kong office.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/defying-international-pressure-north-korea-tests-another-missile/2017/07/03/d814d880-fb23-401e-aef1-e78068077a7f_story.html
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« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2017, 05:12:23 am »

China is only interested in itself and increasing its power in the world at any cost to others...
...it does not want the west living on its border..so having NK stay is convenient ..the west needs to keep increasing the pressure on China...the power is in their hands...there is lots of wheeling and dealing to be done on various matters regarding China.....Trump is not stupid...he is playing his cards close  to his chest.....

Unlike the Oh-bummer administration who advertised all its moves for the world to see...and wondered why they were so predictable...and always 4 moves behind Putin and China.....doh😳
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« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2017, 11:57:01 am »

China is only interested in itself and increasing its power in the world at any cost to others...


That sounds just like America from the time they began ousting Great Britain as the world's top dog.

So what if China is behaving exactly the same way as they gradually shove America out of the world's top dog spot?

And as for testing nuclear warheads and testing ballistic missiles.....the Americans gave the rest of the world the one-finger salute when they were doing just that while other people around the world protested about it, so why shouldn't North Korea or any other country follow the Americans' example?
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« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2017, 01:05:29 pm »

"So what if China is behaving exactly the same way as they gradually shove America out of the world's top dog spot?"

....because they will continue to dredge up coral reefs to make islands on which they would construct military bases and create large Chinese economic zones , they want to control the world...the same way as they control their people and limit their freedoms...unless of course you support communist dictatorship.....oops...what am I thinking...you do😳
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« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2017, 01:40:30 pm »


Ah, CONTROL THE WORLD....just like the Americans did throughout the second half of the 20th century when they overthrew legitimate regimes and installed despot dictators in their place to assist the Americans in controlling the world while they raped the world's resources and pillaged the world's oil reserves.

The Americans (and the British before them) set the example of how a rising superpower should behave, and China are merely carrying on the American (and British) example.

Open your eyes, you silly, silly boy. Pull your tongue out of Donald Trump's arsehole. The TRUTH is there for all to see.
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« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2017, 01:43:10 pm »


from The Washington Post....

North Korea missile launch marks a direct challenge to Trump administration

President Trump's tough talk has yet to yield any change in Pyongyang's behaviour as the regime
continues efforts to build a nuclear weapon capable of striking the mainland United States — the
latest missile flew high and long enough to reach all of Alaska, experts say. Experts also say
the administration does not have many choices for what to do next.


By ANNE GEARAN and EMILY RAUHALA | 4:11PM EDT - Tuesday, July 04, 2017

A South Korean soldier views a television news broadcast about the test launch of a Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile by North Korea early on July 14th. — Photograph: Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
A South Korean soldier views a television news broadcast about the test launch of a Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile
by North Korea early on July 14th. — Photograph: Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


NORTH KOREA's test launch on Tuesday of what appeared to be an intercontinental ballistic missile marks a direct challenge to President Trump, whose tough talk has yet to yield any change in Pyongyang's behavior as the regime continues its efforts to build a nuclear weapon capable of striking the mainland United States.

The latest missile flew higher and remained in the air longer than previous attempts — enough to reach all of Alaska, experts said, in a major milestone for North Korea's weapons program.

The test comes just before Trump will see key Asian leaders and Russian President Vladimir Putin later this week. North Korea was already expected to be a main subject for meetings on the sidelines of the Group of 20 economic summit, but the test adds urgency to a widening U.S. campaign aimed at further isolating North Korea.

Trump responded to the missile test by applying rhetorical pressure on China, North Korea's ally and economic lifeline, and by mocking North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un on Twitter.

“North Korea has just launched another missile. Does this guy have anything better to do with his life?” Trump asked in a message very shortly after the launch, which took place late on Monday evening in the United States.

“Hard to believe that South Korea and Japan will put up with this much longer,” Trump continued. “Perhaps China will put a heavy move on North Korea and end this nonsense once and for all!”

The launch follows a string of recent actions by Pyongyang, including a salvo of missiles last month and three tests in May. Kim has now launched more missiles in one year than his father and predecessor in the family dynasty did in 17 years in power.

