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Donald Trump — the serial sex offender who got away with it…


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Author Topic: Donald Trump — the serial sex offender who got away with it…  (Read 187 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« on: October 08, 2016, 12:34:24 pm »


SEX PEST
(click on the picture to read the news story)
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2016, 12:39:53 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Trump recorded having extremely lewd conversation about women in 2005


In other words, Donald Trump is at about the same level on the sexual predator pecking level as a kid-fucker.

No wonder he suddenly dropped the idea of bring up Bill Clinton's marriage infidelities at the next presidential candidates debate with Hillary Clinton. Stupid as he is, Donald Trump has woken up to the fact that if he opens that particular can of worms, Hillary has a truckload of sexual dirt to throw right back at him.

Funny how all the fundy-mental religionists think the sun shines out of Trump's arse. Obviously those religious nutters also think sexual predation is also okay.
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« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2016, 04:10:54 pm »

how disturbing that trump likes to fuck slutty looking women  Grin


Flight logs show Bill Clinton flew on sex offender's jet much more than previously known

, and Clinton flew together at least 26 times on the disgraced financier's "Lolita Express." (John Coates, airport-data.com)

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/05/13/flight-logs-show-bill-clinton-flew-on-sex-offenders-jet-much-more-than-previously-known.html



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« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2016, 11:37:11 pm »


You're obviously as much a sexual sicko as Donald Trump.

No wonder you support him.
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« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2016, 01:32:30 am »

you never looked at a women and said you want to fuck her and you dont know anything about pussy and your not sexist
yeah right

maybe it's time for you to move out of you're moms basement
the place where Hillary said Bernie supporters live and growup

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« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2016, 02:28:09 pm »


from The Washington Post....

A toxic whirlpool for the GOP: Scripted Trump versus out-of-control Trump

By DAN BALZ | 4:38PM EDT - Saturday October 08, 2016

Workers prepare the stage for the second presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton at Washington University in St. Louis. — Photograph: Patrick Semansky/Associated Press.
Workers prepare the stage for the second presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton at Washington University
in St. Louis. — Photograph: Patrick Semansky/Associated Press.


ST. LOUIS — For the past year, Donald Trump has dragged down to his level almost everything and everyone with whom he has come into contact, whether friend or foe. Today, in the wake of the crude video that broke on Friday, the entire Republican Party is feeling the effects of the Trump riptide as never before.

For many months, two Donald Trumps have been presented to the voters. The first is the Trump who is a creation of those around him, of his handlers and of some Republican Party leaders. This is a Trump who is idealized by those loyalists. He is packaged, controlled, scripted, careful. He delivers pre-written policy proposals via teleprompter and is almost plausible as a victorious candidate.

Then there is the other Trump, the one who breaks the chains with regularity, to the dismay of those who must hastily try to clean up the mess. This is the Trump who is instinctual, reckless, unpredictable, defiant, uncontrollable, vulgar and insulting. This is a Trump who is not a politically plausible winning candidate, no matter how loyal and devoted his base of support is.

Those two Trumps were on full display Friday, though with a twist. This time even the controlled Trump, the Trump who addressed the nation in a taped video that was released shortly after midnight on Friday night, appeared to be on the edge of busting loose.

When The Washington Post's David Fahrenthold posted his story on Friday afternoon with the 11-year-old video of Trump using gross and degrading language about women, everyone knew his campaign was entering a potential death spiral. Many Republicans believe that even a decent performance in Sunday's debate cannot turn around his fortunes.

Before the release of the “Access Hollywood” video, Trump was already reeling from two weeks of trouble — a bad performance in the first debate with Hillary Clinton, a fight with a former Miss Universe that included body shaming by the GOP nominee, a tweet storm that intensified those attacks, a story in The New York Times suggesting he might not have paid taxes for years and then a rambling, off-script rally in Pennsylvania.

After his running mate, Mike Pence, turned in a strong performance in the vice-presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, on Tuesday, attention turned again to Trump's apparent lack of preparation for his first debate and whether he would buckle down ahead of Sunday's town-hall-style forum at Washington University in St. Louis.

His campaign even scheduled him for a town hall event in New Hampshire in an obvious effort to make give him some experience with the give-and-take between candidate and voters that will be on display here on Sunday.

Was this part of debate prep? Trump mocked those who thought so, telling his New Hampshire audience that the event was in no way connected to getting ready for his second encounter with Clinton. That was more of the unscripted, rebellious Trump who remains convinced he knows best about how to win the highest office in the land.

He issued two statements on Friday in response to the video. The first was terse and unapologetic, despite its use of the word “apologize”. This was Trump as Trump, a statement that had the flavor of coming directly from the candidate. He called it “locker room banter” and seemed oblivious to the harm he had done himself by the video's release.

The next statement came many hours later in the late-night video. This was the packaged Trump, a lengthier statement with a more significant apology. “I said it, I was wrong and I apologize,” he said.

But he wasn't finished. He said his words did not compare to the way Bill and Hillary Clinton had treated women in the past. The apology video quickly devolved into an attack video. Republicans were incredulous at what they saw and heard.

The election had turned away from Trump in the two weeks since the first debate. Public and private polls told a story of a shift away from the GOP nationally and in battleground states. The Clinton campaign's internal analysis looked as bright as it had since those days in early August when she held a clear lead over her rival.

Republican strategists tracking the race state by state, via Senate campaigns or their own analysis of public polls, saw only the most torturous of paths for Trump to try to put together a winning 270 electoral votes. As one strategist put it when asked about the most feasible path for Trump: “I'm not sure what it is right now … Hillary seems she’s in the driver's seat when it comes to the electoral college.”

Ed Goeas, a Republican pollster, described Trump's path pre-video as a triple lift of extraordinary proportions: First, hold all the states won by Mitt Romney in 2012 — no easy proposition, given North Carolina's tightness; then, capture Ohio and Florida, not out of the question before Friday, though it would be extremely difficult to get both; and, finally, find another dozen or so electoral votes by trying to win Pennsylvania or two other states to get over the top.

Those calculations are now on hold as everyone awaits the fallout from the video. Democrats wonder whether this might break open a campaign that has shifted back and forth away from one candidate and toward another depending on the tone and tenor of news coverage. Meanwhile, there is the small issue of Sunday's debate.

Ohio Republican Chairman Matt Borges laid out Trump's dire situation in a telephone interview on Saturday morning as he was trying to break away for a bike ride. “It's on life support,” he said of Trump's candidacy, “and he has 90 minutes tomorrow night to correct its course.”

Trump's preparations for that debate became vastly more difficult as a result of the video. First, he and his advisers must settle on a strategy. Should he be contrite? Can he attack Bill and Hillary? Can he demonstrate that he's a changed person from the Trump of the “Access Hollywood” bus ride? Is that possible, given what he's said throughout the campaign?

But even if there is agreement on a strategy, can his advisers trust Trump to do as they all agree he should? He failed that test in Hempstead, New York, in the first debate. In a debate, he is always one comment away from the uncontrollable Trump with the capacity for self-inflicted wounds.

Some Republicans will want to wait until the St. Louis debate before judging their next steps, hoping perhaps that Trump will produce a magical moment. Pence tried to find an awkward middle ground on Saturday, saying he could not condone what Trump said in the video and offering prayers for Trump's family.

Others weren't waiting, as one after another GOP current or former elected official said they're done, that they won't vote for Trump. But one indication of the dilemma for the party was the reaction that Representative Joseph J. Heck, the Republican Senate candidate in Nevada, got when he announced his withdrawal of support. Some in his audience booed.

What's worse? Breaking with Trump and risking that the Trump constituency stays home, turns on the party after the election, or both? Or continuing the awkward embrace of condemning Trump for specific transgressions but holding on to him as the nominee in the hope of protecting the party's Senate and House majorities in November?

No one can say where the party is heading, other than into a maelstrom of its own making. That the party leadership bears some responsibility for the rise of Trump has long been clear, no matter how much many hoped he would never become the nominee. Now it's a full-blown crisis. The election is now four weeks away, but for the GOP, resolving the problem of the two Donald Trumps can't wait that long.


• Dan Balz is Chief Correspondent at The Washington Post. He has served as the paper's National Editor, Political Editor, White House correspondent and Southwest correspondent.

