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TRUMP the stupid CHUMP


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Im2Sexy4MyPants
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« Reply #150 on: June 03, 2016, 06:03:22 am »

i hope donald did hurt that judges feewings  Grin
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« Reply #151 on: June 03, 2016, 08:48:51 am »

i hope donald did hurt that judges feewings  Grin


It seems to me it is TRUMP who is chucking his toys out of the cot because of his hurt feelings. Face facts, he is a LOSER, but his feelings get hurt when he LOSES, as he did in the ruling by this judge revealing how Trump ripped off university students. All the judge did was to issue a ruling which was correct under the laws of the land. Not hurt feelings there on the part of the judge....merely doing his job exposing a conman, liar and thief.
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« Reply #152 on: June 03, 2016, 08:52:16 am »


from the Los Angeles Times....

Donald Trump campaigns in his own weird ‘Wonderland’

By DAVID HORSEY | 5:00AM PDT - Thursday, June 02, 2016



DONALD TRUMP is like a character from “Alice in Wonderland”. He has his own unusual look, his own surreal life and, most of all, his own curious logic. Disney could have cast him in the studio's new movie, “Through the Looking Glass”, if only he were not so busy rhetorically lopping off the heads of his opponents, the media and anyone else who crosses him.

In that way, Trump very much resembles the Queen of Hearts, who screamed “Off with their heads!” at any slight provocation. Trump's news conference at Trump Tower in New York City on Tuesday was like that. When reporters asked perfectly normal questions about his curiously tardy contributions to various veterans' organizations and about the dubious business practices of the now-defunct Trump University, he responded with insults and aggression. He called ABC's political correspondent “a sleazy guy.” He called the press, in general, dishonest and said he finds “the political press to be unbelievably dishonest.”

Trump is not the first political figure to make a habit of criticizing the media — an odd thing, since his campaign has benefited greatly from constant media attention and dozens of lightweight, obsequious interviews — but he is setting a new standard for redefining reality. When confronted with his own provocative statements, he will deny he ever said them. On Wednesday, for instance, he insisted he never said Japan should have nuclear weapons, even though The New York Times has recordings of him saying that very thing in an interview with the newspaper's editorial board.

When asked by reporters why he failed to give details about his money-raising for vets, he said he wanted to keep it all hush-hush. “I wanted to keep it private because I don't think it's anybody's business if I wanted to send [money] to the vets,” Trump insisted. The man has a strange definition of “private”, given that he kicked off the fundraising in a nationally televised event that was competing with a Fox News Republican candidates' debate that he was pointedly skipping.

And now, with the release of court records that detail the loathsome tactics his minions used to bilk suckers out of their money through his bogus “university”, Trump makes up his own facts and deflects queries by claiming he is being wrongly disparaged by an antagonistic judge who appears suspiciously “Mexican”. (The federal judge, Gonzalo Curiel, who is overseeing the class-action lawsuit brought by former Trump University students, was born in Indiana.)

Truth simply does not matter to Trump. He prefers fantasies that reinforce his preconceived notions or that help him in his ceaseless self-promotion. Four years ago, he invested his time and attention in the “birther” cause — the crazy and subliminally racist accusation that America's first black president was born in Kenya, not Hawaii. At a pivotal point in this year's primary battle, he latched onto fictitious reports that Ted Cruz's Cuban father hung out with Lee Harvey Oswald in the days before the assassination of President Kennedy. Last week in California, he seized on the blatantly bizarre notion that the years-long drought that has cut deeply into the state's water supply is a hoax.

In March, Politico magazine scrutinized every Trump statement and speech over one week of the campaign and found a steady stream of mischaracterizations, exaggerations and clear falsehoods — little lies that came at the rate of one every five minutes. For anyone who has listened with a sharp ear as Trump talks, the only surprise in the Politico analysis is that the fibs did not clock in with even more frequency.

It is not hard to recognize Trumpian logic in this exchange between Humpty Dumpty and Alice in “Through the Looking Glass”:

“When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said in a rather scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.”

“The question is,” said Alice, “whether you can make words mean so many different things.”

“The question is,” said Humpty Dumpty, “which is to be master — that's all.”

Mastering the opposition, mastering the media, mastering anyone who has the temerity to question or criticize him — that is all that matters to Trump. In Tuesday's news conference, an alarmed reporter asked Trump if his new level of contentiousness was a passing thing or “is this what it's going to be like if you are president?”

“Yes it is,” said Trump.

Finally, a simple, honest answer.


http://www.latimes.com/opinion/topoftheticket/la-na-tt-trump-in-wonderland-20160602-snap-story.html
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« Reply #153 on: June 04, 2016, 11:18:27 pm »


from the San Francisco Chronicle....

Trump University model: Sell hard, demand to see a warrant

By JEFF HOROWITZ and Michael BIESECKER - Associated Press | 1:31PM PDT - Thursday, June 02, 2016

In this May 23rd, 2005, file photo, Donald Trump, left, listens as Michael Sexton introduces him at a news conference in New York where he announced the establishment of Trump University. The manual for Trump University events was precise: the room temperature should be 68 degrees Fahrenheit. Seats should be arranged in a theater-style curve. And staff should only provide records to an attorney general if compelled by subpoena. Instructing employees how to stall law enforcement investigations might seem like an unusual part of running a seminar company, but at Trump University it was par for the course. — Photograph: Bebto Matthews/Associated Press.
In this May 23rd, 2005, file photo, Donald Trump, left, listens as Michael Sexton introduces him at a news conference
in New York where he announced the establishment of Trump University. The manual for Trump University events
was precise: the room temperature should be 68 degrees Fahrenheit. Seats should be arranged in a theater-style
curve. And staff should only provide records to an attorney general if compelled by subpoena. Instructing
employees how to stall law enforcement investigations might seem like an unusual part of running
a seminar company, but at Trump University it was par for the course.
 — Photograph: Bebto Matthews/Associated Press.


WASHINGTON D.C. — The manual for the staff at Trump University events was precise: The room temperature should be 68 degrees Fahrenheit. Seats should be arranged in a theater-style curve. And government prosecutors had no right to see any documents without a warrant.

Instructing employees how to stall law enforcement investigations might seem like an unusual part of running a real estate seminar company. But at Trump University — which drew investigations by Democratic and Republican attorneys general alike — it was par for the course.