North Korea has also conducted five nuclear weapons tests since 2006, including two last year.

The number and variety of tests worry experts who see each step as part of a march toward a missile capable of striking America's West Coast.

The missile tests violate existing United Nations and other sanctions, which North Korea has found ways to evade. Although Trump and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson have declared that the “era of strategic patience” with North Korea is over, the new U.S. administration has not spelled out what that means.

Tillerson has said Washington might eventually negotiate with North Korea under the right circumstances, but he has suggested that possibility is remote. The United States will act alone if it must, he has warned, though he has not spelled out what exactly that would entail.

The Trump administration has recently leaned on China to rein in North Korea and curb illicit trade with the country, an international pariah largely cut off from the global financial system.

Given that Japan and South Korea are within range of existing North Korean missiles, Trump has also sought to unite leaders of both nations behind a strongly worded U.S. position that it will no longer tolerate the North's provocations. The Trump administration has asked other nations around the globe to sever or downgrade diplomatic ties with Pyongyang.

Leaders of China, South Korea and Japan will be at the G-20 meeting in Germany.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe appeared to share Trump's frustration, if not his tone. In remarks to the news media, he vowed to work closely with the United States and South Korea, but called on China and Russia to do more.

“I'd like to strongly urge international society’s cooperation on the North Korea issue and urge China's chairman, Xi Jinping, and Russia's President Putin to take more constructive measures,” Abe said.

In a daily news conference, Geng Shuang, a spokesman for China's Foreign Ministry, condemned the test but countered that Beijing had “spared no effort” in its fight.

On Tuesday, Russia and China jointly proposed that North Korea put further nuclear and missile tests on hold while the United States and ally South Korea refrain from large-scale military exercises. Both nations oppose North Korea's nuclear weapons program. Both also oppose the U.S. anti-missile system being installed in South Korea.

Experts said the Trump administration does not have many choices for what to do next.

“Unfortunately, the Trump administration has few options other than robust economic pressure on China and North Korea,” said Anthony Ruggiero, a specialist on the long-running diplomatic and military standoff at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies. “The U.S. wasted the last 10 years with a combination of negotiations that were destined to fail and strategic patience that failed from the start.”

A new sanctions regime led by the United States would be the best response, Ruggiero said, because China and Russia would veto the most effective form of sanctions at the U.N. Security Council.

Last week, the Trump administration announced sanctions targeting a China-based bank accused of laundering money for the North Korean government and moved forward with an arms sale to Taiwan that Beijing opposes.

Trump followed up with a call on Sunday to China's Xi, in which Trump “raised the growing threat posed by North Korea's nuclear and ballistic missile programs,” according to the White House.

“Both leaders reaffirmed their commitment to a de-nuclearized Korean Peninsula,” a White House statement said, while “President Trump reiterated his determination to seek more balanced trade relations with America's trading partners.”

The trade reference was an implicit threat to reassert U.S. complaints about Chinese economic practices that Trump has largely set aside in recent months as he has sought to engage Xi, with whom he claims a strong relationship.

China has pledged co-operation with the United States over North Korea but has not fundamentally shifted away from a strategy that balances pressure on the Kim regime with keeping the regime afloat, said Chris Steinitz, a research scientist at the federally funded, nonprofit Center for Naval Analyses.

“It's kind of how China looks at everything. They have a very long view,” Steinitz said. “They will wait, they will bide their time. They have a lot of priorities.”

In the meantime, Steinitz said, North Korea will continue to test missiles.

The U.S. military said the Hwasong-14 was in the air for 37 minutes, a duration that signals a significant improvement over previous tests. In a special announcement on state television, North Korea said the missile flew about 579 miles, reaching an altitude of 1,741 miles.

The launch was made from a site in North Korea’s North Pyongan province, and the missile flew more than 500 miles before landing in waters off Japan’s coast, U.S., South Korean and Japanese officials said.

As with other recent launches, the missile appears to have been fired at a very steep trajectory in an effort to avoid flying over neighbors.

Multiple independent analyses of the test showed that the missile flew at a high-altitude trajectory, soaring to about 1,700 miles before landing in the Pacific off the Japanese coast, about 580 miles from its launch point.