__________________________________________________________________________

Read more on this topic:

 • Trump vows in Washington Post interview never to get out of the race

 • Growing list of Republicans abandon Trump

 • PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY: These Republicans cut ties with Trump after lewd remarks


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/a-toxic-whirlpool-for-the-gop-scripted-trump-vs-out-of-control-trump/2016/10/08/c1027974-8d88-11e6-bf8a-3d26847eeed4_story.html
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2016, 02:36:47 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Inside Trump Tower: The defiant and insulated Republican nominee

By PHILIP RUCKER, DAN BALZ and ROBERT COSTA | 7:43PM EDT - Saturday, October 08, 2016

A doorman outside of Trump Tower in Manhattan on Saturday. The Trump campaign has faced numerous calls for him to step aside after a 2005 recording revealed lewd comments about women. — Photograph: Spencer Platt/Getty Images.
A doorman outside of Trump Tower in Manhattan on Saturday. The Trump campaign has faced numerous calls for him to step aside
after a 2005 recording revealed lewd comments about women. — Photograph: Spencer Platt/Getty Images.


ST. LOUIS — He beamed in just after midnight on Saturday like a captive in his own gilded cage. A man who demands the best of everything was speaking to America from a dimly lit, home-built studio against a fake backdrop of the Manhattan skyline he likes to call his own.

Donald Trump was a beleaguered candidate delivering conflicting messages: one of apology, insincere as it seemed to many viewers, and one of defiance. It was not clear that either message could rescue him after The Washington Post published a video Friday showing Trump making crude remarks about sexual assault.

Trump's extraordinary campaign has been guided by his own instincts, and on Friday, his instinct was to hunker down and fight. Trump spent the next 24 hours in New York mostly ensconced in Trump Tower with only his most loyal advisers, steadfastly refusing to accept or recognize the full reality of what was happening outside.

Republican governors and members of Congress were calling for him to step aside — only a few at first, and then a rush — but Trump, talking to The Washington Post by phone from the grandiose confines of his penthouse apartment, described an alternate universe.

“People are calling and saying, ‘Don't even think about doing anything else but running’,” Trump said. “You have to see what's going on. The real story is that people have no idea about the support.”




For the entirety of his campaign, Trump has lived in a bubble that he helped create. Inside that world, Trump could do no wrong and was forgiven for virtually all of his transgressions.

But this controversy was different. His vice-presidential running mate, Mike Pence, who has perfected the art of explaining away Trump's mis-steps while trying to preserve his own reputation, on Saturday left Trump to clean up his own mess. The Indiana governor backed out of attending a GOP festival in Wisconsin as Trump's substitute, and the statement he issued — under his own letterhead — offered no comfort to his running mate.

Pence, his wife and his aides were “absolutely apoplectic” about Trump's comments about women on the 2005 video, according to one Republican close to the Trump campaign who spoke on the condition of anonymity to speak candidly. “They're melting down … They're inconsolable.”

As Trump grappled with the emerging crisis during Friday afternoon, the circle around him was relatively small, and few of them had long-standing ties to the candidate. Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie were there urging a swift apology, as were Trump's top campaign aides, including chief executive Stephen K. Bannon and manager Kellyanne Conway.

“Priebus and Christie just went at him and said, ‘Donald, you're going to have to apologize for the first time in your life, right now. Right now. You've got to do it’,” said the Republican close to the campaign, who was briefed on the discussions.

If Trump were under the impression that an apology would get him past the worst of the crisis, he was mistaken. As the country waited for a promised video, the intensity of the condemnations gathered more strength. By the time Trump's taped apology finally came, the content and delivery proved inadequate, and by midday Saturday, Republican leaders in red states and blue states alike were abandoning him.

As he watched the final minutes of the Texas-Oklahoma college football game on Saturday, Trump ally William J. Bennett was pained as he spoke about the nominee.

“It's a shame, a crying shame, but he can't win,” he said. “He should step down.”

Bennett, who served as President Ronald Reagan's education secretary and has informally advised Trump on policy, said that the Republican Party “has to make a coldhearted calculation because of what he's done. It just can't stand.”

“It's over,” Bennett said with a sigh. “I hate to say it, but it's over.”

Inside Trump Tower, the candidate and his confidants were seeing things through a different lens. Trump said in his interview with The Washington Post that he would be able to keep Republicans united because of their common foe: Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

“It's because she's so bad. She's so flawed as a candidate. Running against her, I can't say it'd be the same if I ran against someone else, but running against her makes it a lot easier, that's for sure,” Trump said.

Trump spent much of Saturday working the phones, talking with family, advisers and friends from a sprawling network of business and political associates. Well-wishers flooded him with advice, by phone or by emails sent to his assistant.

Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, who spoke with Trump at length on Saturday by phone, said Trump has appreciated the outreach from his supporters but has been dismayed by leaks and the calls for him to drop out.

“He's been going through a lot,” Carson said. “He's weathering it just fine. He's gung ho, and he understands why this all is happening. His enemies have ammunition, and they're dripping it out. He gets it, but he's not frustrated. He's not a quitter.”

Late Saturday afternoon, Trump emerged briefly from his tower to greet onlookers on Fifth Avenue. Flanked by Secret Service agents, Trump, wearing a suit and tie, pumped his fist and flashed a thumbs up. He shook hands with supporters, who were clutching cellphone cameras and shouting Trump's name. Tourists aboard a double-decker bus gawked at the scene.

Even as Trump's friends offered encouragement, some were buzzing behind his back about the long-shot notion of a ticket that no longer included him. Several of the candidate’s allies were discussing a Pence-Carson ticket, according to one person close to Trump.

“You'd keep Pence, and you'd bring the Trump people along with Carson, who they love,” said this person, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to reveal private exchanges. “Right now, Donald isn't going to go and doesn't want to go. But we've been texting about it.”

Other people in Trump's orbit advanced the idea that the crisis had been manufactured by Trump's “enemies” in the media and at the Clinton campaign. Trump mega-donors Robert and Rebekah Mercer issued a defiant statement saying Americans are disgusted with the political elite “who quake before the boombox of media blather.”

Carl Paladino, Trump's New York state co-chairman, a former gubernatorial candidate who had his own scandals over sexism and racism, said Trump's “gutter talk” was something “all men do, at least all normal men.”

“The only people concerned with this are Hillary people right now and the treacherous ones in the Republican Party,” Paladino said. “The people in America look at this and say it's another day in the life of Donald Trump. It doesn't matter to them.”

Some of Trump's allies inside and outside the campaign wondered why he had apologized rather than own his past and punch back, a strategy that helped him survive previous controversies.

“Why didn't he double down? If the apology was intended to stem the flow of dissent, to show that he's sorry for what he's said and done … that's not what took place,” said one Trump friend who is close to the campaign and spoke on the condition of anonymity to speak candidly.

Michael Caputo, a former Trump campaign adviser, said he was encouraging the Trump team to immediately make an issue of former president Bill Clinton's womanizing past and “allegations of sexual crimes.”

“In order to blunt this really bad story — and make no mistake, this is DEFCON One — they need to pull the Clintons into the same mire where Clinton has dumped him, because in fact they do exist there,” Caputo said. “They've got to go nuclear. That's all they have left.”

Sunday night's debate, here in St. Louis, will reveal whether Trump sides with the hard-liners or those urging more contrition. Whichever course, Trump is guaranteed another huge audience.

“I've been here before, I'll tell ya, in life,” Trump said in the interview. “I understand life and how you make it through. You go through things. I've been through many. It's called life. And it's always interesting.”


Robert Costa reported from Washington. Matea Gold in Washington contributed to this report.

• Philip Rucker is a national political correspondent for The Washington Post, where he has reported since 2005.

• Dan Balz is Chief Correspondent at The Washington Post. He has served as the paper's National Editor, Political Editor, White House correspondent and Southwest correspondent.

• Robert Costa is a national political reporter at The Washington Post.

__________________________________________________________________________

Read more on this topic:

 • Washington Post Editorial: The Republican Party does the same pathetic dance with Trump

 • GOP consumed by crisis as more Republicans call on Trump to quit

 • More crude sex remarks by Trump surface in Howard Stern tapes

 • Trump's words create vexing challenge for parents

 • With weeks to go, a major party is walking away from its nominee

 • Vulgar video finally pushed this Trump supporter over the edge

 • The Fix Mike Pence just laid bare his awkward reality with Trump

 • We have known this Trump all along

 • Only the willfully blind are shocked by Trump

 • PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY: These Republicans cut ties with Trump after lewd remarks


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/inside-trump-tower-the-defiant-and-isolated-republican-nominee/2016/10/08/0b3575a0-8d8e-11e6-bf8a-3d26847eeed4_story.html
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« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2016, 05:40:44 pm »

haha Grin
hillary is a bitch she eats more pussy than bill
« Last Edit: October 09, 2016, 08:56:48 pm by Im2Sexy4MyPants » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #8 on: October 10, 2016, 12:17:17 am »


from The Washington Post....

