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TRUMP the stupid CHUMP


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Kiwithrottlejockey
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Having fun in the hills!


« Reply #275 on: October 22, 2016, 03:35:31 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Donald Trump first swept into the nation's capital 40 years ago.
It didn't go well.


As he was trying to sell D.C. on a new convention center in 1976, Trump's father was briefly
jailed for violations at an apartment complex in neighboring Prince George's County.


By MICHAEL E. MILLER and KICHAEL KRANISH | 9:23AM EDT - Friday, October 21, 2016

Donald Trump and his father, Fred Trump, a real estate developer who died in 1999. — Photograph: Ron Galella/WireImage.
Donald Trump and his father, Fred Trump, a real estate developer who died in 1999. — Photograph: Ron Galella/WireImage.

IN THE fall of 1976, Fred Trump made a rare visit to a housing complex he owned in Seat Pleasant, Maryland. For months, Prince George's County inspectors had complained of broken windows, rotted rain gutters and missing fire extinguishers at the 504-unit Gregory Estates. When the problems weren't fixed, fed-up officials asked Trump to come down and meet in person.

The “meeting” however, was brief. As soon as the multimillionaire arrived, he was arrested and — to his outrage — briefly jailed.

The incident came at an awkward time for the Trump family. Fred was accused of subjecting black tenants to poor conditions just a year after settling a lawsuit with the federal government, which alleged that the Trump Organization refused to rent to African Americans.

And his hard-charging son was in the middle of an audacious and ultimately unsuccessful bid to construct a $125 million convention center in the nation's capital. Barely 30 years old, Donald Trump saw opportunity in downtown Washington's barren lots and riot-scarred buildings near Union Station.

In an interview, Trump told The Washington Post he had no idea his father had been arrested in Prince George's. But he had no trouble recalling his convention center proposal, which included a luxury hotel in the historic Government Publishing Office.

“It would have been great for Washington,” he said in an email.

Forty years later, Trump has finally gotten his foothold in the capital with the opening of his glitzy $212 million Trump International Hotel in the Old Post Office Pavilion. And the Republican presidential nominee is trying to claim an even grander address on Pennsylvania Avenue: the White House.

But the seeds of his Washington ambitions can be traced back to 1976, when his convention center proposal fell victim to his strained relationship with African Americans — something that has re-emerged as he runs for president.

“He doesn't really reach out to black people properly,” said Joseph Searles III, now 74, an African American ex-NFL player who was one of Trump's partners in the convention center project.

“Every time we went to a community meeting,” Searles said, “he'd piss off too many people, just like he does now.”


The Pleasant Homes Apartments in Seat Pleasant, Maryland. Formerly known as Gregory Estates, the complex was once owned by Donald Trump's father. Fred Trump was arrested and briefly jailed in 1976 for failing to fix housing-code violations. — Photograph: Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post.
The Pleasant Homes Apartments in Seat Pleasant, Maryland. Formerly known as Gregory Estates, the complex was once owned
by Donald Trump's father. Fred Trump was arrested and briefly jailed in 1976 for failing to fix housing-code violations.
 — Photograph: Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post.


‘Get me out of jail’

In the spring of 1961, when Donald Trump was finishing his freshman year at a military high school in New York, his father purchased Gregory Estates from the Federal Housing Administration. Records show he paid $1. “It was bought at a distress sale,” Donald Trump recalled.

The sprawling, three-story apartment complex had been built a decade earlier during the postwar boom. When the developer couldn't keep up with mortgage payments, the FHA took over, then sold the property to Bruche Realty Corporation, one of Fred Trump's many companies.

Fred Trump rented the one- and two-bedroom apartments for about $150 a month. Initially, his tenants were poor whites. After the 1968 riots devastated parts of Washington, however, both the District and the surrounding areas began to change. African Americans, many of them middle class, moved into Prince George's County as whites fled to Montgomery County and other suburbs.

By 1970, when Donald began to help manage Gregory Estates, the tenants were predominantly black. With his blond pompadour and Ivy League education, the young Trump stood out in the low-income apartment project. He would fly down for a week at a time and stay in the model unit that was shown to prospective renters.

In his interview with The Washington Post earlier this year, he remembered collecting rent for his father at Gregory Estates.

“That was a dangerous territory,” Trump recalled. “I'd go there sometimes by myself and I'd say, ‘Pop, this is a rough piece of property here’.”

But Willie Cabbagestalk remembers things differently.

“He didn't collect [expletive],” said Cabbagestalk, 75, who has worked at Gregory Estates, now called Pleasant Homes Apartments, since the mid 1960s. “He gave me orders.”

He agreed with Trump, however, that Gregory Estates rapidly declined in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

“It used to be rough here,” Cabbagestalk said. “We had 50 to 60 windows broken per day.”

By the time inspectors visited in January of 1976, Gregory Estates was falling apart.


On July 7th, 1976, Donald Trump, then 30, stood beside a model of the D.C. convention center he hoped to build. — Photograph: Tom Allen/The Washington Post.
On July 7th, 1976, Donald Trump, then 30, stood beside a model of the D.C. convention center he hoped to build.
 — Photograph: Tom Allen/The Washington Post.


When the notoriously frugal Fred Trump failed to pay for repairs by that July, his housing license was revoked, preventing him from signing new leases. The blow to his pocketbook spurred him to action: Trump agreed to fly to Maryland to meet with local officials on September 29th, 1976.

Instead, he was arrested.

Prince George's County was cracking down on dilapidated housing complexes, but arresting an owner was unusual. “We probably haven't issued four arrest warrants in the past five years,” Joseph T. Healey, the county's housing inspector supervisor, told The Washington Post for an article on the arrest.

Fred Trump was furious. From his cell, the real estate mogul called Seat Pleasant Mayor Henry T. Arrington and demanded he be released.

“Come get me out of jail,” Trump said, according to Arrington.

Arrington, now 84, was well aware of the problems at Gregory Estates  “It was infested with drugs”  but he had never met the landlord.

