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TRUMP the stupid CHUMP


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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #175 on: June 17, 2016, 07:12:04 pm »


from The New Zealand Herald....

Dear America, can we do a deal on Trump?

For the love of the human race, please don’t put
this vindictive xenophobe in the White House.


By TOBY MANHIRE | 5:00AM - Friday, June 17, 2016

THE WALL

DEAR LAND OF THE FREE and home of the brave,

Gidday from New Zealand, a small country in the depths of the Pacific. All Blacks, Hobbits, Lorde, all that. Steven Adams? I'm like a shorter, fatter, less good at basketball version of him.

I'm writing on behalf of everyone in New Zealand, and everyone in our vassal state Australia, and actually pretty much everyone outside the United States. That might seem a bold claim — and don't be misled by any comments underneath the online version of this column disputing the fact that I'm speaking for everybody; I had them arranged in the cause of verisimilitude — but boldness has a lot to recommend it. As business mogul Donald Trump explained in his 1987 bestseller The Art of the Deal, “a little hyperbole never hurts. People want to believe that something is the biggest and the greatest and the most spectacular. I call it truthful hyperbole.”

As it happens, my cause for writing on behalf of everyone is the very same Donald Trump.

It was all good fun for a while, him mouthing off like a deranged, carrot-stained car salesman, a 4-year-old on a sugary bender: jaw-dropping, sure, but inescapably destined to fall out of favour as the Republican primaries wore on. And yet, there he is: the actual GOP candidate. It isn't funny any more, and so as great admirers of America and Americans, we beseech you: don't do it. Don't.

It gives me no pleasure to write this. Open letters make me squirm — such a mawkish device; to be avoided at all costs, unless the future of the world is at stake. There's genuine risk, what is more, in outsiders wading over democratic borders. When Britain's Guardian newspaper in 2004 encouraged readers, with half a tongue in its cheek, to write to voters in Clark County and encourage them to support John Kerry over George Bush, not everyone loved it. Among the advice from residents of the knife-edge swing county: “weenie-spined limeys” from a “crappy little island full of yellow teeth” should understand that “real Americans aren't interested in your pansy-ass, tea-sipping opinions”. In the end, there was a swing. To the Republicans.

Nevertheless, it falls to me to convey the mood of pretty much all the world. Our concern has compounded in recent days as Trump pounced on the massacre of 49 people in Orlando and exploited it for base political gain, beginning with a tweet that read, “Appreciate the congrats for being right on radical Islamic terrorism” and continuing into a double-down on the promise to ban Muslim immigration, adding migrants from all countries who have any terrorist history to the prohibition, despite the fact that the Orlando murderer was born in New York.

We get it, he's a consummate attention-seeker, a loudmouth, a blowhard. As four-time bankrupt reality TV personality Donald Trump explained in his 1987 bestseller The Art of the Deal, “One thing I've learned about the press is that they're always hungry for a good story, and the more sensational the better … If you do things that are bold or controversial, the press is going to write about you.” But what might have been entertainingly outrageous when it sprung from the rubbery orifice of some ephemeral campaign novelty becomes downright terrifying when there's a real chance this guy could become the most powerful person in the world.

At his worst, America, this human Cheezel of yours makes Robert Mugabe seem palatable. Pro-torture, pro-gun, anti-free-speech. He calls Mexicans “criminals” and “rapists”, says a US-born judge of Mexican ethnicity is biased against him, boasts about his penis size in debates, encourages violence against people protesting at his rallies, believes Barack Obama was born in Kenya, claims to have seen huge crowds celebrating 9/11 in New Jersey that literally no one else did, thinks Belgium is a city. On it goes. The guy is a rejected, absurdly overblown villain from a sloppily inked cartoon strip, made flesh.

This week he banned one of the world's finest newspapers, the Washington Post, from attending his events, the latest on a growing blacklist. He might know how to get media coverage, but when he doesn't like it, he has a solution: he's “going to open up the libel laws so that … when they write hit pieces, we can sue them, and they can lose money.”

But what's most worrying, America, is the nukes. On this I agree with Donald Trump, who said: “The biggest problem we have is nuclear, having some maniac, having some madman go out and get a nuclear weapon.” Speaking for the world, we're worried about that, too, which is why we don't want him to have the opportunity to single-handedly order the world's biggest nuclear arsenal. And that's not hyperbole: in a long feature this week for Politico (another blacklisted publication) detailing the process by which a nuclear attack is launched, nuclear security expert Bruce G Blair writes that a President Trump “would be free to launch a civilisation-ending nuclear war on his own any time he chose”.

You may say: come on, he'd obviously go to his advisers, seek guidance from experts — right? But as hot-tempered xenophobe and deeply vindictive person who could actually become president Donald Trump explained in his 1987 bestseller The Art of the Deal: “Committees are what insecure people create to put off making hard decisions.” His overarching decision-making philosophy: “Listen to your gut.”

Forgive me, forgive us all, for interfering in an election that is yours, but we don't want to have the future of the world at the mercy of Donald Trump's gut. Please.

The latest polls suggest, America, that you're cooling on the idea of a President Trump. As you-know-who explained in his 1987 bestseller The Art of the Deal, “You can't con people, at least not for long. You can create excitement, you can do wonderful promotion, you can get all kinds of press … but if you don't deliver the goods, people will eventually catch on.” You're no suckers.

But your old friends out here in the world thought we'd write all the same, because the polls have been volatile, and god only knows what kind of email-related catastrophe could yet derail the Hillary Clinton campaign. We're not all convinced about Clinton's suitability, but we are united in agreeing her most compelling and unanswerable asset is Not Being Donald Trump. We'll take anyone but Trump. We'd prefer a lamb casserole were president. Do we have a deal?


__________________________________________________________________________

Related commentary:

 • Paul Thomas: Donald Trump so far from suitable to be US President yet so near levers of power


http://www.nzherald.co.nz/opinion/news/article.cfm?c_id=466&objectid=11657958
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« Reply #176 on: June 18, 2016, 05:38:37 am »

so in ww2 if you didn't let the japs come here you were being a xenophobic

maybe this is too hard for some to understand but islam is anti anyone who is not muslim

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« Reply #177 on: June 18, 2016, 01:55:26 pm »


from The Washington Post....

The challenges in covering Trump's relentless assault on the truth

By EUGENE ROBINSON | 7:22PM EDT - Thursday, June 16, 2016



DONALD TRUMP must be the biggest liar in the history of American politics, and that's saying something.

Trump lies the way other people breathe. We're used to politicians who stretch the truth, who waffle or dissemble, who emphasize some facts while omitting others. But I can't think of any other political figure who so brazenly tells lie after lie, spraying audiences with such a fusillade of untruths that it is almost impossible to keep track. Perhaps he hopes the media and the nation will become numb to his constant lying. We must not.