GOP consumed by crisis as more Republicans call on Trump to quit race

By JENNA JOHNSON, SEAN SULLIVAN and ROBERT COSTA | 9:12PM EDT - Saturday, October 08, 2016

Donald Trump pauses during a meeting on Friday. — Photograph: Associated Press.
Donald Trump pauses during a meeting on Friday. — Photograph: Associated Press.

THE REPUBLICAN PARTY plunged into an epic and historic political crisis on Saturday with just a month to go until Election Day as a growing wave of GOP lawmakers called on defiant presidential nominee Donald Trump to drop out of the race in the wake of a video showing him make crude sexual remarks.

The fallout from the tape published by The Washington Post — in which Trump bragged in obscene language about forcing himself on women sexually — threatens to endanger the party's hold on both houses of Congress in addition to the White House, which many Republicans now fear is lost. The episode also comes ahead of Sunday's second presidential debate in St. Louis, which was already a crucial moment but could determine how widely the damage spreads.

By mid-afternoon on Saturday, more than two dozen Republican lawmakers had called on Trump to leave the race, often touting vice presidential candidate Mike Pence as an alternative. Others including Senator John McCain (Republican-Arizona), the 2008 GOP nominee, said they could no longer vote for Trump but stopped short of calling on him to drop out. Still, the Republican Party's top leadership — including House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (Wisconsin), Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Kentucky) and party chairman Reince Priebus — continued to support Trump even as they denounced his comments.

Trump, who offered a qualified apology for the remarks in an overnight video statement while also attacking former president Bill Clinton, told The Washington Post he would not drop out under any circumstances.

“I'd never withdraw. I've never withdrawn in my life,” Trump said in a Saturday morning phone call from his home in Trump Tower in New York. “No, I'm not quitting this race. I have tremendous support.

“They're not going to make me quit, and they can't make me quit,” Trump added, speaking of those who have urged him to step aside. “The Republicans, you've got to remember, have been running for a long time. The reason they don't win is because they don't stick together.”

In the 2005 videotape, Trump boasted in vulgar language about kissing, groping and trying to have sex with women during a conversation caught on a hot microphone, saying that “when you're a star, they let you do it. They let you do anything.”

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and her allies seized on the video as another in a long line of disqualifying remarks and actions by Trump, and increased their pressure on Republican candidates to disavow their support of him or risk being tied to him on Election Day. Democrats are now openly confident they will win the Senate and increasingly optimistic that they could even flip control of the House, which seemed out of reach just a few days ago.

Clinton does not plan to do any interviews or make any further statement herself until the debate on Sunday, when she plans to quickly address Trump's fitness for office, said a close aide who spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe some of the internal discussions. Several Clinton associates said she will not detail the particulars of Trump's comments, instead attempting to show her fitness for high office by contrast.

Another burst of offensive remarks by Trump emerged during Saturday as CNN aired a review of hours of newly uncovered audio from shock-jock Howard Stern's show. Trump spoke of his daughter Ivanka's breasts, three-way sex and not dating women who are older than 35. He also described barging in on nude Miss Universe beauty pageant contestants in their dressing room, characterizing his visits as inspections.

Several Democrats said they think Trump will come into Sunday's town-hall-style debate with the mind set of a “wounded animal”, a factor that could make him more dangerous to Clinton — and to himself.

“I've never seen a candidate walk into a debate with this much at stake,” said longtime Clinton ally James Carville. “He's overweight, he's old, he's tired and he's crabby. And he's going to have a very long hour-and-a-half.”

Trump and his surrogates signaled that the nominee could defend himself by attacking Bill Clinton, whom Trump has accused of abusing women and making comments while golfing with Trump that are more crude than the ones Trump made in 2005. On Saturday night, Trump retweeted two messages from an account labeled as belonging to Juanita Broaddrick, who alleged in 1999 that Bill Clinton had raped her in April 1978. The tweets accused Bill Clinton of being a “rapist” and accused Hillary Clinton of threatening her; the Clintons have repeatedly denied the allegations.

Some news coverage of Trump included warnings of graphic material or profane language, another sign of how ugly the election has become and, given Trump's threats to invoke Bill Clinton's infidelities, how much worse it might get.

Roger Stone, a longtime Republican operative and outside Trump adviser, said Saturday that he and the InfoWars conspiracy website were selling 10,000 T-shirts with Bill Clinton's face next to the word “rape”, a dark parody of President Obama's 2008 “Hope” posters. He worried that Trump had missed a “prime opportunity” to attack Hillary Clinton over the affairs, but said there was still a way for Trump to litigate it.

“It's not about adultery,” Stone said. “It's about Bill hiring heavy-handed private detectives. It's about violence against women. I know you and your colleagues want this to be about infidelity, but it's about Hillary Clinton enabling attacks on women.”

A growing number of elected lawmakers and other prominent Republicans said they simply cannot vote for Trump, given the video. McCain, who is up for re-election in November, said on Saturday that he and his wife would not vote for Trump and will instead “write in the name of some good conservative Republican who is qualified to be president.” McCain had supported Trump even though the businessman joked about him being captured during the Vietnam War and then refused to apologize.

Many said they would like to hand the ticket over to Pence, but experts said it would be almost impossible logistically for the party to replace its nominee a month from the election. Among those calling for Trump to drop out is the third-highest ranking Republican in the Senate, John Thune of South Dakota, who tweeted on Saturday: “Donald Trump should withdraw and Mike Pence should be our nominee effective immediately.”

Condoleezza Rice, who was secretary of state during George W. Bush’s administration, posted on Facebook: “Enough! Donald Trump should not be President. He should withdraw. As a Republican, I hope to support someone who has the dignity and stature to run for the highest office in the greatest democracy on earth.”

The calls for Trump to step aside started during Friday night, after several weeks of growing confidence among congressional Republicans that their candidates had distinguished themselves enough from Trump that they would maintain the majorities. But then they waited and waited for Trump to fully apologize for his comments, leading to a first wave of denunciations from those who had already said they wouldn't vote for Trump or who had avoided taking a stance.

Senator Mark Kirk (Illinois), who revoked his endorsement of Trump in June, called on Trump to drop out so that the party could “engage rules for emergency replacement.” Senator Mike Lee (Utah), one of very few Republican senators who never endorsed Trump, called for the nominee to “step aside” and asked conservatives to find a new candidate.

“It's occurred to me on countless occasions today that if anyone spoke to my wife, my daughter, my mother or any of my five sisters the way Mr. Trump has spoken to women, I wouldn't hire that person. I wouldn't hire that person, wouldn't want to be associated with that person,” Lee said in a video filmed at his home in Utah. “And, I certainly don't think I would feel comfortable hiring that person to be the leader of the free world.”

On Saturday morning, the calls increased and began to include some of Trump's supporters and those from strongly Republican states.

“As disappointed as I've been with his antics throughout this campaign, I thought supporting the nominee was the best thing for our country and our party,” Representative Martha Roby (Alabama) said in a statement. “Now, it is abundantly clear that the best thing for our country and for our party is for Trump to step aside and allow a responsible, respectable Republican to lead the ticket.”

Kelly Ayotte, the New Hampshire senator in a tight re-election race, who had said she supported but did not endorse Trump, tweeted on Saturday morning that she would not vote for him and would instead write in Pence.

“I cannot and will not support a candidate for president who brags about degrading and assaulting women,” Ayotte said in a statement.

Some fundraisers for Trump worry that pledged donations might not come in during the final four weeks and that new donations might dry up. But GOP megadonors Robert and Rebekah Mercer, two of the most influential figures in Trump's orbit, said on Saturday that their support for the GOP nominee has not faltered: “We are completely indifferent to Mr. Trump's locker room braggadocio.”

Trump was supposed to campaign Saturday in Wisconsin with Ryan, Priebus and other prominent Republicans, but Ryan rescinded the invitation on Friday. Pence was supposed to go in Trump's place but decided against it to give Trump space to navigate the fallout from his statements, according to a campaign aide.

After avoiding questions about Trump's comments at campaign events on Friday, Pence issued a statement on Saturday that said: “As a husband and father, I was offended by the words and actions described by Donald Trump in the eleven-year-old video released yesterday. I do not condone his remarks and cannot defend them. I am grateful that he has expressed remorse and apologized to the American people.”

