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5.7 Magnitude quake, 8km deep and centred 30km east of Seddon


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Author Topic: 5.7 Magnitude quake, 8km deep and centred 30km east of Seddon  (Read 762 times)
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« Reply #50 on: July 28, 2013, 09:57:00 pm »


Future of building hangs in balance

The Dominion Post | 12:45PM - Saturday, 27 July 2013

COSTLY JOB: Even before it was damaged in last Sunday's quake, engineers calculated it would cost nearly $10 million to strengthen the heritage-listed Old Public Trust building in Lambton Quay. — KENT BLECHYNDEN/Fairfax NZ.
COSTLY JOB: Even before it was damaged in last Sunday's
quake, engineers calculated it would cost nearly
$10 million to strengthen the heritage-listed
Old Public Trust building in Lambton Quay.
 — KENT BLECHYNDEN/Fairfax NZ.


THE FUTURE of the heritage-listed Old Public Trust Building in Lambton Quay hangs in the balance as engineers assess its condition and the feasibility of fixing it.

The building was deemed earthquake-prone and had been yellow stickered before Sunday's quake, which caused extensive cracking to walls and ceilings.

Creative New Zealand was forced to close its office in the building until further notice after structural engineers advised staff should not return to the building.

Staff are working from home while the arts agency looks for new offices.

Creative New Zealand has a 65 per cent share in the Old Public Trust Body Corporate which last year commissioned a report by consulting engineers Dunning Thornton into the feasibility of strengthening the building to comply with the 2004 Building Act.

The report estimated the cost of strengthening, facade restoration, temporary relocation of staff and fitout would be between $4.6 million and $9.4m.

Creative New Zealand's share of that would be between $2.76m and $5.64m.

The extent of the damage to the building after the Sunday earthquake and the cost of earthquake strengthening will not be known until further investigation is completed.

However, the safety of staff was the first priority, said Arts Council chairman Dick Grant.

Earlier this month the Arts Council of Creative New Zealand agreed in principle to strengthen the building subject to agreement by the body corporate.

"The Arts Council has made some provision for strengthening costs in its budget but will need to look carefully at options for funding the strengthening once updated costs are known," said Grant.

"Creative New Zealand will now be in discussions with the body corporate about the future of the building and is seeking a further engineers' report on strengthening options for consideration by the Arts Council."

The building also housed a legal chambers, Capital Sports Medicine's clinic and a tailor.

Built in 1909, it has a category-1 heritage listing. The Historic Places Trust describes it as a superb example of a public and commercial building of the Edwardian period.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/8971468/Future-of-building-hangs-in-balance
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« Reply #51 on: July 28, 2013, 09:57:56 pm »


Capital must learn Christchurch lesson: Parker

By ANTHONY HUBBARD and MICHELLE ROBINSON - The Dominion Post | 9:30AM - Sunday, 28 July 2013

CHRISTCHURCH MAYOR Bob Parker suggests Wellington should choose which of its heritage buildings it wants to preserve from earthquakes "because there is not enough money to save them all".

He also says people need a more user-friendly earthquake safety code so that those "without an engineering degree" can decide whether to enter an old building.

And he says ordinary people can take steps of their own to avoid catastrophic damage in an earthquake.

Parker was asked what lessons he had learned from the Canterbury earthquakes that might be useful to Wellingtonians in the wake of last Sunday's 6.5-magnitude quake, which caused widespread damage across the capital.

He said the Wellington community, with the city council and central government, should decide which of its heritage buildings it wanted to preserve and which it was prepared to lose.

"There isn't enough money in the kitty — I doubt that there's enough money in the country to [bring] every beautiful old building in every town of New Zealand up to an earthquake code so it can survive," Parker said.

That meant making hard choices — "and sooner rather than later", he said.

"What we've all learned is that these [earthquakes] are random events, there's no telling when they're going to happen."

"You should make the assumption that it could happen sooner rather than later, and there is a degree of urgency in ensuring that you put these support structures in place." Strengthening could be done through government grants, or tax breaks for "rigorously chosen" repairs.