Trump University guides unsealed this week by a federal judge in southern California undercut Trump's portrayal of his one-time real estate seminar course as an uncontroversial operation. Instead, the manuals reflect boiler-room sales tactics — the proceeds of which went largely to Trump.

One guide encouraged staff to learn prospective enrollees' motivations in order to better sell them on products: “Are they a single parent of three children that may need money for food?” the guide asked. When people balked at paying for expensive courses, the suggested response for Trump University staff was harsh.

“I find it very difficult to believe you'll invest in anything else if you don't believe enough to invest in yourself and your education,” the guide offered as a recommended response.

Those who bought into Trump University ended up paying as much as $34,995 for what was purported to be private mentoring with supposed real estate experts — some of whom Trump himself later acknowledged were unqualified.

“It's fraud… straight-up fraud,” said New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman during an MSNBC interview on Thursday morning. Schneiderman is suing Trump over Trump University in separate but similar case. “He was clearly in charge of pitching this scam university to people.”

With past Trump-affiliated business failures and controversies, Trump has often distanced himself by noting that his only financial involvement was a branding agreement. In the case of Trump University, however, Trump's ownership is not in dispute — Trump wanted the business for himself.

When future Trump University President Michael Sexton pitched Trump on the deal, he wanted to pay Trump a flat fee in a licensing deal. Trump rejected that, Sexton said in a deposition.

Trump “felt this was a very good business, and he wanted to put his own money into it,” said Sexton, who ended up receiving $250,000 a year from Trump to run a business in which Trump held more than a 90 percent stake. The design of the Trump University operating agreement “was entirely in the hands of the Trump legal team,” Sexton said.

Other court records and depositions showed that Trump and senior members of the Trump Organization were responsible for reviewing and signing all checks — and that Trump withdrew at least $2 million from the business.

Trump reviewed the advertising for Trump University's courses, Sexton said. And he did not believe Trump ever looked at what the three-day seminars included.

“Mr. Trump is not going to go through a 300-page, you know, binder of content,” Sexton said.

The impression of Trump's involvement given to potential customers was quite different, according to a script for Trump University telemarketers.

“You know who my boss is, right?” the script reads. “Mr. Trump is on a mission to create the next wave of independently wealthy entrepreneurs in America. Is that YOU?”

Trump has defended Trump University by citing surveys in which 98 percent of students reported being pleased with the program. But those surveys took place before students had experienced the full program and were not anonymous, plaintiffs lawyers have said. A higher percentage demanded refunds later.

On Thursday, Trump stood by Trump University in public comments on social media, writing that he planned to reopen Trump University. Such a move would be surprising, however, because Trump University has ceased to exist, has no assets, and according to a deposition by Sexton, was not meeting the Trump Organization's financial expectations.

As scores of students complained that Trump University was a rip-off, the Better Business Bureau in 2010 gave the school a D-minus, its second-lowest grade. State regulators also began to take notice.

Besides the probe that led to Attorney General Schneiderman's suit in New York, the office of then-Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott, a Republican, opened a civil investigation of “possibly deceptive trade practices.” Abbott's probe was quietly dropped in 2010 when Trump University agreed to end its operations in Texas. Trump subsequently donated $35,000 to Abbott's successful gubernatorial campaign, according to records.

A spokesman for Abbott, now Texas governor, declined to comment.

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi briefly considered joining with Schneiderman in a multi-state suit against Trump University. Three days after Bondi's spokeswoman was quoted in local media reports as saying the office was reviewing the New York lawsuit, the Donald J. Trump Foundation made a $25,000 contribution to a political fundraising committee supporting Bondi's re-election campaign. Bondi, a Republican, soon dropped her investigation, citing insufficient grounds to proceed.


http://www.sfgate.com/news/texas/article/Trump-University-model-Sell-hard-demand-to-see-7960034.php
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« Reply #154 on: June 05, 2016, 10:42:35 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Donald Trump said ‘university’ was all about education.
Actually, its goal was: ‘Sell, sell, sell!’


By TOM HAMBURGER, ROSALIND S. HELDERMAN and DALTON BENNETT | 4:52PM EDT - Saturday, June 04, 2016

WHEN Donald Trump introduced his new university from the lobby of his famous tower, he declared that it would be unlike any of his other ventures.

Trump University would be a noble endeavor, he said, with an emphasis on education over profits. It was a way for him to give back, to share his expertise with the masses, to build a “legacy as an educator”.

He wouldn't even keep all the money — if he happened to make a profit, he would turn the funds over to charity.

“If I had a choice of making lots of money or imparting lots of knowledge, I think I'd be as happy to impart knowledge as to make money,” Trump said at the inaugural news conference in the spring of 2005.

The launch of Trump University coincided with two auspicious developments for the real estate mogul: Through his then-year-old hit TV show “The Apprentice”, the billionaire was developing an image as America's savviest boss, while the nation's booming real estate market was giving hope to many who dreamed of striking it rich.

Ads touted Trump University as “the next best thing to being Trump's apprentice.” Trump, who every week on TV singled out someone to be fired, pledged in a promotional video to “hand-pick” instructors. “Priceless information” would help attendees build wealth in the same real estate game that made Trump rich.

In the end, few if any of these statements would prove to be true.

Trump University was not a university. It was not even a school. Rather, it was a series of seminars held in hotel ballrooms across the country that promised attendees they could get rich quick but were mostly devoted to enriching the people who ran them.

Participants were enticed with local newspaper ads featuring images of Trump, then encouraged to write checks or charge tens of thousands of dollars on credit cards for multi-day learning sessions. Participants were considered “buyers”, as one internal document put it. According to the company’s former president, Trump did not personally pick the instructors. Many attendees were trained by people with little or no real estate expertise, customers and former employees have alleged in lawsuits against the company.


Excerpt from a 2010 internal strategy guide for Trump University, known as a playbook, advising staff on how to sell more expensive classes. — From 2010 Trump University playbook.
Excerpt from a 2010 internal strategy guide for Trump University, known as a playbook, advising staff on how to sell
more expensive classes. — From 2010 Trump University playbook.


“I was told to do one thing,” said James Harris, a Trump University instructor whose sessions have been repeatedly cited in the litigation, in an interview with The Washington Post. “And that one thing was: … to show up to teach, train and motivate people to purchase the Trump University products and services and make sure everybody bought. That is it.”