Emily Rauhala reported from Beijing. Joby Warrick contributed to this article from Washington; Shirley Feng and Yang Liu contributed from Beijing.

• Anne Gearan is a national politics correspondent for The Washington Post.

• Emily Rauhala is a China Correspondent for The Washington Post. She was previously a Beijing-based correspondent for TIME, and an editor at the magazine's Hong Kong office.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related media about this topic:

 • VIDEO: North Korea fires ballistic missile ahead of G-20 summit

 • VIDEO: Russia and China join forces over North Korea


https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/north-korea-claims-successful-intercontinental-ballistic-missile-test-defying-international-condemnation/2017/07/04/4f804488-609c-11e7-8adc-fea80e32bf47_story.html
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« Reply #7 on: July 05, 2017, 02:43:20 pm »


The Orange Goblin (Donald J. Trump) is clearly waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay out of his depth when it comes to dealing with the likes of Kim Jong-in.

President DUMB probably thinks being Prez of the USA is like playing “you're fired” on reality television.

He is a total idiot and Kim Jong-un is playing him for the clown & buffoon he is.

As is Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping.

Good job that everything is turning to shit around him.....he's an idiot who deserves it.... 
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« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2017, 02:51:13 pm »

Ok shit for brains....and your solution for North Korea would be....oh that's right you don't have solutions...only obstacles....typical from the demented leftists🤡
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« Reply #9 on: July 05, 2017, 03:09:25 pm »


North Korea isn't doing anything with regards to nuclear tests and missile tests that America hasn't already done, in spite of the world showing its displeasure at what America was doing.

So.....America provided the example for other countries to follow.

DUMBARSE.....
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« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2017, 03:11:57 pm »

Do I take that to mean that you think North Korea should be left to develop any nuclear arms it wants...with no sanctioning at all😳😳😳😳
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« Reply #11 on: July 05, 2017, 03:12:30 pm »


Haw haw haw.....Trump is huffing & puffing and threatening to make a total dork of himself!

The moment the first American missile enters North Korean airspace, tens of thousands of artillery guns will open up on Seoul and American bases in South Korea.

President DUMB is no doubt too stupid to comprehend that fact (as is that clown Reality/Donald in ENZED). Just as well there are saner people in the Pentagon, eh?




from The Washington Post....

U.S. Army and South Korean military respond to North Korea's
launch with missile exercise


The countries launched weapons into South Korean territorial waters along the country's
eastern coastline, a move directly in response to “North Korea's destabilizing
and unlawful actions”, U.S. Pacific Command said in a statement.


By DAN LAMOTHE | 7:45PM EDT - Tuesday, July 04, 2017

TV screens at a Yongsan Electronics shop in Seoul on Tuesday show a North Korean newscaster reading a public announcement about the North's missile launch. — Photograph: Lim Tae-hoon/Newsis/Associated Press.
TV screens at a Yongsan Electronics shop in Seoul on Tuesday show a North Korean newscaster reading a public announcement
about the North's missile launch. — Photograph: Lim Tae-hoon/Newsis/Associated Press.


THE U.S. Army and South Korean military responded to North Korea's latest launch with their own exercise of missiles, launching them on Wednesday into South Korean territorial waters along the country's eastern coastline, U.S. Pacific Command said in a statement. The launches were directly in response to “North Korea's destabilizing and unlawful actions,” Pacific Command said.

The Army used its Army Tactical Missile System and South Korea used its Hyunmoo Missile II, which can be deployed rapidly and provide “deep strike precision capability,” Pacific Command said.

The South Korean-U.S. military alliance “remains committed to peace and prosperity on the Korean Peninsula and throughout the Asia-Pacific,” Pacific Command said. “The U.S. commitment to the defense of the [Republic of Korea] in the face of threats is ironclad.”

On Tuesday, North Korea launched a missile that flew higher and remained in the air longer than previous attempts, enough to reach all of Alaska, experts said, in a milestone for North Korea's weapons program. The response from the U.S. and South Korean military alliance, which came during Tuesday evening Washington time, amounted to a show of force, though it is unclear how the North Korean government would perceive it.