When the mayor told Trump that he had no jurisdiction over the jail, Trump called New York, arranged payment of his $1,000 bond, and flew home immediately.

Irving Eskenazi, a Trump employee, attributed the problems to “a very serious change in the area. Low-income people started moving in.”

Trump, he told The Washington Post at the time, was a “fine gentleman” who “shouldn't even be going to a project like this.” And county officials should have known better than to “try and louse around with his reputation.”

Donald Trump, who had risen to president of the Trump Organization, vowed to fight the allegations in court. But his father pleaded no contest to five misdemeanor charges and paid a fine of $3,640  the equivalent of about $15,400 today.

Fred Trump didn't waste any time washing his hands of the place. Shortly after his arrest, he hired H.R. Crawford, a former assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, to manage the property. Trump, Crawford said, handed him the keys and severed his ties to Bruche Realty and Gregory Estates.

“He didn't want to come back to Prince George's County ever again,” Crawford, 74, recalled.


Donald J. Trump, already president of the Trump Organization, tried to sell skeptical D.C. officials on a $125 million convention center. — Photograph: Tom Allen/The Washington Post.
Donald J. Trump, already president of the Trump Organization, tried to sell
skeptical D.C. officials on a $125 million convention center.
 — Photograph: Tom Allen/The Washington Post.


‘Trump did not excite anybody’

On July 7th, 1976, Donald Trump stood before D.C. officials and promised to transform the struggling capital with a 1.8 million-square-foot convention center.

“The center will bring in $500 million in new business, and the city will take $45 to $50 million of that in taxes,” the 30-year-old, sharply dressed in a wide-lapeled suit and patterned tie, was quoted by The Washington Post as saying.

For the next year, the young Trump would try to sell the city on his plan. But Trump's brash personality and off-the-cuff style angered officials and alienated African American residents.

In the summer of 1976, both Washington and Donald Trump were new to negotiating. Trump had first gained notoriety by defending his family's business against federal allegations of racial bias, ultimately settling the case without admitting fault. Then he bought the old Commodore Hotel in Manhattan and turned it into the Grand Hyatt. He was in the midst of convincing New York City officials to build a convention center on land to which he held a lucrative option when he came to the capital to pitch a similar plan.

Washington had gained home rule on Christmas Eve in 1973. The city's first elected mayor, Walter Washington, felt that a new convention center near Mount Vernon Square would lift the District’s economy and spirit.

Congress still had to approve the plan, however, and a tense standoff ensued. Lawmakers, led by Senator Patrick J. Leahy (Democrat-Vermont), criticized the proposal as too costly.

In stepped The Donald.

Trump offered to arrange $125 million in private financing to build a bigger convention center next to Union Station.

Trump wasn't the only millionaire to offer his services. Abe Pollin, owner of the Washington Bullets and Capitals, initially wanted a convention center alongside a sports arena downtown before settling for an arena in Maryland. Home improvement store magnate John W. Hechinger proposed his lumberyard in Northeast Washington as a site. Architect Arthur Cotton Moore even suggested stringing inflatable “helium cells” over RFK Stadium to create a convention center covered by the “world's first ‘floating roof’.”

City officials were caught off guard by Trump's plan, The Washington Star reported. He and his partners briefed the mayor only a few days before bringing the idea before the D.C. Redevelopment Land Agency board.

Trump's surprise proposal came with two catches. Although he would use private financing to build the center — which would stretch from Massachusetts Avenue to I Street and North Capitol to Second Street — Trump said he was seeking subsidies to meet “a portion of the debt service and carrying charges,” according to The Washington Post. He said the amount would be “$5 to $10 million at the absolute maximum” and would be more than offset by the taxes the city would rake in.

In a move foreshadowing his return to the District 40 years later, Trump also wanted permission to transform the historic red-brick Government Publishing Office building into a luxury hotel.

But Trump ran into serious headwinds. Unlike in New York, he was relatively unknown in the capital.

“The name Trump did not excite anybody back then,” said Sterling Tucker, the D.C. Council chairman at the time.

A bigger hurdle was that the city's first elected officials were against privately financing the convention center. “We were trying to control our destiny,” recalled Tucker, now 92.


Chanting, “Hey, hey, ho, ho, Donald Trump has got to go,” union workers picket outside the Trump International Hotel over a labor dispute at a Trump property in Las Vegas. — Photograph: Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post.
Chanting, “Hey, hey, ho, ho, Donald Trump has got to go,” union workers picket outside the Trump International Hotel
over a labor dispute at a Trump property in Las Vegas. — Photograph: Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post.


What ultimately killed Trump's $125 million plan, however, was a public school.

After Trump's July 7th presentation, he was told that he would have to wait while the redevelopment board considered the proposal, including concerns raised by community groups.

“This is ridiculous. That's why Washington doesn't have a convention center,” Trump responded, according to The Washington Star.

When the redevelopment board met again two weeks later, about 50 residents showed up to protest the location of Trump's proposed convention center. Much of the land was already promised to other things, including Perry Simmons Elementary, they argued.

When the board rejected Trump's plan, they cheered.

Three years later, the city began construction on the Washington Convention Center near Mount Vernon Square. Smaller than Trump's proposal, it opened in 1983 but was quickly dwarfed by competitors. It was demolished in 2004.

In an email, Trump said he remembered his convention center idea well, although he “didn't pursue it heavily.”

“The project we are opening now is even more exciting,” he added.

Trump's palatial new hotel on Pennsylvania Avenue will hold its formal grand opening just days before the election. He cited it during his second debate with Hillary Clinton as an example of his business acumen, touting the work as “under budget, ahead of schedule, saved tremendous money.”

But the project has also drawn protests. Dozens gathered outside on Trump International's first day of operation, chanting: “No Trump, no KKK, no racist USA!” Two weeks ago, a man spray-painted “Black Lives Matter” on its entrance. On Thursday, labor activists picketed over stymied efforts to organize workers at a Trump hotel in Las Vegas.