Trump lies when citing specifics. He claimed that a “tremendous flow of Syrian refugees” has been entering the country; the total between 2012 and 2015 was around 2,000, barely a trickle. He claimed that “we have no idea” who those refugees are; they undergo up to two years of careful vetting before being admitted.

Trump lies when speaking in generalities. He claimed that President Obama has “damaged our security by restraining our intelligence-gathering and failing to support law enforcement.” Obama actually expanded domestic intelligence operations and dialed them back only because of bipartisan pressure after the Edward Snowden revelations.

Trump lies by sweeping calumny. “For some reason, the Muslim community does not report people like this,” he said of Omar Mateen, the shooter in the Orlando massacre. But according to law enforcement officials, including FBI Director James B. Comey, numerous potential plots have been foiled precisely because concerned Muslims reported seeing signs of self-radicalization.

Trump lies by smarmy insinuation. “We're led by a man that either is not tough, not smart, or he's got something else in mind,” he said of Obama. “There's something going on. It's inconceivable. There's something going on.” He also said of Obama: “He doesn't get it or he gets it better than anybody understands — it's one or the other and either one is unacceptable.”

You read that right. The presumptive Republican nominee implies that the president of the United States is somehow disloyal. There is no other way to read “he gets it better than anybody understands.”

Trump claims that Hillary Clinton, the all-but-certain Democratic nominee, “wants to take away Americans' guns and then admit the very people who want to slaughter us.” Clinton has made clear that she doesn't want to take anyone's guns away, nor does she want to eliminate the Second Amendment, as Trump also claims. And the idea that Clinton actually wants to admit would-be slaughterers is grotesque.

I write not to defend Obama or Clinton, who can speak for themselves — and have done so. My aim is to defend the truth.

Political discourse can be civil or rowdy, gracious or mean. But to have any meaning, it has to be grounded in fact. Trump presents a novel challenge for both the media and the voting public. There is no playbook for evaluating a candidate who so constantly says things that objectively are not true.

All of the above examples come from just five days' worth of Trump's lies, from Sunday to Thursday of this week. By the time you read this, surely there will have been more.

How are we in the media supposed to cover such a man? The traditional approach, which seeks fairness through nonjudgmental balance, seems inadequate. It does not seem fair to write “Trump claimed the sky is maroon while Clinton claimed it is blue” without noting that the sky is, in fact, blue. It does not seem fair to even present this as a “question” worthy of debate, as if honest people could disagree. One assertion is objectively false and one objectively true.

It goes against all journalistic instinct to write in a news article, as The Washington Post did on Monday, that Trump's national security address was “a speech laden with falsehoods and exaggeration.” But I don't think we're doing our job if we simply report assertions of fact without evaluating whether they are factual.

Trump's lies also present a challenge for voters. The normal assumption is that politicians will bend the truth to fit their ideology — not that they will invent fake “truth” out of whole cloth. Trump is not just an unorthodox candidate. He is an inveterate liar — maybe pathological, maybe purposeful. He doesn't distort facts, he makes them up.

Trump has a right to his anger, his xenophobia and his bigotry. He also has a right to lie — but we all have a duty to call him on it.


• Eugene Robinson writes a twice-a-week column on politics and culture, contributes to the PostPartisan blog, and hosts a weekly online chat with readers. In a three-decade career at The Washington Post, Robinson has been city hall reporter, city editor, foreign correspondent in Buenos Aires and London, foreign editor, and assistant managing editor in charge of the paper's Style section.

__________________________________________________________________________

Read more on this topic:

 • The Washington Post: FACT-CHECKER

 • Ruth Marcus: Donald Trump — Stonewaller, shape-shifter, liar

 • Ruth Marcus: When it comes to lying, Trump is in a class by himself

 • The Washington Post's View: Trump lies and lies and lies again

 • The Washington Post's View: Mr. Trump spreads dangerous lies about Syrian refugees

 • Dana Milbank: If only Trump came with a money-back guarantee


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-challenges-in-covering-trumps-relentless-assault-on-the-truth/2016/06/16/076b367a-33fd-11e6-8ff7-7b6c1998b7a0_story.html
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« Reply #178 on: June 19, 2016, 05:28:21 pm »

haha the commie washing machine post
attempts to control the dimwitted hearts and minds with another hit at the don
so it's more of the same stupid left wing pc garbage.

if i had half of trumps money a lot of the people who make up all this bullshit would end up meeting with horrible accidents
a bit like the trail of dead bodies the clintons have left behind them.

watch all the terror attacks that are coming to america very shortly caused by obama letting unvetted muslims into the us,then watch the washing machine post try to blame any of these attacks on trump and guns,they will blame it on anything except islam when really it's the left who have hopped into bed with islam but they will say it's all trumps fault because they are pathetic sissies.
also the gays have started stocking up with guns no longer wanting to be victims good on them,

watch the coming terror attacks in the us the stupid bonehead radical muslims will get trump elected to prez lol

watch what happens when the obama government tries to take guns off the americans there would be civil war and nowhere safe for the traitors to hide.
gun sales are going up they are a great investment opportunity
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« Reply #179 on: June 19, 2016, 06:36:26 pm »


Doesn't change the fact that virtually everything which vomits out of Trump's mouth is a pack of LIES.

As shown up by the numerous fact-checker websites on the internet.
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« Reply #180 on: June 20, 2016, 11:26:16 am »

fact checking sites are a joke i think we need a fact checking site that fact checks other fact checking sites

it dont change the fact that all a sjw can do is call people names because they got no balls
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« Reply #181 on: June 20, 2016, 01:11:05 pm »


Fact-checking sites are only a joke to the perpetually STUPID who love being LIED to and don't like FACTS showing how gullible they are.
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« Reply #182 on: June 20, 2016, 02:47:21 pm »



Quote
Fact-checking sites are only a joke to the perpetually STUPID who love being LIED to and don't like FACTS showing how gullible they are.
have you ever fact checked the claims about global warming especially the things Al Gore said by now he is in deep water that lying bastid lol
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« Reply #183 on: June 20, 2016, 03:26:41 pm »


from The Washington Post....

THE FIX: The brutal numbers behind
a very bad month for Donald Trump


By PHILIP BUMP | 9:10AM EDT - Sunday, June 19, 2016

Trump speaks on primary night at the Trump National Golf Club Westchester in Briarcliff Manor, New York. — Photograph: Mike Segar/Reuters.
Trump speaks on primary night at the Trump National Golf Club Westchester in Briarcliff Manor, New York.
 — Photograph: Mike Segar/Reuters.


SUPPORTERS of Donald Trump got an unexpected plea on Saturday: a request to send the billionaire money.