Parker, a former Wellington resident, said the city was "unthinkable" without iconic — and earthquake-prone — buildings such as St Gerard's Monastery in Oriental Bay.

Parker said some buildings classified as earthquake-prone had survived the Canterbury earthquakes.

The rating could reflect the fact that "there's an old brick chimney at the back and that's a brittle component that brings the overall rating down.

"So you remove that and suddenly you've got a building that's not earthquake prone."

Likewise some old historic timber buildings which would have been classified earthquake-prone came through the terrible Canterbury earthquake unscathed.

Engineers needed to design a more user-friendly classification so people would know before they entered an old building what the real risk was.

"I don't have an answer as to how to do that," he said, but that was a task for engineers.

"That's what we pay the guys the bucks to do."

Parker had seen a news report about a Wellington bottle store where stock had fallen off shelves and smashed.

The Canterbury experience was that quite simple steps, such as redesigning shelves or putting glass fronts on them, could prevent such damage and save owners from rocketing insurance premiums.


SMART APP MAKES YOU STAND OUT IN AN EMERGENCY

A St John ambulance volunteer has designed a smartphone app that allows you to send a panic message using your phone's GPS co-ordinates.

Designer Grant Dewar came up with the idea while volunteering as an ambulance officer in the aftermath of the Canterbury earthquakes. "Wellington could certainly have used it last weekend. It's all about being prepared."

The free app allows you to fire off a text or voice call to close contacts or emergency services to tell them you need help.

He said in emergencies people often didn't know where they were — and the panic message would automatically give global positioning system (GPS) co-ordinates giving a location. He said that would help, particularly in rural or bush locations.

It also provided your phone number, which many people forgot when panicked, Dewar said.

"So that information is passed on in a nice clear format to allow emergency services to provide a quick response."

Other features of his HELP app allowed people to bring up personal medical details, and, if no help was needed, but a person was caught in a major crisis the app lets someone send an "I'm OK" message.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/8973592/Capital-must-learn-Christchurch-lesson-Parker
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« Reply #52 on: July 28, 2013, 09:58:28 pm »


St Marys to close for 18 months

The Dominion Post | 12:37PM - Sunday, 28 July 2013

CHECKING IN: Council staff and engineers arrive to check St Mary of the Angels for damage in the days following the 6.5 quake. — LUKE APPLEBY/Fairfax NZ.
CHECKING IN: Council staff and engineers
arrive to check St Mary of the Angels for
damage in the days following the 6.5
quake. — LUKE APPLEBY/Fairfax NZ.


ST MARY OF THE ANGELS Church in central Wellington has been closed for strengthening following last week's earthquake.

The earthquake-prone church in Boulcott Street came through the quake unscathed but the decision had been made to close it for up to 18 months while previously-planned seismic strengthening work was done, parish priest Rev Barry Scannell said.

"We were probably looking to close towards the end this year but after last week we decided to expedite in the interests of safety."

He said the church had not been used since last Sunday night and parishioners were told of the closure when they attended services in the church hall this morning.

The nearly 100-year-old church has a Category 1 Historic Places Trust listing.


SAFETY FIRST: Engineers inspect St Mary of the Angels Church on Boulcott Street in Wellington in the days following the 6.5 quake. — LUKE APPLEBY/Fairfax NZ.
SAFETY FIRST: Engineers inspect St Mary of the Angels Church on Boulcott Street in Wellington
in the days following the 6.5 quake. — LUKE APPLEBY/Fairfax NZ.


Rev Scannell said detailed costings of the strengthening project had not yet been done but it was probably going to cost $5 to $8 million.

"The safety of our parishioners and church users is paramount and therefore we have made the decision to close the church so that the design and strengthening work can be fast-tracked".

"While the church is closed the parish will celebrate weekday masses in the parish hall and after arrangements are made, Sunday masses will be celebrated at St Joseph's Church, Mount Victoria and Sacred Heart Cathedral in Thorndon".