“Donald Trump,” they shouted, “has got to go.”


Alice Crites and Karen DeYoung contributed to this report.

• Michael E. Miller is a reporter on the local enterprise team at The Washington Post.

• Michael Kranish is a national political investigative reporter for The Washington Post.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related stories:

 • Trump Revealed’: The reporting behind The Washington Post's best-selling biography

 • Trump's new Washington monument is a luxury hotel his blue-collar supporters can't afford

 • Confident. Incorrigible. Bully. Donald Trump as a child.

 • Inside the government's racial bias case against Fred and Donald Trump

 • Fifty years later, disagreements over young Trump's military academy record


https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/donald-trump-first-swept-into-the-nations-capital-40-years-ago-it-didnt-go-well/2016/10/21/934b07b8-8f08-11e6-9c52-0b10449e33c4_story.html
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #276 on: October 22, 2016, 03:36:52 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Donald Trump is in a funk: Bitter, hoarse and pondering, ‘If I lose…’

From the final presidential debate to a charity roast where New York City's
glitterati booed and laughed at him as he gave a tone-deaf speech attacking
Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump is struggling amid worsening poll numbers.


By JENNA JOHNSON | 6:13PM EDT - Friday, October 21, 2016

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks to supporters during a campaign stop at the Cambria County War Memorial Arena in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. — Photograph: Justin Merriman/Getty Images.
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks to supporters during a campaign stop at the Cambria County
War Memorial Arena in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. — Photograph: Justin Merriman/Getty Images.


FLETCHER, NORTH CAROLINA — As he took the stage here in this mountain town on Friday afternoon, Donald Trump was as subdued as the modest crowd that turned out to see him. He complained about the usual things — the dishonest media, his “corrupt” rival Hillary Clinton — but his voice was hoarse and his heart didn't seem in it.

He also promised to do all that he could to win, but he explained why he might lose.

“What a waste of time if we don't pull this off,” Trump said. “You know, these guys have said: ‘It doesn't matter if you win or lose. There’s never been a movement like this in the history of this country’. I say, it matters to me if we win or lose. So I'll have over $100 million of my own money in this campaign.”

“So, if I lose,” Trump continued as the crowd remained unusually quiet, “if I lose, I will consider this…”

Trump didn't finish his sentence, but he didn't really need to. After weeks of controversy and declining poll numbers, Trump and his campaign have settled into a dark funk. Even as he vows to prevail in the race, the GOP nominee's mood has soured with less than three weeks to go until Election Day.

His final debate performance this week was a bust, with him snarling that Clinton was “such a nasty woman” and gritting his teeth as he angrily ripped pages off a notepad when it was over. He is under fire from all quarters for refusing to say he will honor the election results if he loses, while 10 women have now come forward accusing him of groping or kissing them without consent. The capper to Trump's bad stretch came on Thursday night, when a ballroom full of New York City's glitterati booed him as he gave remarks attacking Clinton at a charity roast.

The gloomy mood has extended to his signature rallies, which Trump used to find fun. During the primaries, he would bound onto rally stages bursting with energy and a sense of excitement that intensified as the crowds chanted his name and cheered his every word. He would regularly schedule news conferences, call into news shows and chat with reporters, eager to spar with them. He would say politically incorrect things and then watch his polling numbers soar. He used to be the winner.

But no more. In recent days, Trump has tried to explain away his slide in the polls as a conspiracy carried out by the media, Democrats and Republicans. If he loses, it will be because he was cheated, Trump has repeatedly told his supporters, urging them to go to polling places in neighborhoods other than their own and “watch.”

Trump's supporters have concocted elaborate explanations for why he might lose, often involving massive voter fraud conducted by Democrats who will bus undocumented immigrants and people posing as people who have died to battleground states to vote illegally. There are also fears that election results in some states will be tampered with, and Trump's backers have cheered his promise to challenge the election results if he doesn't win.

“Since we can't check to see if you voted in three states, you will. If you want to vote in three states, you will,” said Larry Lewis, 67, a former electrician who lives in Hendersonville, North Carolina. He said he doesn't know anyone who has committed voter fraud but has gotten up to speed on the issue thanks to talk radio. “I mean, that is human nature. I have ultimate faith in human nature.”

Campaigning on Friday in Cleveland, Clinton again criticized Trump for refusing to say he will honor the election results and joked about her time onstage debating him. “I have now spent 4½ hours onstage with Donald, proving once again I have the stamina to be president,” she said.

After the debate on Wednesday night, Trump flew to Ohio for a Thursday rally. He abruptly walked out of two local television interviews before taking the stage in front of a smaller-than-usual crowd. After it was over, he was back at the Columbus airport, slowly plodding up the steps to his personal jet. He was alone, holding a black umbrella as a light rain fell.

Hours later, Trump sat with his wife at the Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner to participate in the long-standing tradition of political candidates roasting each other. The dinner's chairman, Alfred E. Smith IV, set the tone for the evening as he lashed Trump in a series of cutting jokes.

Trump went first, and his opening lines landed with such heavy bitterness that it prompted scattered, uncomfortable laughter.

“A special hello to all of you in this room who have known and loved me for many, many years. It's true,” Trump said as he took command of the lavish dais, wearing a white tie and a black jacket that he kept tugging at.

“The politicians,” he continued. “They've had me to their homes, they've introduced me to their children. I've become their best friends in many instances. They've asked for my endorsement, and they always wanted my money, and even called me really a dear, dear friend, but then suddenly decided when I ran for president as a Republican, that I've always been a no-good, rotten, disgusting scoundrel. And they totally forgot about me.”

Over the next 15 minutes, Trump joked about the size of his hands and the size of his rival's rally crowds, then compared himself to Jesus. He said the debate the night before had been called “the most vicious debate in the history of politics,” prompting him to reflect, “Are we supposed to be proud of that?”