The Army describes the missiles it used as long-range, all-weather guided missiles. They are designed to be precise in nature and can be used beyond the range of artillery and rockets.

The U.S. missile system can be used to take out ground combat units, surface-to-surface missile units, air-defense units, helicopter rearming and refueling systems and communications sites, according to an Army fact sheet.

Some of the missiles in the system are designed to deliver a single, 500-pound warhead on a target through the use of satellite guidance, while others distribute hundreds of smaller bomblets over a larger distance, according to the Army.

Dana White, a Pentagon spokeswoman, confirmed in a statement on Tuesday night that the missile North Korea used was an intercontinental ballistic missile and described it as a “escalatory launch”.

“The launch continues to demonstrate that North Korea poses a threat to the United States and our allies,” White said. “Together with the Republic of Korea, we conducted a combined exercise to show our precision fire capability.”

White said that the United States remains prepared to defend itself and allies and to use “the full range of capabilities at our disposal against the growing threat from North Korea.” The United States seeks only the peaceful denuclearization of the Korea Peninsula, and its commitment to its allies is ironclad, she added.


• Dan Lamothe covers national security for The Washington Post and anchors its military blog, Checkpoint.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/checkpoint/wp/2017/07/04/u-s-army-and-south-korean-military-respond-to-north-koreas-launch-with-missile-exercise
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« Reply #12 on: July 05, 2017, 03:29:29 pm »

But you did not answer the question...would you care to answer the question....can't wait to see what you would you....having a superior in to Donald Trump of course😜

Come on.....show us your solution....

...but really...I don't think you will😏
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« Reply #13 on: July 05, 2017, 03:53:24 pm »


Well....America has been having its way sitting on all the nuclear weapons it wanted for decades.

Are you saying that bullies should be allowed to say “do as I say, not as I do”?

Anyway, North Korea will be looking at things from the point of view that if they can hit the continental USA with nuclear weapons, then that will deter the USA from attacking them.

It's called nuclear deterrence....America has been practising that doctrine for decades, so as you think everything about America is 100% kosher, then it must be an okay doctrine, eh?
 
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« Reply #14 on: July 05, 2017, 03:53:48 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Experts: North Korea's missile was a ‘real ICBM’ — and a grave milestone

North Korea’s defiant test shows that U.S. cities could soon be within reach.

By JOBY WARRICK | 7:48PM EDT - Tuesday, July 04, 2017



THE North Korean missile that soared high above the Sea of Japan on Tuesday was hailed by state-run television as a “shining success”. But to U.S. officials, it was a most unwelcome surprise: a weapon with intercontinental range, delivered years before most Western experts believed such a feat possible.

Hours after the apparently successful test, intelligence agencies continued to run calculations to determine precisely how the missile, dubbed the Hwasong-14, performed in its maiden flight. But the consensus among missile experts was that North Korea had achieved a long-sought milestone, demonstrating a capability of striking targets thousands of miles from its coast.

Initial Pentagon assessments said North Korea had tested a “land-based, intermediate-range” missile that landed in the Sea of Japan just under 600 linear miles from its launch point, Panghyon Airfield, near the Chinese border. The State Department and the Pentagon later confirmed North Korea had launched an intercontinental ballistic missile, or ICBM. Government and independent analyses showed the missile traveling in a steep arc that topped out at more than 1,740 vertical miles above the Earth's surface.

If flown in a more typical trajectory, the missile would have easily traveled 4,000 miles, potentially putting all of Alaska within its range, according to former government officials and independent analysts. A missile that exceeds a range of 3,400 miles is classified as an ICBM.

“This is a big deal: It's an ICBM, not a ‘kind of’ ICBM,” said Jeffrey Lewis, director of the East Asia program at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies. “And there's no reason to think that this is going to be the maximum range.”

David Wright, senior scientist for the Union of Concerned Scientists, calculated in a published analysis that the Hwasong-14's demonstrated capability exceeded 4,100 linear miles, based on estimates released during Tuesday.

“That range would not be enough to reach the Lower 48 states or the large islands of Hawaii, but would allow it to reach all of Alaska,” Wright said.