A Trump spokesman said Harris's comments “have no merit” and accused Harris of “looking for media attention to further his own agenda.”

All told, Trump University received about $40 million in revenue from more than 5,000 participants before it halted operations in 2010 amid lawsuits in New York and California alleging widespread fraud. The New York attorney general estimated Trump netted more than $5 million during the five years it was active. He has since acknowledged that he gave none of the profits to charity.

This account is based on a review of hundreds of pages of internal company records that have become public as a result of the lawsuits, as well as new interviews with former Trump University employees and customers.

Many of the company's internal records, including several “playbooks” that advised employees on strategies for pressuring customers, were unsealed in court over the past week in response to a request by The Post.

Trump and his lawyers have vigorously disputed the allegations, predicting that they will win in court and reopen the business. They point to positive customer-satisfaction surveys that have been submitted in the lawsuits and suggest they have been unfairly targeted by trial lawyers and a politically motivated attorney general in New York.

“We continue to believe that people got substantial value and that people were overwhelmingly satisfied,” said Trump’s general counsel, Alan Garten. “We are not going to be stopping what we are doing. We are going to continue to zealously defend this case because, at the end of the day, we know we are not being tried by The Washington Post or by CNN — but in a courtroom by a jury.”

Garten acknowledged that Trump never gave away the profits to charity. He said it was always Trump's intention but that the lawyers leading the class-action suits against the company “got a hold of this and … whatever profits existed sort of evaporated.” The unfulfilled promise was first reported last year by Time magazine.

In his defense, Trump has often cited the many positive reviews by former customers. A number of them submitted sworn statements in court explaining their positive experiences at Trump University.

Kissy and Mark Gordon, who own a residential development company in Virginia and jointly signed up for the most expensive program in 2008, said in an interview that they still use techniques they learned from the course today.

“Did we have an expectation that Trump was going to teach us? No,” Kissy Gordon said. “We have a building background and the economy changed, and we were looking for something in the same field to do something with it. So we were there to learn.”

Gregory Leishman, another former customer, recalled speaking to his assigned Trump University mentor on the phone weekly and touring potential properties for purchase with him in New Haven, Connecticut. “They gave me information I didn't have otherwise,” he said. “You can probably get all that information from reading books. But Trump University was a crash course. You pay more, you get more.”

Nonetheless, the company has emerged as one of the most potent lines of attack against Trump's campaign for president.

In the Republican primary, Senator Marco Rubio (Florida) cited it as a “fake university” and sought to use it to help build a case that Trump was a “con artist”.

In recent days, Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton and her campaign have picked up on that theme.

“Trump U is devastating because its a metaphor for his whole campaign: promising hardworking Americans a way to get ahead, but all based on lies,” tweeted press secretary Brian Fallon.

Trump also last week invited a torrent of criticism, including from legal scholars on the left and right, for accusing the judge presiding over the California suits, U.S. District Judge Gonzalo Curiel, of being biased because he is of Mexican descent. Trump has said that Curiel is “Mexican”, although the 62-year-old was born in Indiana, and that because Trump wants to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border the judge cannot properly do his job.

The focus on Trump University also reignited a controversy in Texas over the decision there by the state attorney general not to file a fraud case against the business. Newly disclosed documents reported by Texas media show that investigators had probed the company for seven months and recommended a lawsuit. The inquiry was shut down when Trump University closed up shop in the state.

Trump later gave $35,000 to the gubernatorial campaign of then-Attorney General Greg Abbott. A spokesman for Abbott, now the Republican governor of Texas, has said it's “absurd” to suggest a connection between the case and the donation that came several years later and that Trump University was “forced out of Texas and consumers were protected.”

Garten also dismissed any connection between the Texas decision and Trump's donation, saying investigators reviewed “a few complaints … and decided not to proceed.”


‘Sell, sell, sell’

The Trump University sales pitch began at free seminars, such as one hosted at a Holiday Inn just outside of Washington in 2009.

A placard outside the ballroom read, “Trump, think BIG”. Inside, aspiring real estate investors heard the theme song from “The Apprentice”, the O'Jays classic, “For the Love of Money”.

Then, a Trump University instructor took the microphone. “All right, you guys ready to be the next Trump real estate millionaire? Yes or No!?” he yelled, according to a Washington Post account at the time.

The purpose of these free 90-minute introductions was not to turn attendees into millionaires, but rather to “set the hook” for future sales, according to employee playbooks.

The playbooks directed leaders of the free seminars to conclude introductory events by getting “in the sales mindset”, “ready to sell, sell, sell!”


Excerpt from a 2010 internal strategy guide for Trump University, known as a playbook, advising staff on how to sell more expensive classes. — From 2010 Trump University playbook.
Excerpt from a 2010 internal strategy guide for Trump University, known as a playbook, advising staff on how to sell
more expensive classes. — From 2010 Trump University playbook.


Three-day courses typically cost $1,495, the records show. But people who paid to attend them were then urged to sign up for even pricier “elite” programs.

A “workshop enrollment form” distributed to participants laid out the options in categories, starting with the “Trump Gold Elite” program. At $34,995, it was the most expensive option — providing three days of personal, in-the-field mentorship as well as special programs on real estate investment, “wealth preservation” and “creative financing”.

The “Trump Silver Elite” package, priced at $19,495, offered real estate and finance training. The “Trump Bronze Elite”, priced at $9,995, offered similar, but fewer, courses.

Employees distributed “profile” surveys on the first day of the seminars, in which participants would outline their financial goals, as well as current assets and liabilities. Attendees were told that the information would help them figure out how much they had to invest in real estate, according to customer complaints.

But in the evenings, after seminars had concluded for the first day, staff members were instructed to use the information to rank each participant according to assets they had available to spend on more Trump University programs.

“If they can afford the gold elite,” the playbook advised, “don't allow them to think about doing anything besides the gold elite.”

A 43-page “sales playbook” offered guidance on using psychological tools to convince students that they needed to sign up for the classes to fulfill their own goals — overcoming their worries that they might not need or be able to afford the classes.

“Customers don't have needs — they have problems,” the book advised. “Problems are like health. The more a problem hurts now, the more the need for a solution now. And the more it hurts, the more they'll be prepared to pay for a speedy solution.”

In a section devoted to “negotiating student resistance,” sales people were offered sample responses to common objections from potential students. If a potential customer said he was concerned about going into debt to pay for the classes, staff were advised to needle them: “I see, do you like living paycheck to paycheck?”