He joked about prosecuting Clinton if he gets elected president, accused the media of working for her and brought up the FBI's investigation into Clinton's use of a private email server while secretary of state.

“Hillary is so corrupt, she got kicked off the Watergate Commission,” Trump said, citing a false Internet rumor as the crowd turned on him and started to boo, something that simply doesn't happen at lavish charity dinners at the Waldorf Astoria hotel. The face of one the guests sitting on the stage behind him was struck with horror.

“Hillary believes that it's vital to deceive the people by having one public policy and a totally different policy in private,” Trump said, as the booing intensified. Trump would go on to accuse Clinton of “pretending not to hate Catholics” and mock the Clinton Foundation's work in Haiti.

At one point, he wondered aloud whether the crowd was booing him or Clinton, to which someone in the crowd answered: “You!”

As Clinton took her turn, Trump sat at a table decorated with pale roses and white orchids with his arms tightly folded.

“Donald looks at the Statue of Liberty and sees a four, maybe a five if she loses the torch and tablet and changes her hair,” Clinton said, as the crowd laughed and former New York mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani mouthed, “What?”

Trump, his arms folded, cocked his head to the side and smirked as his wife looked elegantly pained.

A few minutes later, Clinton poked Trump for his praise of Russian President Vladi­mir Putin: “Maybe you saw Donald dismantle his prompter the other day, and I get that. They're hard to keep up with, and I'm sure it’s even harder when you're translating from the original Russian.”

Trump smiled and rocked in his seat, his face turning slightly red.

Clinton recognized former New York mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, saying it was a shame he didn't speak, because “I'm curious to hear what a billionaire has to say,” referring to disputes about Trump's actual net worth.

And she gave a shout-out to Trump's campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway, saying: “She's working day and night for Donald, and because she's a contractor, he's probably not even going to pay her.” Conway, who has become subtly critical of her boss, quoted Clinton in a tweet and wrote, “A shout out from @HillaryClinton at #AlSmithDinner.”

As Clinton finished speaking, she received a standing ovation from many in the crowd. Trump clapped, then briefly stood, then sat down again, as if unsure what to do. Lip-readers caught him telling her that she did a good job.

As the dinner ended, Trump shook hands with some of the others on the stage, while a line of people wanting to talk with Clinton grew. After a few minutes, Trump and his wife made their way toward the exit.

Before ducking out, Trump flashed the crowd a thumbs up.


Abby Phillip in Cleveland contributed to this repy.

• Jenna Johnson is a political reporter at The Washington Post who is covering the 2016 presidential campaign.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related stories:

 • At charity roast, Trump delivered what might as well be a campaign eulogy

 • Trump's rationale for attacking the Clintons: Michelle Obama ‘started it’

 • GOP braces for Trump defeat, rushes to protect down-ballot seats

 • At third debate, Trump won't commit to accepting election results if he loses


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/donald-trump-is-in-a-funk-bitter-hoarse-and-pondering-if-i-lose/2016/10/21/d944b518-97a3-11e6-bb29-bf2701dbe0a3_story.html
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #277 on: November 07, 2016, 11:09:20 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Trump's staff reportedly keeping him off Twitter
in final days, much to Obama’s amusement


“Now if somebody can't handle a Twitter account, they
can't handle the nuclear codes,” said President Obama.


By BEN GUARINO | 5:09AM EST - Monday, November 07, 2016

Donald Trump speaks during an early morning campaign rally in Virginia on November 7th. — Photograph: Carlo Allegri/Reuters.
Donald Trump speaks during an early morning campaign rally in Virginia on November 7th. — Photograph: Carlo Allegri/Reuters.

OF ALL THE LOOSE CANNONS to roll across political Twitter's decks, Donald Trump may have been the most volatile. The GOP nominee blasted his messages into the feeds of 13 million followers and accrued retweets by the thousands. For every hit scored against Jeb Bush (low energy), Ted Cruz (Lyin'”) or Hillary Clinton (Crooked), though, there remained a risk Trump's potshots would be self-destructive rather than tactical.

In the past, Trump's worst tweets included the ludicrous, like his claim that climate change was a Chinese hoax, as well as the insulting and unsubtle. “While @BetteMidler is an extremely unattractive woman,” Trump tweeted in 2012, “I refuse to say that because I always insist on being politically correct.” He remained an impulsive tweeter well into his presidential campaign. On September 30th, he unleashed a series of tweets in the dead of morning, exhorting supporters to “check out sex tape” of former Miss Universe Alicia Machado.

“Wow,” Trump wrote, “Crooked Hillary was duped and used by my worst Miss U. Hillary floated her as an ‘angel’ without checking her past, which is terrible!”

Now, during the final stretch of the presidential race, Trump's campaign staff has taken control of his social media persona, The New York Times reported on Sunday.

“Aides to Mr. Trump have finally wrested away the Twitter account that he used to colorfully — and often counterproductively — savage his rivals,” The Times wrote. According to the report into the Republican nominee's last few days on the campaign trail:

Taking away Twitter turned out to be an essential move by his press team, which deprived him of a previously unfiltered channel for his aggressions.

On Thursday, as his plane idled on the tarmac in Miami, Mr. Trump spotted Air Force One outside his window. As he glowered at the larger plane, he told Ms. Hicks, [Hope Hicks] his spokeswoman, to jot down a proposed tweet about President Obama, who was campaigning nearby for Mrs. Clinton.

“Why is he campaigning instead of creating jobs and fixing Obamacare?” Mr. Trump said. “Get back to work.” After some light editing — Ms. Hicks added “for the American people” at the end — she published it.


Trump representative Hicks did not reply to a request for comment from The Washington Post late on Sunday.

An analysis by data scientist David Robinson may shed some light into the nature of Trump's tweets. In August, Robinson quantified the difference in tweets sent from Trump's account, depending on the source — whether they came from Twitter for Android or Twitter for iPhone. Robinson concluded that the Android tweets were “more hyperbolic and aggressive” whereas the iPhone tweets were closer to traditional campaign messages.