"Our priority, with the Church now closed, is to set about raising the funds for this essential work to secure the future of this Wellington landmark."

"The Parish will be going out to all Wellingtonians and others to seek their support for preserving this Wellington icon, which is treasured by so many people in the city and throughout New Zealand," said Rev Scannell.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/wellington/8973897/St-Marys-to-close-for-18-months



Quake prompts church closure

Heritage listed church needs strengthening

By HANK SCHOUTEN - The Dominion Post | 5:00AM - Monday, 29 July 2013



ANOTHER heritage-listed central Wellington landmark has been closed in the wake of last weekend's big earthquake.

Parishioners who arrived for Sunday mass at St Mary of the Angels in Boulcott Street yesterday were ushered into the church hall and told the 91-year-old building would be closed for up to 18 months for earthquake-strengthening work.

It follows the forced evacuation of the Old Public Trust building in Lambton Quay, which sustained serious damage in last Sunday's 6.5 magnitude earthquake.

The category 1 heritage-listed St Mary's, which had already been yellow-stickered as requiring strengthening work, came through the quake unscathed, but parish priest Father Barry Scannell said the safety of parishioners was paramount.

"We were probably looking to close towards the end of this year but, after last week, we decided to expedite it in the interests of safety."

The quake highlighted the urgency of the upgrade work being planned on the church, he said. Some strengthening was done when it was reroofed and refurbished in the 1980s and 90s, but it now required a full upgrade, at a cost of an estimated $5 million to $8m.

The gothic revival church was designed by Wellington architect Frederick de Jersey Clere, who also designed St Gerard's Monastery in Mount Victoria, another heritage building that needs strengthening.


SAFETY FIRST: St Mary of the Angels is closed for 18 months for quake strengthening. Parish priest Father Barry Scannell said the safety of parishioners was paramount. — ROSS GIBLIN/ Fairfax NZ.
SAFETY FIRST: St Mary of the Angels is closed for 18 months for quake strengthening. Parish priest
Father Barry Scannell said the safety of parishioners was paramount. — ROSS GIBLIN/ Fairfax N .


Wellington Catholic archdiocese administration director David Mullin said no further church closures had been prompted by last week's quakes.

Anglican Insurance Board chairman Don Baskerville said the Anglican and Presbyterian churches were going through the same assessment exercise, and raised the question of whether New Zealand could afford to strengthen all its quake-prone heritage buildings.

"This is an issue that has politicians too scared, and a lot of ostriches have their heads buried in the sand," he said.

Mr Baskerville believed the engineering and building capacity existed to do the work required on thousands of buildings, but it was going to take time.

The bigger issue was how much it would cost, and whether some old buildings would have to be pulled down.

Mr Mullin said about 50 of the 180 parish buildings in an archdiocese that ran from Westport to Levin had been assessed as earthquake-prone since the Christchurch earthquakes.

The Catholic Church was going through the process of deciding which would be strengthened first, which it could afford to do, and which ones parishioners would have to pay for.

Historic Places Trust central region general manager Ann Neill said she was not surprised by the decision to close St Mary's. "It's a safe, well thought-through response to last Sunday." She said the trust had been working with the church as it prepared plans for its seismic upgrade.

Brian McGuinness, managing director of construction company L T McGuinness, which has been involved in many heritage building projects, said previous work on the church involved strengthening the tower and its big rose windows, but the main structure now needed attention too.

The recent quakes had again reminded people of the need to get work done, he said. "The capacity is there, but everything has got to be done in a controlled manner when resources are available, which I think they are. Wellington is more on to it in terms of seismic strengthening than the other cities, and a lot of the stock is pretty good."


‘A DIFFICULT DECISION’

FAREWELL FOR NOW: Parishioner Cecilia Kim looks around the church for the last time before it is closed for earthquake strengthening.
FAREWELL FOR NOW: Parishioner Cecilia Kim looks
around the church for the last time before it is
closed for earthquake strengthening.


Parishioner Cecilia Kim supports the decision to close St Mary's, though she will miss the building's beauty during its 18-month refit.

