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A typical day in Chicago?


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Author Topic: A typical day in Chicago?  (Read 384 times)
Kiwithrottlejockey
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« Reply #25 on: September 07, 2016, 06:39:11 pm »


from the Chicago Tribune....

After reports of rapid-fire shots, dispatcher asks:
‘You wanna hear some more bad news?’


By PETER NICKEAS, ALEXANDRA CHACHKEVITCH and ELVIA MALAGON | 1:12PM CDT - Tuesday, September 06, 2016

Members of the Chicago Police Department search a vehicle involved in a shooting in the 3300 block of West Douglas Boulevard while it is parked outside Mount Sinai Hospital on September 6th, 2016. Two men were shot and drove themselves to the hospital. — Photograph: Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune.
Members of the Chicago Police Department search a vehicle involved in a shooting in the 3300 block of West Douglas Boulevard
while it is parked outside Mount Sinai Hospital on September 6th, 2016. Two men were shot and drove themselves to the hospital.
 — Photograph: Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune.


TWO HOURS had passed since two boys were shot on the Far North Side in Rogers Park late Monday, and the city hadn't seen a shooting during that period.

The day was busy. South Side districts logged shootings and homicides and chases over a few hours during Monday as the night wore on, but a temporary quiet took hold.

Then, about 10:45 p.m., someone called in the sound of gunfire near California Avenue and Lexington Street, on the West Side.

“Five shots heard,” the dispatcher said. “Anonymous calling. One call. Nothing further.”

A minute later, another call, this time saying one person had been shot.

A minute later, more calls.

“You guys be careful. We're getting a lot of calls from over there. Fifteen to 20 shots, rapid fire.”


A vehicle involved in a shooting in the 3300 block of West Douglas Boulevard is wrapped with police tape outside of Mount Sinai Hospital on September 5th, 2016. Two men were shot and drove themselves to the hospital. — Photograph: Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune.
A vehicle involved in a shooting in the 3300 block of West Douglas Boulevard is wrapped with police tape outside
of Mount Sinai Hospital on September 5th, 2016. Two men were shot and drove themselves to the hospital.
 — Photograph: Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune.


As officers made it to Lexington, the young men shot were dropped off at Mount Sinai Hospital, all bleeding from gunshot wounds suffered on Lexington. Police found one victim on Lexington, and paramedics took him to Stroger Hospital, where he died.

Another man taken to Mount Sinai Hospital died. They were the last two people killed during a holiday weekend that saw almost half of its victims shot during a 21-hour period between Monday and Tuesday mornings.

Officers were still trying to figure out how many people had been shot on Lexington when evidence technicians at the Homan Square station a few blocks away called in the sound of gunfire.

A couple of minutes later, the neighborhood was calling it in. Police in the Ogden District happened upon two gunshot victims who had stopped their car on Douglas Boulevard before taking off and driving to Mount Sinai Hospital. A third person injured in that shooting walked into Stroger Hospital.

Officers followed the car to Mount Sinai Hospital and told their dispatcher they had the driver of the car. It still wasn't clear where they had been shot.

“You wanna hear some more bad news? Units in 11, citywide, shots fired, people shot, 3320 on Flournoy. Says three gunshots were fired. Says two people are shot out in the front. 11th District,” said a Chicago police dispatcher.

Officers near Lexington who hadn’t made it there — some just passing by — turned on sirens and started heading west.


An evidence marker is placed inside vehicle involved in a shooting in the 3300 block of West Douglas Boulevard while it is parked outside Mount Sinai Hospital on September 6th, 2016. Two men were shot and drove themselves to the hospital. — Photograph: Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune.
An evidence marker is placed inside vehicle involved in a shooting in the 3300 block of West Douglas Boulevard while it is
parked outside Mount Sinai Hospital on September 6th, 2016. Two men were shot and drove themselves to the hospital.
 — Photograph: Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune.


“You wanna start heading there toward 3328 on Flournoy? I'm getting multiple, multiple tickets out there,” the dispatcher said. “Five gunshots, a female shot in the car, 3315 Flournoy — black Camaro with people all shot up. Multiple tickets of person shot again in 11th District, zone 10 radio.”

Officers lingering on the edge of the Lexington scene walked fast back to their cars and turned on sirens, sped down side streets, bounced the under sides of their squad cars against speed bumps and rolled stop signs until they clogged the streets surrounding the 3300 block of Flournoy, where two more people had been shot.

Some in a crowd yelled as a man was lifted from a car and set on a gurney, awake and alert and holding his phone up with two hands as paramedics moved him to the ambulance. The woman shot and removed from the car before him is in critical condition.

Families gathered at Mount Sinai Hospital looking for updates on their loved ones wounded in the three shootings.

The emergency room became packed in a matter of minutes, and to keep a sense of order a nurse poked her head out every few minutes looking for the relatives of one victim. Everyone had to wait outside.

The car carrying two victims that police had spotted on Douglas was surrounded by police tape and had a bullet hole in its front window.

After about an hour, officers cut the tape and someone moved it from near the emergency room entrance and parked it up the street.


http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/thebeat/ct-after-reports-of-rapid-fire-shooting-dispatcher-says-you-wanna-hear-some-more-bad-news-20160906-story.html
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« Reply #26 on: September 07, 2016, 06:39:29 pm »


from The Washington Post....