It was an “emergency” request, The Hill reported, representing an urgent need for an infusion of $100,000 to put ads on the air in battleground states. Why Trump couldn't simply write a check to cover the costs apparently wasn't explained, but the missive was useful regardless: It demonstrates clearly the difficult position of the Trump campaign with only 142 days to go.

We looked at Trump's sliding poll numbers on Friday, but it's worth adding a bit more context.

"[T]here's no way to look at Trump's national polling that avoids the grim reality that he is at a lower ebb than any general election candidate has hit in the last three elections," the National Review's Dan McLaughlin wrote last week.

Not only are Trump's poll numbers slipping, they are at a low that no one, Republican or Democrat, has seen in the past three election cycles. Looking at the window of time between 200 and 100 days before each of those elections, you can see that Trump has consistently polled worse than George W. Bush in 2004, John McCain in 2008 and Mitt Romney in 2012. He caught up briefly after clinching the GOP nomination — and then sank again.




The margin by which he trails Hillary Clinton now mirrors McCain's deficit to Barack Obama in 2008. McCain rebounded after the Republican convention — but it's important to remember that we're comparing Trump to the worst Republican performance in a general election since 1996.



There's every reason to think that those numbers will get worse. Trump essentially has no campaign at this point; there's no sign that he has started staffing up significantly. We looked this month at how his staffing compared with the two final Democratic candidates. His campaign was never a traditional, national effort.



He has indicated that he doesn't plan to increase staff, either. On Friday, the Associated Press reported that Trump intended, in effect, to outsource his campaign to the Republican Party. As of right now, “the campaign estimates it currently has about 30 paid staff on the ground across the country,” according to the report.

On Sunday morning, NBC News's Mark Murray shared numbers on ad spending by Trump and Clinton. In June 2012, the Romney campaign and PACs supporting it spent about $38 million on ads in battleground states — a bit behind the $44.6 million spent by Obama and his allies.

This June? Trump is getting skunked.




In their look at the 2012 election, our John Sides and UCLA's Lynn Vavreck found that ads made a difference in the race when the balance was lopsided, as it is now. They also found that the presence of staff on the ground made a slight difference in the margin for a candidate in that region. (Without his field operation, they estimate, Obama probably would have lost Florida.) It's very early; Sides and Vavreck also found that ads right before the election made the biggest difference.

The current gap in ad spending exists because Trump can't or won't spend money on ads, just as he can't or won't spend money on staff. He will probably trail Clinton in fundraising even if he were to focus on it, and he has said in the past that he didn't need to spend because he got so much free media.

In essence, Trump is running a real-time experiment in a new form of presidential campaigning. And the early numbers suggest that the experiment is shaping up to be a failure.


• Philip Bump writes about politics for The Fix at The Washington Post. He is based in New York City.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/06/19/the-brutal-numbers-behind-a-very-bad-month-for-donald-trump
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« Reply #184 on: June 20, 2016, 03:28:02 pm »


Hahaha....TRUMP is going to LOSE the presidential election and take the GOP with him.

The Democrats will rule the White House, the Senate and the House of Congress.

Donald Trump's stupid white-trash supporters will be the cause of that for blindly believing and following a RETARD.

Funny shit, eh?   
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« Reply #185 on: June 20, 2016, 03:46:27 pm »

So if i create a website and call it fact checker you will believe me right nancy boy?

if i have  a hidden agenda and tweak and twist those facts just a little bit like the media do, a thing called spin,
maybe ill add a bit of the emotional heart string pulling stuff to it,

like save the children or save the poor animals or save the whales,or save the earth or save those poor drowning mofos muslim refugees invite them into your home, give them money and dont make a fuss when they rape your daughter or your son at the pool.
someone should fact check that
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« Reply #186 on: June 20, 2016, 03:50:25 pm »


Hahaha....TRUMP is going to LOSE the presidential election and take the GOP with him.

The Democrats will rule the White House, the Senate and the House of Congress.

Donald Trump's stupid white-trash supporters will be the cause of that for blindly believing and following a RETARD.

Funny shit, eh?   

And you think that will be a good thing?
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« Reply #187 on: June 20, 2016, 03:52:14 pm »

well ktj you're a sexist white trash racist for not giving your train driving job to a black person or a women right you snowflake
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« Reply #188 on: June 20, 2016, 04:07:53 pm »

with trump
it's not over till the fat lady? in the pants suit sings
maybe she will be in sing sing?

But Hitlery Clinton she might get the sympathy vote if Bill will just up and die,
because poor old bill clinton looks like he's on his last legs i think he's
getting very sick from being under pressure from all those rape and pedifile allegations that he surely knows trump is going to be targeting him with shortly in the campaign lmao.
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« Reply #189 on: June 20, 2016, 04:16:13 pm »

So if i create a website and call it fact checker you will believe me right nancy boy?


If you can come up with PROVEN facts, as opposed to the snake-oil bullshit Trump spouts.

Those FACT-CHECKER websites, such as the one run by The Washington Post can usually put up video footage of Trump saying something in the past that is the opposite to what he is saying now. Or else multiple news reports written by journalists from different news media organisations at the time.

Trump seems to forget that there is a shitload of video footage, sound recordings and multiple news reports of virtually anything he has ever publicly said, so when he tells bullshit that is different to what he has spouted in the past, he is ALWAYS going to come unstuck. And that is exactly what the numerous FACT-CHECKER websites have been doing.
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« Reply #190 on: June 20, 2016, 06:11:00 pm »

when america was great and it can be again with trump

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« Reply #191 on: June 20, 2016, 07:21:30 pm »

when america was great and it can be again with trump





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« Reply #192 on: June 21, 2016, 02:40:35 pm »

there was a time in america when they made the best products had the best engineering skills and had full time good jobs
and they had culture
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« Reply #193 on: June 21, 2016, 04:16:14 pm »


from The Washington Post....

The Trump campaign is becoming an outright catastrophe

By PAUL WALDMAN | 9:12AM EDT - Monday, June 20, 2016

Donald Trump speaks to a crowd in Tampa. — Photograph: Chris O'Meara/Associated Press.
Donald Trump speaks to a crowd in Tampa. — Photograph: Chris O'Meara/Associated Press.

EVERY presidential campaign has its ups and downs, its moments when everything seems to be going right and those when it looks to be hurtling toward defeat. This is one of the latter moments for Donald Trump, with him falling in the polls after a series of controversial statements (and frankly, “A Series of Controversial Statements” could be his campaign motto). Ed O'Keefe reports that panicked Republicans are waging a last-ditch effort to convince convention delegates to switch from Trump to someone or other, and they claim “that they now count several hundred delegates and alternates as part of their campaign.” The effort will almost certainly fail, but the fact that it consists of more than a few desperate people is an indication of how bad things are for Trump.

But wait — doesn't he have plenty of time to turn this campaign around? So he trails Hillary Clinton by somewhere between 6 and 8 points in all the reputable polling averages — didn't George H.W. Bush trail Michael Dukakis by 17 points after the Democratic convention in 1988?

