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Benjamin Netanyahu “scarier than Iran” — former Mossad chief


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Author Topic: Benjamin Netanyahu “scarier than Iran” — former Mossad chief  (Read 61 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« on: March 10, 2015, 06:07:06 pm »


from The Telegraph....

Former Mossad chief hits out at Benjamin Netanyahu

Meir Dagan says he is more scared by the Israeli prime minister than the country's enemies

By INNA LAZAREVA in Tel Aviv | 6:15PM GMT - Sunday, 08 March 2015

Mr Netanyahu's visit to Rechalim was seen as so politically sensitive that it was not disclosed in advance. — Photo: Daniel Bar On/Reuters.
Mr Netanyahu's visit to Rechalim was seen as so politically sensitive that it was not disclosed in advance.
 — Photo: Daniel Bar On/Reuters.


THE former head of the Israeli intelligence agency Mossad has delivered an extraordinary assault on the country’s prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu, saying his policies left him fearing for the future of the state.

Meir Dagan accused Mr Netanyahu of being more dangerous than Iran in a speech at a rally in advance of next week’s general election, which has seen the combative leader fighting for his political life.

“Israel is a country surrounded by enemies, but the enemies do not scare me,” he said. “I am scared of our leadership, by the absence of vision and the loss of a path, the loss of determination. By the hesitance and the impasse.”

“And above all, I am scared by the crisis of leadership, which is the worst there has ever been until today.”

Addressing crowds of over 35,000 people in Tel Aviv’s Rabin Square, Mr Dagan lambasted Mr Netanyahu’s political decision-making as the demonstrators chanted “Bibi — go home!” and punched a giant red balloon imprinted with the prime minister’s face through the crowds.

“We have a leader who is fighting only one battle: the battle for his own political survival,” he said. “Benjamin Netanyahu has served as prime minister for six years straight — six years in which he has not led a single genuine process of change to the face of the region or the creation of a better future.”

Mr Dagan, a veteran of the game-changing 1967 Six-Day War, the 1973 Yom Kippur war and other military campaigns, momentarily stunned many of the onlookers when he broke down in tears during his address.

His verbal attack comes as a culmination of a weeks-long campaign of criticism by Mr Dagan and others from the security establishments directed at Mr Netnayahu.

They have challenged his hard-line approach to the West’s negotiations on Iran’s nuclear deal, most recently in his speech to the US Congress, and for his failure to make progress on the Palestinian issue.

Last week, Mr Dagan accused him of causing “the greatest strategic damage to Israel on the Iranian issue”, while a group of retired military leaders also weighed over his Congress speech.

Demonstrations about social welfare issues also returned to the streets of Israel’s commercial and cultural capital Tel Aviv last week, as dozens of protest tents were set up along the city’s prosperous Rothschild Boulevard.

Under the slogan “I’m 40 and I can’t afford to buy my own apartment’, many are once again taking a stance against the high cost of living, including food and property prices - issues which have not seen significant improvement since the mass tent protests of 2011.

There is also lingering controversy over last year’s war in Gaza, seen by many as damaging Israel’s reputation without providing any long-term resolution to relations with the Palestinians.

“An entire election campaign has gone by without remembering the blood that was shed over the summer,” said Michael Kastan-Keidar, whose husband Lieutenant Colonel Dolev Keidar was killed.

“But last summer, I lost the love of my life during the war, and I came here to request of you, when you go to cast your ballots, to vote for who will prevent the next war, for who is prepared to do everything possible to prevent more deaths.”

Ms Kastan-Keidar’s anti-war message came as the outgoing United Nations Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process, Robert Serry, issued a stern reminder to Israel about the ever deteriorating situation in Gaza.

“My message to you is: don’t forget Gaza”, said Mr Serry, in an interview published by the Israeli daily Ma’ariv, as he urged the government to sign a two-year temporary ceasefire with Gaza.

“When the peace talks don’t make progress, Gaza explodes.”


Related news stories:

 • Netanyahu warns Congress over Iran: as it happened

 • Netanyahu accuses Obama of risking ‘nuclear arms race’ with Iran deal

 • Benjamin Netanyahu's speech to Congress interrupted by standing ovations

 • Barack Obama: ‘nothing new’ in Benjamin Netanyahu's Iran speech

 • Will Netanyahu’s speech derail nuclear talks with Iran?

 • What has Netanyahu's speech before Congress done for his election prospects?


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/middleeast/israel/11457725/Former-Mossad-chief-hits-out-at-Benjamin-Netanyahu.html




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reality
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« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2015, 08:32:06 pm »

Mmm..don't know what the fuss is about ......

....what could possibly be wrong with a country who wants us all dead because  we are not Muslim....