Gun violence surges in Chicago, where residents
want to show ‘everything is not all bad’


By MARK BERMAN and MARK GUARINO | 7:42PM EDT - Tuesday, September 06, 2016

A community event over the weekend included chess games in the city's Chatham neighborhood. — Photograph: Mark Guarino/The Washington Post.
A community event over the weekend included chess games in the city's Chatham neighborhood.
 — Photograph: Mark Guarino/The Washington Post.


ON A weekend afternoon in a city scarred by escalating violence, Kris Pinder watched his children play at a park festival in Roseland, a neighborhood on Chicago’s South Side.

The harmonies of a gospel choir bubbled up through loudspeakers while clippers buzzed across the scalps of little boys in barber chairs. Basketballs flew across a nearby court, and tennis balls bounced over nets on another.

By the end of a violent Labor Day weekend, Chicago had reached a grim milestone, recording more homicides through to Monday night than the city experienced during all of last year. This tally came with a late surge of gunfire, as the Chicago police said there were 13 homicides over the Labor Day weekend, most of them on Monday, along with 43 shooting incidents, both numbers that topped those seen in the city a year earlier.

All told, by the end of Monday police said there were 488 homicides in Chicago so far this year, more than the 481 killings they logged last year — with nearly four months left in 2016. The surge in violence on Labor Day came after an average of three people were killed each day in August, marking a particularly brutal stretch in a bloody year.

But in Roseland, where a woman was fatally shot five days before the festival, people came together over the weekend for a gathering that was one of dozens across the city over the long weekend aimed at helping parts of the city under siege from escalating gun violence.

“The children need to see that everything is not all bad,” said Pinder, 33.

Police have said that most of the city's homicide victims were people killed by gunfire. In August alone, there were 92 victims of homicide, the city's deadliest month in more than two decades and more killings than most big cities across the country recorded in the first six months of the year.

Eddie Johnson, the Chicago police superintendent, said the violence was due to repeat offenders in “impoverished neighborhoods” utilizing what he described as an absurd proliferation of guns on the streets.

“It's not a police issue,” Johnson said at a news briefing on Tuesday. “It's a society issue … people without hope do these kinds of things.”

Police have attributed the spike in gun violence in Chicago to known, repeat offenders using illegal guns. Johnson again called for tougher penalties for people who commit gun crimes, echoing a plea he has made this summer in the face of the violence.

“I'm frustrated,” he said on Tuesday. “The city should be frustrated. Frustrated that despite these weekends, we still see repeat offenders get back out on the street far too soon.”

For many in the city, this ongoing bloodshed has filled them with fear and anxiety; in a survey earlier this year, residents were found as likely to think young people in the city would become victims of a violent crime as graduate from college.

Over the weekend, a group of 75 organizations, block clubs and churches staged pop-up events in the areas of the city most impacted by the violence — the southern and western neighborhoods that have been home to most of the increase in killings, police say. The surge in violence has given an urgency to the block parties, cookouts, chess matches, gospel concerts, stage plays and pickup basketball games.

“When the amount of violence skyrocketed this summer, people realized if we don't do something, it'll get out of hand,” said Kaaron Johnson, 28, at a gathering in Bronzeville, another South Side neighborhood.

Last year, Chicago saw 481 homicides last year, police said, a number that authorities revised upwards from the 473 homicides they had previously reported. They also had said there were 90 killings in August before increasing that number as well. Police said the homicide totals increase when someone dies from wounds suffered during a particular time period or if an investigation winds up determining a death was a homicide. (While official police statistics put the city on the verge of 500 homicides this year after Labor Day, data collected by the Chicago Tribune — including killings not included in the homicide total by police — showed that the city topped that figure early Tuesday.)

Chicago is on pace for more than 600 homicides in a single year for the first time since 2003. The country's third-biggest city has had more killings so far this year than the two larger cities — New York and Los Angeles — combined.

While crime rates nationwide remain far below those seen just a quarter-century ago — between 1990 and 1995, Chicago had at least 800 homicide victims each year — homicides have spiked in a number of big cities across the country this year and last year. Chicago's violence has drawn attention for the sheer scale of the bloodshed, and it has reverberated on the presidential campaign trail.


Eddie Johnson, the Chicago police superintendent. — Photograph: Ashlee Rezin/Sun-Times Media/Associated Press.
Eddie Johnson, the Chicago police superintendent. — Photograph: Ashlee Rezin/Sun-Times Media/Associated Press.

Some other cities have also seen more killings this year than last, while still others have reported declines. Through late August, police say there were 227 homicides in New York, down from the 234 killings at the same point a year earlier; in Los Angeles, there were 182 killings, down slightly from the 186 a year before. On Tuesday, the New York police announced that there were fewer crimes reported there over the summer than they had seen in decades, adding that crimes like murder went down in August.

“We have further reduced violence and serious crime across this city, yet again,” New York Police Commissioner William J. Bratton, who is on the verge of retirement, said in a statement Tuesday. “The tremendous focus on a small group of criminals has resulted in these unprecedented declines in crime — as violence has increased in other American cities significantly.”