If doubts persisted, staffers were advised to invoke the big boss himself.

“Mr. Trump won't listen to excuses and neither will we,” the instructors were told to say.

Former students have said they were instructed to call their credit card companies on the spot and raise their borrowing limit to pay for the program.


Excerpt from a 2010 internal strategy guide for Trump University, known as a playbook, advising staff on how to sell more expensive classes. This from a part of the playbook advising staff how to respond if potential customers raise potential objections to buying. — From 2010 Trump University playbook.
Excerpt from a 2010 internal strategy guide for Trump University, known as a playbook, advising staff on how to sell
more expensive classes. This from a part of the playbook advising staff how to respond if potential customers raise
potential objections to buying. — From 2010 Trump University playbook.


Harris, the former instructor, recalled one of his typical pitches to urge customers to find money for programs: “Do you have any equity on your home? Do you have a 401(k) or IRA?”

Harris, 47, said he was one of Trump University's biggest sellers. Garten, Trump's lawyer, said Harris was one of the most highly rated instructors.

Instructors had to sell hard to turn participants at free seminars into paying customers.

For the four years Trump University operated, more than 80,300 people attended the free introductory sessions. Those previews were offered 2,000 times in nearly 700 locations around the country.

But only around 6,000 people paid between $995 and $1,995 to attend three-day seminars, director of operations Mark Covais said in a 2012 affidavit. According to Covais, 572 people paid the full $34,995 for the top-level Trump University mentorship.


All about Trump

The entire program was built around Trump — his picture, his quotes and the promise of obtaining access to his special formula for prosperity.

One ad for the free Trump University seminars that appeared in a Corpus Christi, Texas, newspaper in 2009 promised attendees that they would “Learn from the Master,” below a picture of Trump.

“I can turn anyone into a successful real estate investor,” read a quote on the ad, attributed to Trump.

The California class-action lawsuit contains 49 separate instances of Trump University attendees being told their instructor or future mentor was personally chosen by Trump in 2009 alone.

“Donald Trump personally picked me,” one instructor told a group at a free seminar in May 2009, according to a transcript of the session filed as part of the New York case. “He could have picked anybody in this world but he picked me and the reason he picked me is because I've been very, very successful helping average people make a lot of money.”

Harris, the former instructor, told an introductory meeting of potential customers in 2009 that Trump's personal generosity was a core element of the program.

“He did not have to start this university,” Harris told the group, according to a transcript in the New York case. “He does not need the money…. He does not get a dime of it. Does everyone understand this? Please say ‘yes’, He does not need the money.”

In one presentation cited in the New York lawsuit, Harris described Trump as instrumental to his own efforts to turn his life around just after high school.

“I lived on the streets of New York, mostly down in the subways for the first nine months, and I did a lot of things to make some money,” he told a group attending a 2008 event. “And then I met a gentleman and he took me in, and I lived with him for a year and he taught me how to do real estate. He is still my mentor today. So the reason I am here is because Donald Trump picked me.”

In an interview, Harris said he met Trump once in the early 1990s, backstage at an event at the Taj Mahal casino. “Here is the truth,” he said. “When I was at Trump University, I had not one interaction with him ever. Not one.”

In reality, the instructors were not close to Trump, and many were not experts in real estate, according to several ex-staffers who have testified in the lawsuits.

“The Trump University instructors and mentors were a joke,” said Jason Nicholas, who worked for the company for seven months in 2007 and submitted a statement in the lawsuit. “In my opinion, it was just selling false hopes and lies.”

Michael Sexton, who was president of Trump University, acknowledged in sworn testimony in the New York case that none of the event instructors were hand-picked by Trump. Trump told lawyers in California that he would not dispute Sexton's statement — nor could he remember a series of instructors, including Harris, by name or face.

Trump also did not review course curriculum, Sexton said.

“He would never do that,” Sexton said. “Mr. Trump is not going to go through a 300-page, you know, binder of content.”

Only when it came to marketing material was Trump deeply involved, reviewing every piece of advertisement, Sexton testified.

“Mr. Trump understandably is protective of his brand and very protective of his image and how he's portrayed,” Sexton said. “And he wanted to see how his brand and image were portrayed in Trump University marketing materials. And he had very good and substantive input as well.”

Garten, the Trump attorney, said Trump was engaged as any CEO would be in the operations. Outside experts designed the curriculum, Garten said, but Trump was “intimately involved” in the process. While Trump may not have selected every instructor, Garten said he was “very much involved in the process and the discussion of what type of instructor was desired.”


Selling success

At the courses, students were supposed to learn Trump's secrets of real estate success.

But in sworn testimony in New York, Sexton could recall only one Trump practice that was incorporated into the courses: Invest in foreclosed properties.

The lesson underscored how Trump University, which was formed to teach aspiring business people to profit from the fast-expanding housing market, tailored itself after the 2008 economic crash to offer guidance on profiting from the aftermath.

One ad placed in the San Antonio Express-News in October 2009 promised that seminars would allow participants to “learn from Donald Trump's handpicked experts how you can profit from the largest real estate liquidation in history.”

At a seminar called “Fast Track to Foreclosure”, students were instructed to find OPM, “other people's money,” to buy homes out of foreclosure at depressed prices, dress them up with new paint and attractive landscaping — then flip them for profit.

Attendees were advised to use credit cards to invest in real estate, and they were told how to persuade credit card companies to raise their credit limits. If a credit card company representative asked for their income, they were advised to add $75,000 in anticipated earnings from their real estate venture before providing a figure for their expected earnings for the year.

Some customers have also alleged they were told there would be a personal appearance at the session by Trump. Instead, they received the opportunity to get their photograph taken with a life-size cardboard cutout of the mogul.

John Brown, a customer who provided a sworn statement in the New York case, described how he “came to realize that I was not adequately trained, which caused me to feel that Trump University had taken advantage of me.”

Brown said he paid $1,495 for a three-day seminar in 2009 and then used multiple credit cards to charge a $24,995 Trump mentorship program. Three years later, he said he had made no real estate investments using Trump knowledge — but was still paying off $20,000 from the courses.

“Because of the Trump name,” he said, “I felt these classes would be the best.”


Alice Crites contributed to this report.

• Tom Hamburger covers the intersection of money and politics for The Washington Post.