North Korea's apparent accomplishment puts it well ahead of schedule in its years-long quest to develop a true ICBM. The Hwasong-14 tested early on Tuesday could not have reached the U.S. mainland, analysts say, and there's no evidence to date that North Korea is capable of building a miniaturized nuclear warhead to fit on one of its longer-range missiles. But there is now little reason to doubt that both are within North Korea’s grasp, weapons experts say.

“In the past five years, we have seen significant, and much more rapid than expected, development of their ballistic-missiles capability,” said Victor Cha, a former director of Asian affairs for the George W. Bush administration's National Security Council. “Their capabilities have exceeded our expectations on a consistent basis.”

While U.S. intelligence officials have sought, with some success, to disrupt North Korea's progress, Pyongyang has achieved breakthroughs in multiple areas, such as the development of solid-fuel rocket engines and mobile-launch capabilities, including rockets that can be fired from submarines. Early analysis suggests that the Hwasong-14 uses a new kind of indigenously built ballistic-missile engine, one that North Korea unveiled with fanfare on March 18th. Nearly all the country’s previous ballistic missiles used engines based on modifications of older, Soviet-era technology.

“It's not a copy of a crappy Soviet engine, and it's not a pair of Soviet engines kludged together — it's the real thing,” Lewis said. “When they first unveiled the engine on March 18th, they said that the ‘world would soon see what this means’. I think we're now seeing them take that basic engine design and execute it for an ICBM.”

In announcing the test in a special TV broadcast on Tuesday, North Korean officials proclaimed that the country had achieved an ICBM capability that would safeguard the communist government from attacks by the United States and other adversaries. According to U.S. analysts, leader Kim Jong Un has long calculated that nuclear-armed ICBMs are the best deterrence against threats to his survival, as any perceived aggression against him could trigger a retaliatory strike targeting U.S. cities.

“As the dignified nuclear power who possesses the strongest intercontinental ballistic rocket which is capable of hitting any part of the world along with the nuclear weapons, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea will fundamentally terminate the U.S. nuclear war threats and blackmail and credibly protect the peace and stability of the Korean Peninsula and the region,” a government spokeswoman said in a bulletin read on state-run television.

The spokeswoman said that the missile's trajectory was deliberately set “at the highest angle” to avoid harming nearby countries.

That claim rang true to U.S. analysts, who agreed the high arc was probably intended to avoid the possibility of hitting Japanese territory. Moreover, the rocket's flight path would help North Korea secure another objective: secrecy. By sending the spent engine splashing into the deep waters of the Sea of Japan, Pyongyang ensured it would be hard, if not impossible, for U.S. and Japanese divers to retrieve the parts.


• Joby Warrick joined The Washington Post's national staff in 1996. He has covered national security, the environment and the Middle East and currently writes about terrorism. He is the author of two books, including 2015's Black Flags: The Rise of ISIS, which was awarded a 2016 Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction.

__________________________________________________________________________

More on this topic:

 • North Korea showed off a lot of missiles. What might be its targets?

 • North Korean missiles getting an important boost — from China


https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/experts-north-koreas-missile-was-a-real-icbm--and-a-grave-milestone/2017/07/04/554bb81e-60da-11e7-8adc-fea80e32bf47_story.html
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« Reply #15 on: July 05, 2017, 04:11:03 pm »

Can you just give a straight forward answer to a straight forward question...

if you were the leader of the free world (heaven forbid)..how would you approach the problem of North Korea getting long range (even to reach ZNZ) nuclear missiles?
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« Reply #16 on: July 05, 2017, 05:28:42 pm »


What free world?

The USA??

Don't make me laugh.....Fascist States of America is more like it.

Have you checked out their homeland security laws?

The NAZIs would have been proud of America today.
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« Reply #17 on: July 05, 2017, 05:48:06 pm »

Yup..so again ...no answer....plenty of ridicule...but no answer or solutions....
There has to be a name for people like you....oh that's right...there is..🤡

When you finally decide on a solution for North Korea...instead of slagging off al other proponents of solutions..please feel free to share😜
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« Reply #18 on: July 05, 2017, 06:12:40 pm »


How many countries has North Korea invaded?