The Khandallah resident has been attending services in St Mary's since she moved to Wellington in 1995, and she was married there.

"It's beautiful — an iconic building in Wellington City."

She knew Father Barry Scannell had made a difficult decision in closing the Gothic revival building after last weekend's earthquake, but she supported it. "It's understandable - the safety of people is paramount."

The church would be missed not just by the parishioners, but also the wider community, including musical groups who practised and performed there.

Father Scannell said that, while St Mary's was closed, weekday masses would take place in the parish hall and, after arrangements were made, Sunday masses would be celebrated at St Joseph's Church in Mount Victoria and Sacred Heart Cathedral in Thorndon.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/8974540/Quake-prompts-church-closure


« Last Edit: July 29, 2013, 11:23:26 am by Kiwithrottlejockey » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #53 on: July 28, 2013, 10:07:29 pm »



Then last night Campbell Live on tv3   Shocked


That seriously pissed me off.  I had to go to Greymouth for a funeral Saturday.  All I could think of there and back was "I'm in the red zone, 297 years since the last with a 300 year cycle +-60... I'm in the red zone".

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« Reply #54 on: July 29, 2013, 10:55:52 am »


‘Severe’ 5.4 quake hits overnight

By TOM HUNT - The Dominion Post | 5:51AM - Monday, 29 July 2013

A "SEVERE" quake this morning in Cook Strait caused damage and was felt as far away as Auckland.

It also increased the probability of further severe aftershocks, GeoNet seismologist John Ristau said.

The 5.4-magnitude quake struck at 1.07am today, just over a week since a 6.5 magnitude Cook Strait earthquake, which caused damage around Wellington.

Today’s quake was 12km deep and 20km east of Seddon in Cook Strait. It was followed by a swarm of smaller quakes.

More than 1500 people, mainly in the upper South Island and lower North Island, reported feeling the quake to GeoNet.

At least one person reported it caused damage.

"I certainly wouldn’t be surprised if this earthquake knocked items off shelves," Dr Ristau said.

It was also felt in Auckland, Hamilton, and Tauranga.

At midday yesterday, Geonet had downgraded the chance of a 5-5.9 aftershock within 24 hours to 11 per cent.

When GeoNet reworked its figures, it would increase the likelihood of a 5-5.9 aftershock, he said.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/8975509/Severe-5-4-quake-hits-overnight



I heard that bugger before it hit. I've been staying in a room on level 9 in the Intercontinental Hotel in Wellington over the weekend, and the hotel swayed and creaked somewhat. Still, no big panic as it didn't last very long....it was all over in a matter of seconds.
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« Reply #55 on: July 29, 2013, 11:17:43 am »

This morning's one woke me up but I was only sleeping lightly anyway - have a decent cold and the coughing was getting to me!

The cats didn't seem too concerned so I figured that was it and went back to sleep. They are a good indicator to me.
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« Reply #56 on: July 29, 2013, 11:41:35 am »

 
The cats didn't seem too concerned so I figured that was it and went back to sleep. They are a good indicator to me.


  Wink  LOL   perhaps you didn't seem too concerned so they figured that was it and went back to sleep?



Total Reports: 1984 at time of starting this post, Total Reports: 2012 at time of posting  !


http://www.geonet.org.nz/quakes/region/wellington/2013p563639





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« Reply #57 on: July 29, 2013, 12:23:56 pm »


The cats didn't seem too concerned so I figured that was it and went back to sleep. They are a good indicator to me.


  Wink  LOL   perhaps you didn't seem too concerned so they figured that was it and went back to sleep?



Total Reports: 1984 at time of starting this post, Total Reports: 2012 at time of posting  !


http://www.geonet.org.nz/quakes/region/wellington/2013p563639




They don't take their reaction from me at all. They know before I do that it's about to hit. Their reaction pretty much tells me whether I need to be concerned or not.