• Rosalind Helderman is a political enterprise and investigations reporter for The Washington Post.

• Dalton Bennett is a political video reporter covering the 2016 election for The Washington Post.

__________________________________________________________________________

Related story:

 • In downturn, aspiring moguls turn to Trump U. for wisdom


https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/donald-trump-said-university-was-all-about-education-actually-its-goal-was-sell-sell-sell/2016/06/04/5b6545d0-2819-11e6-ae4a-3cdd5fe74204_story.html
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« Reply #155 on: June 05, 2016, 10:43:19 pm »


I think a more appropriate title for this thread would be, “TRUMP the thieving, lying CUNT!”
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« Reply #156 on: June 05, 2016, 11:49:51 pm »

Donald Trump Leaked PornHub Parody Video Gives You Even More Of The Donald
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/donald-trump-porn-parody-video-pornhub_uk_5751428be4b0b23a261a03ee

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« Reply #157 on: June 07, 2016, 03:57:34 am »

ktj is a frustrated festering lefty who might need to visit pornhub for some relief into an old sock
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Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP
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« Reply #158 on: June 07, 2016, 08:21:52 am »


YOU can't handle the truth, which is that your HERO is a rip-off artist, a conman, a thief, a criminal, a liar, a bully, a piece of shit!

Trump must be a total idiot if he thought the news media weren't going to dig into his past and drag up all this unsavoury stuff about the TRUE Donald Trump.

The hilarious thing is the number of stupid, gullible people in the USA who are either too thick, or who choose to ignore the evidence which is everywhere.

In fact, there are even stupid, gullible people in New Zealand who are too thick, or who choose to ignore the evidence of Trump's unsavoury dealings and TRUE charactor.
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« Reply #159 on: June 07, 2016, 01:23:47 pm »

the media have fuck all on trump those lying media cunts make shit up like you do ktj

ktj you talk such a load of hate filled leftist cock sucker bullshit next to you trump is an angel

you are so funny ktj when you call people idiots but it's you who really are the dumbest prick i ever heard
i'm ashamed that you're a white trash racist kiwi arse hole because you are giving us good kiwis a bad you're such a dead ball twat.

so let's get your story right everyone one is an idiot except you you lying wanker hahaha
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« Reply #160 on: June 07, 2016, 03:43:03 pm »


The media have a shitload of Trump's unsavoury history, including telling lies, ripping people off, getting stuff made cheap in China and Mexico so he can maximise his profits, then ranting & raving about Chinese and Mexicans taking American jobs. The thing about Trump is that he has always been a narcissistic character who has manufactured his own high profile, with the result that he has been reported on in the news media, and interviewed and recorded with video cameras and audio recording devices at his numerous self-called news media conferences over the decades. And guess what? All those recordings and videos still exist. So Trump can deny all he likes that he DIDN'T say things, but those recordings exist in news media archives to PROVE he is a LYING PIECE OF SHIT.

Then, there are the gullible, simpleton idiots who believe Trump's bullshit in spite of all that archived audio and video footage and numerous documents. Which just goes to show that those simpleton idiots are stupid retards.
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« Reply #161 on: June 07, 2016, 04:25:26 pm »

I'm not too sure about those paragons of virtue, the Clintons, Bushes - the Obamas....

Strangely enough, in recent times Reagan is one I cant recall dirt on - but I'm sure its only a momentary glitch in my memory.
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« Reply #162 on: June 08, 2016, 01:48:02 am »

media's job is hypnotising the masses
the media is owned by the big six corporations and being so this means it is controlled by the elite, they are portraying the things they need the masses to believe in so they can hold on to their corrupt power which they use to control the hearts and minds of the mindless.
lately they have been losing their grip as a lot of the people have all began waking up and they have started to peer behind the curtain which is upsetting their handlers

trump is like a breath of fresh air with his un pc style of speaking his mind and not caring or afraid about what he says and hes saying what a lot of the awake humans already know.

that is the fact that almost everything we are told by the media is a lie.

trump is not in it for the power or the money as he already has both of those 2 things,he is putting his life on the line and is in great danger and he knows this.
the people who support trump hope that he will improve their lives and restore america back to the way it was intended to be when it was founded not as a democracy but a constitutional republic ruled by the people and for the people with true justice and rights for all unlike it has become now where 2 wolves can vote to eat the sheep for dinner.

i believe he does have good intentions and wants to make a better future for the american people plus his own children and grandchildren.

the powers that be and the ones screaming the most are controlled and funded by the elite who control both the left and the right as it serves their interest to cause division among the masses and get them all fighting against each other.

us schools have become state run brainwashing institutions full of leftist teachers training children to behave like self centred spoilt brats who for some strange reason think they are important without need to have any honor and believe the world owes them a free ride, they are such a worthless generation of fools walking around with iphones glued to their eyes,most are unable to read,their minds are like grasshoppers that jump from one stupid fad to the next.

i am afraid soon these kids are about to get a rude awakening as they will need to learn to live in the real world and will be forced to grow up.

at this moment the kids in america are so screwed up i feel sorry for them but at the moment they are having fun chanting fuck donald trump lol.

my hope is trump can do away with all the forms of control and the red tape which is screwing up the whole planet.

who knows trump might turn out to be an arsehole like all the others were but where there's a chance for real changes to this world it gives me something good to hope for,i hope for real change and not just words.


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« Reply #163 on: June 10, 2016, 12:29:53 am »


from the Los Angeles Times....

Trump bigotry has shameless defenders, from GOP pols to CNN shills

By DAVID HORSEY | 5:00AM PDT - Thursday, June 09, 2016



IT IS a wondrous thing to watch the mental and moral gymnastics Republican politicians and political surrogates put themselves through to defend Donald Trump. This week, they've had to work especially hard for their 30 pieces of silver to justify Trump's bigoted remarks about a “Mexican” judge.

The target of Trump's latest self-serving rant is U.S. District Judge Gonzalo Curiel, who is overseeing a class-action lawsuit brought by hundreds of people who claim they were bamboozled by the billionaire's bogus Trump University. Trump alleges that Curiel is treating him unfairly — the big baby is always whimpering about being treated unfairly by someone — because the judge is a Mexican.