Compounding anxieties among people who live in Chicago's most heavily impacted areas are a series of memos from the Chicago Fraternal Order of Police asking the city's police force not to work voluntary overtime during the holiday weekend.

In one memo obtained by the Chicago Tribune, the stated reason not to work overtime was “to show unity and to protest the continued disrespect of Chicago Police Officers and the killings of law enforcement officers across our country.”

Dean Angelo, president of the Chicago Fraternal Order of Police, said the memos were not aimed at City Hall with the union's contract up next year, but were aimed at officers uneasy after police were attacked and killed in Dallas and Baton Rouge.

“This isn't a work slowdown…. This is telling the guys you take your family for granted; we take ourselves for granted,” Angelo said in an interview.

Many people cooking hot dogs, passing out school supplies or watching their children get free haircuts over the weekend said they don't blame individual officers. Instead, they said their anger is reserved more for what they called bureaucratic infighting.

“People are fed up,” said Hal Baskin, 64, a lifelong resident of the Englewood neighborhood who helped organize several events there on Saturday. He called the union's suggestion un-American. “We don't care about their political agenda, we care about lives,” he said.

The memos were also sent as the embattled Chicago police force is being investigated by the Justice Department, a civil rights probe launched after video footage emerged last year showing a white officer fatally shooting Laquan McDonald, a black teenager.

After that shooting, a task force assembled by Mayor Rahm Emanuel (Democrat) examined the Chicago police — the country's second-biggest local law enforcement agency — and released a blistering report in April lambasting the way the department treats minorities.

Angelo said this weekend that he felt like police officers in the city were being misrepresented by the media as well as by city officials.

“We've got no support politically,” he said. “We occasionally get, ‘Most of them do a good job’. A lot of time when we hear something positive about the police, there is the proverbial ‘but’ that follows.”

Chicago's violence has also been pushed into the national consciousness through repeated mentions by Donald Trump, the Republican presidential candidate. Trump has sought to portray himself as the law-and-order candidate and has invoked the city's violence during campaign events and his acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention.

After Nykea Aldridge, cousin of NBA star Dwyane Wade, was shot and killed while pushing a child in a stroller, Trump posted on Twitter and claimed it was evidence of “what I have been saying.” Wade said that the comment “left a bad taste in my mouth” because it appeared like it was meant for “political gain.”

Just days before weighing in on Aldridge's death, Trump claimed during an interview on Fox News that a “top police officer in Chicago” had told him there was a way to stop the violence “within one week.”

He did not name the officer or elaborate on what this officer would do, and Trump's campaign did not respond to a request to identify him. The Chicago police say no senior officials met with Trump or his campaign, but they added that he is welcome to offer his input.

“If you have a magic bullet to stop the violence anywhere, not just in Chicago but in America, then please, share it with us,” Johnson, the police superintendent, said in response last week.


Chicago police detectives at the scene of a fatal shooting in the city's South Side last month. — Photograph: Joshua Lott/Getty Images.
Chicago police detectives at the scene of a fatal shooting in the city's South Side last month.
 — Photograph: Joshua Lott/Getty Images.


Activist Phillip Jackson said that when he heard about the police union's overtime memos, he decided to rally community groups together for what he called a “Community Peace Surge,” a play on the titles of the “Purge” movies, during which crime becomes legal and violence takes over the streets.

Through social media and word of mouth, the idea grew into a mixture of official events, such as park festivals, and homegrown activities, such as neighborhood cookouts. Jackson, who operates the Black Star Project in Bronzeville, said most people know the police can't stop the gunfire. But he said it felt like officers were abandoning their posts during times of great need, which he said confirmed the mistrust of police that lingers on in these areas.

“Dean Angelo basically said, ‘You guys are mad at us, so we won't work’,” he said. “Yes, we are mad at you for shooting down young black boys in the street. What is a community supposed to think?”

A Chicago police spokesman said the union's calls on overtime were not a factor in the weekend deployment. There were volunteers to work and leave was canceled only for specific units — such as those focused on gangs and guns — to keep those officers deployed, said Anthony Guglielmi, the department's chief spokesman.

Most of the events in Chicago received no money or help from the city or philanthropic foundations, organizers said. In Bronzeville, six women pooled $700 and rented a bouncy house for tots, hired a DJ and bought hot dogs and other summer treats.

“This is the first time we've seen this kind of thing in years,” Kaaron Johnson said at the Bronzeville gathering. “We wanted the community to know it's safe to come out and have a good time.”

For some of those out over the weekend, the fun shielded an underlying anxiety. On Sunday, one 13-year-old sat on a street curb in Bronzeville watching his friends practice dance moves together. He said he was scared because “people keep dying over here.”

Police say murder arrests and gun arrests are both ticking up in the city, and the department said it has seized or collected more than 5,900 illegal guns. On Saturday, the police said they arrested 77 people in police raids, dozens of whom authorities said were documented gang members.

Parents and organizers say they realize a weekend of activities is not a solution to the bloodshed, but they hope it could be the beginning of one. The Labor Day weekend is typically a deadly one in Chicago; last year, nine people were killed and dozens more shot.