Over the years when there's been the odd bump in the night or noise outside, I feel perfectly safe if the cats don't react. If they react I know that there is someone on the property. I had a prowler a few weeks ago. It started off as me hearing a noise outside. As soon as it happened, Mitzi jumped up from in front of the heater and walked and stood staring at the front door. I looked outside and the security light was on. The only way that would have been set off was for someone to have walked past my carport (or is there were particularly strong winds which there wasn't that night). I am the back one of three units. I rang the Police and they caught up with the three youths who had been on the property not far up the road from where I live.
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« Reply #58 on: July 29, 2013, 01:15:24 pm »

It woke both me and mr welly up but it didn't bother the cats or the kids.  Anyway it was too bloody cold to jump out of bed and take cover. Grin
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« Reply #59 on: July 30, 2013, 07:41:34 pm »


Safety costs hang over heritage sites

Some heritage buildings may have to go

By ALEX FENSOME - The Dominion Post | 5:00AM - Tuesday, 30 July 2013

War Memorial podium and carillion on Buckle Street. — ROSS GIBLIN/Fairfax NZ.
War Memorial podium and carillion on Buckle Street. — ROSS GIBLIN/Fairfax NZ.

ST GERARD'S MONASTERY, standing proud above Oriental Parade, is unquestionably one of Wellington's landmark buildings.

It is also a liability that could fall over in a significant earthquake, and will cost millions of dollars to be brought up to an acceptably safe standard.

It is money that neither the Catholic Church nor the Wellington City Council has.

So if the city wants to keep the iconic monastery — and other precious historic buildings like it — who is going to pay?

Even the Historic Places Trust accepts it is not possible to save every heritage building.

The trust was working with the Wellington City Council to encourage strengthening but it was a challenge, central region general manager Ann Neill said.

"There's a gap between the market value of the building, in this recessionary time, and the costs. That's a deterrent for an owner and a barrier to their decision."


The Wellesley Club building on Maginnity Street. — CHRIS SKELTON/Fairfax NZ.
The Wellesley Club building on Maginnity Street. — CHRIS SKELTON/Fairfax NZ.

The trust wanted to persuade owners they had good reason to strengthen — even if the initial work was minor.

She suggested Wellington adopt a strategy from Dunedin, where a targeted rate on heritage buildings will be used to fund low-interest loans for strengthening work.

Wellington has 14 category-1 heritage-listed buildings that are judged to be quake risks.

They include the Old Public Trust Building in Stout Street, which was evacuated last week, St Mary of the Angels church, closed on Sunday, St Gerard's and the National War Memorial.

Wellington Property Council branch president Ian Cassels, an outspoken critic of council plans to spend $43.7 million on strengthening the Town Hall, said some buildings — such as the Old Public Trust Building — had to be saved.


The old Public Trust building on Lambton Quay. — KENT BLECHYNDEN/Fairfax NZ.
The old Public Trust building on Lambton Quay. — KENT BLECHYNDEN/Fairfax NZ.

But others might have to go, including the empty Harcourts Building in Lambton Quay.

Developer Mark Dunajtschik wanted to demolish the 85-year-old building, which is yellow-stickered, but the council refused permission. Mr Dunajtschik's appeal to the Environment Court will be heard next month.

"Harcourts should come down because it occupies a critical office site," Mr Cassels said.

"We need a reworking of the rating system to assist those buildings that the community want, and the owner can't afford to fix, but need some real tools."

These include transferable development rights, targeted rates on quake-prone buildings and public ownership of strengthening work.

Council built environment portfolio leader Iona Pannett said she would like to see more government funding for strengthening, focused on high-value buildings. There was a role for the council, too, although it was fiscally limited.

"Heritage buildings have a significant impact on public safety," she said. "We do have an incentive fund of $400,000 to help property owners but that's a tiny amount of money in terms of the work which needs to be done."

Mayor Celia Wade-Brown said the city had to work with central government to make sure there were ways to help fund the large amount of work still to be done.

"The category 1 [buildings] are of national interest, so we need to work together with central government on how we can make sure that they're strengthened."