(A program like TweetDeck specifies the origin of tweets by operating system.)

Robinson hypothesized that Trump, who had been documented in the past checking Twitter using a Samsung Galaxy phone and expressing a distaste for Apple, issued the Android tweets. The iPhone tweets, lacking the emotional charge, were dictated to or written by staffers.

President Obama, campaigning for Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in Florida, did not pass up the chance to get in a few digs at Trump on Sunday.

Apparently his campaign has taken away his Twitter.

In the last two days, they had so little confidence in his self-control, that they said ‘We're just going to take away your Twitter…’

Now if somebody can't handle a Twitter account, they can't handle the nuclear codes. If somebody starts tweeting at 3 in the morning because SNL made fun of you, then you can't handle the nuclear codes.


On Saturday morning, Trump tweeted, “MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!” As of publication, this was the last tweet sent from an Android phone.

Since then, an iPhone has been used to run Trump's account. The most recent messages have been classic Trump boilerplate: Expressions of gratitude toward supporters, plus encouragements to vote, to Make America Great Again and to Drain the Swamp (meaning corruption in Washington, D.C., though the myth that the capital city was once a swamp is false).

There's another angle to support that Trump no longer has his fingers on the “send” button. Since Thursday, Trump had yet to add a new notch to the more than 280 people and other targets he'd insulted on Twitter during his presidential campaign.


• Ben Guarino writes for The Washington Post's Morning Mix.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related story:

 • Rosie O'Donnell responds to Trump: Calls him an ‘orange’ body part on Twitter


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2016/11/07/trumps-staff-reportedly-keeping-him-off-twitter-in-final-days-much-to-obamas-amusement
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« Reply #278 on: December 04, 2016, 09:23:53 am »

TRUMP gave the stupid left the HUMP
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« Reply #279 on: December 05, 2016, 06:16:18 am »


Trump has turned America into the laughing stock of the entire world.

He has PROVED that a huge number of Americans are idiots who deserve no longer being great.

No wonder China's star is on the rise while America is imploding into a has-been former superpower.

Donald Trump is merely giving the decline a push.
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« Reply #280 on: December 05, 2016, 09:43:13 am »


trump seems to be doing ok to me that is without all your made hype
you should join hillarys clintons cry feist
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« Reply #281 on: January 22, 2018, 05:36:50 pm »


Time to revive this thread.



from The New York Times....

After Vowing to Fix Washington, Trump Is Mired in a Familiar Crisis

Immigration policy, the issue that propelled President Trump's political rise,
snarled negotiations to avert a government shutdown.


By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVID and MAGGIE BABERMAN | Saturday, January 20, 2018

President Trump opted not to accept a deal that he and Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the top Senate Democrat, had hashed at the White House on Friday. — Photograph: Al Drago/The New York Times.
President Trump opted not to accept a deal that he and Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the top Senate Democrat, had hashed at the White House on Friday.
 — Photograph: Al Drago/The New York Times.


WASHINGTON — One year to the day after taking office with vows to bring the dysfunction of Washington to heel, President Trump on Saturday found himself thrust into the most perennial of political crises, bitterly casting blame on Democrats for a government shutdown he said they had orchestrated to mar the anniversary.

Mr. Trump had planned to spend the weekend at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida, celebrating his first year in office at a soiree with friends and supporters. Instead, he remained out of sight in the White House, where he stewed about an impasse he had been unable to prevent, according to people close to him, and held a feverish round of conversations with Republican leaders in search of a resolution.

“This is the One Year Anniversary of my Presidency and the Democrats wanted to give me a nice present,” he wrote on Twitter before dawn, appending the hashtag #DemocratShutdown. By afternoon, the president's trip — which was to include a lavish $100,000-per-couple party to celebrate his first year in office — had been shelved as aides contemplated with dread the potential practical and political impacts of shuttering the government.

Inside the White House, Mr. Trump, the neophyte president who has styled himself the ultimate dealmaker, remained remarkably disengaged from the complex process of hammering out a politically palatable deal that could provide a way out of the morass.

Senior advisers counseled him to do less, not more, negotiating, arguing that the shutdown was a political problem that Democrats had created for themselves, and had to find their own way to resolve. But Mr. Trump, a highly reactive personality who detests headlines questioning his leadership — like those that dominated cable TV throughout Saturday, during coverage of the shutdown and women's marches throughout the country denouncing his presidency — felt stymied and wanted somehow to intervene, according to one presidential adviser.

It fell to John F. Kelly, his chief of staff, who is also a newcomer to high-stakes legislative talks, and is still learning to channel Mr. Trump's fluctuating impulses, to haggle over the details with Republican leaders, who have become accustomed to plunging into tricky negotiations without a clear sense of what the president would accept.

Mr. Trump shuttled between the presidential residence and the Oval Office, where he spent some time in the afternoon. Throughout the day, he monitored television coverage that toggled between the government shutdown and the women's marches, one of which ended near the White House.

The president spoke with the Homeland Security secretary, Kirstjen Nielsen, and Jim Mattis, the defense secretary, to discuss the impact of the shutdown on border security and the military. He spoke by phone with Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, the House speaker, Paul D. Ryan, Republican of Wisconsin, and the House majority leader, Kevin McCarthy of California, to strategize on a path forward.

The immediate cause of the shutdown, which began at 12:01 a.m. on Saturday after Senate Democrats blocked consideration of a House-passed stopgap measure, was a dispute over spending. But it was a stalemate over immigration policy, the topic that propelled Mr. Trump's political rise and has dominated his first 12 months as president, that snarled the negotiations, as the president vacillated over what approach he should take and advisers including Mr. Kelly counseled a harder line.

Eager to strike a deal with Democrats to extend deportation reprieves to a group of undocumented immigrants brought to the country as children, Mr. Trump was nonetheless constrained by his own campaign promises to toughen immigration restrictions, and hemmed in by Republican congressional leaders uneasy about lining up behind a mercurial president with a penchant for changing his mind.