Still, other people in Chicago said they have given up. Despite the sunshine, music and friendly crowd at the Roseland festival, Jonas Lee said he was not happy as he watched his two daughters, both girls wearing pink tiaras and black leggings while they walked with their pet pug.

“I don't like them outside at all,” Lee, 37, an exterminator, said at the event. He said it was because a family friend had been shot in the head while sitting on his porch this year. “If it could happen to him, it could happen to anybody,” Lee said. His house is on the market, and Lee said he plans a move to Indiana to escape the “never-ending” violence.

Others echoed the commitment to retaking the streets after living in fear. People felt unsafe “because of the violence that has overtaken our city,” said Laura Pinder, 61, as she watched her grandchildren — twin boys and a girl — play at the park in Roseland.

“You can't stop living,” she said.


Mark Guarino reported from Chicago.

• Mark Berman covers national news for The Washington Post and anchors Post Nation, a destination for breaking news and stories from around the country.

__________________________________________________________________________

Read more on this topic:

 • Chicago has had more homicides this year than New York and Los Angeles combined

 • Police superintendent calls for firing officer who shot and killed Laquan McDonald

 • Chicago inspector general said multiple officers should be fired for lying in the McDonald case

 • Video of Paul O'Neal shooting shows Chicago officers firing at a fleeing car

 • America is safer than it was decades ago. But homicides are up again in Chicago and cities across the country

 • Chicago residents think kids growing up there are as likely to be violent-crime victims as college graduates

 • ‘We have a problem’. Homicides are up again this year in more than two dozen major U.S. cities.

 • Chicago will make some changes to its police department as a ‘down payment’ on reform

 • After a blistering report, what's next for the embattled Chicago police?

 • Chicago's staggering rise in gun violence and killings


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2016/09/06/gun-violence-is-surging-in-chicago-where-residents-look-to-escape-fear-and-show-that-everything-is-not-all-bad
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« Reply #27 on: September 07, 2016, 06:40:22 pm »


from the Chicago Tribune....

Top cop after violent holiday weekend:
‘It's not a police issue, it's a society issue’


By JEREMY GORNER, PETER NICKEAS, ELVIA MALAGON and ALEXANDRA CHACHKEVITCH | 10:54PM CDT - Tuesday, September 06, 2016

A member of the Chicago Police Department looks around the scene of a shooting in the 3300 block of West Flournoy Street on September 5th, 2016, in the Homan Square neighborhood. — Photograph: Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune.
A member of the Chicago Police Department looks around the scene of a shooting in the 3300 block of West Flournoy Street
on September 5th, 2016, in the Homan Square neighborhood. — Photograph: Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune.


AFTER another violent holiday weekend, Chicago police Superintendent Eddie Johnson said on Tuesday his department is doing all it can to combat violence rooted in “impoverished neighborhoods” where “people without hope do these kinds of things.”

“It's not a police issue, it's a society issue,” Johnson told reporters outside police headquarters after a long weekend that saw 65 people shot, 13 of them fatally.

“Impoverished neighborhoods, people without hope do these kinds of things,” he said. “You show me a man that doesn't have hope, I'll show you one that's willing to pick up a gun and do anything with it.”

“Those are the issues that's driving this violence. CPD is doing its job,” he continued.

Johnson pointed to increases in gun arrests this year over last year — and more than 6,000 illegal gun recoveries so far in 2016 — as evidence that officers are out on the streets working.

But he acknowledged that the fallout from last year's release of the Laquan McDonald video, and the amplified distrust between the police and African-American community, doesn't make it easy for his officers.

“Of course, they're human. They're people,” Johnson said. “So of course, nobody wants to be the next viral video. These officers have families to take care of too.”

The weekend had begun relatively quietly. But the violence spiked on the last day, with 31 shot between 6 a.m. Monday and 3 a.m. Tuesday. Nine of the fatal shootings occurred over that period.


Members of the Chicago Police Department look inside a vehicle involved in a shooting in the 3300 block of West Flournoy Street on September 5th, 2016, in the Homan Square neighborhood. A man and woman were both shot inside the parked car and were taken to Mount Sinai Hospital. — Photograph: Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune.
Members of the Chicago Police Department look inside a vehicle involved in a shooting in the 3300 block of West Flournoy Street
on September 5th, 2016, in the Homan Square neighborhood. A man and woman were both shot inside the parked car and were
taken to Mount Sinai Hospital. — Photograph: Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune.


Among those shot was a woman who is nine months pregnant and was wounded in the abdomen on the same block where someone had been killed less than 20 hours earlier. No information on the baby was available. A man she was standing near was left in critical condition in the same shooting around 3:30 p.m. in the Back of the Yards neighborhood.

Farther south, a retired pastor from East Chicago, Indiana was shot to death outside a senior housing complex in the South Shore neighborhood around 6:30 a.m. on Monday.

Police say the man was found dead, shot in the face outside the Senior Suites of Rainbow Beach near 77th and Exchange around 6:30 a.m. on Monday. Residents identified the man as Allen H. Smith and said they heard him arguing with another man before shots were fired.

Police said they took into custody another resident of the home. No charges had been filed.

The Labor Day weekend was the deadliest of the three holiday weekends this summer. The Memorial Day weekend saw 69 shot, six of them fatally, and the Fourth of July weekend recorded 66 shot, five of them fatal.