Trump's wife, Melania, released a similar statement: “The words my husband used are unacceptable and offensive to me. This does not represent the man that I know. He has the heart and mind of a leader. I hope people will accept his apology, as I have, and focus on the important issues facing our nation and the world.”

In both New Hampshire and Ohio, the GOP chairs signaled there would be no repercussions from the party for any elected officials or others who make a clean break from the nominee.

New Hampshire GOP chair Jennifer Horn issued a statement condemning Trump's “erratic behavior” and “outrageous comments.” She added, “There will be no repercussions from the party directed at those who choose not to support Donald Trump.”

In Ohio, party chair Matt Borges said in an interview that the state party would be “fully supportive” of Senator Rob Portman, who is running for re-election against former governor Ted Strickland.

“Rob needs to know that we are fully supportive of his campaign,” Borges said in a phone interview. “However he chooses to proceed there will be no ramifications from the state party.”

Trump said in a statement that he planned to spend Saturday preparing for Sunday's presidential debate with the help of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, Senator Jeff Sessions (Alabama) and Priebus, who on Friday said that no one should ever talk about women the way that Trump did in 2005.

On Saturday morning, Trump broke an hours-long silence and tweeted: “Certainly has been an interesting 24 hours!” He tweeted again on Saturday afternoon: “The media and establishment want me out of the race so badly — I WILL NEVER DROP OUT OF THE RACE, WILL NEVER LET MY SUPPORTERS DOWN!”

Meanwhile, Trump's 2005 comments played again and again on cable news, upstaging even a dangerous hurricane. Some of Trump's surrogates and prominent supporters came to his defense.

Senator Roy Blunt (Missouri), a member of the party leadership who is facing a tough re-election battle, said on Saturday that Trump's comments were “absolutely unacceptable,” but he dismissed the idea that Trump could step aside 30 days before the election to make way for another nominee.

“I think that's an unrealistic solution,” Blunt said. “The devastation of Obamacare, the out-of-control regulators, the foreign policy that our friends don't trust us, make a third Obama term an unacceptable alternative.”

Asked whether he would vote for Trump, Blunt asked: “Didn't I just say that?”

Dallas investor Doug Deason dismissed the episode as a manufactured media story.

“It's just CNN and the press making a big deal out of nothing,” he said. “Anybody who is surprised about that or appalled or shocked is disingenuous. People knew that Trump was like that in those days. There's probably more of it out there. He's not like that anymore. He is a changed guy. We are a nation that believes in redemption and second chances, right? I don't think he's been that way for a very long time.”

Late on Saturday afternoon, Trump emerged from Trump Tower with a swarm of U.S. Secret Service agents, surprising reporters who had staked out the lobby and delighting tourists and supporters hoping for a sighting.

As Trump waved at the crowd, reporters fired off questions: Will he stay in the race? What's his message to his supporters? For the Republican Party?

“Tremendous support!” Trump said. “Tremendous support!”

When asked if he would stay in the race, Trump responded: “One hundred percent.”


Sean Sullivan reported from New York. Abby Phillip in New York; Dan Balz, David Weigel and Jose A. DelReal in St. Louis; Matea Gold and Aaron Blake in Washington; and David Weigel in Mount Vernon, Missouri, contributed to this report.

• Jenna Johnson is a political reporter who is covering the 2016 presidential campaign for The Washington Post.

• Sean Sullivan has covered national politics for The Washington Post since 2012.

• Robert Costa is a national political reporter at The Washington Post.

__________________________________________________________________________

Read more on this topic:

 • Trump offers brief, defiant apology for lewd remarks

 • More crude sex remarks by Trump surface in Howard Stern tapes

 • The Fix: What Trump really meant when he apologized on Friday night

 • The Fix: GOP's brutal responses to the new Trump video, broken down

 • Here are the ways Republicans could upend Trump. But they probably wouldn't work.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/a-growing-list-of-republicans-call-for-trump-to-step-down/2016/10/08/2b572628-8ce2-11e6-875e-2c1bfe943b66_story.html
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« Reply #9 on: October 10, 2016, 02:08:46 am »



EXCLUSIVE — Video Interview: Bill Clinton Accuser Juanita Broaddrick Relives Brutal Rapes



http://www.breitbart.com/2016-presidential-race/2016/10/09/breitbart-news-exclusive-video-interview-bill-clinton-accuser-juanita-broaddrick-breaks-describing-brutal-rapes/
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« Reply #10 on: October 10, 2016, 08:27:18 am »


Hahaha.....Donald Trump is going to go down and sink the Republican Party with him.

That will be worth celebrating!!
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« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2016, 01:33:36 pm »



even one Bernie supporter moving out of his mothers basement That will be worth celebrating

the Clinton's are money grubbing scumbags

Hillary left death and destruction all over the middle east because shes an evil bitch

her Clinton foundation is a rip off used as the Clinton piggybank

Hurricane-Ravaged Haiti Needs $2 Billion In Donations Clinton Foundation Stole From Its Earthquake Relief Funds

Once again, Haiti is devastated by a natural disaster, this time by Hurricane Matthew.

Before the hurricane plowed into the southeast U.S. coast, where it caused major flooding and widespread power outages, “Matthew” had struck Haiti, the poorest country in the Americas, killing 877 people and displacing tens of thousands.

No doubt, there’ll be a drumbeat asking you to donate to Haiti’s hurricane relief, if it hasn’t already begun.

Don’t!

Below are the reasons why.

“In 2010, a massive 7.0 earthquake devastated Haiti, killing more than 200,000 people, leveling 100,000 homes, and leaving 1.5 million people destitute.”

As Dinesh D’Souza recounts for National Review, July 18, 2016,”countries around the world, as well as private and philanthropic groups such as the Red Cross and the Salvation Army, provided some $10.5 billion in aid, with $3.9 billion of it coming from the United States. But very little of this aid money actually got to poor people in Haiti.”

Bill Clinton & George W. Bush inspected the devastation of the Haiti earthquake, March 22, 2010.

According to the National Review:

“Bill Clinton was the designated UN representative for aid to Haiti. Following the earthquake, Bill Clinton had with media fanfare established the Haiti Reconstruction Fund. Meanwhile, his wife Hillary was the U. S. secretary of state, in charge of U.S. aid allocated to Haiti. Together the Clintons were the two most powerful people who controlled the flow of funds to Haiti from around the world.”

Read more about what the Clintons did with the billions of dollars meant for Haiti’s earthquake relief, here.

In 2015, Vice.com sent an investigative reporter to Haiti, who was shocked to find Haiti still devastated 5 years after the earthquake, with many people homeless or living in self-made shacks, without running water or plumbing, despite the $10 billion in relief aid pledged around the world.



7:21 mark: “What’s odd is that the Haitians who received little to no foreign aid actually seem to be doing than those in the designated relief areas.

8:06 mark: “But there was one permanent structure that was built here for the earthquake survivors. For some reason the International Olympics Committee [IOC} thought that these people could use an $18 million state-of-the-art soccer field and recreation center [instead of plumbing and running water], adding insult to injury in a community lacking in even the most basic amenities.”

8:32 mark: “But this [the IOC soccer field] wasn’t the only strange reconstruction project we saw foreign aid invested in. Seven hours north of the earthquake, over $300 million of foreign aid was spent in the district of Caracol, [a town that wasn’t affected by the earthquake]…. But even though the town wasn’t affected, it didn’t stop our government aid from being invested in another soccer field [that actually cost $2.9 million to built, not the $300 million spent by the contractor. The State Department’s records say the cost of constructing the Caracol soccer field was even lower — $2.3 million.] And when we looked at the cost of many other projects, we noticed the same contractor kept coming up [– Chemonics, the largest USAID recipient across the world, including in Afghanistan….] There’s been a number of audits that have shown lack of progress, the lack of oversight. Here, this is a contract of Chemonics with USAID. All the cost information throughout the contract, that’s all redacted, and we just have [blank] pink sheet after pink sheet…25 pink sheets [in total].”