Wellington Town Hall on Wakefield Street. — CRAIG SIMCOX/Fairfax NZ.
Wellington Town Hall on Wakefield Street. — CRAIG SIMCOX/Fairfax NZ.

The Opera House on Manners Street. — CHRIS SKELTON/Fairfax NZ.
The Opera House on Manners Street. — CHRIS SKELTON/Fairfax NZ.

St Gerard's Monastery in Mount Victoria, Wellington. — Photo: Fairfax NZ.
St Gerard's Monastery in Mount Victoria, Wellington. — Photo: Fairfax NZ.

The Dominion Observatory. — Photo: Fairfax NZ.
The Dominion Observatory. — Photo: Fairfax NZ.

St Mary of the Angels church on Boulcott Street. — ROSS GIBLIN/Fairfax NZ.
St Mary of the Angels church on Boulcott Street. — ROSS GIBLIN/Fairfax NZ.

St John's in the City church on Willis St. — ROSS GIBLIN/Fairfax NZ.
St John's in the City church on Willis St. — ROSS GIBLIN/Fairfax NZ.

Former Home of Compassion creche at 18 Buckle Street. — Photo: Fairfax NZ.
Former Home of Compassion creche at 18 Buckle Street. — Photo: Fairfax NZ.

Former Red Cross building on the corner of Willis and Ghuznee streets. — ROSS GIBLIN/Fairfax NZ.
Former Red Cross building on the corner of Willis and Ghuznee streets. — ROSS GIBLIN/Fairfax NZ.

Erskine College Chapel in Island Bay. — ROSS GIBLIN/Fairfax NZ.
Erskine College Chapel in Island Bay. — ROSS GIBLIN/Fairfax NZ.

Turnbull House on Bowen Street. — CRAIG SIMCOX/Fairfax NZ.
Turnbull House on Bowen Street. — CRAIG SIMCOX/Fairfax NZ.

The Harcourts Building on the corner of Lambton Quay and Grey Street. — CHRIS SKELTON/Fairfax NZ.
The Harcourts Building on the corner of Lambton Quay and Grey Street. — CHRIS SKELTON/Fairfax NZ.

CATEGORIES AND STICKERS

The New Zealand Historic Places Trust lists two categories of heritage buildings.

Category 1: Buildings described as of "special or outstanding historical or cultural heritage significance or value".

Category 2: Buildings that have "historical or cultural heritage significance or value".

Being on the register does not automatically mean a building is protected. However, councils and owners of the buildings have to take listing into account when they plan or consider changes, and notify the Historic Places Trust. Councils also have their own heritage listings.


QUAKE STICKERS

There are three types of stickers which identify potential quake risks in buildings.

RED stickers mean the building is unsafe to occupy and requires immediate closure.

ORANGE stickers set a deadline for the building to be fixed or demolished.

YELLOW stickers set out a timeframe for strengthening work or demolition, depending on the building's use, the number of occupants and the level of risk.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/8978370/Safety-costs-hang-over-heritage-sites
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« Reply #60 on: July 30, 2013, 07:58:09 pm »


Aerial sweep reveals major cliff collapses

Significant movements of massive parts of ground

By PENNY WARDLE - The Marlborough Express | 11:31AM - Tuesday, 30 July 2013

SLIPPING TO THE SEA

EARTHQUAKES have caused cliffs along the Marlborough coastline from the Vernon Bluffs towards Lake Grassmere to subside and fall into the sea.

The slumps were photographed by GNS senior engineering geologist Graham Hancox who flew over the area last week.

"There are places where the ground has moved downwards 10 to 15 metres on cliff tops," he said. "These are significant movements of massive parts of ground."

Cracks appeared 5m to 10m back from cliff edges.

Debris which fell from the top of the Vernon Bluff east of the Wairau Lagoon had run down a gully and into the sea.


THE WIDE VIEW: Vernon Bluff between the Awatere Valley, on the left, and the Wairau Lagoons, on the right.
THE WIDE VIEW: Vernon Bluff between the Awatere Valley, on the left, and the Wairau Lagoons, on the right.