Early on Monday morning, it appeared Chicago had a chance of ending a holiday weekend with fewer than four dozen people shot, which would have made it one of the least violent weekends of the summer.

The uptick in shootings in this weekend's final hours mirrored the end of the Fourth of July. Gunfire in the final hours of that holiday made up half the entire weekend's bloodshed.

Police attributed the 11th-hour surge to retaliatory acts, often involving gangs, after a weekend of parties and tense encounters.


Bullet holes can be seen in a vehicle involved in a shooting in the 3300 block of West Douglas Boulevard while it is parked outside Mount Sinai Hospital on September 5th, 2016, in Chicago. — Photograph: Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune.
Bullet holes can be seen in a vehicle involved in a shooting in the 3300 block of West Douglas Boulevard while it is parked
outside Mount Sinai Hospital on September 5th, 2016, in Chicago. — Photograph: Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune.


Homicides in Chicago this year have risen to levels not seen since the 1990s, when killings peaked at more than 900 annually.

The 92 homicides in August was the most the city had seen in a single month since July 1993 when 99 people were slain.

Through 5 a.m. Tuesday, the city recorded 488 homicides, marking a 47 percent increase from 331 for the same year-earlier period and exceeding the 481 for the entire 2015, according to official Police Department statistics.

The number of shooting victims has topped 2,930, approaching the 2,988 total for all of last year, according to a Chicago Tribune analysis.

Even at 488 homicides, the Police Department's statistics do not include killings on area expressways, police-involved shootings, other justifiable homicides or death investigations that could later be reclassified as homicides.

The Chicago Tribune's own database, which primarily uses the Cook County medical examiner's office to determine whether to count a death as a homicide, put the total number of killings at 512 as of early Tuesday.

Homicides and shootings in Chicago continue to far outpace both New York and Los Angeles, both bigger cities. According to official statistics through to late August, the most recent publicly available, New York and Los Angeles had a combined 409 homicides, well below Chicago's total.


Chicago Tribune reporter Christy Gutowski contributed.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-chicago-violence-labor-day-tuesday-20160906-story.html
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« Reply #28 on: September 07, 2016, 11:21:26 pm »

I blame Obama for not caring about his people he's supposed to be one of the most powerful people on the planet so whats his excuse for Chicago and why doesn't he just invade the place and fix things like he done in the middle east.

I would think since that obama spent a lot of time there as a young political agitator then rising up to become the us president that he might hand out some free 2nd hand military bullet proof vests  Roll Eyes
« Last Edit: September 07, 2016, 11:26:35 pm by Im2Sexy4MyPants » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #29 on: September 08, 2016, 01:26:00 pm »


Chicago has been a violent place since way before the Al Capone era and Obama wasn't even born then.

If you visit Chicago, stay well away from the South Side.
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« Reply #30 on: September 08, 2016, 04:28:03 pm »


from The Washington Post....

EDITORIAL: Chicago's violence is a ‘police issue’ — at least in part

By EDITORIAL BOARD | 7:12PM EDT - Wednesday, September 07, 2016

Diann Aldridge, left, the mother of Nykea Aldridge, is embraced with a hug during a prayer vigil for her daughter, who was shot in the head and killed when a stray bullet struck her while she was pushing her baby in a stroller, in Chicago. — Photograph: Joshua Lott/Getty Images.
Diann Aldridge, left, the mother of Nykea Aldridge, is embraced with a hug during a prayer vigil for her daughter, who
was shot in the head and killed when a stray bullet struck her while she was pushing her baby in a stroller, in Chicago.
 — Photograph: Joshua Lott/Getty Images.


THE DEADLIEST MONTH in two decades. More homicides this year than in New York and Los Angeles combined. Almost twice as many people killed as U.S. soldiers killed in Afghanistan since 2013. With each new homicide in Chicago comes a new description that tries to capture the magnitude — and horror — of the violence that has plagued America’s third-largest city.

A wave of shootings — 65 people shot, 13 of them fatally — over the Labor Day weekend pushed the number of dead for 2016 past 500, putting Chicago on pace for more than 600 homicides for the year. Among those killed over the holiday weekend: a 44-year-old man killed as he and his wife drove to the grocery store, an 80-year-old pastor shot in the face outside the senior home where he lived and a 17-year-old boy shot in the back. Others gunned down this year include a young woman caught in crossfire as she walked her baby in a stroller and a newborn baby boy who died two days after an emergency delivery necessitated by his mother being shot in the chest.

The violence, reminiscent of the crack-cocaine epidemic that drove murders in cities across the nation in the 1990s, seems to have left officials flummoxed. Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson said on Tuesday that his department is doing all it can to combat violence. “It's not a police issue, it's a society issue,” he said, pointing the finger instead at “impoverished neighborhoods” where “people without hope do these kinds of things.”

That sounded like an evasion. No doubt the chief is right about the complexities that give root to crime and violence. But it is clear — as evidenced by the success New York and other cities have had in curtailing homicides — that Chicago has a unique set of problems in which the police play their part. Foremost among them are the tumult and distrust that pervade police-community relations in the wake of the fatal shooting of black teen Laquan McDonald by an officer in October 2014 and the belated release of a troubling video a year later. That the police union urged its members to refuse voluntary overtime over the recent holiday weekend — when they were most needed — suggests there may be a morale problem, the “Ferguson effect” of police not doing all they can.