As negotiators on Capitol Hill held out hope of a swift agreement that could end the impasse before the weekend was out, the House and the Senate reconvened for a rare Saturday session. The likeliest path to reopening the government is an agreement on a stopgap spending measure that would stretch longer than the few days that Senate Democrats wanted, but shorter than the four weeks that the House approved on Thursday night.

Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House press secretary, said on Saturday that the president refused to negotiate on immigration issues until there was a deal to reopen the government.

Referring to Democrats' insistence that a deal to protect the young immigrants be in hand before they agree to a funding measure, Marc Short, the White House legislative director, told reporters at the White House: “There is nothing in this bill Democrats say they object to, yet it's like a 2-year-old temper tantrum to say, ‘I'm going to take my toys and go home because I'm upset about something else’.”

In his morning Twitter burst, Mr. Trump said Democrats were prioritizing “illegal immigrants” over American citizens and military personnel, and argued that the only solution to end the dysfunction was to defeat the party in this year's mid-term congressional elections.

“Democrats are far more concerned with Illegal Immigrants than they are with our great Military or Safety at our dangerous Southern Border,” the president said on Twitter. “They could have easily made a deal but decided to play Shutdown politics instead. #WeNeedMoreRepublicansIn18 in order to power through mess!”

In fact, it was Mr. Trump who opted not to pursue a potential deal that he and Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the top Senate Democrat, had hashed out over lunch at the White House on Friday. The proposal would have kept the government open, funded a border wall and extended legal status to undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children, while including disaster aid funds and money for a federal children's health insurance program. Mr. Kelly later called Mr. Schumer to say the agreement lacked sufficient immigration restrictions.

While Mr. Schumer said shortly after the government shut down that “in my heart, I thought we might have a deal tonight,” White House officials argued that he had drastically overstated the progress made during the lunch.

On Saturday, though, Mr. Schumer said that even members of the president's party had by now recognized that Mr. Trump was ill equipped to strike a political compromise.

“What's even more frustrating than President Trump's intransigence is the way he seems amenable to these compromises before completely switching positions and backing off,” he said on the Senate floor. “Negotiating with President Trump is like negotiating with Jell-O.”

The remark echoed one made by Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, at a hearing this past week, in which he said there were “two Trumps,” one who was open to a bipartisan immigration deal and one who was not.

Mr. Trump's shifting desires and demands on immigration have complicated the task of resolving the shutdown conflict. He has repeatedly signaled an inclination to strike a deal with Democrats that would codify Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, the Obama-era program that gave work permits and deportation reprieves to about 800,000 undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children.

But each time he has drifted toward such a bargain — first at a dinner last year with Mr. Schumer and Representative Nancy Pelosi of California, the minority leader, then at a large meeting in the Cabinet Room this month with lawmakers in both parties, next in phone conversations with Mr. Graham and Senator Richard J. Durbin, Democrat of Illinois, and again on Friday with Mr. Schumer — he has snapped back to a hard-line position.

Conservative Republican lawmakers and proponents of immigration restrictions in his inner circle at the White House, led by his senior adviser, Stephen Miller, and Mr. Kelly, have often been the ones to intervene, pushing the president to take a harder line.

One senior administration official, who asked for anonymity to discuss private conversations, described an inexperienced president who genuinely wanted to reach a deal with Mr. Schumer when he called the Democratic leader to the White House on Friday. But Mr. Trump had not determined how it would play out or mapped out a strategy with Republican leaders, the official said, or considered how the politics of a shutdown might unravel.

After Mr. Schumer departed, Mr. Trump met at the White House with Representatives Mark Meadows of North Carolina and Raúl Labrador of Idaho, members of the conservative Freedom Caucus who insist that any DACA measure include steeper immigration restrictions than the president has demanded.

Yet Mr. Trump has complained privately about his own advisers' attempts to stiffen his spine on immigration. In the Cabinet Room meeting this month, the president erupted when an aide distributed a list of conditions that included restrictive interior enforcement measures. “I don't know what this is,” the president said, according to a person briefed on the exchange, which was first reported by The Washington Post, and said he did not appreciate being blindsided by his own staff.

A Trump adviser painted a different picture, saying that Mr. Durbin, the second-ranking Democrat, had expressed anger at the document, and that Mr. Trump, who often plays to the crowd in front of him, was merely joining in the outrage.

On Saturday, the president was left alternately defiant and angry, self-pitying and frustrated. He argued to aides that he did not deserve the blame he was taking, but without a credible deal on the table, there was little for him to do. Irritated to have missed his big event in Florida, Mr. Trump spent much of his day watching old TV clips of him berating President Barack Obama for a lack of leadership during the 2013 government shutdown, a White House aide said, seeming content to sit back and watch the show.


__________________________________________________________________________

• Julie Hirschfeld Davis is a White House correspondent at The New York Times. She has covered politics from Washington for 19 years, writing on Congress, three presidential campaigns and three presidents. She joined The Times in 2014 after stints at Bloomberg News, the Associated Press, The Baltimore Sun and Congressional Quarterly. Julie is the 2009 winner of the Everett McKinley Dirksen Award for Distinguished Reporting of Congress for her coverage of the federal response to the 2008 financial meltdown. She grew up in New York City and attended Yale University.

• Maggie Haberman is a White House correspondent. She joined The New York Times in February 2015 as a campaign correspondent. Previously, Ms. Haberman worked as a political reporter at Politico from 2010 to 2015 and at other publications including the New York Post and New York Daily News. She was a finalist for the Mirror Awards, with Glenn Thrush, for What is Hillary Clinton Afraid of? which was published in 2014. Her hobbies include singing, and she is married with three children.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • GRAPHIC: What Will Happen if the Government Remains Shut Down

 • Government Shuts Down as Bill to Extend Funding Is Blocked; Senate Adjourns for the Night

 • Shutdown? It Could Be Forgotten in a Trumpian Flash.