Actually, Curiel is an Indiana-born American, but his parents are from Mexico and Trump told the Wall Street Journal that amounts to “an absolute conflict.” Why? Because Trump wants to build a wall along the Mexican border and, because Curiel might not approve of that, he is bound to be biased in his rulings. At least that is Trump's skewed reasoning, based on no evidence.

Republican Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, who tried to minimize the impact of his endorsement of Trump for the GOP presidential nomination by publishing it in his hometown newspaper in Wisconsin, was at least direct in his characterization of Trump's comments. He called the candidate's words a “textbook definition of a racist comment.” Other Republicans were less forthright.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell went before reporters to tell Trump he should “quit attacking the various people you competed with and various minority groups and get on message.” His concern, apparently, was less what Trump said than it was his lack of campaign discipline. Utah GOP Senator Orrin Hatch showed little concern about Trump's bigoted assertion that a Latino judge's ethnicity should be disqualifying. Hatch told the media that, because poor little Donald is new to politics, they should “be nice to him.” Trump's prized lap dog, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, defended his new master. “I've known him for 14 years,” Christie said. “And Donald Trump is not a racist.”

The most brazen defense was put up by two of Trump's shills at CNN on Tuesday night. The first zinger came from Kayleigh McEnany, one of the gaggle of vacuous young women who are vying to establish themselves in the lucrative business of conservative punditry. McEnany, a constant guest on CNN, is notorious for her inability to veer from Trump-friendly talking points. She outdid herself this time when she tried to change the subject from Trump's remarks to the terribly unfair way the man has been treated by the media. Incredibly, it took other panelists several seconds too long to point out that Trump's successful campaign has been built almost entirely on unlimited free media attention and a long string of softball interviews.

McEnany's inanity was exceeded only by CNN's favored Trump surrogate, Jeffrey Lord. The veteran political operative who was an aide to Ronald Reagan and Jack Kemp is usually much more nuanced in his Trump pumping. But this time his spin veered into the surreal. Trump's comments weren't racist, he argued, Trump was “calling attention to racism.” Lord went on to accuse Ryan and McConnell of playing the race card by critiquing Trump.

Wow. That's what you call bold. And loyal. And twisted.

The most venal thing about what Trump said actually goes beyond racism. It is that he is intentionally stirring up ethnic animosity in order to deflect scrutiny of the abundant evidence that he and his trained sharks bilked hundreds of people out of the many thousands of dollars they paid for worthless courses at his “university”. And, in so doing, Trump is defaming Curiel, a respected jurist and former prosecutor whom the last Republican governor of California, Arnold Schwarzenegger, calls a hero in the fight against Mexican drug cartels.

If the Republican politicians who are defending Trump had not lost their sense of decency, they would be ashamed of themselves. CNN's Trumpistas McEnany and Lord are, obviously, incapable of shame. They are what they are, professional spinmeisters angling for a better TV gig or a job in the Trump White House. Too bad Trump University is defunct. McEnany and Lord could have been professors.


http://www.latimes.com/opinion/topoftheticket/la-na-tt-trump-bigotry-20160609-snap-story.html
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« Reply #164 on: June 12, 2016, 12:13:42 am »


Donald Trump addressed a major gathering of the American Indian Nation.

He spoke for almost an hour about his plans for increasing every Native American's present standard of living.
 
Though vague in detail, he spoke about his ideas for helping his “red sisters and brothers”.

Afterwards, the Tribes presented him with a plaque inscribed with his new Indian name, “Walking Eagle”, which he proudly accepted.

After Trump left, a news reporter asked the chiefs how they came to select this name.
 
They explained that “Walking Eagle” is the name given to a bird so full of shit it can no longer fly.






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« Reply #165 on: June 13, 2016, 11:59:38 am »

ktj him speak with fork tongue lol
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« Reply #166 on: June 13, 2016, 04:54:38 pm »


FACT-CHECKER


....where Donald Trump's LIES & BULLSHIT & FALSEHOODS are exposed by FACTS, as are the lies & untruths spouted by other politicians, although it's interesting to note that Donald Trump's LIES seem to come up more often than the LIES of any other politician.

No doubt the STUPID (ie....Trump-supporters) will avoid FACT-CHECKER like the plague, because they'll be too scared of learning they are gullible idiots!

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« Reply #167 on: June 13, 2016, 07:39:25 pm »


from The Washington Post....

As its stock collapsed, Trump's firm gave
him huge bonuses and paid for his jet


By DREW HARWELL | 3:28PM EDT - Sunday, June 12, 2016

Donald Trump appears above the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange on June 7th, 1995, the day that Trump Hotels and Casino Resorts went public at $14 a share. — Photograph: Kathy Willens/Associated Press.
Donald Trump appears above the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange on June 7th, 1995, the day that Trump Hotels
and Casino Resorts went public at $14 a share. — Photograph: Kathy Willens/Associated Press.


IT WAS promoted as the chance of a lifetime: Mom-and-pop investors could buy shares in celebrity businessman Donald Trump's first public company, Trump Hotels and Casino Resorts.

Their investments were quickly depleted. The company known by Trump's initials, DJT, crumbled into a penny stock and filed for bankruptcy after less than a decade, costing shareholders millions of dollars, even as other casino companies soared.

In its short life, Trump the company greatly enriched Trump the businessman, paying to have his personal jet piloted and buying heaps of Trump-brand merchandise. Despite losing money every year under Trump's leadership, the company paid Trump handsomely, including a $5 million bonus in the year the company's stock plummeted 70 percent.

Many of those who lost money were Main Street shareholders who believed in the Trump brand, such as Sebastian Pignatello, a retired private investor in Queens. By the time of the 2004 bankruptcy, Pignatello's 150,000 shares were worth pennies on the dollar.

“He had been pillaging the company all along,” said Pignatello, who joined shareholders in a lawsuit against Trump that has since been settled. “Even his business allies, they were all fair game. He has no qualms about screwing anybody. That's what he does.”

Trump's bid for the White House relies heavily on his ability to sell himself as a master businessman, a standout performer in real estate and reality TV.

But interviews with former shareholders and analysts as well as years of financial filings reveal a striking characteristic of his business record: Even when his endeavors failed and other people lost money, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee found a way to make money for himself, to market his Trump-branded products and to pay for his expensive lifestyle.

Trump was the chairman of Trump Hotels and Casino Resorts in Atlantic City from 1995 to 2009, his only outing as the head of a major public company. During that time, the company lost more than $1 billion, financial records show. He also was chief executive from 2000 to 2005, during which time share prices plunged from a high of $35 to as low as 17 cents.