It is also important to address the flow of illegal guns that fuels the violence in gang-heavy neighborhoods. Despite restrictive gun laws, guns are easily available from nearby jurisdictions, such as Indiana. And despite its reputation for strict control, Chicago has relatively lenient gun penalties. There is a one-year minimum for illegal possession, compared with New York’s 3½ years.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel (Democrat) has promised to deliver a major address in mid-September to deal with the violence. “It's a complex set of problems that will be dealt with in a very comprehensive way,” he said. “Everything from the police, to children, to what we have to do for their safety, to guns, to making sure we're providing hope where there is despair.” That many of his constituents think it more likely that young people will become victims of crime than graduates from college shows the need for urgency in offering solutions.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/chicagos-violence-is-a-police-issue--at-least-in-part/2016/09/07/8fe1248e-7538-11e6-b786-19d0cb1ed06c_story.html
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« Reply #31 on: September 08, 2016, 08:24:14 pm »

this is more than likely the reason for the crime culture believe it or not

"The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation"

This anonymous letter landed in my inbox about a minute ago:
Hello,

After more than 20 years, I've finally decided to tell the world what I witnessed in 1991, which I believe was one of the biggest turning point in popular music, and ultimately American society. I have struggled for a long time weighing the pros and cons of making this story public as I was reluctant to implicate the individuals who were present that day. So I've simply decided to leave out names and all the details that may risk my personal well being and that of those who were, like me, dragged into something they weren't ready for.

Between the late 80's and early 90’s, I was what you may call a “decision maker” with one of the more established company in the music industry. I came from Europe in the early 80’s and quickly established myself in the business. The industry was different back then. Since technology and media weren’t accessible to people like they are today, the industry had more control over the public and had the means to influence them anyway it wanted. This may explain why in early 1991, I was invited to attend a closed door meeting with a small group of music business insiders to discuss rap music’s new direction. Little did I know that we would be asked to participate in one of the most unethical and destructive business practice I’ve ever seen.

The meeting was held at a private residence on the outskirts of Los Angeles. I remember about 25 to 30 people being there, most of them familiar faces. Speaking to those I knew, we joked about the theme of the meeting as many of us did not care for rap music and failed to see the purpose of being invited to a private gathering to discuss its future. Among the attendees was a small group of unfamiliar faces who stayed to themselves and made no attempt to socialize beyond their circle. Based on their behavior and formal appearances, they didn't seem to be in our industry. Our casual chatter was interrupted when we were asked to sign a confidentiality agreement preventing us from publicly discussing the information presented during the meeting. Needless to say, this intrigued and in some cases disturbed many of us. The agreement was only a page long but very clear on the matter and consequences which stated that violating the terms would result in job termination. We asked several people what this meeting was about and the reason for such secrecy but couldn't find anyone who had answers for us. A few people refused to sign and walked out. No one stopped them. I was tempted to follow but curiosity got the best of me. A man who was part of the “unfamiliar” group collected the agreements from us.

Quickly after the meeting began, one of my industry colleagues (who shall remain nameless like everyone else) thanked us for attending. He then gave the floor to a man who only introduced himself by first name and gave no further details about his personal background. I think he was the owner of the residence but it was never confirmed. He briefly praised all of us for the success we had achieved in our industry and congratulated us for being selected as part of this small group of “decision makers”. At this point I begin to feel slightly uncomfortable at the strangeness of this gathering. The subject quickly changed as the speaker went on to tell us that the respective companies we represented had invested in a very profitable industry which could become even more rewarding with our active involvement. He explained that the companies we work for had invested millions into the building of privately owned prisons and that our positions of influence in the music industry would actually impact the profitability of these investments. I remember many of us in the group immediately looking at each other in confusion. At the time, I didn’t know what a private prison was but I wasn't the only one. Sure enough, someone asked what these prisons were and what any of this had to do with us. We were told that these prisons were built by privately owned companies who received funding from the government based on the number of inmates. The more inmates, the more money the government would pay these prisons. It was also made clear to us that since these prisons are privately owned, as they become publicly traded, we’d be able to buy shares. Most of us were taken back by this. Again, a couple of people asked what this had to do with us. At this point, my industry colleague who had first opened the meeting took the floor again and answered our questions. He told us that since our employers had become silent investors in this prison business, it was now in their interest to make sure that these prisons remained filled. Our job would be to help make this happen by marketing music which promotes criminal behavior, rap being the music of choice. He assured us that this would be a great situation for us because rap music was becoming an increasingly profitable market for our companies, and as employee, we’d also be able to buy personal stocks in these prisons. Immediately, silence came over the room. You could have heard a pin drop. I remember looking around to make sure I wasn't dreaming and saw half of the people with dropped jaws. My daze was interrupted when someone shouted, “Is this a f****** joke?” At this point things became chaotic. Two of the men who were part of the “unfamiliar” group grabbed the man who shouted out and attempted to remove him from the house. A few of us, myself included, tried to intervene. One of them pulled out a gun and we all backed off. They separated us from the crowd and all four of us were escorted outside. My industry colleague who had opened the meeting earlier hurried out to meet us and reminded us that we had signed agreement and would suffer the consequences of speaking about this publicly or even with those who attended the meeting. I asked him why he was involved with something this corrupt and he replied that it was bigger than the music business and nothing we’d want to challenge without risking consequences. We all protested and as he walked back into the house I remember word for word the last thing he said, “It’s out of my hands now. Remember you signed an agreement.” He then closed the door behind him. The men rushed us to our cars and actually watched until we drove off.