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/20/us/politics/trump-shutdown.html
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« Reply #282 on: January 22, 2018, 06:19:58 pm »


from The New York Times....

A President Not Sure of What He Wants Complicates the Shutdown Impasse

Democrats struggle with a president who says he wants to compromise but then is reined in by his own staff,
while Republican leaders are loath to guess at his intentions.


By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVID and MAGGIE BABERMAN | Sunday, January 21, 2018

President Trump has privately told lawmakers twice recently that he is eager to strike a deal to extend legal status to young undocumented immigrants, only to have aides pull him back from such a compromise. — Photograph: Al Drago/The New York Times.
President Trump has privately told lawmakers twice recently that he is eager to strike a deal to extend legal status to young undocumented immigrants,
only to have aides pull him back from such a compromise. — Photograph: Al Drago/The New York Times.


WASHINGTON — When President Trump mused last year about protecting immigrants brought to the United States illegally as children, calling them “these incredible kids,” aides implored him privately to stop talking about them so sympathetically.

When he batted around the idea of granting them citizenship over a Chinese dinner at the White House last year with Democratic leaders, Mr. Trump's advisers quickly drew up a list of hard-line demands to send to Capitol Hill that they said must be included in any such plan.

And twice over the past two weeks, Mr. Trump has privately told lawmakers he is eager to strike a deal to extend legal status to the so-called Dreamers, only to have his chief of staff, John F. Kelly, and senior policy adviser, Stephen Miller, make clear afterward that such a compromise was not really in the offing — unless it also included a host of stiffer immigration restrictions.

As the government shutdown continued for its second day on Sunday, one thing was clear to both sides of the negotiations to end it: The president was either unwilling or unable to articulate the immigration policy he wanted, much less understand the nuances of what it would involve.

Both sides have reason to be confused. Each time Mr. Trump has edged toward compromise with Democrats, he has appeared to be reined in by his own staff, which shares the hawkish immigration stance that fueled his campaign. And Republican leaders, bruised by past experience with a president who has rarely offered them consistent cover on a politically challenging issue, are loath to guess at his intentions.

The result has been a paralysis not only at the White House but on Capitol Hill, complicating the chances for an ultimate resolution of how to protect hundreds of thousands of young undocumented immigrants, the problem underlying the shutdown. And it has raised questions not only about Mr. Trump's grasp of the issue that animated his campaign and energizes his core supporters, but his leadership.

“There's a real sense that there's a disconnect between the president and his staff on immigration issues, and people on all sides are seeking to exploit that disconnect,” said Alex Conant, a Republican strategist who advised Senator Marco Rubio of Florida, one of Mr. Trump's rivals, in his 2016 bid for the White House. “This is what happens when you have a president who is not clear and consistent on what he will accept: It emboldens all parties to take positions that they won't compromise.”

Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, suggested that Mr. Trump was in the thrall of extremists on his staff pulling him back from more moderate instincts on immigration.

“His heart is right on this issue; I think he's got a good understanding of what will sell, and every time we have a proposal, it is only yanked back by staff members,” Mr. Graham told reporters on Capitol Hill on Sunday. “As long as Stephen Miller is in charge of negotiating immigration, we are going nowhere. He's been an outlier for years.”


John F. Kelly, center, the White House chief of staff, with Nick Ayers, right, the vice president's chief of staff. Mr. Kelly fielded most of the calls from Senate and House leaders during the shutdown impasse on Sunday as Mr. Trump was urged to step back from the fray. — Photograph: Credit Al Drago/The New York Times.
John F. Kelly, center, the White House chief of staff, with Nick Ayers, right, the vice president's chief of staff. Mr. Kelly fielded most of the calls from Senate and
House leaders during the shutdown impasse on Sunday as Mr. Trump was urged to step back from the fray. — Photograph: Credit Al Drago/The New York Times.


Mr. Miller, 32, has been the ideological architect behind much of Mr. Trump's immigration agenda and a tart-tongued and unapologetic true believer in the president’s “America First” approach to the issue. A former aide to Attorney General Jeff Sessions when he was in the Senate, he cut his teeth on Capitol Hill as a lonely gladiator against bipartisan efforts to overhaul the immigration system and provide a pathway to citizenship for roughly 11 million unauthorized immigrants.

The White House had a tart retort for Mr. Graham, a one-time opponent of Mr. Trump who in recent months seemed to be growing close to the president.

“As long as Senator Graham chooses to support legislation that sides with people in this country illegally and unlawfully instead of our own American citizens, we're going nowhere,” said Hogan Gidley, a White House spokesman. “He's been an outlier for years.”

The intraparty spat unfolded while Mr. Trump spent the weekend at the White House out of sight and off the airwaves, unusually disengaged, except for some phone calls, for a president who enjoys the limelight.

His only comment on the situation came on Twitter on Sunday morning, when he vented his frustration as the shutdown threatened to bleed into the workweek, complicating his plans for a trip on Wednesday to the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, and the run-up to his first State of the Union address on January 30th.

“If stalemate continues, Republicans should go to 51% (Nuclear Option) and vote on real, long term budget, no C.R.'s!” Mr. Trump said on Twitter, using the abbreviation for a continuing resolution, legislation to temporarily extend government funding.

He was referring to filibuster rules in the Senate, which effectively require a three-fifths vote, or 60 senators, to advance major legislation, rather than a simple majority. Republicans have 51 seats.

And he took a tone far different from the one he used this month in pitching a “bill of love” to address immigration, posting on Twitter that, “The Dems just want illegal immigrants to pour into our nation unchecked.”

Underscoring that hard-line position, his campaign released a TV advertisement featuring an undocumented man who killed two police officers, and saying Democrats who refused to support a government funding measure without progress toward an immigration deal were “complicit in every murder committed by illegal immigrants.”


Stephen Miller, Mr. Trump's senior policy adviser, has been the unapologetic ideological architect behind much of the president's immigration agenda. — Photograph: Doug Mills/The New York Times.
Stephen Miller, Mr. Trump's senior policy adviser, has been the unapologetic ideological architect behind much of the president's immigration agenda.
 — Photograph: Doug Mills/The New York Times.