11:21 mark: “USAID’s real investment here [in Caracol] is the more than $260 million spent for the Caracol industrial park — the largest U.S. development project in the aftermath of the earthquake…. [T]here’s paved streets, there’s sidewalks, there’s electricity and there’s drinkable running water which is actually unheard of in Haiti. Unfortunately, it only provides roughly only 10% of the jobs it promised. Its main tenant is a South Korean garment manufacturing company which enjoys cheap labor, tax exemptions and duty-free access to the U.S. market. Worst of all, none of the employees we met were earthquake survivors, and the plan for the park was drawn up before the [earthquake] disaster even happened.“

13:17 mark: “While many attempts to reform the system have been made, to date, nothing has changed, and the result is the faileddisaster capitalism we see in Haiti, where aid has become an industry of pro-profit companies. In fact, only a month after the earthquake, our own U.S. ambassador was quoted in a leaked document claiming ‘The gold rush is on.’ And now these same companies are using lobbying groups to ensure reforms never come. It’s often said that waste, inefficiency, corruption, these are problems that are unique to the developing world, that are unique to Haiti. The reality is that these are actually fundamental aspects of the U.S. foreign aid complex. Instead of relying on potentially corrupt money, we simply give it to U.S. companies and allow them to take 25% off the top. It’s a different form of corruption, and without realizing that, we’ll continue to make the same mistakes going forward.”

The standard advice for donating to charities is “Keep it local,” i.e., donate only to local charities where you can keep a better eye on how your donations are spent.

http://www.globalresearch.ca/hurricane-ravaged-haiti-needs-2-billion-in-donations-clinton-foundation-stole-from-its-earthquake-relief-funds/5550029
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« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2016, 03:30:33 pm »


from the Los Angeles Times....

Trump demeans women and slanders men with his ‘locker room talk’

By DAVID HORSEY | 5:00AM PDT - Wednesday, October 12, 2016



PUFFY-FACED Donald Trump does not look like a guy who spends a lot of time in locker rooms, unless you count the plush changing facilities at the country clubs where he hangs out with other billionaire golfers. Still, as we now know, he revels in what he calls “locker room talk”.

The Republican Party was slammed like a crash-test dummy by last week's revelation of a videotape in which Trump boasts about how his celebrity entitles him to kiss, grope and seduce any beautiful woman who comes near him. GOP luminaries such as Arizona Senator John McCain, the party's standard bearer in 2008, and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, the No.2 guy on the Republican ticket in 2012, along with numerous members of Congress, have announced that they can no longer give even grudging support to Trump. New polls indicate that women across the country will vote against Trump in even more lopsided numbers than already anticipated.

It is pretty much assumed this will not be the last chance for voters to hear Trump use language that more typically would be heard from a horny frat boy after a keg stand and several pints of Jägermeister. Reportedly, various staffers who worked on Trump's reality TV show, “The Apprentice” say there are hours and hours of video in which the star of the show lets his lechery run loose.

Trump first responded to the uproar by saying, “This was locker room banter, a private conversation that took place many years ago. Bill Clinton has said far worse to me on the golf course — not even close.” This was like a little kid in trouble saying, “Billy stole two candy bars from the store and I only stole one!” It doesn't get him off the hook for his own words and deeds.

Trump was not in a locker room when he was speaking so offensively. He was in mixed company on an “Access Hollywood” bus, wearing a live microphone and preparing to meet Arianne Zucker, a “Days of Our Lives” actress. It is in the seconds before Trump and interviewer Billy Bush ooze off the bus and insist that Zucker give them hugs that Trump claims one of the perks of stardom is that women don't complain if you “grab them by the [genitals].” Millions of voters saw this and felt the urge to gag.

A number of professional athletes were offended as well. Doc Rivers, former NBA point guard and current coach of the L.A. Clippers, said of Trump's version of locker room talk, “That's a new locker room for me.” Ex-Minnesota Vikings punter Chris Kluwe took Trump to task for his characterization of locker room banter. “We never had anyone say anything as foul and demeaning as [trump] did on that tape,” Kluwe wrote in a blog post for Vox. “Hell, I played a couple years with a guy who later turned out to be a serial rapist. Even he never talked like that.”

I've spent a lot of time in locker rooms in recent years with men whose ages range from 20-something to 60-something. Sure, there is occasional talk about sex. Attractive women are noticed and noted. But I've never heard any of them talk like Trump.

That doesn't mean some men do not talk that way. Plenty do. But they are oafish jerks. And so is Trump.


http://www.latimes.com/opinion/topoftheticket/la-na-tt-locker-room-20161012-snap-story.html
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« Reply #13 on: October 13, 2016, 05:09:20 pm »

Quote
Trump claims one of the perks of stardom is that women don't complain if you “grab them by the [genitals]

horsey twisted the words out of context typical lefty and a pussy


Trump: "Yeah that's her with the gold. I better use some Tic Tacs just in case I start kissing her. You know I'm automatically attracted to beautiful... I just start kissing them. It's like a magnet. Just kiss.I don't even wait. And when you're a star they let you do it. You can do anything."

Bush: "Whatever you want."?

Trump: "Grab them by the pussy. You can do anything."

sounds like he was trying to impress bush and joking with a little trash talk

the  bit on the bus was edited and sliced

little did trump know bush was getting some dirt on him to cash in on later



 
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« Reply #14 on: October 13, 2016, 06:11:39 pm »

Personally I think both of you are guillty of bias reporting. You can't condemn either Trump or Clinton without condemning the other. Those that fail in this are just hypocrites and have their right to a freedom of speech revoked.
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« Reply #15 on: October 13, 2016, 09:58:12 pm »


from The Dominion Post....

The locker room — a new holy space

Delusions of your own fabulousness can lead you to dark places.

By ROSEMARY McLEOD | 5:00AM - Thursday, 13 October 2016

Years of sexually propositioning female employees finally cost Roger Ailes his job at Fox.
Years of sexually propositioning female employees finally cost Roger Ailes his job at Fox.

“ARE WE BABIES?”, asked Donald Trump. It was a cosmic question, and he was just the man to ask it.

Others have pondered the proposition and found a similar answer: to name a few, Silvio Berlusconi, Dominique Strauss-Kahn, Bill Cosby, Jimmy Savile, and Roger Ailes. I'll tuck  Gable Tostee in here, currently accused of killing a New Zealand woman he met on Tinder. He was in the habit of boasting online about how many women he'd had it off with, knowing that quantity is all-important. Delusions of your own fabulousness can lead you to dark places, I guess, even when you're young, with all your own hair.

And then there's Trump, of the ultimate comb-over, who boasted to a radio jock that his fame meant beautiful women let him grope them and slobber over them without resistance. Other men dream of such invincibility. I guess. How we all wish we were young and perfectly formed, because then they'd want to honour us, too, with the activity that they place at the core of their self-worth, and snigger about afterwards. We'd be so lucky.

Former Italian premier Berlusconi, ex-French presidential hopeful Strauss-Kahn, and Fox News's now ex-boss Ailes share with Trump a remarkable lack of physical attractiveness and a lot of weary years, but their women must be young, and ever younger. Trump cuts women off at 35, half his age. He says they don't rate after that, yet fortunately he does. It must be the money.


Dominique Strauss-Kahn was the go-to man if orgies were your thing.
Dominique Strauss-Kahn was the go-to man if orgies were your thing.

The locker room is like AA meetings, or the confessional: it is another country, and they do things differently there.
The locker room is like AA meetings, or the confessional: it is another country,
and they do things differently there.


Jimmy Savile had free rein with sick children in British hospitals.
Jimmy Savile had free rein with sick children in British hospitals.

Berlusconi's bunga bunga parties, where women were hired to have sex with him and his cronies, were popular, but an under-age girl proved to be a mistake; justice has no sense of fun. Strauss-Kahn was the go-to man if orgies were your thing. Due to misunderstandings about sophistication, and a protesting American hotel maid, he also fell from grace. As for Ailes, many years of sexually propositioning female employees finally cost him his job at Fox, which goes to show what misery can be caused when women turn an old man down.

The common theme here is entitlement, which is where Jimmy Savile, a weirdo and creep beloved of the British for unfathomable reasons, had free rein with sick children in British hospitals, and young girls living in what was euphemistically called “care”. His fame and fundraising meant other adults turned their backs and left him to it.

Bill Cosby's popularity as a comedian and TV star meant he felt entitled to his share of attractive young women too, with the original twist that he is accused of rendering them unconscious before using their bodies.

All around the world men are doing similar things and boasting about it in what Trump calls “locker room talk”. That's OK, according to Trump, because women should never get to hear about it because he loves and respects them too much, and besides, there is a special magic seal on what takes place there. The locker room is like AA meetings, or the confessional: it is another country, and they do things differently there.


Entertainer Bill Cosby felt entitled to his share of attractive young women.
Entertainer Bill Cosby felt entitled to his share of attractive young women.

Italy's former prime minister Silvio Berlusconi would hold bunga bunga parties, where women were hired to have sex with him and his cronies.
Italy's former prime minister Silvio Berlusconi would hold bunga bunga parties,
where women were hired to have sex with him and his cronies.