Don't know? I'll tell you....ONE! South Korea.

How many countries has the USA invaded?

I won't list them, but there are a shitload.

Kinda says it all about who is the worst warmonger, eh?
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« Reply #19 on: July 05, 2017, 06:22:14 pm »

Yup..so again ...no answer....plenty of ridicule...but no answer or solutions....
There has to be a name for people like you....oh that's right...there is..🤡

When you finally decide oN a solution feel free to share

You can avoid the question for as long as you like but it won't go away..
You bring up all the usual lefty propaganda...but the question won't go away..
You can run..but you can't hide..
Just be honest and say what your solution would be if you were in a position to have influence..
Go on..I dare ya😜
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #20 on: July 05, 2017, 07:33:30 pm »


Based on past performance (after all, actions ALWAYS speak louder than words), which of the following two countries is most likely to use nuclear weapons to incinerate tens of thousands of human beings in the blink of an eye; and which of the following two countries is most likely to indulge in warmongering in the form of invading another country?

1. The United States of America.

2. The People's Republic of Korea.
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Donald
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« Reply #21 on: July 05, 2017, 07:41:23 pm »

 Well what a surprise...you avoided the question😳
Yup..so again ...no answer....plenty of ridicule...but no answer or solutions....
There has to be a name for people like you....oh that's right...there is..🤡

When you finally decide oN a solution feel free to share

You can avoid the question for as long as you like but it won't go away..
You bring up all the usual lefty propaganda...but the question won't go away..
You can run..but you can't hide..
Just be honest and say what your solution would be if you were in a position to have influence..
Go on..I dare ya😜
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Donald
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« Reply #22 on: July 05, 2017, 07:43:22 pm »

Please see below for the complete answer from ktj on the North Korea issue









That was it in its entirety😳
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« Reply #23 on: July 05, 2017, 07:54:59 pm »


Why are you so obsessed with North Korea obtaining the means to defend themselves against American aggression?

After all, the North Korean leader has seen for himself what happens to dictators who fall foul of the USA and who don't have the means to hit back with nuclear-armed intercontinental ballistic missiles.

Remember Saddam? What about Gaddaffi?

After all, it's not as though the North Koreans are arming themselves with some new, fantastic weapons system which is more advanced than anything anywhere else in the world. They are merely arming themselves with weapons systems which America already has, which means that the Americans cannot legitimately criticise any other country for developing and arming themselves with weapons the Americans possess without opening themselves up to the taunt of HYPOCRITE!!
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« Reply #24 on: July 05, 2017, 07:59:57 pm »


from the Los Angeles Times....

U.S. says North Korea's ICBM launch is ‘a new escalation
of the threat to the United States’ and the world


The test still may be the North's most successful yet; a weapon analyst
says the missile could be powerful enough to reach Alaska.


By MATT STILES and JONATHAN KAIMAN | 8:05PM PDT - Tuesday, July 04, 2017

A photo distributed by the North Korean government shows what is said to be the launch of a Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile in North Korea on July 4th. — Photograph: Korean Central News Agency.
A photo distributed by the North Korean government shows what is said to be the launch of a Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile
in North Korea on July 4th. — Photograph: Korean Central News Agency.


SIX MONTHS AGO, North Korea's dynastic leader, Kim Jong Un, announced in clear terms his nation's resolve to develop a ballistic missile capable of reaching the continental United States.

Such an accomplishment would surely shift the power dynamic in Northeast Asia — and help cement the government's long-sought status as a nuclear state.

It appears Kim has gotten his wish.

North Korea announced on Tuesday that it had, at long last, test-launched an intercontinental ballistic missile — a “glistening miracle”, as state news described it.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson condemned what he acknowledged was an ICBM test, saying the launch represents "a new escalation of the threat to the United States, our allies and partners, the region and the world.”

The news means an already intractable problem posed by Pyongyang’s advancing nuclear and missile programs just became more difficult for the United States and its regional allies.

“It's really, really significant from a technological and political standpoint,” said Melissa Hanham, a senior research associate at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies in California who studies North Korea's missile program.