A million things were going through my mind as I drove away and I eventually decided to pull over and park on a side street in order to collect my thoughts. I replayed everything in my mind repeatedly and it all seemed very surreal to me. I was angry with myself for not having taken a more active role in questioning what had been presented to us. I'd like to believe the shock of it all is what suspended my better nature. After what seemed like an eternity, I was able to calm myself enough to make it home. I didn't talk or call anyone that night. The next day back at the office, I was visibly out of it but blamed it on being under the weather. No one else in my department had been invited to the meeting and I felt a sense of guilt for not being able to share what I had witnessed. I thought about contacting the 3 others who wear kicked out of the house but I didn't remember their names and thought that tracking them down would probably bring unwanted attention. I considered speaking out publicly at the risk of losing my job but I realized I’d probably be jeopardizing more than my job and I wasn't willing to risk anything happening to my family. I thought about those men with guns and wondered who they were? I had been told that this was bigger than the music business and all I could do was let my imagination run free. There were no answers and no one to talk to. I tried to do a little bit of research on private prisons but didn’t uncover anything about the music business’ involvement. However, the information I did find confirmed how dangerous this prison business really was. Days turned into weeks and weeks into months. Eventually, it was as if the meeting had never taken place. It all seemed surreal. I became more reclusive and stopped going to any industry events unless professionally obligated to do so. On two occasions, I found myself attending the same function as my former colleague. Both times, our eyes met but nothing more was exchanged.

As the months passed, rap music had definitely changed direction. I was never a fan of it but even I could tell the difference. Rap acts that talked about politics or harmless fun were quickly fading away as gangster rap started dominating the airwaves. Only a few months had passed since the meeting but I suspect that the ideas presented that day had been successfully implemented. It was as if the order has been given to all major label executives. The music was climbing the charts and most companies when more than happy to capitalize on it. Each one was churning out their very own gangster rap acts on an assembly line. Everyone bought into it, consumers included. Violence and drug use became a central theme in most rap music. I spoke to a few of my peers in the industry to get their opinions on the new trend but was told repeatedly that it was all about supply and demand. Sadly many of them even expressed that the music reinforced their prejudice of minorities.

I officially quit the music business in 1993 but my heart had already left months before. I broke ties with the majority of my peers and removed myself from this thing I had once loved. I took some time off, returned to Europe for a few years, settled out of state, and lived a “quiet” life away from the world of entertainment. As the years passed, I managed to keep my secret, fearful of sharing it with the wrong person but also a little ashamed of not having had the balls to blow the whistle. But as rap got worse, my guilt grew. Fortunately, in the late 90’s, having the internet as a resource which wasn't at my disposal in the early days made it easier for me to investigate what is now labeled the prison industrial complex. Now that I have a greater understanding of how private prisons operate, things make much more sense than they ever have. I see how the criminalization of rap music played a big part in promoting racial stereotypes and misguided so many impressionable young minds into adopting these glorified criminal behaviors which often lead to incarceration. Twenty years of guilt is a heavy load to carry but the least I can do now is to share my story, hoping that fans of rap music realize how they’ve been used for the past 2 decades. Although I plan on remaining anonymous for obvious reasons, my goal now is to get this information out to as many people as possible. Please help me spread the word. Hopefully, others who attended the meeting back in 1991 will be inspired by this and tell their own stories. Most importantly, if only one life has been touched by my story, I pray it makes the weight of my guilt a little more tolerable.

Thank you.


http://www.hiphopisread.com/2012/04/secret-meeting-that-changed-rap-music.html
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« Reply #32 on: September 08, 2016, 09:42:18 pm »


Rap music wasn't around when Al Capone was using a Thompson submachinegun to wipe out his opponents in Chicago.

Chicago has always been a violent place and probably always will be.

If you stay away from the violent South Side, you'll most likely be okay.

Perhaps Donald Trump could show us how brave he is by walking around the South Side of Chicago by himself.
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« Reply #33 on: September 09, 2016, 09:05:09 pm »

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« Reply #34 on: December 27, 2016, 12:37:32 pm »


from the Chicago Tribune....

53 shot, 11 fatally, over Christmas weekend

By KATHERINE ROSENBERG-DOUGLAS and PETER NICKEAS | 5:33PM CST - Monday, December 26, 2016

Police investigated multiple sites where people were shot and killed in Chicago on Christmas Day. — Photograph: Armando Sanchez/Chicago Tribune.
Police investigated multiple sites where people were shot and killed in Chicago on Christmas Day.
 — Photograph: Armando Sanchez/Chicago Tribune.