Areas of cliff had also failed between Mussel Point, at the end of Marfells Beach, and Cape Campbell, quite close to the London Hill fault.

These sorts of failures happened in "special earthquakes" such as the 1848 Marlborough earthquake and the Wairarapa quake which hit Wellington seven years later, Mr Hancox said.

These were relatively small landslides because they did not happen in an epicentre area and the quakes were not very big. However, the damage indicated what might occur with a larger event.

Coastal Marlborough cliffs mostly made up of Tertiary and Cretaceous Periods mudstone and sandstone could fall if strongly shaken, he said.


SLIPPING INTO THE SEA: Bluffs between Marfells Beach and Cape Campbell. — GRAHAM HANCOX/GNS SCIENCE.
SLIPPING INTO THE SEA: Bluffs between Marfells Beach and Cape Campbell.
 — GRAHAM HANCOX/GNS SCIENCE.


Seddon was the most vigorously shaken town in the recent quakes because it was closest to their epicentre, Mr Hancox said. However, people in Ward felt them most strongly because of the area's geology with bands of soft material alternating with harder ridges.

"This might not be finished," he said. "We are still in a waiting game."

There was a substantial gap between the Christchurch quake in February 2011 and the next big one in June.

"Always expect the worst and hope for the best," he said.


CHANGING LANDSCAPE: A slice of cliff has fallen into the Awatere River opposite Black Birch. — Photo: MELINDA PRICE.
CHANGING LANDSCAPE: A slice of cliff has fallen into the Awatere River opposite Black Birch.
 — Photo: MELINDA PRICE.


Victoria University geophysics professor Euan Smith said Seddon soils were generally 1.5m to 3m of silt covering 15m of coarse gravels and small rocks, underlaid by siltstone and mudstone. Blenheim sat on 2.5m to 3m of silt on top of coarse gravels with deeper silt in the area of old streams.

One of his students had recorded that the earthquake shaking was amplified around Blenheim compared with surrounding hills.

River gravels usually provided a stable foundation compared with river silts, Professor Smith said.


• Mr Hancox has invited people to email him photos which show the geological impacts of quakes — g.hancox@gns.cri.nz.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/marlborough-express/news/8979714/Aerial-sweep-reveals-major-cliff-collapses
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« Reply #61 on: July 30, 2013, 11:59:41 pm »

I drove down Ponsonby Rd (Auckland) today.

I couldn't help thinking that everything that makes that area special won't be within cooee of earth quake standard.
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« Reply #62 on: August 01, 2013, 03:26:51 pm »

Shaky Morning for Cook Strait


Wellington continues to rock with aftershocks following last Sunday's 6.5 quake.

GeoNet recorded a ''strong'' 4.9-magnitude quake at 11.10am today.

It was at a depth of 16km beneath the Cook Strait, 30km east of Seddon in the upper South Island.

The quake was followed by a 4.4-magnitude aftershock at 11.55am at the same spot, at a depth of 5km.

Earlier, a ''strong'' 4.4-magnitude quake at 5.46am today was centred around the same area. That one was felt in Hutt Valley, Kapiti, Wellington, and Blenheim.

It was followed three minutes later with a 3.7-magnitude quake in a similar area.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/8989172/Shaky-morning-for-Cook-Strait
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Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #63 on: August 01, 2013, 03:58:43 pm »


Presbyterians to host St Mary mass

Presbyterian church to shelter St Mary's flock

By TIM DONOGHUE - The Dominion Post | 12:29PM - Thursday, 01 August 2013

HELPING OUT: Rev Allister Lane, left, welcomes St Mary of the Angels priest Father Barry Scannell to St John's in the City. — CHRIS SKELTON/Fairfax NZ.
HELPING OUT: Rev Allister Lane, left, welcomes
St Mary of the Angels priest Father Barry Scannell
to St John's in the City. — CHRIS SKELTON/Fairfax NZ.


ST MARY OF THE ANGELS Catholic Church parishioners will be able to attend a Sunday mass at St John's in the City Presbyterian Church while their church undergoes earthquake strengthening work during the next 18 months.