Donald Trump — a big baby making a mess for others to clean up.
Donald Trump — a big baby making a mess for others to clean up.

Priests can't reveal what they're told by sinners making a confession, but the locker room is a new holy space. Outside it women might find the bragging that goes on there offensive, but what women think anywhere doesn't count for much, however good-looking they are. In any case you lie to each other in the locker room. You never did those things. It's all part of the fun of pretending to demean women.

It was in the locker room, that special male space, that shock jock Howard Stern asked Trump if he'd ever had a threesome. “Haven't we all?”, replied the presidential contender, “Are we babies?” Which is the point where I began.

A baby is a human being driven to attach itself to a woman's body, after its birth, for its very survival. It knows only its own needs, and can't imagine anyone else's. It is the centre of its own universe, cared for by those who keep it alive and protect it. And so Trump and his kind are indeed babies, throwing their toys out of the cot, wailing for the breast, and making messes for other people to clean up. But the similarity is unfair to infants. They get to grow up.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/comment/columnists/85243286
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« Reply #16 on: October 14, 2016, 04:13:50 am »

Rap Sheet: The Women Who Claim to Be Victims of Bill and Hillary Clinton



http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2015/12/31/rap-sheet-the-women-who-claim-to-be-victims-of-bill-and-hillary-clinton/

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« Reply #17 on: October 14, 2016, 12:53:00 pm »


from The New York Times....

Two Women Say Donald Trump Touched Them Inappropriately



Oh well....more examples of “Donald Trump the sexual predator & sicko” coming out of the woodwork.

But wait....it gets better.....Trump's lawyers sent a letter to The New York Times demanding they retract the story and appologise or he will sue them for libel.

Bad move....The New York Times replied and said that you couldn't smear the reputation of somebody who has already smeared his own reputation by boasting how he has forced himself on women and grabbed their pussy, so “sue and we'll see you in court!”



CAN'T LIBEL HIM!
(click on the picture to read the news story)


So now, Trump has a HUGE dilemma. He can carry on and sue The New York Times and not only almost certainly lose the case, but also open himself up to court-ordered “DISCOVERY” whereby lawyers appointed by the court will be able to trawl through his affairs. Or he can back down and in the process virtually admit that he is a “sexual offender” and a “pervert!”

Game set & match to The New York Times. Or to put it another way, CHECKMATE!!






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« Reply #18 on: October 14, 2016, 02:15:01 pm »

Let's see hillary helped obama fund and arm isis caused the islamic invasion of europe

then there was libya,the benghazi affair,the emails,arming the terrorists in syria she is a vile murdering fascist pig of a women.

bill is a sexual predator he lost his lawyer license because of one case and was fined $800,000  dollars which was paid to his victim

then

Bill Clinton Pushing for Clinton Foundation Haiti Relief After Fleecing Haitians



In the wake of the devastating destruction to Haiti caused by Hurricane Matthew, President Bill Clinton took to Twitter and urged his six million-plus followers to go to the embattled Clinton Foundation to assist in relief efforts.
“Praying for everyone impacted by #HurricaneMatthew. Here’s how you can help in Haiti,” Clinton said his tweet, which linked to a Medium article, entitled, “Members of the Clinton Foundation Community Respond to Hurricane Matthew; Ways to Support.”

The last time tragedy struct the tiny Caribbean country, Bill and then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton — according to scores of enraged Haitians — used their billion dollar charity and leveraged their global connections to enrich themselves and their monied cronies.

Following the devastating earthquake in Haiti in 2010 — while 316,000 lifeless bodies lay buried under rubble, and while 300,000 Haitians suffered from injuries, with another 1.3 million displaced — the Clintons saw an opportunity to cash in.

Hillary Clinton’s brother, Tony Rodham, landed a lucrative and historically rare Haitian “gold exploitation permit,” while Clinton Foundation donors, including Digicel mobile phone company founder Denis O’Brien, were winning multi-million dollar contracts that would siphon massive profits from the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere.

While then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s State Department was funneling billions in relief funds to rebuild Haiti, the Clinton Foundation was leveraging its influence to guide high-dollar contracts to longtime Clinton cronies who would go on to reap millions off the catastrophe that had claimed so many lives on the devastated island.

“I deal through the Clinton Foundation,” Tony Rodham said according to a transcript of his testimony during court proceedings, obtained by The New York Times. “That gets me in touch with the Haitian officials. I hound my brother-in-law [Bill Clinton], because it’s his fund that we’re going to get our money from. And he can’t do it until the Haitian government does it.”

The anger at the Clintons from the Haitian people is no secret.

Indeed, dozens of Haitian protesters gathered outside the Democrat National Convention in July and railed against the Clintons and the Clinton Foundation for their long-reported history of using their global connections to exploit the resources and the poor people of Haiti.

“The main message is that Hillary Clinton belongs in jail,” one protester said at the time when asked what the overall message of the protest was. “We believe that the world should know about the crimes the Clinton family has committed against the country of Haiti–the money they have stolen from the earthquake victims. And we believe that were this to be anyone else, they’d be in jail right now.”

“She’s not in jail because she’s being protected by the Obama administration, the Justice Department, State Department,” the protester said.

Bill Clinton’s tweet, urging support for Haiti, smacks of irony, and Twitter followers took notice.

“Clintons still scamming off poor Haiti after a natural disaster ,” one user wrote.

“Do u realize what the Clinton Foundation did to Haiti?” another Twitter user asked.

His question was quickly answered by another user, who said, “Practically stole 6 billion promising hospitals/homes to rebuild Haiti?”

“More like literally,” another user said.

“There it is, Clinton’s looking to fill their bank accounts off another natural disaster,” another user remarked.

As Breitbart News reported, Haitians have been protesting the Clintons for years for their transgressions against the tiny island nation.

http://www.breitbart.com/2016-presidential-race/2016/10/06/bill-clinton-pushing-for-clinton-foundation-haiti-relief-after-fleecing-haitians/

 
   
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« Reply #19 on: October 14, 2016, 02:34:30 pm »


from The Washington Post....

‘This is intolerable … Stop this madness’: Michelle Obama
rallies women against Trump


By KRISSAH THOMPSON | 1:51PM EDT - Thursday, October 13, 2016

At an October 13th Hillary Clinton campaign event in Manchester, New Hampshire, first lady Michelle Obama grew emotional while talking about allegations of sexual assault against Republican nominee Donald Trump. — Photograph: Bloomberg.
At an October 13th Hillary Clinton campaign event in Manchester, New Hampshire, first lady Michelle Obama grew emotional
while talking about allegations of sexual assault against Republican nominee Donald Trump. — Photograph: Bloomberg.


MICHELLE OBAMA ditched her campaign speech at a rally for Hillary Clinton today in Manchester, New Hampshire, to discuss the language Donald Trump has used to describe women and the accusations of sexual assault he is facing.

“To dismiss this as locker-room talk is an insult to decent men everywhere,” she said, referring to comments Trump made off-camera during a 2005 taping of “Access Hollywood.

Keeping with her tack of not addressing Trump by name, she said, “We have a candidate for president of the United States that has said things about women that are so shocking, so demeaning.”

Obama said she could not repeat the words that were used because they were so distasteful.




She described herself as “shocked” and compared Trump's actions to those of men who sexually harass and disrespect women in the workplace, placing Trump's comments in a realm familiar to women who have faced sexual assault or know those who have.

“It is that feeling of terror or violation that too many women have felt when someone has forced themselves on them,” she said.

“Too many are treating this as just another day's headline, as if this is normal … just politics as usual,” she said, raising her voice. “Be clear, New Hampshire: This is not normal. This is not politics as usual. This is disgraceful; this is intolerable. It doesn't matter what party you belong to … no woman deserves to be treated this way.”

She continued framing the election in moral, rather than political, terms. “I know it's a campaign but this isn't about politics. It's about basic human decency — about right and wrong.”

She told the story of a 6-year-old boy who concluded that Trump could not be elected president because he called a woman “piggy”.

“If we have a candidate that brags about sexually assualting women, then how can we maintain our moral authority in the world?” she said, calling on voters to “stop this madness.”

“While our mothers and grandmothers were often powerless … we have all we need to determine the outcome of this election,” she said. “On November 8th, we as women, we as Americans, we as decent human beings can come together and declare that enough is enough and we do not tolerate this kind of behavior.”


Michelle Obama, left, and Hillary Clinton.
Michelle Obama, left, and Hillary Clinton.