Those who know the president best argue that leaving the legislative haggling to his staff is merely the style of an executive used to delegating the small stuff to his underlings.

“The misconception is that the president does not know what he does not know. In my experience, the reality is that the president knows what he does not know and does not think he needs to know it,” said Sam Nunberg, a former campaign adviser. “He's a C.E.O. The tiny details are for his staff.”

But Mr. Trump is also a showman who is intensely focused on pleasing the audience in front of him at the moment, a habit that some confidants believe has led to misunderstandings about what the president is actually willing to accept in any deal. He often leaves people with the impression that he agrees with them, stressing whatever position is convenient at the time.

Mark Krikorian, the executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies, a group that presses for less immigration, said Mr. Trump had maintained his tough line on the issue despite occasionally talking about a compromise.

“He seems to make commitments that he is not going to keep,” Mr. Krikorian said. “His inclinations are hawkish on immigration, but he seems to like to be agreeable to people and nod his head when he's at a meeting and people are saying things, and try to make a deal.”

Mr. Krikorian said that he did not subscribe to the “Svengali theory” of the White House that cast Mr. Miller as a puppet master on immigration, but that it often fell to him and Mr. Kelly to explain the nuances of certain terms or proposals to a president unfamiliar with them. The chief of staff alluded to that dynamic in a closed-door meeting with Democratic lawmakers last week and later in an interview with Fox News, enraging Mr. Trump.

Immigration advocates hold a darker view.

“The president should trust his instincts and cut a deal,” said Kevin Appleby, the senior director of international migration policy at the Center for Migration Studies. “He is president and should not be the puppet of a few immigration restrictionist staffers, including his chief of staff. The perception is that they have total control over him, to the detriment of the nation.”

Mr. Kelly, a retired four-star general who headed the United States Southern Command and was Mr. Trump's first homeland security secretary, has emphasized immigration enforcement inside the country rather than policing the borders while Mr. Trump has indicated that is not as high a priority for him.


Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, leaving a meeting with other senators on Capitol Hill on Sunday. “His heart is right on this issue,” he said of Mr. Trump. “I think he's got a good understanding of what will sell, and every time we have a proposal, it is only yanked back by staff members.” — Photograph: Eric Thayer/The New York Times.
Senator Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, leaving a meeting with other senators on Capitol Hill on Sunday. “His heart is right on this issue,” he
said of Mr. Trump. “I think he's got a good understanding of what will sell, and every time we have a proposal, it is only yanked back by staff members.”
 — Photograph: Eric Thayer/The New York Times .


On Sunday, Mr. Kelly fielded most of the calls from Senator Mitch McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, and the House speaker, Paul D. Ryan of Wisconsin. The president was urged for a second day to step back from the fray, and for a second day he vented to aides that he wanted to do more to get involved.

Yet when Mr. Trump has become engaged, he has sometimes created problems for himself and his party.

Mr. Trump has demonstrated confusion over time about the details of immigration policy, including during a televised meeting in the Cabinet Room this month with lawmakers of both parties.

When Senator Dianne Feinstein, Democrat of California, said she wanted a “clean DACA bill,” Mr. Trump quickly agreed, only to have Representative Kevin McCarthy of California, the majority leader, pipe up to explain that meant accepting a stand-alone bill to legalize a group of undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children, without any security measures or other conditions the president had cited as priorities.

During a closed portion of that meeting, Mr. Trump snapped at staff members for handing out a sheet of paper he had not seen before that included an elaborate plan for border security.

“The president looked at it and said: ‘Who did this? This is way too much. I didn't approve this’,” Mr. Graham said on Sunday.

At that same session, he added, Mr. Trump had talked about a request of $18 billion for border security, and said he could build a wall for less.

“So what does the White House staff do a couple days later? They pitch a proposal for $33 billion,” Mr. Graham said. “That's just not credible.”


__________________________________________________________________________

Julie Hirschfield Davis reported from Washington, and Maggie Haberman from New York.

• Julie Hirschfeld Davis is a White House correspondent at The New York Times. She has covered politics from Washington for 19 years, writing on Congress, three presidential campaigns and three presidents. She joined The Times in 2014 after stints at Bloomberg News, the Associated Press, The Baltimore Sun and Congressional Quarterly. Julie is the 2009 winner of the Everett McKinley Dirksen Award for Distinguished Reporting of Congress for her coverage of the federal response to the 2008 financial meltdown. She grew up in New York City and attended Yale University.

• Maggie Haberman is a White House correspondent. She joined The New York Times in February 2015 as a campaign correspondent. Previously, Ms. Haberman worked as a political reporter at Politico from 2010 to 2015 and at other publications including the New York Post and New York Daily News. She was a finalist for the Mirror Awards, with Glenn Thrush, for What is Hillary Clinton Afraid of? which was published in 2014. Her hobbies include singing, and she is married with three children.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related to this topic:

 • Shutdown's Crux: Democrats' Deep-Rooted Distrust of G.O.P. on Immigration

 • How Trump and Schumer Came Close to a Deal Over Cheeseburgers

 • The Chaos President vs. His Iron-Fisted Chief of Staff


https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/21/us/politics/trump-government-shutdown.html
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« Reply #283 on: January 23, 2018, 02:01:52 am »

go back to sleep

« Last Edit: January 23, 2018, 06:02:55 am by Im2Sexy4MyPants » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #284 on: June 09, 2018, 02:55:22 pm »



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« Reply #285 on: June 09, 2018, 03:00:03 pm »



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« Reply #286 on: June 13, 2018, 08:37:52 pm »

you have no idea
Here is a man person with an idea

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« Reply #287 on: June 27, 2018, 05:40:07 pm »



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« Reply #288 on: June 28, 2018, 02:30:41 pm »

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« Reply #289 on: June 28, 2018, 04:29:57 pm »



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