Yes, Trump has time to reverse the current situation. But today's polls aren't meaningless, even if they don't tell us exactly what will happen in November. The problem for Trump isn't the size of his polling deficit (which isn't all that large); it's the magnitude of challenges his campaign faces.

While he could manage a stunning turnaround, at the moment Trump seems to have put together one of the worst presidential campaigns in history. Let's take a look at all the major disadvantages Trump faces as we head toward the conventions:

A skeletal campaign staff. Trump succeeded in the primaries with a small staff whose job was to do little more than stage rallies. But running a national campaign is hugely more complex than barnstorming from one state to the next during primaries. While the Clinton campaign has built an infrastructure of hundreds of operatives performing the variety of tasks a modern presidential campaign requires, the Trump campaign “estimates it currently has about 30 paid staff on the ground across the country,” a comically small number.

Not enough money, and little inclination to raise it. Trump hasn't raised much money yet, and he doesn't seem inclined to do so; according to one report, after telling Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus that he'd call 20 large donors to make a pitch, he gave up after three. Fundraising is the least pleasant part of running for office, but unlike most candidates who suck it up and do what they have to, Trump may not be willing to spend the time dialing for dollars. Instead, he's convinced that he can duplicate what he did in the primaries and run a low-budget campaign based on having rallies and doing TV interviews. As he told NBC's Hallie Jackson, “I don't think I need that money, frankly. I mean, look what we're doing right now. This is like a commercial, right, except it's tougher than a normal commercial.” It's not like a commercial, because in interviews Trump gets challenged, and usually says something that makes him look foolish or dangerous. But he seems convinced that his ability to get limitless media coverage, no matter how critical that coverage is, will translate to an increase in support.

Outgunned on the airwaves. As a result, Democrats are pouring money into television ads attacking Trump and promoting Clinton with no answer from the other side. As Mark Murray reported yesterday, “So far in June, Clinton and the outside groups backing her have spent a total of $23.3 million on ads in the battleground states of Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Nevada New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio and Virginia.” And how much have Trump and his allies spent on ads in those states? Zero. Nothing. Nada.

Not enough backup from his allies. There may never have been a presidential nominee with so little support from the people who are supposed to be out there persuading people to vote for him. Every day sees new stories about Trump being criticized by Republican leaders or about Republicans distancing themselves from him. And that includes the people who have endorsed him. Last week the chair of Trump's leadership committee in the House begged reporters to stop making him defend Trump.

That lack of unity can have a large impact on how Republicans view their vote. While the rote arguments between Democrats and Republicans may seem too predictable to change many minds, when intra-partisan unanimity breaks down, it sends a signal to people that it's okay to disagree with your party's nominee — and even to reject him altogether.

A popular president opposing him. Every political science election model says that the view of the current president matters a great deal in determining whether voters decide to change which party controls the White House. Right now President Obama's approval rating is over 50 percent for the first time in a long while, and he'll be campaigning vigorously against Trump.

A demographic disadvantage. Trump is running on what is essentially an ethno-nationalist appeal to white voters, at a time when the country grows less white every year. He would have to do significantly better than recent Republican nominees among large minority groups in order to win, yet rather than court them, he has done just the opposite. In the latest Washington Post-ABC News poll, 89 percent of Hispanics said they had an unfavorable view of Trump, an absolutely stunning figure. That's not to mention the enormous gender gap he's opening: 77 percent of women also viewed him unfavorably in that poll.

An electoral college disadvantage. Any Republican candidate faces a challenge in the electoral college, where Democrats start with a built-in advantage. In all of the past four elections, Democrats have won 17 states (plus D.C.) that give them 242 of the 270 electoral votes they need to win. That means that for Trump to win, he has to sweep almost every swing state. But instead of trying to do that, Trump is worried about holding on to red states such as Utah and Arizona.

A candidate with a lethal combination of dreadful strategic instincts and absolute certainty of his own brilliance. Trump's inexperience in politics has shown itself in many ways, such as his utter ignorance about policy and how the U.S. government works. It also means that when confronted with new situations, he often does something politically foolish, as when he responded to the Orlando shooting by congratulating himself for predicting that there would one day be another terrorist attack. And while for a time we kept hearing that he was going to “pivot” to the general election, instead he seems to be running as though he's still trying to persuade his own supporters to stay with him. Those supporters comprise a plurality of a minority of the whole electorate.

Perhaps even more importantly, unlike some neophyte candidates, Trump not only doesn't know what he doesn't know, but also insists that he doesn't need to know it. Whatever deep insecurities drive his constant preening bluster, he isn't going to let anyone tell him that he's anything less than a genius and things aren't going great. Which means that as the campaign goes on and his situation gets worse, he'll be exceedingly unlikely to make the kind of changes he needs to reverse his fortunes.

Trump is no stranger to failure, but in his life as a businessman he could segregate those failures from the rest of his enterprises, at least enough to keep moving forward and find other ways to make money. He could fail at the casino business, or the steak business, or the vodka business, or the magazine business, or the airline business, or the football business, or the real estate seminar business, or the vitamin pyramid scheme business, and maintain the viability of his overall brand. But he has never been on a stage like this one before. He didn't have hundreds of reporters on the steak beat scrutinizing every twist and turn in the decline of Trump Steaks and putting the results of their reporting on every front page in America.

But now he does, and he can't just drop one scheme and move on to the next one. In that interview with Hallie Jackson, Trump said, “We really haven't started. We start pretty much after the convention, during and after.” But his problem isn't that he hasn't started; it's that he started a year ago — digging himself into a hole it's going to be awfully hard to climb out of.


• Paul Waldman is a contributor to The Plum Line blog, and a senior writer at The American Prospect.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/wp/2016/06/20/the-trump-campaign-is-becoming-an-outright-catastrophe
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« Reply #194 on: June 21, 2016, 04:28:59 pm »


♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪

The wheels are falling off the Donald Trump bus…

Tra…la…la…la…la…la…la…la…la…

♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪♫♪

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« Reply #196 on: June 21, 2016, 07:23:33 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Six weeks to sanity: The anti-Trump surge is finally here

By JENNIFER RUBIN | 10:15AM EDT - Monday, June 20, 2016

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump films a town hall meeting for MSNBC with Chris Matthews in March. — Photograph: Tom Lynn/Getty Images.
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump films a town hall meeting for MSNBC with Chris Matthews in March.
 — Photograph: Tom Lynn/Getty Images.


IN MAY (was it only last month?), Donald Trump's Republican competitors left the presidential primary race. GOP officials scrambled to endorse him. There was talk big donors were coming on board. Many conscientious conservatives were in a funk, disillusioned with a party (albeit only a plurality of primary voters) who could select a charlatan and a bigot. Lifelong Republicans were appalled at the elected leaders willing to carry water for a demagogue. There was widespread anxiety Trump would beat expectations in the general election just as he did in the primaries.