NINE PEOPLE wounded in daylight shootings during Monday morning brought to more than 50 the number of people shot since Christmas weekend began on Friday afternoon.

Eleven of the 53 people shot between about 4:50 p.m. Friday and about the same time on Monday died from their wounds. More than a dozen others were listed in serious or critical condition.

The city has seen eight multiple-victim shootings, including two double homicides. One was an attack in the East Chatham neighborhood that left five dead and two wounded, and an attack in the Austin neighborhood left two dead.

Much of the violence happened in areas “with historical gang conflicts on the south and west side of Chicago,” said Anthony Guglielmi, a spokesman for the Chicago Police Department. He also referenced the department's “strategic subject list,” which is generated daily from a computerized algorithm and assigns a score from 1 to 500 based on such factors as a person's arrests and the activities of his associates. Those people with a score in the upper 200s or higher are considered in danger of being shot or of shooting someone else.

“Ninety percent of those fatally wounded had gang affiliations, criminal histories and were pre-identified by the department's strategic subject algorithm as being a potential suspect or victim of gun violence,” Guglielmi said Monday.

The most recent shooting happened on Monday afternoon in the Lawndale neighborhood on the city's West Side. A 45-year-old man was shot in the 4100 block of West Arthington Street and taken Mount Sinai Hospitalf or treatment. He had been in an argument just before getting shot, police said.

Two people were shot in the 5800 block of South May Street in the  Englewood neighborhood about 3:25 p.m. A 20-year-old man was taken to John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County with a back wound and a 35-year-old man refused medical treatment for a graze wound. Someone in a dark-colored sedan fired shots and fled the scene, police said.

A 22-year-old man walked into Advocate Trinity Hospital on the city's South Side seeking treatment for a gunshot wound sustained in the 7900 block of South Cottage Grove Avenue about 2:45 p.m., police said.

Earlier, about 11:20 a.m. in the 1800 block of South Ridgeway Avenue in North Lawndale, a 23-year-old man was shot in each leg. He was being treated at Mount Sinai Hospital, according to police.

Before that, police were called about 10:40 a.m. to the 400 block of West Marquette Road in Englewood. A 24-year-old man was shot in the hand, officials said. Other details about that shooting weren't immediately available.

In the 7000 block of South Indiana, in the Park Manor neighborhood about 9:30 a.m., an initial call went out for two people shot in the area of 78th Street. Police later said a 25-year-old man had a graze wound to his head and also was shot in a leg. A 26-year-old man was shot in the face. The men were able to get themselves to St. Bernard Hospital, where they were being treated.

The first daylight shooting happened about 9:25 a.m. in the 300 block of South Kostner Avenue. A man was taken to Mount Sinai Hospital with gunshot wounds to the ankle and leg. He was in stable condition, authorities said.

The mass shooting in East Chatham overnight, and the others on Christmas, added to the tolls this year in Chicago, where more than 700 homicides have been recorded with more than 4,000 people shot — a level of violence not seen in Chicago since the late 1990s, according to Chicago Tribune and police data. Last year, 488 people were killed in Chicago.

The holiday weekend began with five teenagers shot within feet of each other in the South Austin neighborhood. At 3:30 p.m. Friday, a 16-year-old boy was shot in the 4900 block of West Kinzie Street. A little more than an hour later, four other teenagers were shot just feet away, in the 4900 block of West Hubbard Street. Their conditions had stabilized.

Guglielmi said most of the attacks were targeted attacks by gangs against potential rivals who were at holiday gatherings. That only brought on retaliatory gun violence. In response, police adjusted their assignments as needed and seized 45 guns from areas with a heavy presence of gangs, Guglielmi said.

“While we have promising leads, this unacceptable level of gun violence demonstrates the clear and present need for policy makers to convene in January and give Chicago the gun sentencing tools against repeat offenders so that we can adequately hold people accountable,” he said.


http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-chicago-christmas-shootings-violence-47-shot-holiday-weekend-20161226-story.html
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« Reply #35 on: December 27, 2016, 08:28:45 pm »


Oh dear, the shooting total for Chicago over Christmas Weekend has increased, so the news story has been ammended.

Americans are such nasty, nasty people. No wonder they elected a boofhead & maniac like Donald Trump as their president.


from the Chicago Tribune....

56 shot, 11 fatally, over Christmas weekend
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« Reply #36 on: August 11, 2017, 04:51:03 pm »

...oops not Chicago....here in NZ....
....throw away the key....feed him rice and sardines...😜

Cop shooter, Rhys Warren, sentenced to preventive detention
MATT SHAND
Last updated 13:30, August 11 2017
Rhys Warren was sentenced in the High Court at Tauranga on Friday.


The man who shot four Armed Offenders Squad members in a house near Kawerau has been sent to jail indefinitely.

Rhys Richard Ngahiwi Warren was sentenced to preventive detention when he appeared for sentence at the High Court in Tauranga on Friday on two charges of attempted murder, three of using a firearm against a law enforcement officer and one of wounding with intent to cause grievous bodily harm.

Preventive detention means Warren can be detained indefinitely and will only be released if the Parole Board deems it safe to do so. He will not be eligible for parole for at least 10 years.
......
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