...having an arsenal of nuclear weapons😳
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2015, 12:48:14 pm »


I see Netanyahu is displaying his usual fuck you “nasty arsehole” persona...



from The Washington Post....

Some Israelis want to take in Syrian refugees. Netanyahu says no.

By RUTH EGLASH | 10:29AM - Sunday, September 06, 2015

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, right, and Cabinet Secretary Avichai Mandelblit arrive at the weekly cabinet meeting in Jerusalem on Sunday. Netanyahu said Israel could not afford to take in refugees fleeing the war in neighboring Syria and vowed to surround Israel with security fences on all its borders. — Photograph: Menahem Kahana/Reuters.
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, right, and Cabinet Secretary Avichai Mandelblit arrive at the weekly cabinet meeting in Jerusalem
on Sunday. Netanyahu said Israel could not afford to take in refugees fleeing the war in neighboring Syria and vowed to surround Israel
with security fences on all its borders. — Photograph: Menahem Kahana/Reuters.


JERUSALEM — As Syrian refugees continued to pour into Europe over the weekend, some Israelis were calling on their government to open the border and allow in those fleeing the ongoing civil war in Syria.

But almost as soon as the discussion started, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu discounted the possibility, saying, “Israel is a small, a very small country that lacks demographic and geographic depth.”

Instead, at his weekly cabinet meeting on Sunday, the Israeli leader announced that construction had started on a fence along the country's eastern border with Jordan — a possible pathway for war-weary Syrians to reach Israel but also a way for extremists from groups such as the Islamic State to infiltrate the Jewish state.

“We will not allow Israel to be flooded with illegal migrants and terrorists,” Netanyahu said in a statement.

The new barrier will extend from Israel's southern tip up to its existing border fence on the Golan Heights, the spot where Israel touches Syria.

Although Israel is one of five countries bordering Syria and has even seen some spillover from the fighting there, it has not officially taken in any refugees from the mostly Muslim country. The two nations have no diplomatic relations.

Israel has, however, provided medical care for wounded Syrians — about 1,000 or so — who have arrived at its border. It has also indicated that it would assist members of the minority Druze community in Syria, who live near the border with Israel, if their situation deteriorates.

Over the weekend, Israeli opposition leader Isaac Herzog called on the government to follow the lead of some European countries and take in refugees from Syria.

He said Jews could “not remain indifferent to hundreds of thousands of refugees.”

Herzog was joined by other political leaders, including Zehava Galon, head of the left-wing Meretz party, who said that the images from Europe were shocking and that taking in a few tens of thousands of refugees not only would not harm Israel, but also would strengthen its standing in the Western world.

Another Knesset Member, Elazar Stern wrote on Facebook that Israel should “grant asylum to a limited number of Syrian refugees and recreate, to a certain degree, (former) prime minister Menachem Begin's first decision, to take in refugees from Vietnam.”

Israel is well known for absorbing millions of Jewish immigrants, but it has little experience taking in people from other nations. From 1977 to 1979, Israel provided safe haven to 300 Vietnamese refugees, and in the early 1990s, it accepted 84 Bosnian Muslims from the former Yugoslavia.

However, over the past decade, it has been grappling with the influx of nearly 50,000 asylum-seekers from Africa, mostly Muslims from Sudan and Christians from Eritrea, who arrived by way of Israel's southern border with Egypt.

The presence of thousands of non-Jewish Africans, whom the authorities refer to as infiltrators or migrants, has proved a religious and cultural complication for Israel as it tries to keep the Jewish nature of the state intact.

It has also led to a series of zigzagging policies, including attempting to ban the Africans from seeking employment, internment in a semi-open desert facility and offering to pay them to return to a third country in Africa.

Israeli human rights groups are highly critical of the government's policy toward the Africans, saying they should be fully recognized as asylum-seekers or at least have their status determined. Activists point out that only a handful of people have received official shelter in Israel, a country of just over 8 million.

A parliamentary report published in 2013 noted that since its creation in 1948, Israel has granted official refugee status only to 200 people.


• Ruth Eglash is a reporter for The Washington Post based in Jerusalem. She was formerly a reporter and senior editor at the Jerusalem Post and freelanced for international media.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2015/09/06/some-israelis-want-to-take-in-syrian-refugees-netanyahu-says-no
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reality
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« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2015, 01:52:14 pm »

Thats ok...we understand..they are in an awkward position..we can take their share too Tongue
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2015, 04:10:27 pm »


Those jews of Netanyahyu's ilk are preaching racial purity.

They have learnt well from their former Nazi oppressors.

SIEG HEIL!!
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reality
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« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2015, 05:48:35 pm »

kj...."...are preaching racial purity..."

...sounds like you are a tiny bit envious...are you a mongrel Wink
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