Six weeks later, it is a much brighter picture for #NeverTrump Republicans and the country at large. The media is critically examining his record, challenging his bigotry and inane pronouncements. When he suggested the president might be in league with Islamist terrorists, the media pounced. Trump's temper tantrum in barring The Washington Post from his campaign events underscored his frustration with a new level of scrutiny.

A short but impressive list of Republicans have declined to endorse or have un-endorsed Trump. Trump is “threatening” (huh!?) to fund his own campaign because donors have not come on board. A delegate rebellion, once a pipe dream, is now a reality. You know it is worrying to Trump if he simultaneously claims it is a Jeb Bush plot and a media hoax. Meanwhile, his own “campaign” is a joke — a skeleton of a presidential operation lacking the staff and data needed to win a national election (as opposed to a series of small primaries where true believers could carry the day).

Moreover, it turns out the vast majority of Americans do not take kindly to a racist, do not appreciate his proposal for a Muslim ban and do not approve of his response to the Orlando terrorist attack. In the primaries, “gaffes” seemed only to enhance his standing. The dumber his debate answers, the higher he went in the polls. Now, however, his outlandish comments are driving his poll numbers down. Maybe most Americans have not lost their minds, turned to political nihilism and rejected the American spirit of inclusion and fairness. It turns out what worked in the primaries doesn't work in a general election context.

It is increasingly likely that either Trump will get dumped or he will lose by a healthy margin to Hillary Clinton. The Republic, it seems, may escape a brush with authoritarian buffoonery. (All caveats apply about Clinton's FBI investigation, a severe economic downturn and other developments that could upend the race.)

That does, however, raise the troubling question: Why couldn't the GOP have figured all this out before Trump got to 1,237 delegates? Right-wingers will smell a plot. (The MSM held back until he had the nomination!) But there were a number of factors in the primary — a huge field (dividing the not-Trump vote and shielding him in debates), a press entranced with his media show, the novelty of his “act”, and the collapse of his opponents at critical times (e.g., Senator Marco Rubio's pre-New Hampshire primary debate) — that aided Trump.

Still, there is something fundamentally amiss on the right that in a mere six weeks the country has figured out Trump, whereas Republicans in nine months plainly could not see the character they were embracing. That should highlight some troubling deficiencies on the right.

First, the anti-immigration obsession that had transfixed the right-wing inured many supposed gate-keepers (e.g., magazines, pundits) as well as the base to a candidate peddling a dangerous brew of nativism, protectionism and isolationism. If the “respectable” publications rant and rave about “amnesty”, one can imagine why Trump's idea for a wall might have gotten traction rather than guffaws. It's no coincidence Trump's closest ally is Senator Jeff Sessions (Republican-Alabama), an anti-immigration zealot who found Trump the perfect spokesman for his cause. Thankfully, the general electorate, including Republicans who did not vote in the primary, take a dim view of his xenophobia. They oppose mass deportation and a Muslim ban.

Second, over the past seven years, the anti-government tirades from talk radio, from Beltway groups such as Heritage Action and even from Senator Ted Cruz (Republican-Texas) saturated the base, convincing them that everyone with experience “betrayed them” and only outsiders devoid of exposure to governance had the secret sauce for peace and prosperity. In the general election, by contrast, Clinton has skewered Trump's inane ideas and ridiculed his ignorance in ways the GOP field did not do consistently and zealously from the get-go.

Third, the “establishment” — the officialdom of the Republican National Committee — facilitated Trump's rise, convinced he'd run as an independent (did they not realize how cheap he is?). Refusing to condemn him, declining to press him on releasing his tax returns, maintaining an excessively large debate contingent and actively condoning his candidacy all enabled Trump to achieve a degree of legitimacy he otherwise would never have gotten. A soulless party chairman who lacked fidelity to the ideals of the party unwittingly may have handed the election to Clinton and decimated the party itself.

One, therefore, is left with an unpleasant reality: A plurality of GOP voters wanted Trump. They did not care or may have actively embraced his lunacy, bigotry and ignorance. His rotten character and abject honesty elicited shrugs. They wore his “pants on fire” fact checks like badges of honor. A significant segment of the GOP primary electorate itself lacked common sense, standards of decency, and intolerance of bigotry and cruelty. No group was worse than the evangelical “leaders” who cheered him along the way.

A Republican wag joked that the GOP needs not only a new candidate but also a new base. There is something to that. In the 2016 postmortem, it will be worth examining the extent to which the GOP has promoted crackpots, become ghettoized in distorted right-wing media and lost track of what 21st-century America believes and looks like. That suggests conservative “leaders” need to do more leading, and less following, and the party as a whole has to expand its vision and its base. It's time to stop reveling in ignorance and celebrating lost causes.

Barry Goldwater's widow was recently quoted as saying, “Barry would be appalled by Mr. Trump's behavior — the unintelligent and unfiltered and crude communications style. And he's shallow — so, so shallow.” She continued, “Barry was so true to his convictions and would never be issuing these shallow, crude, accusatory criticisms of the other party or the other person.” She's right, of course. And yet the GOP primary electorate did not see all that. It's a problem when the rest of the country has to rescue the GOP and the country from Republican voters' terrible judgment.


• Jennifer Rubin writes the Right Turn blog for The Washington Post, offering reported opinion from a conservative perspective.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/right-turn/wp/2016/06/20/six-weeks-to-sanity-the-anti-trump-surge-is-finally-here
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« Reply #197 on: June 21, 2016, 10:14:49 pm »


from The Washington Post....

What actually happens when Trump blacklists a reporter

By PAUL FARHI | 4:19PM EDT - Monday, June 20, 2016

Trump, seen here in New York last month, has made a habit of yanking press credentials from media outlets that displease him. — Photograph: Carlo Allegri/Reuters.
Trump, seen here in New York last month, has made a habit of yanking press credentials from media outlets that displease him.
 — Photograph: Carlo Allegri/Reuters.


A DAY after Donald Trump revoked The Washington Post's credentials to cover his campaign last week, one of the newspaper's reporters walked into his rally in Greensboro, North Carolina, and began reporting on it. The only difference was that the reporter, Jenna Johnson, entered on a general-admission ticket, not a press pass. She sat in the audience instead of the designated media “pen” and later filed a story.

So much for being barred from covering Donald Trump.

Johnson's experience says much about the practical impact of Trump's efforts to banish news organizations whose reporting has displeased him. For the most part, Trump's sanctions against the press haven't made much difference. Although the dozen or so news outlets that have been blacklisted certainly object to being shut out, they say the restrictions are largely symbolic, an attack on traditional norms, and don't deter reporting on the presumptive Republican nominee.