A report in North Korean state media on Wednesday said a smiling Kim, speaking to his scientists, referred to the “package of gifts” they had delivered on the U.S. Independence Day, and urged them to “frequently send big and small ‘gift packages’ to the Yankees,” according to the Associated Press.

The report said Kim “stressed that the protracted showdown with the U.S. imperialists has reached its final phase and it is the time for [North Korea] to demonstrate its mettle to the U.S., which is testing its will in defiance of its warning.”

American and South Korean officials, while confirming the launch and expressing concern, said in their initial assessments that the missile appeared to be somewhat less capable than North Korea announced.

Tillerson called upon all nations to publicly stand together against North Korea's pursuit of nuclear weapons — as diplomats from the United States, Japan and South Korea requested an emergency U.N. Security Council meeting to discuss the launch.

“Global action is required to stop a global threat,” Tillerson said in a statement. “Any country that hosts North Korean guest workers, provides any economic or military benefits, or fails to fully implement U.N. Security Council resolutions is aiding and abetting a dangerous regime.”

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley and her counterparts from Japan and South Korea called for a Security Council meeting on Wednesday.

“As we, along with others, have made clear: We will never accept a nuclear-armed North Korea,” Tillerson said.

The U.S. Army and South Korea military conducted a combined missile exercise Tuesday as a show of force in response to North Korea's test.

Multiple Hyunmoo-2 missiles, capable of striking any target in North Korea, were blasted from launchers along South Korea's eastern coastline into the South’s territorial waters. The exercise took place within 10 miles of the demilitarized zone separating North and South.

“The deep strike precision capability enables the [South Korean]-U.S. alliance to engage the full array of time critical targets under all weather conditions,” the U.S. Army said in a statement.

The initial questions about North Korea's claim appeared to be about the performance and range of the missile — not the fact that Pyongyang had significantly improved its capability. By any measure, the missile appeared to be the longest-range military device North Korea has tested.

The apparently successful test wasn't a surprise for security analysts and military officials like Hanham, who were watching in the fall when North Korea suffered two mysterious and explosive missile failures at the same launch facility.

North Korea has also recently released images from rocket engine tests and displayed what appeared to be several intercontinental ballistic missiles at a massive military parade in Pyongyang this spring. The government has accelerated the pace of its missile testing program in recent years under Kim, a grandson of Kim Il Sung, the nation's late communist patriarch.

But the new capability — a clear violation of Security Council resolutions — seems to have crossed a psychological threshold. It already has led to widespread alarm that other, shorter-range ballistic missile tests this year haven't provoked.

“Politically, it's a game changer,” said Go Myong-hyun, a research fellow at the Asan Institute for Policy Studies in Seoul.

Tuesday's test, conducted about 9:40 a.m. from Banghyon airfield near the northwestern town of Kusong, was North Korea's 12th and most significant launch this year.

North Korean media released images of a smiling Kim, who reportedly watched the test nearby on a panel of computer monitors. Other images showed the leader surrounded by celebrating military commanders.

The device, which North Korea called the Hwasong-14, flew on a trajectory more than 1,700 miles into the atmosphere — farther than the International Space Station — for about 40 minutes. It landed more than 500 miles east, in the Sea of Japan, which Koreans call the East Sea.

In theory, the missile's range could have allowed it to reach Alaska on a flatter trajectory, though such a flight path would have introduced other technical complexities and physical hurdles for the North's scientists.

Still, it's a significant accomplishment for the government. “When I heard it was a 40-minute flight,” Hanham said, “my stomach just dropped.”

Newly elected South Korean President Moon Jae-in, who recently discussed North Korea at a summit with President Trump in Washington, convened an emergency security meeting. He also called on the international community to “take action.”

But for South Korea and the United States, which has 28,000 troops on the Korean peninsula, a list of bad options for slowing or stopping North Korea now appears even more limited.

Pyongyang's nuclear and missile programs have perplexed the last three American presidents. They have tried negotiation, economic aid, international sanctions, diplomatic pressure and even covert action.

The strategies have failed. Experts now believe North Korea is an established nuclear state with more than a dozen devices. A key question had been whether the government could deliver its weapons globally.