Trump received more than $44 million in salary, bonuses and other compensation during his time at the company, filings show. He also benefited from tens of millions of dollars more in special deals, advisory fees and “service agreements” he negotiated with his company.

Trump's campaign did not make him available to respond to specific questions about the company, but in a recent Washington Post interview, Trump said he “made a lot of money in Atlantic City,” adding, “I make great deals for myself.”

He expounded: “They say, ‘Why don't you take the casinos public or something?’ You know, if you take them public, you make money on that. All I can say is I wasn't representing the country. I wasn't representing the banks. I wasn't representing anybody but myself.”

Corporate governance experts say it's rare for executives of public companies to suggest that they haven't been looking out for the shareholders who financed them.

“When companies go public, when they first invite investors in … they say: ‘I promise you, you will come first. We are here to create shareholder value, and that's why you should trust us’,” said Nell Minow, the vice chair of ValueEdge Advisors, which advises shareholders on corporate governance issues. “For them to say, ‘I don’t really care about you’, it's basically your [sell] signal. Who's going to make sure my interests as a shareholder are going to be protected?”


Whatever price he wanted

Trump Hotels and Casino Resorts started out as a holding company that owned the Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City, and then it steadily added other Trump properties.

Because it was publicly traded, Trump could sell shares and quickly raise money while other corners of his empire were in distress. Virtually all of Trump's other businesses are privately held, so key information about their performance is hidden from view.

The company began advertising its public offering of stock in 1995, saying shareholders would benefit from “the widespread recognition of the ‘Trump’ name and its association with high quality amenities and first class service.”

When it debuted that year on the New York Stock Exchange, Trump's company raised $140 million from investors, at $14 a share, and said the money would go toward expanding the Plaza and developing a riverboat casino in Indiana.

But much of that money went to pay off tens of millions of dollars in loans Trump had personally guaranteed, filings show. Those loans were taken out before the company went public, but Trump's private fortune could have been at risk if they went unpaid.

The company got off to an encouraging start. An improving national economy and an upturn in Atlantic City gambling helped shares soar to a peak of $35 in 1996. That boosted the value of Trump's stake in the company and helped him return to the Forbes 400 list — the magazine's ranking of America's wealthiest people — for the first time since 1989.

The early success didn't last long. In less than a year, the company paid premium prices for two of Trump's deeply indebted, privately held casinos, the Trump Taj Mahal and the Trump Castle. In essence, he was both buyer and seller, able to set whatever price he wanted. The company bought his Castle for $100 million more than analysts said it was worth. Trump pocketed $880,000 in cash after arranging the deal, financial filings show.


The Trump Taj Mahal, seen in this March 14th, 2007 photo, was one of two Atlantic City properties sold to Trump Hotels and Casino Resorts in 1996. — Photograph: William Thomas Cain/Getty Images.
The Trump Taj Mahal, seen in this March 14th, 2007 photo, was one of two Atlantic City
properties sold to Trump Hotels and Casino Resorts in 1996.
 — Photograph: William Thomas Cain/Getty Images.


By the end of 1996, shareholders who had bet on a rosy Trump future were now investors in a company with $1.7 billion of Trump's old debt. The company was forced to spend hundreds of millions of dollars a year on interest payments, more than the casinos brought in, securities filings show. The unprofitable company couldn't afford the upgrades it needed to compete with newer gambling rivals.

Spooked investors fled the company in 1996, sending its share price down to $12. As millions of dollars in shareholder value evaporated, the company gave Trump a $7 million pay package, including a 71 percent raise to his salary, financial filings show. Trump defended his compensation by telling the Wall Street Journal, “Other than the stock price, we're doing great.”

“He ran these companies into the ground,” Graef Crystal, an executive-pay consultant who watched the company at the time, said in an interview.

As the company spiraled downward, it continued to pay for Trump's luxuries. Between 1998 and 2005, it spent more than $6 million to “entertain high-end customers” on Trump's plane and golf courses and about $2 million to maintain his personal jet and have it piloted, a Washington Post analysis of company filings shows.

Trump also steered the company toward deals with the rest of the Trump-brand empire. Between 2006 and 2009, the company bought $1.7 million of Trump-brand merchandise, including $1.2 million of Trump Ice bottled water, the analysis shows.

“If you're chairman of the company, there have to be safeguards to avoid that kind of blatant self-dealing,” said Pignatello, who said he lost tens of thousands of dollars in the investment. “He was milking the company.”


A ‘basket of goodies’

The grand promises and boasting Trump had become famous for as a private businessman became a source of tension with public investors. Wall Street traders spoke of the “Donald discount” to highlight the gap between what Trump promised and what they believed his stock was actually worth.

Trump said in 1997 that he was “the biggest there is in the casino business.” But that March, when the stock was trading at a quarter of its price 10 months before, Chase bond analyst Steve Ruggiero said the company wasn't “forthcoming” about its financial performance with analysts, which he said “raises suspicions.”

The company at times ran into trouble. In 1998, the U.S. Treasury fined one of the Trump casinos $477,000 for failing to file reports designed to help guard against money laundering. Trump did not comment then on the action. The company agreed last year to pay a $10 million civil penalty after regulators found that it had continued to violate the reporting and record-keeping requirements of the Bank Secrecy Act.

In 2000, Trump and his partners paid $250,000 to settle a case brought by New York state alleging that they had secretly funded an ad blitz opposing the opening of competing casinos in the Catskill Mountains. “It's been settled. We're happy it all worked out nicely,” Trump said then.

In 2002, federal securities regulators issued a cease-and-desist order against the company, saying it had misled shareholders by publishing a news release with numbers “deceptively” skewed to appear more upbeat. The company said it quickly corrected the error and was not fined. Trump defended the release by saying it “was just a statement that was too verbose.”

The company lost money every year of Trump’s leadership, and its share price suffered. A shareholder who bought $100 of DJT shares in 1995 could sell them for about $4 in 2005. The same investment in MGM Resorts would have increased in value to about $600.

In 2004, the year Trump took home a $1.5 million salary, stock-exchange officials froze trading in the company — and, later, delisted it entirely — as word spread that it was filing for bankruptcy because of about $1.8 billion in debt.