“And remember this,” she said near the end of her remarks, “when they go low, we go …”

“High!” the crowd shouted, finishing her sentence. This phrase has become a mantra for Clinton's campaign.

“We need to recover from our shock and depression and do what women have always done in this country,” she said. “We need to roll up our sleeves and get to work.”


• Krissah Thompson began writing for The Washington Post in 2001. She has been a business reporter, covered presidential campaigns and written about civil rights and race. More recently, she has covered the first lady's office, politics and culture.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/this-is-intolerable--stop-this-madness-michelle-obama-rallies-women-against-trump/2016/10/13/1be41874-9168-11e6-9c52-0b10449e33c4_story.html
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« Reply #20 on: October 19, 2016, 01:28:20 pm »


from The Washington Post....

The conspiracy to rig the election against Trump just got bigger

By GREG SARGENT | 3:18PM EDT - Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Donald and Melania Trump. — Photograph: Mark Kauzlarich/Reuters.
Donald and Melania Trump. — Photograph: Mark Kauzlarich/Reuters.

ON CNN LAST NIGHT, Melania Trump dismissed allegations that her husband made unwanted advances on numerous women as “lies” that were “organized” by “the opposition”.

“I know he respects women,” Melania said. “But he's defending himself because they're lies.” Melania also insisted that “this was all organized from the opposition,” and argued that the infamous Access Hollywood sex tape was the result of Trump getting “egged on” by “boy talk”.

Putting aside how disconcerting it is that Trump was 59 years old when he got drawn into this “boy talk”, Melania's suggestion that the “opposition” organized the parade of female accusers just took a big hit.

People Magazine has now produced five additional people who say that one of Trump's most visible accusers told them of Trump's advance at the time. The accuser, Natasha Stoynoff, a writer for People, has claimed that in 2005, Trump pushed her against a wall and tried to kiss her. Trump denies this happened.

But People's account today lists five people who say she told them this story at around the time it allegedly happened. One is a friend of hers who says Stoynoff called her the day after the advance and gave her a full accounting of it. Another is a former journalism professor of hers who says she called him the very night of the advance. Three others were co-workers of hers who say she confided in them.

Politico reports that a full account from these confidantes will run in People Magazine tomorrow. Theoretically, this should complicate the Trump campaign's ongoing push-back.

Trump has claimed the charges of unwanted groping and kissing are part of a plot in which his female accusers have made up stories about him, providing fodder for the Clinton campaign and the news media to conspire to rig the election against him.

But People's latest story points to a problem with this argument. As I noted yesterday, if there is such a plot, it would have to involve more than just his accusers, the Clinton campaign, and the news media. It would also have to involve the people who say that his accusers told them of the advances at the time or more recently, and have now said as much to news outlets.

In other words, either Trump's accusers told their friends, co-workers, and relatives these false stories, in some cases years ago, perhaps in order to derail a Trump presidential run many years in the future, or these confidantes have all recently been enlisted in the plot against Trump, and thus are all falsely claiming to have been told these tales.

Indeed, taking into account this new People magazine story, around 10 confidantes now fall into this category. There are the five reported on by People. On top of that, there is the friend of another accuser who told The Washington Post's Karen Tumulty she was told of Trump's advance soon after it happened in the early 1990s. And then there are four friends of still another accuser (who has claimed Trump felt her up on an airplane three decades ago) who all told The New York Times that she confided in them with this story in the last year.

These confidants have a special place in our chart of the vast international conspiracy to stop Trump, down there on the left, where it says “friends of accusers enlisted in plot”:




And the conspiracy continues to grow.

• Greg Sargent writes The Plum Line blog at The Washington Post, a reported opinion blog with a liberal slant — what you might call “opinionated reporting” from the left.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/wp/2016/10/18/the-conspiracy-to-rig-the-election-against-trump-just-got-bigger
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« Reply #21 on: January 18, 2017, 12:02:26 pm »


from the Los Angeles Times....

Former ‘Apprentice’ contestant accuses Donald Trump
of unwanted sexual advances, files defamation suit


By HAILEY BRANSON-POTTS | 2:05PM PST - Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Attorney Gloria Allred, left, accompanies her client Summer Zervos at a news conference announcing Zervos' lawsuit against President-elect Donald Trump. — Photograph: Valerie Macon/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.
Attorney Gloria Allred, left, accompanies her client Summer Zervos at a news conference announcing Zervos' lawsuit
against President-elect Donald Trump. — Photograph: Valerie Macon/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images.


A FORMER CONTESTANT on TV's “The Apprentice” on Tuesday filed a defamation lawsuit against President-elect Donald Trump, whom she has accused of making unwanted sexual advances toward her.

Summer Zervos announced the lawsuit at a downtown Los Angeles news conference with her attorney, Gloria Allred, three days before Trump's inauguration.

Zervos, who appeared on the fifth season of the reality show, said Trump had tried to seduce her at the Beverly Hills Hotel in 2007, kissing her on the mouth without her consent and pressing himself against her. She tearfully described darting around a hotel room to avoid physical contact with Trump, even as she sought employment from him.

Zervos said in October that she felt compelled to go public with the accusations after seeing recordings on the set of “Access Hollywood” that had been released days earlier, in which Trump made crude comments about grabbing women by the genitals.

“For the first time, Summer Zervos saw Trump's behavior towards her for what it was: a sexual predator who had preyed on her and other women,” the suit says.

On Tuesday, Allred said her client had voluntarily taken a lie detector test regarding the allegations and had passed.

The suit was filed in New York.

Trump responded by denying Zervos' allegations and saying he “vaguely” recalled her from the reality-television show he hosted for more than a decade.

“To be clear, I never met her at a hotel or greeted her inappropriately a decade ago. That is not who I am as a person, and it is not how I've conducted my life,” Trump said in a statement.

On Tuesday, Zervos said she would retract her lawsuit if Trump issued a retraction of his statements about her.

“I would still be willing to dismiss my case against him immediately for no monetary compensation if he will simply retract his false and defamatory statements about me and acknowledge that I told the truth about him,” Zervos said.

Allred said the suit opens the possibility that Trump will be forced to testify under oath and that recordings and video from “The Apprentice” could be subpoenaed.

Allred said Zervos gave Trump months to retract his statements about Zervos and said the timing of the suit the week of the inauguration came because his “time is up.”

“This was in Mr. Trump's hands,” Allred said. “This lawsuit did not need to be filed.”

She said she and Zervos, and possibly other Trump accusers, will be in Washington, D.C., for the Women's March on Washington.

Trump's media relations team did not immediately respond to a request for comment.


http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-former-apprentice-contestant-lawsuit-summer-zervos-trump-20170117-story.html
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« Reply #22 on: October 23, 2017, 02:29:51 pm »


from The Washington Post....

‘My pain is everyday’: After Weinstein's fall,
Trump accusers wonder: Why not him?


The latest scandal has renewed the frustrations of women who claim
the man who now occupies the Oval Office harassed them.


By KAREN TUMULTY, MARK BERMAN and JENNA JOHNSON | 6:48PM EDT - Saturday, October 21, 2017

Jessica Leeds at her home in New York on October 20th, 2017. — Photograph: Celeste Sloman/The Washington Post.
Jessica Leeds at her home in New York on October 20th, 2017. — Photograph: Celeste Sloman/The Washington Post.

ALMOST A YEAR after New Yorker Jessica Leeds and other women stepped forward with harrowing accounts of being sexually assaulted by a powerful man, another scandal with similar elements exploded.

Only this time, the punishment was swift and devastating.

“It is hard to reconcile that Harvey Weinstein could be brought down with this, and [President] Trump just continues to be the Teflon Don,” said Leeds, who claims she was groped 30 years ago on a plane by the man whose presence she cannot escape now that he sits in the Oval Office.

In Florida, Melinda McGillivray was having much the same reaction.

“What pisses me off is that the guy is president,” McGillivray, who a year ago went public with allegations that Trump grabbed her at Mar-a-Lago in 2003 when she was 23. “It's that simple.”

Leeds and McGillivray were among the 11 women who came forward in the 2016 campaign to accuse the then-Republican presidential candidate of unwanted touching or kissing. Trump called the charges “pure fiction” and referred to the women as “horrible, horrible liars.”

Their claims did not stop the celebrity real estate titan on his climb to the most powerful office in the world.

Since then, numerous men in high places have been felled by charges of sexual misconduct. Most notable among them were Bill O'Reilly, the star Fox News anchor who was ousted less than a year after Roger Ailes, the network's co-founder; and Weinstein, once regarded as one of the most influential figures in the entertainment business.