Experts believe North Korea needs more time to miniaturize its warheads so that they can be launched on missiles. And scientists there still would need to figure out how to get the warheads to safely and accurately re-enter the atmosphere en route to a target.

Still, the aim of long-range delivery now appears within sight despite Trump's pre-inauguration tweet in January vowing, “It won't happen!”

The Trump administration has announced a new policy of imposing “maximum pressure” on North Korea, calling for sanctions but also dialogue if the regime ends its program. The administration has left open the possibility of a military strike, but that could prove catastrophic.

North Korea, for example, could retaliate with its masses of conventional weapons, such as artillery, along the border that is about 40 miles from Seoul, a metropolitan area of more than 20 million residents.

Some believe the United States and other countries that have concerns about North Korea's nuclear and missile programs should negotiate a freeze on testing and perhaps a return of international inspectors to North Korean laboratories.

With all the focus on missiles lately, it's easy to forget that the North could perform its sixth underground nuclear detonation test any day — another provocation that would further increase the sense of crisis in the region, said John Delury, a North Korea expert at Yonsei University in Seoul.

“There are some diplomatic options — they're not great — but they're probably what we should do,” he said.

Trump had hoped that China — North Korea's only significant trading partner — would help solve the problem. But in recent weeks his administration has grown frustrated with what it claims is a lack of pressure by Beijing on Pyongyang, concerns Trump reportedly expressed in a phone call with Chinese President Xi Jinping this week.

“Perhaps China will put a heavy move on North Korea and end this nonsense once and for all!” Trump tweeted after the launch.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang insisted China has already made “relentless efforts” to stem North Korea's nuclear ambitions. And he repeated China's usual refrain, calling for a stop to actions that violate United Nations resolutions but emphasizing a need for calm and restraint.

Some question whether there's much more that can be done by China, which also fears that a leadership change in Pyongyang could lead to a North Korean refugee crisis or even a unified Korea that counts the United States as an ally.

“Even if you cancel most of the trade between China and North Korea, I think Kim Jong Un would still be determined to do these nuclear activities,” said Shi Yinhong, an international relations professor at People's University in Beijing. “I think the problem from China's perspective is quite serious. And the issue is that China still can’t find a way out of this predicament.”

China announced in February that it would ban North Korean coal imports for the rest of 2017, in line with United Nations sanctions. Yet visitors to the China-North Korea border have witnessed coal trucks crossing, casting doubt on the ban's efficacy, and China's trade with North Korea grew nearly 40% in the first quarter of the year, according to Chinese official figures.

North Korea announced Tuesday's launch on state television, using a familiar news anchor seen in other major announcements, a middle-aged woman in a pink hanbok, the traditional Korean dress.

“The success of the last stage of becoming a nuclear power state is developing an intercontinental ballistic missile,” she read in a booming cadence familiar to North Korea watchers.

Her report added that the test shows the “unwithering power of our state, our strong independence and defense in the world, and will be marked as a significant mark in our history.”

The announcement came after a nearly 30-minute montage featuring soaring socialist songs and patriotic imagery, including panoramas of the Pyongyang skyline and Mount Paektu, a volcano included in the country's national emblem.

The montage also briefly included a soaring missile, which perhaps has now given North Korea an advantage it might retain for some time.

“At this point, it's no longer about de-nuclearizing the Korean peninsula,” Hanham said. “Now it's just about containing North Korea as best we can.”


Matt Stiles reported from Seoul and Jonathan Kaiman reported from Beijing.

• Matt Stiles is a freelance journalist based in Seoul who writes for the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, NPR, the Chicago Tribune, The Sydney Morning Herald and the Houston chronicle, as well as several other newspapers.

• Jonathan Kaiman is the Los Angeles Times' Beijing bureau chief. He was previously a correspondent for The Guardian, a freelance writer and a Fulbright scholar researching folklore in China's rural southwest. He graduated from Vassar College.

__________________________________________________________________________

Read more on this topic:

 • Trump suggests China should step in after North Korean missile test

 • As the world focuses on its nuclear ambitions, North Korea deploys another weapon: Drones


http://www.latimes.com/world/la-fg-north-korea-intercontinental-ballistic-missile-20170704-story.html
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