St John's in the City will continue to hold its own Sunday services at 10:00am and 5:45pm while the catholic parishioners will hold a Sunday mass service at the presbyterian venue at noon on Sundays.

The two churches have a long history of supporting each other during tough times. "We feel this is a practical way we can help our neighbour church," Rev Allister Lane said.

The close association between the two churches goes back to the 1850s, when a priest from St Mary of the Angels offered to conduct a service at St John's in the City while the Presbyterian community waited for a minister to arrive from Scotland.

In the 1990s, St Mary of the Angels' Boulcott Street church was closed for renovations and masses were held at St John's in upper Dixon Street. The co-operation between the two institutions continues today, with a combined Advent service each year using a joint choir from both churches.

St Mary of the Angels parish priest Father Barry Scannell, SM, today expressed gratitude for the St John's offer.

"It will also help our parishioners come together for worship while we undertake the earthquake strengthening of our church building."

Rev Lane said St John's was also undertaking an earthquake strengthening programme but was in a better position than St Mary of the Angels to offer church services.

The category 1 heritage-listed St Mary of the Angels, which had already been yellow-stickered as requiring strengthening work, came through the quake unscathed, but Father Scannell said the safety of parishioners was paramount.

St Mary of the Angels, a gothic revival church was designed by Wellington architect Frederick de Jersey Clere. De Jersey Clere also designed St Gerard's Monastery in Mount Victoria, another heritage building that needs strengthening.


ST MARY SUNDAY MASS TIMES

7am — St Mary of the Angels Parish Hall, Boulcott Street;

9am — Cathedral of the Sacred Heart, Hill Street;

Noon — St John's in the City (with Robert Oliver's gregorian chant choir) and...

5pm — St Josephs, Mount Victoria.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/wellington/8990046/Presbyterians-to-host-St-Mary-mass
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« Reply #64 on: August 01, 2013, 05:22:33 pm »

Have to wait three weeks for EQC to come out and inspect our cracks. Talking with friends in CHCH, they tell me EQC can play the bully with the smaller damage claims trying to get people to forget about them. I look forward to that chat.
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Alicat
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« Reply #65 on: August 01, 2013, 05:52:15 pm »

Have to wait three weeks for EQC to come out and inspect our cracks.


I have this terrible mental picture
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« Reply #66 on: August 01, 2013, 07:46:17 pm »


this terrible mental picture  Roll Eyes
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« Reply #67 on: August 01, 2013, 08:55:20 pm »

Have to wait three weeks for EQC to come out and inspect our cracks.


I have this terrible mental picture



LOL - Get your mind out of the gutter.
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Alicat
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« Reply #68 on: August 01, 2013, 09:18:47 pm »

Have to wait three weeks for EQC to come out and inspect our cracks.


I have this terrible mental picture



LOL - Get your mind out of the gutter.

Novus came to mind - 'Show us your crack' - pardon the pun but it cracks me up every time
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« Reply #69 on: August 01, 2013, 11:37:31 pm »

Have to wait three weeks for EQC to come out and inspect our cracks. Talking with friends in CHCH, they tell me EQC can play the bully with the smaller damage claims trying to get people to forget about them. I look forward to that chat.

We have the repairers having to come out a third time to repair the bad workmanship from the second time they came out to repair the bad workmanship from the first time.    Undecided  Do you want to know how that conversation is going to go down?
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« Reply #70 on: August 02, 2013, 05:55:19 pm »

Have to wait three weeks for EQC to come out and inspect our cracks. Talking with friends in CHCH, they tell me EQC can play the bully with the smaller damage claims trying to get people to forget about them. I look forward to that chat.

We have the repairers having to come out a third time to repair the bad workmanship from the second time they came out to repair the bad workmanship from the first time.    Undecided  Do you want to know how that conversation is going to go down?


Well....you could consider recording the conversation, then uploading it to this group....
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If you aren't living life on the edge, you're taking up too much space! 

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