“Access has never been central to our journalism, and we think the best reporting done on Trump, by us and others, is from the outside,” said Ben Smith, the editor of Buzzfeed, which hasn't been accredited by Trump since he announced his candidacy a year ago.

Getting on Trump's blacklist does present a few logistical hassles. Reporters from affected organizations have to wait longer to enter Trump's events; they can't attend or ask questions at his news conferences; and they tend not to get interviews with Trump or his staff.

But for every restriction, there's a workaround. The Des Moines Register, banned by Trump since last summer, gets audio and video footage of the candidate's events and copies of his press statements from friendly third parties in the news media, said Annah Backstrom, who oversees the paper's political reporting. The paper's reporters have covered his events the same way The Post did: by securing a publicly available ticket. If all else fails, a verboten news organization can hire a freelancer to cover for it.

It's not entirely clear how Trump decides who or what organizations to ban. The most obvious element is a persistent pattern of stories he doesn't like — although one strike is sometimes enough, too.

The Huffington Post, for example, went into Trump's penalty box early on by consigning coverage of him to its entertainment section. (It has since changed its mind but is still banned.) The Washington Post got the hook a week ago for a headline suggesting that he had tied President Obama to the nightclub massacre in Orlando — even though The Wall Street Journal ran a similar headline on its story without incurring his wrath. Both The Des Moines Register and the New Hampshire Union Leader lost access not for news stories but for anti-Trump editorial columns.

Trump has banned only two TV networks — the Spanish-language broadcaster Univision and the Fusion channel, which is part-owned by Univision — and only briefly at that. This suggests that the onetime reality-TV star has been careful not to alienate TV broadcasters, thus preserving his access to the medium he likes best, although he has frequently disparaged TV reporters on Twitter and at news conferences. The two networks were frozen out after Univision dropped its telecast of the Trump-owned Miss Universe pageant following Trump's remarks that Mexican immigrants are “rapists”. (Trump sued Univision over the cancellation but dropped his lawsuit in February.)




Reporters banned by Trump get their credential requests turned down via a robo-email from the Trump campaign that says the following: “During the 2016 Presidential Primary race, the Donald J. Trump Campaign fully recognizes and respects all media but due to various venue sizes, media space, and safety, we must limit the number of credentialed media and give priority to our national and local outlets. We appreciate your understanding.”

Those still on the banned list have found that Trump's restrictions are often arbitrarily enforced and vaguely defined. Reporters from some blacklisted outlets still receive news releases from his campaign; others don't. A day after Trump sanctioned The Post, one of the paper's reporters got a call back from Trump's press handlers, suggesting the lines of communications are still open (the campaign has been responsive to other Washington Post reporters in recent days, including Johnson). But others face a complete blackout. The campaign did not respond to several requests for comment for this article.

The Washington Post doesn’t know yet whether Trump's sanctions against the newspaper extend to the Republican convention next month or to the team of reporters who are producing a book about him. The Post's book team has interviewed Trump many times, including two weeks ago, when he expressed enthusiasm for the project and invited the journalists back for more interviews. But Trump has also publicly trashed the book, telling Fox News at one point that the paper has been asking him “ridiculous questions” about his past.

The real objections to Trump's actions from the press aren't about the inconvenience; they're about the seemingly undemocratic nature of his actions. Candidates of every party rarely like the coverage they get, but few have resorted to banning a reporter, let alone entire news organizations.

“When I was in Moscow, Vladimir Putin's Kremlin gave me credentials to cover his re-election campaign to a second term even after several years of critical coverage of his crackdown on Russian media and rollback of democratic reforms,” said Susan Glasser, the editor of Politico, whose beat reporter was banned by Trump in March. “It is just astonishing that something like this is happening in the United States.”


• Paul Farhi is The Washington Post's media reporter.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/what-actually-happens-when-trump-blacklists-a-reporter/2016/06/20/aff81a2c-3319-11e6-8758-d58e76e11b12_story.html
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« Reply #198 on: June 22, 2016, 12:57:24 pm »


from The Washington Post....

New anti-Trump movement grows to include hundreds of GOP delegates

By ED O'KEEFE | 5:39PM EDT - Monday, June 20, 2016

Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the Richmond Coliseum in Richmond, Virginia, on June 10th, 2016. — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.
Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the Richmond Coliseum in Richmond, Virginia, on June 10th, 2016.
 — Photograph: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post.


A CAMPAIGN to stop Donald Trump from becoming the Republican presidential nominee has the support of nearly 400 delegates to the GOP's convention next month, according to organizers, quickly transforming what began as an idea tossed around on social media into a force that could derail a national campaign.

While organizers concede their plan could worsen internal party strife, they believe they are responding to deep-rooted concerns among conservatives about Trump, who is suffering from declining poll numbers after weeks of mis-steps and embarrassing headlines.

“Short-term, yes, there's going to be chaos,” said Kendal Unruh, a co-founder of the group, Free the Delegates. “Long-term this saves the party and we win the election. Everything has to go through birthing pains to birth something great. We're going to go through the trauma of the birthing pains, but the reward will be worth it.”

Unruh, of Colorado, said her cause is “winning support from the non-rabble rousers. The rule-following, churchgoing grandmas who aren't out protesting in the streets. This is the way they push back.”

The campaign's growing support came amid a significant shake-up in Trump's campaign. On Monday, he fired his campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski, one of his most loyal and vocal aides. The move was seen as an urgent attempt to ease GOP concerns over the campaign's direction.

Unruh and other GOP delegates from Colorado hatched the idea of trying to stop Trump by introducing a rule change: Instead of binding delegates to the results of the caucuses and primaries — as many party leaders insist they are — the convention's 2,472 delegates should instead be able to vote their conscience and select whomever they want.

For weeks, Unruh, her colleague Regina Thomson and other Colorado Republicans sought out like-minded delegates in other states. After Unruh appeared in newspaper interviews and called in to a few radio talk shows, she said other delegates with similar concerns in places such as Louisiana and Missouri reached out. By this past weekend, Unruh was consulting a lawyer about possible fundraising plans while Thomson was compiling the list of interested delegates, building a website and booking a conference call phone line that could host 1,000 participants.

“As we carefully consider not only the presidential nominee but the rules of the convention, the platform of the Republican Party and the vice-presidential nominee, remember that this is true reality TV — it is not entertainment,” Thomson said on a conference call she hosted late Sunday.

Thomson said at least 1,000 people participated in the call. Delegates who participated said they plan to spend this week wooing others to the cause.

“Trump claims to be pro-life, but he used to be pro-abortion. He claims to be for traditional marriage, but he never used to talk that way. His lifestyle is such that I cannot support him,” Utah delegate Gayle Ruzicka said. “Trump doesn't even seem to understand Christian principles.”