Under the company's Chapter 11 reorganization plan, shareholders' stake in the company shrunk from roughly 40 percent to about 5 percent. Trump, meanwhile, would remain chairman — and receive a $2 million annual salary, a $7.5 million beachfront tract in Atlantic City and a personal stake in the company's Miss Universe pageant.

“I don't think it’s a failure. It's a success,” Trump said in 2004 about the bankruptcy. “The future looks very good.”

Shareholders sued, saying in court filings that the “sweetheart deal” amounted to a “basket of goodies” for Trump. “Chairmen of public companies usually don't celebrate when millions of dollars of shareholder equity are being wiped out,” attorneys wrote in a court filing that year. “Donald Trump apparently does.”

Trump settled, agreeing to give creditors $17.5 million in cash and the proceeds from an auction of the Atlantic City land.

Trump has said he had no regrets about the company's performance. “Entrepreneurially speaking, not necessarily from the standpoint of running a company but from an entrepreneur's standpoint, [the stock offering] was one of the great deals,” he told Fortune in 2004.


The ‘imperial CEO’

Company decisions were, as in most public companies, approved by a board of directors. None of the original directors responded to requests for comment. Trump wrote in his book “Trump: Surviving at the Top” that he “personally didn't like answering to a board of directors.”

Charles Elson, the director of the John L. Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance at the University of Delaware, said that Trump exemplified the corporate-American role once known as the “imperial CEO”: an unchallenged, dominant leader who singlehandedly steered the company.

“The CEO ran the show … and the board was the creature of the CEO,” Elson said. “These days, it's very different,” he added, because of a shift toward greater oversight from company directors and the increasing presence of activist shareholders.

One later director was close to Trump: his daughter. Ivanka Trump was named to the board of directors in 2007, when she was 26 and had been working for two years at her father's private company, the Trump Organization. The public company paid her $188,861 in cash and stock awards that year, filings show. Representatives for Ivanka Trump declined to comment.

Ivanka and Donald Trump both resigned from the company in 2009, after Trump declared in a statement that he strongly disagreed with bondholders who had been pushing the company to file again for bankruptcy.

“The company has represented for quite some time substantially less than 1 percent of my net worth, and my investment in it is worthless to me now,” Trump said at the time.

The company, now called Trump Entertainment Resorts, never escaped its crippling debt and filed for bankruptcy twice more, in 2009 and 2014. Carl Icahn, the billionaire investor Trump has called a friend, took control of the public company this year.

Trump's corporate reign was disruptive enough to give even his biggest supporters pause. Jimmy Mullins, a Trump superfan who once paid for specialty “TRMP 1” license plates, said he bought some of the company's first publicly traded shares believing that Trump would lead the casinos to glory. “How could you lose money at a casino?” Mullins said in a recent interview.

But in 2009, after losing money, Mullins told the Press of Atlantic City newspaper: “He let us down… I could have bought another [car]. That's how much money I lost in this company.”

Mullins, now 64 and working part time at a catering hall in New York, said Trump called him after the story appeared and offered him complimentary hotel stays at the casino. Mullins said he was upset when interviewed in 2009 but no longer feels that way. He said he intends to vote for Trump for president.

“Other people did lose money,” Mullins said. “But he took care of me.”


Alice Crites contributed to this report.

• Drew Harwell is a national business reporter at The Washington Post.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/as-its-stock-collapsed-trumps-firm-gave-him-huge-bonuses-and-paid-for-his-jet/2016/06/12/58458918-2766-11e6-b989-4e5479715b54_story.html
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« Reply #168 on: June 13, 2016, 08:24:41 pm »

when people gamble some people win and some lose i love to gamble sometimes i lose but i dont cry about it lol

tell us all about your life experiences ktj, your great investments and goals and how are they going i am guessing you never made any mistakes so you learnt nothing except how to blame everyone one else  for your own failures

what have you ever done that has saved any of the world's people from their hardships

i bet you done nothing except just moan like a bitch and stir as much shit as you can
how wonderful lol

fuck off to africa and dig some wells that's all you're good for
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« Reply #169 on: June 13, 2016, 08:48:42 pm »


The only time Trump as run a public company with other shareholders' money, he ripped them off and mis-managed the company, while at the same time lining his own pockets, like the incompetent businessman and thief he really is.

Imagine trusting him with the US Treasury (ie....American taxpayers' money) to enrich himself with?

His public business history tells us Trump is a crook, so he is the last person who is fit to be Prez of the USA.

Trump the LIAR, Trump the CROOK!!
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« Reply #170 on: June 13, 2016, 09:42:37 pm »

you're so full of bullshit your words and your self hating white life add up to nothing lol
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« Reply #171 on: June 14, 2016, 12:23:49 pm »


Read the article.....click on the hotlinks contained within the article.....it is all backed up with FACTS.

FACTS you are deliberately refusing to see, because it doesn't fit with the delusion which is your view of the LIAR and CROOK Donald Trump.
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« Reply #172 on: June 14, 2016, 07:12:46 pm »

the washington post have been accused of making shit up now why would they do that?


so its hard for me to believe any of it that is unless i am wearing wearing my stupid commie goggles

there is no scripted mainstream news brainwashing for the dumbed down public zombie

there's nothing happening here believe your masters people and go back to sleep zzzzzZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ





but wait there's more

« Last Edit: June 14, 2016, 08:14:34 pm by Im2Sexy4MyPants » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #173 on: June 14, 2016, 08:29:45 pm »


It still doesn't change the fact that Trump is a MORON, a LIAR and a CROOK.

Nor does it change the fact that there are a lot of stupid people who are gullible enough to believe all of Trump's bullshit.

Hahaha....if Trump announced he was GOD, no doubt all of those stupid people would bow down and worship him, 'cause that's how mentally-retarded Trump supporters are.
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« Reply #174 on: June 14, 2016, 09:54:48 pm »

you need to watch thode films below to see how your brain work ?

well you should know all about trump because you are all the same things you call him  Grin

trumps your daddy be funny if he win drafts all the leftist pc moron trolls and sends them all over to fight isis

i would pay good money to watch that on tv haha
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Are you sick of the bullshit from the sewer stream media spewed out from the usual Ken and Barby dickless talking point look a likes.

If you want to know what's going on in the real world...
And the many things that will personally effect you.
Go to
http://www.infowars.com/

AND WAKE THE F_ _K UP

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