The Weinstein scandal, which has featured graphic accounts of assault from a string of celebrity accusers, has sparked a national debate about sexual harassment. Many women, inspired by a #MeToo campaign, have taken to social media to tell their own stories, and calls to the National Sexual Assault Hotline have risen sharply.

But for Trump's accusers, the renewed debate offers a reminder that their allegations did not have the same effect.

Trump, unlike Weinstein, was able to deflect their claims — despite the disclosure of a video in which he was heard bragging about the kind of behavior some of the women had alleged. Trump has never followed through with his vow to sue his accusers or produce the “substantial evidence” he said would refute their claims.

So far, the allegations against the president have led to a single new lawsuit filed by a Trump accuser who argues that the president defamed her when he denied her allegations — a case that Trump's lawyer Marc Kasowitz called a “completely contrived, totally meritless lawsuit, which we expect to be summarily dismissed.”

Kasowitz did not respond to questions from The Washington Post about the other women's claims and why Trump has not produced the evidence he said would to disprove them.

The frustrations of some Trump accusers surfaced publicly in the days after The New York Times revealed the allegations against Weinstein.

“My pain is everyday with bastard Trump as President,” tweeted Jill Harth, who once worked with Trump on organizing beauty pageants and sued him in 1997, claiming he had repeatedly groped her breasts, tried to touch her genitals and kissed her against her will. “No one gets it unless it happens to them. NO one!”

Harth, who is now a makeup artist in New York and declined to be interviewed, also accused  Trump of getting into bed, uninvited, with one of the 22-year-old contestants in the early 1990s, according to allegations detailed in The Boston Globe.

Cathy Heller, who last year told The Guardian that Trump forcibly kissed the side of her mouth during a brunch at Mar-a-Lago in 1997, expressed dismay that “nothing stuck” against him.

Heller said she wondered whether the fame of Weinstein's accusers — who include Oscar winners such as Gwyneth Paltrow — played a role in how their claims were received.

“A lot of them were actresses we've all heard of,” said Heller, 64. “When it's a celebrity, it has more weight than just someone who he met at Mar-a-Lago or a beauty pageant contestant. They're not people we've heard of. And that, in our society, has much more weight because they're famous.”

Heller said Weinstein's removal from his production company made her glad that “finally something was really done and a guy finally got his dues, his just deserts,” she said. “We'll see about Trump. It's never too late.”

McGillivray, now 37, said she was initially afraid to speak out, calling it “petrifying”. But she said she felt driven by a patriotic duty — as well as a desire to do right by her teenage daughter.

“I wanted to be heard,” said McGillivray, who lives in Palm Springs, Florida, not far from Mar-a-Lago, the president's private club.

Allegations about Trump's behavior toward women became an issue early in his candidacy and lingered for months, exploding in early October when The Washington Post published the 2005 “Access Hollywood” video in which he boasted in vulgar terms about kissing women and grabbing them by the genitals. The then-GOP nominee called the remarks “locker-room banter,” adding: “I apologize if anyone was offended.”

That disclosure was followed by accusations concerning incidents alleged to have occurred over several decades, starting in the early 1980s and continuing until at least 2007. The accusers included several women whose careers depended on Trump, in addition to women he encountered by happenstance.

Polls showed that a clear majority of voters came to believe that Trump had committed the kind of behavior described by his accusers.

A Washington Post poll three weeks before the election found that more than two-thirds of registered voters — including almost half of Republicans — thought that Trump probably had made unwanted sexual advances toward women.

But the specific allegations did little to budge an electorate that had become almost tribal in its divisions.

“Sexual abuse should not be a partisan issue, but it frequently is,” said conservative commentator Amanda Carpenter. “That to me is maddening, just to watch women become fodder, to watch women become cannon fodder for these men. It's gut-wrenching.”

After the allegations against Weinstein were made public, Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel argued on CNN that Trump's alleged offenses were “not even comparable” to Weinstein's, adding that “to even make that comparison is disrespectful to the president.”

McDaniel tried to turn the Weinstein case on the Democrats whose campaigns he had helped finance, tweeting on October 7th: “Whose side is Hillary Clinton on: Harvey Weinstein's or his victims?”

Unlike Weinstein, Trump responded to the accusations against him with vehement denials and fierce counterpunching. Although he apologized for his comments heard on the “Access Hollywood” tape, he attacked the credibility of the women making specific claims.

Trump deemed their accounts a “total fabrication”, “totally and absolutely false” and “pure fiction”. In the cases of two of the women, he urged the public to judge whether they were attractive enough for him to have assaulted them.

“Believe me: She would not be my first choice. That I can tell you,” he said of Leeds.

Trump's pushback led one of his accusers, Summer Zervos, a former contestant on Trump's reality television show, “The Apprentice”, to file a defamation lawsuit against him three days before he took the oath of office.

Zervos first appeared weeks before the election at a news conference with her attorney, Gloria Allred, and accused Trump of aggressively kissing her and groping her breasts during a 2007 meeting that took place when she was seeking a job at his company.

In court documents, Zervos's attorneys said Trump defamed her by labeling his accusers liars. They have sought to subpoena documents from Trump's campaign related to any of the women accusing him of inappropriate sexual contact. “Summer has really suffered, and she deserves to have her reputation restored,” said Allred, who also represents other women who have accused Trump.

Asked this week about the case, Trump called it “totally fake news”.

“It's just fake,” he said during a Rose Garden news conference. “It's fake. It's made-up stuff, and it's disgraceful, what happens, but that happens in the — that happens in the world of politics.”

Trump's lawyers are seeking to have the case dismissed.

The next brief is due on October 31st, and sometime after that, a judge in New York state, where the suit was filed, is expected to rule on whether the case will proceed.

History suggests that an ongoing court case could be perilous for a sitting president. The last deposition of one was in another sexual harassment case, when Bill Clinton was questioned for six hours in January 1998 by lawyers for former Arkansas state employee Paula Jones. She claimed that Clinton, while governor in 1991, had exposed his genitals to her in a Little Rock hotel room.

Clinton paid Jones $800,000 to settle the case without admitting guilt, but during that deposition, he was asked about his relationship with White House intern Monica Lewinsky and gave false statements that led to his impeachment.

The same factor that helped Clinton survive impeachment and remain in office helped Trump overcome the accusations of misconduct against him, said Elaine Kamarck, a former Clinton White House official who is now a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.

“The fact is, there were bigger issues at play,” Kamarck said. “Nobody expected him to be a good guy. People knew what kind of guy he was.”

Leeds, now 75, said the furor over her decision to come forward last year in The New York Times lasted several months, “longer than I imagined.” In the aftermath, she said, younger women approached her to thank her for her bravery. Many told her they have agonized over whether to do the same.

“I thought things were better in that area, with more women in the workplace,” Leeds said. But she has come to the conclusion that the culture that fostered experiences like the one she claims to have had with Trump “is still very strong and very prevalent, and that was discouraging.”


Scott Clement, Alice Crites and Julie Tate contributed to this report.

• Karen Tumulty is a national political correspondent for The Washington Post.

• Mark Berman covers national news for The Washington Post and anchors Post Nation, a destination for breaking news and stories from around the country.

• Jenna Johnson is a political reporter who covers the White House for The Washington Post. She spent more than a year writing about Donald Trump's presidential campaign, traveling to 35 states to attend more than 170 political rallies and interview hundreds of Trump supporters.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • VIDEO: ‘Trump just keeps merrily going along’: For Trump accusers, nothing has changed

 • #MeToo made the scale of sexual abuse go viral. But is it asking too much of survivors?

 • In ‘Apprentice’ defamation case, Trump will argue he is immune from lawsuits in state courts until he leaves office


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/my-pain-is-everyday-after-weinsteins-fall-trump-accusers-wonder-why-not-him/2017/10/21/bce67720-b585-11e7-be94-fabb0f1e9ffb_story.html
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« Reply #23 on: October 23, 2017, 02:30:44 pm »


What is really needed is for leaders of other western countries to grow some BALLS and refuse point-blank to have any interaction with Donald J. Trump due to the fact that he is a sexual predator & sicko. They need to completely turn their backs on him and ignore him at ALL world forums he attends and to loudly proclaim WHY they are doing it. Turn the bastard into the biggest pariah in the western world. Go all out to humiliate and belittle him. And that will also give the message firmly to the USA that the rest of the world will not stand by and tolerate them electing a sexual predator & sicko as their president and that America will be marginalised on the world stage until they see the error of their ways.
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