Talmage Pearce, a delegate from Arizona, said he is backing the movement because Trump's “deceit, bullying, insulting, blackmailing and liberal views all make it impossible for me to cast him my endorsement.”


Maria Murray, center, holds up pictures of Donald Trump during the Georgia Republican State Convention on June 4th, 2016, in Augusta, Georgia. — Photograph: Todd Bennett/The August Chronicle/Associated Press.
Maria Murray, center, holds up pictures of Donald Trump during the Georgia Republican State Convention on June 4th, 2016,
in Augusta, Georgia. — Photograph: Todd Bennett/The August Chronicle/Associated Press.


In recent days Trump has called attempts to strip him of the party nomination “totally illegal” and a rebuke of the millions of people who voted for him. Over the weekend he accused former opponents Jeb Bush and Senator Ted Cruz (Texas) of trying to undermine his candidacy. Both men say they have nothing to do with the new movement.

On the call during Sunday night, leaders of Free the Delegates repeatedly insisted they are not working on behalf of any of Trump's former opponents. They also lashed out at Chairman Reince Priebus and other officials at the Republican National Committee who have dismissed the delegates' efforts as silly and a media-driven myth.

“Mr. Priebus needs to understand that leadership has not answered the call of the most important people in the Republican Party, and that's the conservatives. We have always been there; we've endured a lot of one-way loyalty,” said Chris Ekstrom, a Dallas-based businessman and founder of Courageous Conservatives PAC, which supported Cruz's campaign but is now backing the new movement.

Steve Lonegan, a Republican consultant from New Jersey who is advising the dissidents on fundraising and media outreach, asked participants in the call to donate to Ekstrom's PAC. The money would be used to help track down more delegates and to help any delegates who may face threats or pressure back home.

Delegates in several states are under pressure not to join anti-Trump groups. In North Carolina, some have proposed fining delegates or kicking them out of the party if they vote against Trump. In other states, party leaders are threatening to strip delegates of their credentials if they buck primary results and vote against Trump, according to delegates who have contacted The Washington Post. Some reached out on the condition of anonymity, saying that their spouses are fearful of physical threats if they speak out publicly.

But several delegates said they were buoyed by House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (Republican-Wisconsin), who told NBC's “Meet the Press” on Sunday that “it is not my job to tell delegates what to do, what not to do, or to weigh in on things like that. They write the rules. They make their decisions.”

Said Unruh: “Paul Ryan signed our permission slip.”

One delegate from Colorado supporting the campaign, who requested anonymity to avoid harassment, wrote in an email that “we will not put our delegates in an ethical dilemma” if they are unbound. “We live in America. The land of the free. As delegates, we should be free to vote our conscience.”

Cecil Stinemetz, a delegate from Iowa angered by what he views as intimidation tactics, released an email he received on Friday from Steve Scheffler, who holds one of Iowa's seats on the Republican National Committee and is a leader of the Iowa Christian Alliance.

“Stop this madness Cecil!!” Scheffler wrote. “All the other candidates have either folded their campaigns or suspended them. You are hurting Iowa! Can't you behave yourself? You are an embarrassment! The binding for Iowa is what it is and your trying to make a name for yourself in the press is disgusting! Christians don't behave this way!”

Scheffler declined to comment about the exchange.

“My whole adult life I have been a loyal Republican. But this whole experience has really opened my eyes to what some folks I previously thought were nuts were warning us about,” Stinemetz said. “If you want to know how it's possible for someone like Donald Trump to rise this far in our party, it's because we have leaders like this.”


• Ed O'Keefe is covering the 2016 presidential campaign for The Washington Post. He's covered presidential and congressional politics, Congress and federal agencies and spent a brief time covering the Iraq war.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related stories:

 • The Kochs' powerful operation isn't aimed at helping Trump — but it might anyway

 • As the GOP's anti-Trump, Ben Sasse picked a big fight. What would it mean to win?


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/new-anti-trump-movement-grows-to-include-hundreds-of-gop-delegates/2016/06/20/88fb25cc-36f7-11e6-9ccd-d6005beac8b3_story.html
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« Reply #199 on: June 22, 2016, 12:57:40 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Trump fires top aide in an urgent move to reboot his floundering campaign

By PHILIP RUCKER, JOSE A. DELREAL and SEAN SULLIVAN | 11:21PM EDT - Monday, June 20, 2016

Corey Lewandowski, seen here talking with reporters in New York in May, was fired on Monday as presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's campaign manager. — Photograph: Spencer Platt.
Corey Lewandowski, seen here talking with reporters in New York in May, was fired on Monday as presumptive Republican
presidential nominee Donald Trump's campaign manager. — Photograph: Spencer Platt.


DONALD TRUMP abruptly fired top aide Corey Lewandowski on Monday in an urgent move to reboot his floundering general-election campaign, which has been besieged by organizational turmoil, strategic mishaps and an erratic message.

Trump's dismissal of Lewandowski — his combative campaign manager and one of his longest-serving aides — was seen as an effort to calm allies, donors and Republican officials who have grown increasingly alarmed by recent mis-steps and unwanted dramas that threaten to undermine the presumptive GOP presidential nominee's chances in November.

A Trump loyalist whose mantra was “Let Trump be Trump” — Lewandowski chafed at suggestions that the candidate behave more presidentially. His departure consolidates power around veteran GOP operative and lobbyist Paul Manafort, Trump's campaign chairman and senior strategist, who has been trying with limited success to professionalize the campaign.

Lewandowski's internal turf battles with Manafort were intense and at times paralyzed the campaign. The manager's relations with senior staff at the Republican National Committee had so deteriorated that RNC Chairman Reince Priebus implored Trump to make a change, according to two Republicans briefed on the matter who requested anonymity to speak candidly.

Lewandowski also ran afoul of Trump's family, especially his daughter Ivanka and her husband, Jared Kushner, who convinced Trump he needed a centralized management structure for the general election, according to people briefed on the decision. Trump fired Lewandowski at a meeting on Monday morning that was attended by the candidate's adult children, one of those people confirmed.

Lewandowski was escorted from Trump Tower flanked by security guards.

The campaign he leaves behind faces immediate challenges: The fundraising operation is sputtering; the ground game in battleground states is shockingly thin; key jobs at the national headquarters in New York have gone unfilled for months; the campaign has not aired a single television advertisement to counter Democrat Hillary Clinton's swing-state ad blitz; and aides struggle to coordinate strategy and basic operational tasks with the RNC.

Monthly fundraising totals released on Monday night underscored Trump's difficulties. In May, his campaign reported raising $3.1 million and entered June with $1.3 million on hand — a meager total akin to a House candidate's. That puts him at a severe disadvantage against Clinton, who raised $28 million in May and ended the month with $42 million on hand.

Former House speaker Newt Gingrich, a Trump supporter who is considered a possible running mate, said Trump and his team are “rapidly learning the general election, 50 states simultaneously, is a much bigger, more complex system.”

Gingrich praised Lewandowski for what he described as a historic primary campaign. But Gingrich said in an interview, “The general election is like a gigantic football team — it takes a whole different set of requirements both for the candidate and for the team.”

It remains to be seen whether Lewandowski's ouster is the beginning of a general-election pivot by the candidate or by his political operation. Supporters, including New Jersey Governor Chris Christie (Republican), have been privately urging a change to avert what they fear could be certain defeat on Election Day.

In the seven weeks since he secured the delegates to claim the GOP nomination, Trump has rejected calls to develop a more inclusive and disciplined message. Instead, he has relished distracting feuds, one after another, which appear to have contributed to his decline in public polls.

Some leading Republicans were doubtful the staff shake-up would have a meaningful effect on the campaign's trajectory, which they see as strongly favoring Clinton, the presumptive Democratic nominee. GOP leaders are concerned that Trump's incendiary rhetoric could doom the party at large, endangering the Republican Senate and House majorities.

“The problem is Trump,” said veteran Republican strategist Mike Murphy, a Trump critic. “You can fire all the yes men you want, but the campaign reflects on the candidate, and the candidate is hopelessly flawed.”

John Weaver, another GOP strategist and Trump critic, said: “Corey's core message was that he was allowing Trump to be Trump. So my question is, now that Corey is gone, will Trump stop being Trump? That's the only way to fix this.”

Lewandowski told CNN on Monday that he did not know why he was fired.

“I think in all campaigns you have detractors and you have supporters. That's the nature of the beast,” he said. He painted a rosy portrait of the campaign, denied there were internal skirmishes, and refused to criticize Trump or rivals in the campaign.

In March, Trump repeatedly defended Lewandowski against charges that he had assaulted a reporter at a news conference in Florida. But despite his earlier loyalty, Trump let his top aide go.

In a statement released on Monday, campaign spokeswoman Hope Hicks said: “The Donald J. Trump Campaign for President, which has set a historic record in the Republican Primary having received almost 14 million votes, has today announced that Corey Lewandowski will no longer be working with the campaign. The campaign is grateful to Corey for his hard work and dedication and we wish him the best in the future.”

Trump praised Lewandowski in a Fox News interview that aired on Monday night, calling him “a good man” and “a talented person”. Explaining his decision, Trump said: “We're going to go a little bit of a different route from this point forward. A little different style.”

Lewandowski was not the only senior aide to leave the campaign. Michael Caputo, a communications and political adviser, resigned on Monday afternoon after sending a tweet mocking Lewandowski with a “Wizard of Oz” reference: “Ding dong the witch is dead!” The tweet, Caputo wrote in his resignation letter, “was too exuberant a reaction to this personnel move.”

The campaign sought to project an image of competence on Monday after Lewandowski's ouster, which many staffers first heard about through news reports. Manafort led a staff-wide phone call in which he complimented Lewandowski's work and said the campaign would expand its ranks in the coming weeks, according to people on the call.

Trump held a private strategy meeting with family members and senior advisers, which was described as “upbeat” and “very forward-looking” by one person briefed on the session. The team discussed plans for the mid-July Republican National Convention in Cleveland, the selection of a vice-presidential running mate and fundraising. They also mapped out paths to victory in key battleground states and crafted a message tightly tailored to the economy and national security, said this person, who demanded anonymity to discuss internal matters.

The Trump team faces an immediate test Tuesday and Wednesday with a series of New York fundraising events. Steven Mnuchin, Trump's national finance chairman, has been scrambling to get commitments from major GOP donors. One fundraiser involved in the effort said it was “a question mark” whether the events would be successful.

One of Trump's first campaign hires, Lewandowski was an architect of his successful strategy, based on extensive media attention and massive rallies, throughout the primaries. Lewandowski became a force of personality, building a loyal stable of lieutenants at Trump Tower in New York and in states across the country.

He became known for his short temper and would explode at staff members and reporters who challenged or angered him — something he would brag about as a strength. Over the course of the campaign, Lewandowski repeatedly was caught saying things that were untrue, although he seemed to face no public repercussions for doing so.

In March, conservative reporter Michelle Fields accused Lewandowski of roughly grabbing her arm after a news conference at one of Trump's golf courses in Florida. Lewandowski denied having touched Fields and tweeted that she was “totally delusional,” but video from Trump's security cameras, later released by Florida authorities, showed Lewandowski grabbing Fields.

Lewandowski lost the trust of Trump's three adult children involved in the campaign — Donald Jr., Ivanka and Eric — when they learned he had been pitching reporters to write negative stories about Kushner, Ivanka's husband, who had emerged as a rival adviser, according to a Republican briefed on the episode.

Lewandowski came under scrutiny for the campaign's connection to a pro-Trump super PAC run last year by Mike Ciletti, a Colorado Republican operative who worked closely with Lewandowski in previous jobs. Lewandowski initially told The Washington Post that he did not know Ciletti, then was forced to admit they were longtime associates. In the wake of The Post's reporting, Ciletti shuttered the super PAC last fall.

After that, the Trump campaign began directing large sums to a printing company, WizBang Solutions, where Ciletti serves as a director. In all, the campaign paid WizBang more than $2 million for printing, design and telemarketing through the end of April, making the company the campaign's fourth-largest vendor.

Trump himself has been under heavy fire in recent weeks for a string of damaging controversies — from his clumsy response to the mass shooting in Orlando that included unfounded accusations against American Muslims to his highly personal attacks against a federal judge overseeing two lawsuits against him to his campaign's failure to disburse pledged donations for veterans' charities.

Just as alarming to Trump's supporters is his failure so far to build a national infrastructure and fundraising apparatus in the same league as Clinton's. Trump heard these worries firsthand last week as he embarked on a cross-country fundraising trip.

Mica Mosbacher, a longtime Republican fundraiser who helped Trump and the RNC arrange donor events in Texas, said that “you need seasoned operatives” running a general-election campaign.

“Corey did a good job,” she said, but added, “I would not call him a seasoned operative.”

Former Oklahoma governor Frank Keating echoed the sentiments of many Republican establishment figures when he said Trump needs to show how he would govern.

“Donald Trump may be a billionaire businessman,” Keating said. “But the question is, will he be a trillionaire political and governmental leader? Switching your campaign manager, if that will bring some stability, that's all good. But all of us who love our party and our country want to see specifics from him as to what he's going to do, when and why.”


Matea Gold and Jenna Johnson contributed to this report.

• Philip Rucker is a national political correspondent for The Washington Post, where he has reported since 2005.

• Jose A. DelReal covers national politics for The Washington Post.

• Sean Sullivan has covered national politics for The Washington Post since 2012.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related media:

 • PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY: Who is former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski?


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